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1.
Trials ; 23(1): 905, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089230

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Participant recruitment into clinical trials remains challenging. The global increase in the number of social media users has accelerated the use of social media as a modality of recruitment, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic when traditional recruitment methods were reduced. However, there is limited evidence on the performance of social media recruitment strategies into eczema clinical trials. METHODS: From September 2021 to January 2022, we recruited participants with eczema into an online randomised controlled trial using free advertising on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Reddit (unpaid methods), followed by paid Facebook advertisements (paid method). Unpaid methods were used periodically for 63 days, whilst the paid method for 16 days. Interested individuals who clicked on the advertisement link were directed to the study website, where they could sign up to participate. Consenting, randomisation and data collection occurred exclusively online, using a database management web platform. Evaluation of the social media recruitment methods was performed, including the number of expression of interests, enrolment yield, cost, baseline characteristics and retention. RESULTS: Our multi-platform based social media recruitment strategy resulted in 400 expressions of interests, leading to 296 participants. Unpaid methods accounted for 136 (45.9%) of participants, incurring no financial cost. Paid Facebook adverts reached 154,370 individuals, resulting in 123 (41.6%) trial participants for a total cost of £259.93 (£2.11 per participant) and other recruitment methods resulted in 37 (12.5%) enrolments. Paid advertisements predominantly attracted younger participants below the age of 20, whereas unpaid methods mainly drew in participants between 20-29 years of age. The social media platforms recruited an ethnically diverse participant population. Completion rate of follow-up was slightly higher for the paid method (n = 103, 83.7%) compared with the unpaid methods (n = 111, 81.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Unpaid social media posts recruited the most participants; however, it was time consuming for the researcher. Paid Facebook adverts rapidly recruited a large number of participants for a low cost and provided flexibility to target specific audiences. Our findings indicate that social media is an efficient tool that can potentially support recruitment to clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN45167024. Registered on 29 June 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eczema , Social Media , Adult , Humans , Young Adult , Advertising/methods , Pandemics
2.
Embase; 27.
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-346615

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pandemic affected common disease infections, while the impact on hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is unclear. Google Trends data is beneficial in approximately real-time statistics and easily accessed, expecting to be used for infection explanation from information-seeking behavior perspectives. We aimed to explain HFMD cases before and during COVID-19 using Google Trends data. Method(s): HFMD cases were obtained from the National Institute of Infectious Disease, and Google search data from 2009 to 2021 was downloaded using Google Trends in Japan. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between HFMD cases and the search topic "HFMD" from 2009 to 2021. Japanese tweets containing "HFMD" were retrieved to select search terms for further analysis. Search terms were retained with counts larger than 1000 and belonging to ranges of infection sources, susceptible sites, susceptible populations, symptoms, treatment, preventive measures, and identified diseases. Cross-correlation analyses were conducted to detect lag changes between HFMD cases and HFMD search terms before and during COVID-19. Multiple linear regressions with backward elimination processing were used to identify the most significant terms for HFMD explanation. Result(s): HFMD cases and Google search volume peaked around July in most years without 2020 and 2021. The search topic "HFMD" presented strong correlations with HFMD cases except in 2020 when COVID-19 outbroke. In addition, differences in lags for 73 (72.3%) search terms were negative, might indicating increasing public awareness of HFMD infections during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results of multiple linear regression demonstrated that significant search terms contained the same meanings but expanded informative search content during COVID-19. Conclusion(s): Significant terms for HFMD cases explanation before and during COVID-19 were different. The awareness of HFMD infection in Japan may improve during the COVID-19 pandemic. Continuous monitoring is important to promote public health and prevent resurgence. Public interest reflected in information-seeking behavior can be helpful for public health surveillance. Copyright The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.

3.
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. In Practice ; 10(10):A25-A29, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2050122

ABSTRACT

Administration of biologics is not necessary to be postponed due to SARS-CoV-2 infection.Constant-Load Exercise Versus High-Intensity Interval Training on Aerobic Fitness in Moderate-to-Severe Asthma: A Randomized Controlled Trial Aparecido da Silva et al 2596 What is already known about this topic? Bronchiectasis is expected to worsen the clinical and functional outcomes in patients with asthma, but limited data are available regarding the long-term effects of bronchiectasis on the clinical course of asthma. Data from this large, prospective study translate the OCS-sparing effect of mepolizumab in patients with severe asthma reported across randomized, placebo-controlled trials into real-world clinical effectiveness when used alongside standard of care. [...]these risk factors are not of sufficient magnitude to warrant special measures regarding their vaccination.Assessment of Immediate Allergic Reactions After Immunization With the Pfizer BNT162b2 Vaccine Using Intradermal Skin Testing With the COVID-19 Vaccines Shavit et al 2677 What is already known about this topic?

4.
Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases ; 9:S299, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043395

ABSTRACT

Objective: Evaluate the safety and tolerability of losmapimod in the treatment for FSHD. Background: FSHD is a relentless, variably progressive disease leading to accumulation of disability over decades. Fulcrum is developing losmapimod, a small molecule p38 α/β MAPK inhibitor, to treat FSHD. Losmapimod has been generally well-tolerated in more than 3,600 subjects across multiple clinical studies, including >100 subjects with FSHD. Fulcrum has assessed losmapimod in FSHD in one completed phase 1 study (FIS 001-2018) and two ongoing Phase 2 studies in the open label extension period (FIS 001-2019 and FIS 002-2019). Methods: Subjects aged 18-65 years with genetically confirmed FSHD1, Clinical Severity Score 2-4, and MRI-eligible muscles for biopsy were exposed to losmapimod 7.5 or 15 mg twice daily PO for 14 days and up to 76 weeks. In study FIS 001-2018, 6 subjects were exposed to 7.5 mg and 11 subjects to 15 mg twice daily dosing for 14 consecutive days. In studies FIS 001-2019 and FIS 002-2019, 14 and 77 subjects respectively, received at least one dose of losmapimod 15 mg twice daily for up to 76 weeks. Results: A total of 108 subjects with FSHD1 have been exposed to losmapimod, with approximately 131 patient-years of exposure. Fifty-seven subjects have been exposed to losmapimod for 12 to 18 months, and 30 have been exposed for over 18 months. Most adverse events (AEs) observed during the studies were considered of mild to moderate in severity. The most common AEs were alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase, headache, dizziness, dry skin, eczema and gastrointestinal disorders. The majority of AEs resolved with continued dosing. Dosing has been paused for 14 days in four subjects (3 in FIS 001-2019 and 1 in FIS 002-2019) subjects due to COVID-19 infection. There were no reported drug related SAEs, deaths, discontinuations due to AEs, or clinically significant changes in vital signs, clinical laboratory results, or ECG parameters. Conclusion: Losmapimod given as up to 15 mg twice daily in >100 subjects with FSHD1 for up to 76 weeks has been generally well-tolerated, consistent with that previously reported in other patient populations. Therefore, the benefit-risk profile of losmapimod for the treatment of FSHD remains favorable.

5.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(9): e15665, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032368

ABSTRACT

Most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have a good response to topical treatment. However, some need systemic therapy in order to satisfactorily control the disease. Azathioprine is an accessible drug for patients in many countries, including underdeveloped countries, and therefore it is used by many dermatologists in moderate and severe AD. It is important to have a deep knowledge and understanding about this drug since it is an alternative therapy as a steroid-sparing agent and an affordable one. However, when it comes to systemic therapy for AD, it is not always clear its indications and it is necessary to have a closer follow-up of the patient. In this paper, we describe thoroughly its indications in AD, the mechanism of action of the drug, as well as the interactions, adverse effects, adequate monitoring, and precautions in special population that must be considered when prescribing azathioprine. This review will help dermatologists prescribe it safely to all patients who require it.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis, Atopic , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Azathioprine/adverse effects , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects
6.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB210, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031399

ABSTRACT

Dermatology is unique in that not only are there a shortage of dermatologists in the United States but patient access care to is largely disproportionate. As a response to the chasm of access that exists, many patients have relied on the Internet to obtain information on how to address their concerns, and this often comes at the cost of non-evidence based remedies being promoted. The inception of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has led many physicians to restrategize their approach to patient care. Fortunately, utilization of a virtual model has been integral to this process. The purpose of this study was twofold: increase patient confidence in addressing dermatologic concerns by providing targeted education on specific dermatologic topics and define a framework that can be implemented by dermatologists looking to use social media to increase patient education and access to dermatologic care. 3 separate education sessions (webinars) were held where the topics of hair, eczema, and acne were discussed, respectively. Each session was roughly 1 hour in length. Attendees were given pre- and postwebinar surveys to assess existing patient attitude toward their knowledge of dermatologic topics and their comfort in consulting a dermatologist with their concerns. Across the 3-day series, the total number of registrants was 30. 12 registrants for the hair webinar with an overall attendance rate of 33%;12 registrants for the eczema webinar with an overall attendance rate of 33%;6 registrants for the acne webinar with an overall attendance rate of 50%.

7.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB204, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031397

ABSTRACT

A highly visual practice, dermatology as a field has significant potential to use emerging technology such as mobile applications for research and patient-centered mapping of the disease process. The UCSF team is working to create SkinTracker, a mobile application for patients with skin disease to remotely participate in clinical trials and research studies. The initial iteration of the application focuses on atopic dermatitis. The application includes an enrollment and consent module, validated surveys including the Patient Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) for itch, link to a wearable device that collects biometric data, a voice diary, and a patient-directed photography module to facilitate physician evaluation of disease. Also included is the ability to report medication use, adverse events, and the ability to chat with the study team. The patient information is available to the research team on a secure online website, where researchers can assess patient photographs to perform Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) scoring, note important patient observations from the voice diary, and view quantitative data from both patient surveys and health measures like physical activity, sleep, and environmental factors. We believe this application and website will facilitate patient interest and participation in research, continue research despite in-person restrictions placed during the COVID-19 pandemic, and allow enrollment of more diverse patients for clinical studies who would otherwise be less likely to participate in research due to time or financial constraints.

8.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB170, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031394

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hand dermatitis causes significant physical, psychosocial, and economic burden. The internet is a major source of health education for patients. Here, we evaluate the readability, quality, and comprehensiveness of online health resources on hand dermatitis. Methods: On July 27th 2021, a Google search was conducted with terms “hand dermatitis” and “hand eczema” and the first 40 items were evaluated. Articles that were advertisements, blogs, intended for professionals, scientific papers, or irrelevant were excluded. Contents of articles were evaluated using several validated grading tools/criteria for readability and quality and Pearson’s correlation assessed the relationship between readability and quality. Results: Twenty-three articles met inclusion criteria. Average readability was at the 11th-grade level (range 7.7-15.6). University-level reading comprehension (≥13th grade) was required for 5/23 websites. The highest quality website based on the Discern instrument was Medical News Today (55.5);nearly half of the websites (48%, 11/23) rated as poor or very poor. The average JAMA benchmark score was only 1.4/4. Nineteen websites contained images (83%) and only 4 websites (21%) included images representing hand dermatitis in skin of color (SOC). Quality and readability of the articles were significantly correlated (P =.02). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that generally, articles were too difficult to read, have low quality, and lack representation of SOC images. With increases in hand dermatitis in the setting of frequent hand-hygiene practices during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important for online health information to improve in readability, quality, and inclusion of SOC images to optimize online patient education.

9.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(Suppl 2):A103, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2019842

ABSTRACT

CDDFTExplore the meaning of the COVID-19 pandemic for parents of children with asthma in relation to healthcare seeking for their child.MethodsInterpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) – allows researcher to focus on personal meaning in a particular context (healthcare seeking), for people (parents of children with asthma), who share a particular experience (COVID-19 pandemic). IPA ensures congruence between researcher paradigm, philosophical stance, personal stance, positionality statement, phenomenon to be studied, data collection method, and analysis.Eligibility criteria•Parents of a child (2-16 years) with a diagnosis of asthma.•Parents of a child with a diagnosis of asthma without other respiratory conditions•Parents of a child with asthma not associated with prematurity (gestation >37/40) or chronic lung disease.•Parents of a child with asthma and any of the following co-morbidities: eczema, hay-fever or food allergies (atopy)•Parents who are able to read and speak EnglishData collection and analysis:Unstructured interviews lasting 30-60mins, recorded using Zoom. Transcripts transcribed verbatim and uploaded to Nvivo – data coded using descriptive, linguistic and conceptual comments. Codes mapped in to groups according to inter-relatedness, an iterative and interpretive process using deconstruction, reconstruction and re-organisation of text to identify themesResultsThemes identified1. Protecting the child: mothers’ perception of threat from COVID-19, and what this meant they needed to do, to protect their child.2. Balancing needs and conflicts of interest: the difficulty mothers’ face in trying to balance the physical, mental, and emotional health needs of the child with the need to socialise, go to school, and learn;and for mothers that needed to go to work, the conflict of interest this created3. Accessing healthcare: the positive influence of knowledge and experience on the speed of accessing healthcare, the barrier of timing in relation to availability of service, and the effort required to access services4. Being heard, understood and responded to: mothers’ perception of not being heard, understood or responded to whilst seeking healthcare for their child and the psychological consequences that result5. Changing perception of risk over time: the changing perception of risk to the child’s health during the pandemic, as related to perception of reality.ConclusionDuring a pandemic, information conveyed to parents needs to be updated in line with emerging evidence. Parents may be operating on high alert - it is not sufficient to issue the message that the NHS is still available. The importance of face-to-face consultations for worried and stressed parents should not be under-estimated and where this is not possible, video consultations should supersede other forms of communication so that information is not lost in translation and parents feel heard and understood. Wider society should implement good hand hygiene, social distancing and face masks when they have a viral infection, to protect those around them.Healthcare professionals need to recognise the daily burden of asthma for mothers, who are always on the look-out for symptoms, and the fear that an acute exacerbation can induce. Management should include emotional support as well as medical, to ensure parents feel in control and able to manage.

10.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(Suppl 2):A56, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2019829

ABSTRACT

1066 Figure 1Maps showing infant mortality in Sparkbrook area (in red) on left, and inappropriate attendances to ED on right[Figure omitted. See PDF] 1066 Figure 2Priorities identifies during community engagement fro the pilot Sparkbrook Children’s Zone (number of response)[Figure omitted. See PDF]ConclusionWith funding from NHS England and Birmingham Children’s Trust, a weekly clinic is in set-up in the Sparkbrook ward, which will open after school, where community groups, Early Help, GPs, dental services and paediatricians will work alongside each other to deliver place-based health and social care to a population of 14,000 children, prioritising early intervention programmes, health promotion (immunisations, healthy weight) and common chronic conditions (asthma, eczema and constipation).ReferencesMcHale P, Wood S, Hughes K, Bellis MA, Demnitz U, Wyke S. Who uses emergency departments inappropriately and when - a national cross-sectional study using a monitoring data system. BMC Medicine. 2013 Dec 13;11(1):258.Williams M, Franklin J. Children and young people’s services: Spending 2010-11 to 2019-20. 2021 Jul.Royal College Of Paediatrics and Child Health. Paediatrics 2040: Our vision for the future of paediatrics in the UK. London;2021 Feb.Montgomery-Taylor S, Watson M, Klaber R. Child Health General Practice Hubs: a service evaluation. Archives of Disease in Childhood. 2016 Apr;101(4):333–7.Birmingham Public Health Intelligence Team. Birmingham Health Profiles: Hall Green Constituency 2019. Birmingham;2018.

11.
Journal of Pakistan Association of Dermatologists ; 32(3):585-597, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003330

ABSTRACT

Hand eczema (HE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the hand with a prevalence of 14.5% worldwide. The incidence of HE has increased considerably during Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic due to increased hand hygiene practice. Despite not affecting the mortality rate, HE can decrease the patient's quality of life significantly and increase morbidity. In general, HE can be classified based on its onset, etiology, precipitating factors, and clinical morphology. The diagnosis of HE is established through history taking and physical examination, however, several diagnostic tests should be performed to identify the etiology and exclude the differential diagnosis, including dermoscopic examination, histopathological examination, patch test, and prick test. In addition to diagnostic tests, the severity of HE should also be established to determine the appropriate therapy and monitor the therapeutic responses. After HE is identified, comprehensive management should be provided immediately so that HE will not progress into a chronic disorder which will further decrease the patient's quality of life.

12.
Contact Dermatitis ; 87(6): 500-510, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Occupational hand eczema (HE) is common among healthcare workers (HCWs) and has-in some regions of the world-increased during the COVID-19 pandemic due to related hygiene measures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of an intervention for HE prevention in HCWs during the pandemic. METHODS: A prospective, controlled, unblinded interventional trial was conducted in 302 HCWs. The intervention group (IG) (n = 135) received online-based health education and free access to hand cleansing and hand care products. The control group (CG) (n = 167) did not receive any intervention within the study. At baseline (T0), after 3 (T1) and 6 (T2) months, participants completed standardized questionnaires. The Osnabrueck Hand Eczema Severity Index (OHSI) was assessed at T0 and T2. RESULTS: During the observation period, there were no new HE cases in the IG (n = 115) and 12 cases (8.8%) in the CG (n = 136). OHSI values at T2 were lower in the IG (b = -1.44, p < 0.001). Daily use of emollients was higher at work (b = 1.73, p < 0.001) and at home (b = 1.62, p < 0.001) in the IG at T2. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention was effective in HE prevention and improving skin care behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact , Dermatitis, Occupational , Eczema , Hand Dermatoses , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Eczema/prevention & control , Eczema/epidemiology , Hand Dermatoses/prevention & control , Hand Dermatoses/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
13.
Contact Dermatitis ; 87(6): 473-484, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992762

ABSTRACT

The use of masks for infection control was common in the COVID-19 pandemic. As numerous cross-sectional studies have suggested a link between the use of such masks and various facial dermatoses, a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies was conducted to evaluate this association, as well as potential risk factors for the development of such facial dermatoses. Observational studies were searched for in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register. Thirty-seven observational studies with a total of 29 557 study participants were identified. This study was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2020 checklist and quality was assessed via the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale., Overall prevalence of facial dermatoses was 55%. Individually, acne, facial dermatitis, itch and pressure injuries were consistently reported as facial dermatoses, with a pooled prevalence of 31%, 24%, 30% and 31%, respectively. Duration of mask-wear was the most significant risk factor for the development of facial dermatoses (95% CI: 1.31-1.54, p < 0.001). Overall, facial dermatoses associated with mask wear are common, and consist of distinct entities. They are related to duration of use. Appropriate and tailored treatment is important to improve the outcomes for these affected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact , Facial Dermatoses , Humans , Masks/adverse effects , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/etiology , Facial Dermatoses/epidemiology , Facial Dermatoses/etiology
15.
Revista Alergia Mexico ; 69(1):61-64, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1969987

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess cutaneous reactions after Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine administration. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was carried out in health workers belonging to the city of Guayaquil-Ecuador, from March to May 2021. The participants were contacted through a local registry established by the Universidad Espíritu Santo. Frequencies and percentages were used to represent the proportions of nominal variables, while the mean and standard deviation were used for continuous data, given a normal sample distribution. Results: Local skin reactions were the most frequent, and included redness, edema, and itching. On the other hand, delayed large local skin reactions (generalized rash and pruritus, angioedema, urticaria, eczema, petechiae) were rare and occurred in less than 1.4% of participants, (95% CI = 0.69-1.00). Finally, we did not find cases of anaphylaxis or other life-threatening reactions requiring urgent attention after vaccination. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that local skin reactions occur in a minority of recipients and are often mild and self-limited.

16.
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacy ; 23(4):244-248, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955738

ABSTRACT

Background:As the pandemic progresses, we are growing increasingly aware that COVID-19 affects multiple parts of the body beyond the lungs. Objective: We aimed to review the literature to outline the COVID-19 effect on hair, vision, thinking, hearing, fertility, taste and smell, skin and gastro-intestine (GI), and its health crisis among COVID-19 infected patients.Method: We searched the database «PubMed» which included studies that measured COVID-19 effect on hair, vision, thinking, hearing, fertility, taste and smell, skin, and GI. Results: A total of 60 studies were reviewed and screened based on titles and s. Of these, only 15 studies were determined to meet the eligibility criteria for discussion. The health crisis associated with hair, vision, thinking, hearing, fertility, taste and smell, skin, and GI were baldness, hair shedding, conjunctivitis, pink-eye syndrome, sore-eyes, brain fog, short-term memory loss, reduction in male sperm concentration, altered sperm cell shape, morbidity, tinnitus, loss of hearing, reduce taste and loss of smell, acne, eczema, psoriasis, and rosacea, lacy and dusky rashes on the skin, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting diarrhea, and abdomen pain. Conclusion: Scientists, researchers and clinicians are still learning, observing and knowledge is evolving daily related to COVID-19 infection.

17.
Aktuelle Dermatologie ; 2022.
Article in German | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1937462

ABSTRACT

Around the world the COVID-19 pandemic has severely impaired life and work. With the beginning of vaccinations, the hope of a turnaround increases. Nevertheless, COVID and intensive care units in hospitals are still heavily burdened. Often, for capacity reasons, medical dermatological as well as dermatological nursing specialists are involved in treatment and care of COVID-19 patients in clinics. As a result dermatological manifestations of COVID-19 could be recognized and classified more closely in the course of the pandemic. However, differentiated hygiene concepts, especially that of hand hygiene, reveal another dermatological problem associated with the pandemic: the development of hand eczema. This is not limited to medical professions and therefore shows a possible overriding importance of dermatology in the context of future pandemic strategies.

18.
Community Practitioner ; 95(3):16-17, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1929205

ABSTRACT

The study could help policymakers amend interventions that improve vaccine confidence, as well as help public health organisations better tailor their communications. bit.ly/JSTP_behaviour_ vaccine_hesitancy ITALY AIR POLLUTION LINKED TO HEIGHTENED RISK OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE Long-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to an increased risk of autoimmune disease, including rheumatoid arthritis, research published in RMD Open has found. Long-term exposure to traffic and industrial air pollutants was associated with an approximately 40% higher risk of rheumatoid arthritis, a 20% higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease, and a 15% higher risk of connective tissue diseases. bit.ly/RMDO_pollution_autoimmune_disease NORWAY FAMILY-BASED TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH SEVERE OBESITY IMPROVES WEIGHT LOSS Family-based behavioural social facilitation treatment (FBSFT), delivered at an obesity outpatient clinic, improved weight-related outcomes significantly more than treatment as usual (TAU) among children aged six to 18 years with severe obesity, a study has found. Children receiving FBSFT reduced their body mass index standard deviation score and percentage above the International Obesity Task Force cut-off for overweight significantly more than children enrolled in TAU. bit.ly/CO_family_children_obesity NORWAY WOMEN EXPOSED TO ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES MORE LIKELY TO DEVELOP MS Childhood trauma could be linked to an increased risk of women developing multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, research suggests.

19.
Sleep ; 45(SUPPL 1):A228, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1927416

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly disrupted the daily lives of children and adolescents. This study aimed to characterize sleep and mood during COVID in youth with asthma and/or eczema at two times: shortly after the lifting of stay at home orders (Summer 2020 [T1]) and after youth returned to school (Winter 2021 [T2]). Methods: Pediatric PROMIS measures (Sleep Disturbances, Sleep- Related Impairment, Anxiety, Depressive Symptoms) and the Pediatric Sleep Practices Questionnaire were administered through REDCap. Parents of younger children (YC, 5-7 years, n=16) completed proxy measures for their children, while older children (OC, 8-12 years, n=16) and adolescents (ADOL, 13-17 years, n=17) completed self-report measures. Results: For YC, mean Sleep Disturbances T-scores significantly decreased between T1 and T2 (62.0 vs. 56.4, p=.02), with no significant changes in the other variables. For OC, there were no significant changes in mean T-scores for any of the outcomes. For ADOL, there was a significant increase in Sleep-Related Impairment between T1 and T2 (52.0 vs. 57.7, p=.003), as well as a significant increase in Depressive Symptoms (48.2 vs. 52.5, p=.04). At T1, technology use prior to bedtime was more common in ADOL (YC=37.5%, OC=37.5%, ADOL=88.2%). At T2, technology use was also more common in ADOL (YC=50.0%, OC=37.5%, ADOL=64.7%), with an increase in YC technology use and a decrease in ADOL technology use observed. Parental presence while falling asleep was greatest in YC at both time points, with no noted changes in any group across time (T1: YC=56.3%, OC=18.8%, ADOL=17.6%;T2: YC=50.0%, OC=25.0%, ADOL=11.8%). Conclusion: This study was limited by a small sample size, but provides some insights into the sleep and mood of children and adolescents with allergic disease during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although YC had fewer sleep disturbances at T2, there was an increase in technology use prior to bedtime. For ADOL, some of the changes in sleep, technology use, and depressive symptoms were likely due to the return to school at T2. Finally, it was notable that multiple OC and ADOL required parental presence to fall asleep. Additional research is needed to understand how the ongoing pandemic is impacting children and adolescents.

20.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1927863

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Spontaneous pneumothoraxes in children are uncommon, may be idiopathic or associated with underlying pulmonary disease, and can present management challenges. We present a 12-year-old female with recurrent right sided spontaneous pneumothorax in the setting of an asymptomatic SARS-Co-V2 (COVID) infection and imaging concerning for congenital lobar overinflation (CLO) versus congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), prompting surgical intervention. Case: A 12-year-old pre-menstrual female with remote history of eczema, asthma, and environmental allergies presented from an outside facility with four-days of progressive chest pain and dyspnea on exertion and diagnosis of right-sided spontaneous pneumothorax, improving after pigtail chest tube placement. Physical exam was significant for tall thin body habitus;family history was significant for paternal spontaneous pneumothorax as an adolescent. She was incidentally found to be COVID positive. Chest plain films (CXRs) showed subcutaneous emphysema and persistent right-sided pneumothorax. Clamping trial failed, prompting removal of the pigtail and placement of 12F chest tube with resultant near complete re-expansion. On serial CXRs, a right hilar cystic lucency was newly identified. Chest CT confirmed the right upper lobe (RUL) air-filled cystic structure and abrupt narrowing of the RUL posterior segmental bronchus, concerning for CLO versus CPAM. Chest tube was successfully removed on day 6, and she was discharged home with planned follow-up. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent right-sided spontaneous pneumothorax diagnosed after one day of chest pain, cough, and dyspnea. Laboratory testing revealed mild leukopenia and anemia;she was COVID negative. A chest tube was placed and set to wall suction. Due to persistent pneumothorax, this was replaced with a pigtail drain on day 5. CXRs demonstrated persistent cystic RUL lung mass. With her prior COVID infection now resolved, RUL wedge resection was completed via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery on day 8. She tolerated the procedure well and was discharged on day 10 with resolving pneumothorax. Tissue for pathology results revealed pleural fibrosis and focal hemorrhage without malignancy, most consistent with a ruptured bleb. At one week follow up, she remained stable without complications. Discussion: Pneumothoraxes in tall, thin adolescents are often categorized as primary spontaneous. Most pneumothoraxes resolve with conservative management and often do not require surgical intervention. Congenital lung malformations are a rare secondary cause in children and may be detected on CXR. Chest imaging should be carefully reviewed for congenital malformations requiring specific surgical intervention. These findings, along with the patient's clinical course, may assist in determining management.

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