Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 586
Filter
1.
Intern Emerg Med ; 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A substantial drop in emergency department (ED) visit volume was previously demonstrated at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in the number of non-COVID adult ED visits and their associated 30-day mortality during 14 months of the pandemic in Israel. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study including 1,285,270 adult ED visits between 1st March, 2018 and 30th April, 2021 to the internal and surgical EDS in eight general hospitals of the largest healthcare organization in Israel. The 14 months of the pandemic period (March 2020-April 2021) were divided into seven periods according to dates of the three lockdowns. Exposure to each of these periods was compared to the parallel period during the two previous years. March 2020-April 2021 was compared to the parallel periods in 2018 and 2019. RESULTS: During the pandemic period, the largest decline in ED visits (44.6% and 50.9% for internal and surgical EDs, respectively) and the highest excess 30-day mortality following an ED visit (internal EDs Adjusted OR (ORadj), 1.49; 95% CI, 1.34-1.66 and surgical EDs: ORadj 1.50; CI, 1.16-1.94) were 95%, observed during the first lockdown. Both gradually levelled-off subsequently until near-normalization was reached in March-April 2021 for both parameters. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial decline in non-COVID ED visits and excess mortality at the beginning of the pandemic, are probably the results of social distancing restrictions alongside patients' fear of exposure to COVID-19, which gradually moderated thereafter, until near normalization was reached after 14 months. Gradual return to pre-pandemic ED utilization patterns were noticed as the population and the healthcare system acclimatize to life alongside COVID.

2.
BMC Emerg Med ; 22(1): 62, 2022 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840946

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Opioid-related overdoses cause substantial numbers of preventable deaths. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist available in take-home naloxone (THN) kits as a lifesaving measure for opioid overdose. As the emergency department (ED) is a primary point of contact for patients with high-risk opioid use, evidence-based recommendations from the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia THN practice guidelines include the provision of THN, accompanied by psychosocial interventions. However, implementation of these guidelines in practice is unknown. This study investigated ED opioid-related overdose presentations, concordance of post-overdose interventions with the THN practice guidelines, and the impact, if any, of the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic on case presentations. METHODS: A single-centre retrospective audit was conducted at a major tertiary hospital of patients presenting with overdoses involving opioids and non-opioids between March to August 2019 and March to August 2020. Patient presentations and interventions delivered by the paramedics, ED and upon discharge from the ED were collated from medical records and analysed using descriptive statistics, chi square and independent T-tests. RESULTS: The majority (66.2%) of patients presented to hospital with mixed drug overdoses involving opioids and non-opioids. Pharmaceutical opioids were implicated in a greater proportion (72.1%) of overdoses than illicit opioids. Fewer patients presented in March to August 2020 as compared with 2019 (26 vs. 42), and mixed drug overdoses were more frequent in 2020 than 2019 (80.8% vs. 57.1%). Referral to outpatient psychology (22.0%) and drug and alcohol services (20.3%) were amongst the most common post-discharge interventions. Naloxone was provided to 28 patients (41.2%) by the paramedics and/or ED. No patients received THN upon discharge. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights opportunities to improve ED provision of THN and other interventions post-opioid overdose. Large-scale multi-centre studies are required to ascertain the capacity of EDs to provide THN and the impact of COVID-19 on opioid overdose presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug Overdose , Opiate Overdose , Aftercare , Analgesics, Opioid , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Overdose/drug therapy , Drug Overdose/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Naloxone/therapeutic use , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
IEEE Access ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1840228

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak has become a global public health threat. The influx of COVID-19 patients has prolonged the length of stay (LOS) in the emergency department (ED) in the United States. Our objective is to develop a reliable prediction model for COVID-19 patient ED LOS and identify clinical factors, such as age and comorbidities, associated with LOS within a “4-hour target.”Data were collected from an urban, demographically diverse hospital in Detroit for all COVID-19 patients’ED presentations from March 16 to December 29, 2020. We trained four machine learning models, namely logistic regression (LR), gradient boosting (GB), decision tree (DT), and random forest (RF), across different data processing stages to predict COVID-19 patients with an ED LOS of less than or greater than 4 hours. The analysis is inclusive of 3,301 COVID-19 patients with known ED LOS, and 17 significant clinical factors were incorporated. The GB model outperformed the baseline classifier (LR) and tree-based classifiers (DT and RF) with an accuracy of 85% and F1-score of 0.88 for predicting ED LOS in the testing data. No significant accuracy gains were achieved through further splitting. This study identified key independent factors from a combination of patient demographics, comorbidities, and ED operational data that predicted ED stay in patients with prolonged COVID-19. The prediction framework can serve as a decision-support tool to improve ED and hospital resource planning and inform patients about better ED LOS estimations. Author

4.
CJEM ; 2022 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838463

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study's objective was to examine emergency department (ED) workers' perspectives during the Canadian COVID-19 first wave. METHODS: This qualitative study included workers from nine Canadian EDs who participated in 3 monthly video focus groups between April and July 2020 to explore (1) personal/professional experiences, (2) patient care and ED work, (3) relationships with teams, institutions and governing bodies. Framework analysis informed data collection and analysis. RESULTS: Thirty-six focus groups and 15 interviews were conducted with 53 participants (including 24 physicians, 16 nurses). Median age was 37.5 years, 51% were female, 79% had more than 5 years' experience. Three main themes emerged. (1) Early in this pandemic, participants felt a responsibility to provide care to patients and solidarity toward their ED colleagues and team, while balancing many risks with their personal protection. (2) ED teams wanted to be engaged in decision-making, based on the best available scientific knowledge. Institutional decisions and clinical guidelines needed to be adapted to the specificity of each ED environment. (3) Working during the pandemic created new sources of moral distress and fatigue, including difficult clinical practices, distance with patients and families, frequent changes in information and added sources of fatigue. Although participants quickly adapted to a "new normal", they were concerned about long-term burnout. Participants who experienced high numbers of patient deaths felt especially unprepared. INTERPRETATION: ED workers believe they have a responsibility to provide care through a pandemic. Trust in leadership is supported by managers who are present and responsive, transparent in their communication, and involve ED staff in the development and practice of policies and procedures. Such practices will help protect from burnout and ensure the workforce's long-term sustainability.


RéSUMé: CONTEXTE: Cette étude avait pour objectif d'examiner le point de vue des travailleurs des services d'urgence pendant la première vague de la COVID-19 au Canada. MéTHODES: Cette étude qualitative a inclus des travailleurs de neuf services d'urgence canadiens qui ont participé à 3 groupes de discussion monsuels par visioconférence entre avril et juillet 2020, pour explorer: (1) leurs expériences personnelles/professionnelles, (2) les soins aux patients et le travail au service d'urgence, (3) leurs relations avec les équipes, les institutions et instances dirigeantes. Le "framework analysis" a guidé le receuil et l'analyse des données. RéSULTATS: Trente-six groupes de discussion et 15 entretiens individuels ont été menés avec 53 participants (dont 24 médecins et 16 infirmières). L'âge médian était de 37,5 ans, 51% étaient des femmes, 79% avaient plus de 5 ans d'expérience. Trois thèmes principaux sont ressortis. (1) Au début de cette pandémie, les participants se sont sentis responsables de prodiguer des soins aux patients et solidaires envers leurs collègues et leurs équipes des urgences, tout en cherchant à équilibrer la gestion de nombreux risques et leur protection personnelle. (2) Les équipes des services d'urgence souhaitaient participer aux prises de décision, informées par les meilleures connaissances scientifiques disponibles. Les décisions institutionnelles et les lignes directrices cliniques doivent être adaptées à la spécificité de chaque salle d'urgence. (3) Travailler pendant la pandémie a créé de nouvelles sources de détresse morale et de fatigue, notamment des pratiques cliniques difficiles, la distance avec les patients et les familles, les changements fréquents d'information. Bien que les participants se soient rapidement adaptés à une « nouvelle normalité¼, ils étaient préoccupés par l'épuisement professionnel des travailleurs au long terme. Les participants qui ont vécu un nombre élevé de décès de patients à l'urgence se sentaient particulièrement mal préparés. INTERPRéTATION: Les travailleurs des services d'urgence estiment qu'ils ont la responsabilité de fournir des soins en cas de pandémie. Un sentiment de confiance dans les décideurs peut être soutenu par des gestionnaires qui sont présents et réactifs, transparents dans leur communication, et qui impliquent le personnel des services d'urgence dans le développement des politiques et procédures cliniques. De telles pratiques aideront à protéger contre l'épuisement professionnel pour garantir le bien-être des travailleurs d'urgence.

5.
Rev Invest Clin ; 2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1836372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Information is needed on the safety and efficacy of direct discharge from the emergency department (ED) of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to study the variables associated with discharge from the ED in patients presenting with COVID-19 pneumonia, and study ED revisits related to COVID-19 at 30 days (EDR30d). METHODS: Multicenter study of the SIESTA cohort including 1198 randomly selected COVID patients in 61 EDs of Spanish medical centers from March 1, 2020, to April 30, 2020. We collected baseline and related characteristics of the acute episode and calculated the adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for ED discharge. In addition, we analyzed the variables related to EDR30d in discharged patients. RESULTS: We analyzed 859 patients presenting with COVID-19 pneumonia, 84 (9.8%) of whom weredischarged from the ED. The variables independently associated with discharge were being a woman (aOR 1.890; 95%CI 1.176 3.037), age < 60 years (aOR 2.324; 95%CI 1.353-3.990), and lymphocyte count > 1200/mm3 (aOR 4.667; 95%CI 1.045-20.839). The EDR30d of the ED discharged group was 40.0%, being lower in women (aOR 0.368; 95%CI 0.142-0.953). A totalof 130 hospitalized patients died (16.8%) as did two in the group discharged from the ED (2.4%) (OR 0.121; 95%CI 0.029-0.498). CONCLUSION: Discharge from the ED in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia was infrequent and was associated with few variables of the episode. The EDR30d was high, albeit with a low mortality.

6.
Turk J Emerg Med ; 22(2): 114-117, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835082

ABSTRACT

Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a life-threatening condition. Its pathology lies behind its unique anatomy. Critically ill COVID-19 patients are managed in the emergency department for longer periods while awaiting critical care admission. Therefore, more complex procedures such as prone positioning are performed in the emergency department to ensure patient care continues. We report this case of RSH in an intubated critically ill COVID-19 patient requiring prone position. During her stay in the Emergency Department Acute Care Unit, she developed anemia, uremia, and worsening hypoxia. Emergency contrast-enhanced computed tomography leads to our diagnosis of RSH. She was treated with a conservative approach and blood transfusion. We would like to highlight this case for its diagnostic complexity since this ventilated patient required both biochemical and radiological markers to diagnose RSH in combination with high suspicion levels. RSH must be considered in patients with risk factors such as prone position and anticoagulant usage. Last, a holistic approach to critically ill patients will not only benefit patients but also health-care profession. The direction of care should be decided based on the patient's condition, imaging, and hospital resources.

7.
Front Digit Health ; 4: 818705, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emergency departments (ED) are an important intercept point for identifying suicide risk and connecting patients to care, however, more innovative, person-centered screening tools are needed. Natural language processing (NLP) -based machine learning (ML) techniques have shown promise to assess suicide risk, although whether NLP models perform well in differing geographic regions, at different time periods, or after large-scale events such as the COVID-19 pandemic is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance of an NLP/ML suicide risk prediction model on newly collected language from the Southeastern United States using models previously tested on language collected in the Midwestern US. METHOD: 37 Suicidal and 33 non-suicidal patients from two EDs were interviewed to test a previously developed suicide risk prediction NLP/ML model. Model performance was evaluated with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and Brier scores. RESULTS: NLP/ML models performed with an AUC of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.71-0.91) and Brier score of 0.23. CONCLUSION: The language-based suicide risk model performed with good discrimination when identifying the language of suicidal patients from a different part of the US and at a later time period than when the model was originally developed and trained.

8.
Int J Health Sci (Qassim) ; 16(1): 22-29, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1824082

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Mildly symptomatic COVID-19 patients may seek medical attention either in the Emergency Department (ED) or Ambulatory Clinics (AC). However, it is unclear if ED patients have different characteristics and outcomes than AC patients when discharged under telemedicine surveillance, which we explored in this study. METHODS: Patients with mild or asymptomatic COVID-19 disease referred to a multidisciplinary Telemedicine clinical service (TM-CS) program in an urban tertiary-care hospital, between June 2020 and February 2021, were evaluated. Those referred from ED were labeled "ED Group" and ones from AC as "AC Group." Their characteristics, clinical features and outcomes including telemedicine parameters, subsequent ED visits, hospital admission, oxygen requirements, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and mortality were compared. RESULTS: Out of 1132 confirmed non-admitted COVID-19 patients, 526 with mild (89%) or asymptomatic (11%) disease were enrolled in TM-CS. Majority of these were referred from ED (n = 370; 70%) and rest (n = 156, 30%) from the AC. Patients in the ED group compared to AC group, had higher BMI (28.9 vs. 27.5), higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (1.4 vs. 0.9), and higher incidence of comorbidities (50% vs. 22%), P ≤ 0.01. However, there were no differences in the ED and AC groups in subsequent ED visits (26% vs. 24%), hospital admission (18% vs. 15%), oxygen requirements (5% vs. 4%), ICU admission (1% vs. 2%), and mortality (0.3% vs. 0.6%), respectively (P > 0.40). CONCLUSION: Significant number of mild COVID-19 patients head to the ED for initial assistance but have similar outcomes to AC patients. TM-CS could be a safe alternative for follow-up monitoring of these patients.

9.
Cureus ; 14(4): e23874, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822589

ABSTRACT

Emergency departments (EDs) in the United States are the primary drivers of hospital admissions. As the nation continues to experience unrestrained spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), EDs, hospitals, and testing centers are overwhelmed with patients. The consequence of "boarding" admitted patients in EDs leads not only to longer ED wait times for all patients but also delays the medical practice of intensivists and internists while patients await an inpatient bed. Here, we describe the case of an ED boarder with severe COVID-19 who developed refeeding syndrome while boarding in the ED, ultimately requiring in-depth electrolyte and renal management by the ED team before intensive care unit admission.

10.
Paediatrics & Child Health ; : 5, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1821761

ABSTRACT

Objectives The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of the pandemic on poisoning in children under 18 years presenting to a tertiary care paediatric emergency department (ED) in Canada. Methods We utilized the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) surveillance data to identify children presenting to the Hospital for Sick Children for poisonings during two time periods: pre-pandemic (March 11 to December 31, 2018 and 2019) and pandemic (March 11 to December 31, 2020). Primary outcomes investigated the change in proportion for total poisonings, unintentional poisonings, recreational drug use, and intentional self-harm exposures over total ED visits. Secondarily, we examined the change in proportion of poisonings between age, sex, substance type, and admission requirement pre-pandemic versus during pandemic. Results The proportions significantly increased for total poisonings (122.5%), unintentional poisonings (127.8%), recreational drug use (160%), and intentional self-harm poisonings (104.2%) over total ED visits. The proportions over all poisoning cases also significantly increased for cannabis (44.3%), vaping (134.6%), other recreational drugs (54.5%), multi-substance use (29.3%), and admissions due to poisonings (44.3%) during the pandemic. Conclusion Despite an overall decrease in ED visits, there was a significant increase in poisoning presentations to our ED during the pandemic compared with pre-pandemic years. Our results will provide better insight into care delivery and public health interventions for paediatric poisonings.

11.
J Am Coll Emerg Physicians Open ; 3(3): e12728, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819356

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in over 6 million deaths worldwide as of March 2022. Adverse psychological effects on patients and the general public linked to the pandemic have been well documented. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult emergency department (ED) encounters with diagnoses of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes at a tertiary care hospital in New York City from March 15 through July 31, 2020 and compared it with ED encounters during the same time period in the previous 3 years (2017-2019). The relative risk (RR) of these diagnoses was calculated comparing a prepandemic sample to a pandemic sample, accounting for total volume of ED visits. Results: A total of 2816 patient encounters met the inclusion criteria. The study period in 2020 had 31.5% lower overall ED volume seen during the same time period in the previous 3 years (27,874 vs average 40,716 ED encounters). The risk of presenting with anxiety during the study period in 2020 compared to prior 3 years was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-1.63), for depression was 1.47 (95% CI 1.28-1.69), and for suicidal ideation was 1.05 (95% CI 0.90-1.23). There was an increase in admissions for depression during the pandemic period (15.2% increase, 95% CI 4.6%-25.7%). Conclusion: There was a relative increase in patients presenting to the ED with complaints of anxiety and depression during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, while absolute numbers remained stable. Our results highlight the importance of acute care-based mental health resources and interventions to support patients during this pandemic.

12.
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1819420

ABSTRACT

Background Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and mild bronchodilator that has been shown to improve systemic oxygenation, but has rarely been administered in the Emergency Department (ED). In addition to its favorable pulmonary vascular effects, in-vitro studies report that NO donors can inhibit replication of viruses, including SARS Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This study evaluated the administration of high-dose iNO by mask in spontaneously breathing emergency department (ED) patients with respiratory symptoms attributed to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods We designed a randomized clinical trial to determine whether 30 min of high dose iNO (250 ppm) could be safely and practically administered by emergency physicians in the ED to spontaneously-breathing patients with respiratory symptoms attributed to COVID-19. Our secondary goal was to learn if iNO could prevent the progression of mild COVID-19 to a more severe state. Findings We enrolled 47 ED patients with acute respiratory symptoms most likely due to COVID-19: 25 of 47 (53%) were randomized to the iNO treatment group;22 of 47 (46%) to the control group (supportive care only). All patients tolerated the administration of high-dose iNO in the ED without significant complications or symptoms. Five patients receiving iNO (16%) experienced asymptomatic methemoglobinemia (MetHb) > 5%. Thirty-four of 47 (72%) subjects tested positive for SARS-CoV-2: 19 of 34 were randomized to the iNO treatment group and 15 of 34 subjects to the control group. Seven of 19 (38%) iNO patients returned to the ED, while 4 of 15 (27%) control patients did. One patient in each study arm was hospitalized: 5% in iNO treatment and 7% in controls. One patient was intubated in the iNO group. No patients in either group died. The differences between these groups were not significant. Conclusion A single dose of iNO at 250 ppm was practical and not associated with any significant adverse effects when administered in the ED by emergency physicians. Local disease control led to early study closure and prevented complete testing of COVID-19 safety and treatment outcomes measures.

13.
J Clin Med ; 11(9)2022 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820303

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Electrocardiogram (ECG) offers a valuable resource easily available in the emergency setting. OBJECTIVE: Aim of the study was to describe ECG alterations on emergency department (ED) presentation or that developed during hospitalization in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients and their association with 28-day mortality. METHODS: A retrospective, single-center study including hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 was conducted. ECG was recorded on ED admission to determine: heart rhythm, rate, and cycle; atrio-ventricular and intra-ventricular conduction; right ventricular strain; and ventricular repolarization. A specialized cardiologist blinded for the outcomes performed all 12-lead ECG analyses and their interpretation. RESULTS: 190 patients were included, with a total of 24 deaths (12.6%). Age (p < 0.0001) and comorbidity burden were significantly higher in non-survivors (p < 0.0001). Atrial fibrillation (AF) was more frequent in non-survivors (p < 0.0001), alongside a longer QTc interval (p = 0.0002), a lower Tp-e/QTc ratio (p = 0.0003), and right ventricular strain (p = 0.013). Remdesivir administration was associated with bradycardia development (p = 0.0005) but no increase in mortality rates. In a Cox regression model, AF (aHR 3.02 (95% CI 1.03-8.81); p = 0.042), QTc interval above 451 ms (aHR 3.24 (95% CI 1.09-9.62); p = 0.033), and right ventricular strain (aHR 2.94 (95% CI 1.01-8.55); p = 0.047) were associated with higher 28-day mortality risk. CONCLUSIONS: QTc interval > 451 ms, right ventricular strain, and AF are associated with higher mortality risk in SARS-CoV-2 hospitalized patients. ECG recording and its appropriate analysis offers a simple, quick, non-expensive, and validated approach in the emergency setting to guide COVID-19 patients' stratification.

14.
J Infect Chemother ; 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814722

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: After COVID-19 vaccination was initiated, the number of patients visiting the emergency department (ED) with vaccine-related adverse reactions increased. We investigated the clinical features of older adults (aged 65 years and older) visiting the ED with self-reported COVID-19 postvaccination fever. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational study at three EDs between March 2021 and September 2021. Patients who reported adverse reactions, fever (≥37.5 °C) and/or febrile sensation or rigors following COVID-19 vaccination were included. The demographic and clinical data of these patients were collected by reviewing their medical records. RESULTS: A total of 562 patients were selected, and 396 (70.5%) were female. The older adult group included 155 (27.6%) patients, and the median age was 75 (69-79 years). The older adults less frequently had a fever (≥37.5 °C) upon ED presentation (75.5% vs. 85.7%, respectively), used more emergency medical services (43.9% vs. 18.7%, respectively), and visited an ED more frequently during early hours (00:00-06:00) (31% vs. 20.1%, respectively) compared to the younger adults (p = 0.004, p < 0.001 and p = 0.036). Fewer older adults visited an ED within 2 days of fever onset (73.5% vs. 84%) (p = 0.012), and more older adults were admitted for medical conditions other than vaccine-related adverse reactions (32.9% vs. 4.2%) (p < 0.001). Older adults received more thorough testing (laboratory and imaging tests). Among the older adults, the admission rate was associated with age (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Older adults presenting with fever as an adverse reaction following COVID-19 vaccination less frequently had a fever upon visiting the ED, required more ED testing, and had higher admission rates for non-vaccination-related medical conditions.

15.
Am J Emerg Med ; 57: 91-97, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814024

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus of 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a global pandemic; COVID-19 has resulted in significant challenges in the delivery of healthcare, including emergency management of multiple diagnoses, such as stroke and ST-segment myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to identify the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on emergency department care of stroke and STEMI patients. In this study a review of the available literature was performed using pre-defined search terms, inclusion criteria, and exclusion criteria. Our analysis, using a narrative review format, indicates that there was not a significant change in time required for key interventions for stroke and STEMI emergent management, including imaging (door-to-CT), tPA administration (door-to-needle), angiographic reperfusion (door-to-puncture), and percutaneous coronary intervention (door-to-balloon). Potential future areas of investigation include how emergency department (ED) stroke and STEMI care has adapted in response to different COVID-19 variants and stages of the pandemic, as well as identifying strategies used by EDs that were successful in providing effective emergency care in the face of the pandemic.

16.
R I Med J (2013) ; 105(4): 9-15, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1812674

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: This study aimed to understand how the COVID-19 pandemic affected youth presentations to the Emergency Department's psychiatric service and how many warranted an inpatient and acute residential admission. METHODS: This cross-sectional study examined the patients (youth ages 3 to 18 years) evaluated at Hasbro Children's Hospital's Emergency Department by Lifespan's Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Service (LPBHES) over four months, March through June, of years 2019, 2020, and 2021. The sample was categorized into two groups: Children ages 3 to 11 years and adolescents ages 12 to 18 years. RESULTS: Youth evaluated by LPBHES showed an increase in acuity, where 11% more children and 12% more adolescents met criteria for inpatient and acute residential admission from years 2019 to 2020. This increase was observed despite fewer overall LPBHES evaluations. CONCLUSION: Future directions include prospective studies that explore the barriers to youth receiving the appropriate level of outpatient mental health services to prevent acute mental health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prospective Studies
17.
J Pers Med ; 12(4)2022 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809987

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The aim was screening the performance of nine Early Warning Scores (EWS), to identify patients at high-risk of premature impairment and to detect intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, as well as to track the 2-, 7-, 14-, and 28-day mortality in a cohort of patients diagnosed with an acute neurological condition. (2) Methods: We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, observational study, calculating the EWS [Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), National Early Warning Score (NEWS), VitalPAC Early Warning Score (ViEWS), Modified Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (MREMS), Early Warning Score (EWS), Hamilton Early Warning Score (HEWS), Standardised Early Warning Score (SEWS), WHO Prognostic Scored System (WPSS), and Rapid Acute Physiology Score (RAPS)] upon the arrival of patients to the emergency department. (3) Results: In all, 1160 patients were included: 808 patients were hospitalized, 199 cases (17%) required ICU care, and 6% of patients died (64 cases) within 2 days, which rose to 16% (183 cases) within 28 days. The highest area under the curve for predicting the need for ICU admissions was obtained by RAPS and MEWS. For predicting mortality, MREMS obtained the best scores for 2- and 28-day mortality. (4) Conclusions: This is the first study to explore whether several EWS accurately identify the risk of ICU admissions and mortality, at different time points, in patients with acute neurological disorders. Every score analyzed obtained good results, but it is suggested that the use of RAPS, MEWS, and MREMS should be preferred in the acute setting, for patients with neurological impairment.

18.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(4)2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809812

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of the study was to analyze whether a patient's opinion is related to the effect of analgesic treatment. METHODS: The study was conducted using a survey questionnaire among adult patients admitted to the hospital emergency department in March 2021. The Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) was used to assess pain. Patients were asked to rate the intensity of pain during their stay in the emergency department in three situations: (1) at admission; (2) during the stay; and (3) upon discharge. The relationships between qualitative variables were assessed by the chi-squared test. Significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS: There was no statistical dependence between the patient's opinion about the medical institution and results of the effectiveness of analgesic treatments (p = 0.056). The highest percentage of patients satisfied with the received treatment were those who did not feel pain during ED discharge (94.12%), and the lowest were those who complained of severe pain during ED discharge (63.91%). The average mark for the functioning and organization of the emergency department was 7.44 (±2.04). Only 54 patients (29.83%) had taken pain medication before deciding to visit ED. CONCLUSIONS: No statistical dependency between the effect of the analgesic treatment and the patient's opinion has been observed. The majority of patients with pain discomfort visit emergency departments without looking for consultation in other locations or without taking analgesics. In the considered institution, patients were satisfied with the analgesic treatment, staff performance, and with the organization of the department.

19.
Public Health Rep ; : 333549221085580, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807860

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Emergency departments (EDs) could play an important role in the COVID-19 pandemic response by reaching patients who would otherwise not seek vaccination in the community. Prior to expanding COVID-19 vaccination to the acute care setting, we assessed ED patients' COVID-19 vaccine status, perspectives, and hypothetical receptivity to ED-based vaccination. METHODS: From January 11 through March 31, 2021, we conducted a multisite (Albany Medical Center, Boston Medical Center, Buffalo General Hospital, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, and Upstate Medical Center), cross-sectional survey of ED patients, with embedded randomization for participants to receive 1 of 4 vignette vaccination messages (simple opt-in message, recommendation by the hospital, community-oriented message, and acknowledgment of vaccine hesitancy). Main outcomes included COVID-19 vaccination status, prior intention to be vaccinated, and receptivity to randomized hypothetical vignette messages. RESULTS: Of 610 participants, 122 (20.0%) were vaccinated, 234 (38.4%) had prior intent to be vaccinated, 111 (18.2%) were unsure as to prior intent, and 143 (23.4%) had no prior intent to be vaccinated. Vaccine hesitancy (participants who were vaccine unsure or did not intend to receive the vaccine) was associated with the following: age <45 years, female, non-Hispanic Black, no primary health care, and no prior influenza vaccination. Overall, 364 of 565 (64.4%; 95% CI, 60.3%-68.4%) were willing to accept a hypothetical vaccination in the ED. Among participants with prior vaccine hesitancy, a simple opt-in message resulted in the highest acceptance rates to hypothetical vaccination (39.7%; 95% CI, 27.6%-52.8%). CONCLUSIONS: EDs have appropriate patient populations to initiate COVID-19 vaccination programs as a supplement to community efforts. A simple opt-in approach may offer the best messaging to reach vaccine-hesitant ED patients.

20.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older adults represent a disproportionate share of severe COVID-19 presentations and fatalities, but we have limited understanding of the differences in presentation by age and the association between less typical emergency department (ED) presentations and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used the RECOVER Network registry, a research collaboration of 86 EDs in 27 U.S. states. We focused on encounters with a positive nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2, and described their demographics, clinical presentation, and outcomes. Sequential multivariable logistic regressions examined the strength of association between age cohort and outcomes. RESULTS: Of 4536 encounters, median patient age was 55 years, 49% were women, and 34% were non-Hispanic Black persons. Cough was the most common presenting complaint across age groups (18-64, 65-74, and 75+): 71%, 67%, and 59%, respectively (p < 0.001). Neurological symptoms, particularly altered mental status, were more common in older adults (2%, 11%, 26%; p < 0.001). Patients 75+ had the greatest odds of ED index visit admission of all age groups (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.66; 95% CI 5.23-8.56), 30-day hospitalization (aOR 7.44; 95% CI 5.63-9.99), and severe COVID-19 (aOR 4.26; 95% CI 3.45-5.27). Compared to individuals with alternate presentations and adjusting for age, patients with typical symptoms (fever, cough and/or shortness of breath) had similar odds of ED index visit admission (aOR 1.01; 95% CI 0.81-1.24), potentially higher odds of 30-day hospitalization (aOR 1.23; 95% CI 1.00-1.53), and greater odds of severe COVID-19 (aOR 1.46; 95% CI 1.12-1.90). CONCLUSIONS: Older patients with COVID-19 are more likely to have presentations without the most common symptoms. However, alternate presentations of COVID-19 in older ED patients are not associated with greater odds of mechanical ventilation and/or death. Our data highlights the importance of a liberal COVID-19 testing strategy among older ED patients to facilitate accurate diagnoses and timely treatment and prophylaxis.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL