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1.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2083350

ABSTRACT

Emotional eating is a commonly described phenomenon reported by individuals across the weight spectrum. Not only does existing evidence suggest it is not an effective emotion regulation strategy, but emotional eating is also associated with difficulty losing weight during weight loss interventions and other negative health outcomes. The majority of existing work in the area of emotional eating has focused on the broad dimensions of negative and positive affect. Yet, there are data suggesting that different emotions appear to produce different changes in eating behaviors, suggesting the importance of investigating the influence of discrete emotions on eating. The lack of understanding regarding eating in response to boredom in particular, is a major gap in the current literature. Moreover, little is known about individual characteristics that could make some individuals more vulnerable to "bored eating." Given data suggesting interoception as central to other forms of dysregulated eating, as well as its theoretical relevance, the current study focused on interoceptive ability as a vulnerability factor for bored eating. Utilizing an experimental design, Study 1 examined boredom as a trigger of snacking behaviors in a laboratory setting. Due to COVID-19, data collection was terminated early, but preliminary results provided tentative support for a causal role of boredom in food consumption. Study 2 was a cross-sectional, correlational extension of Study 1. Consistent with predictions, Study 2 found that boredom proneness was a significant predictor of emotional eating, even when accounting for the broad dimensions of negative and positive affect. Inconsistent with hypotheses, the association between boredom proneness and emotional eating was not moderated by interoception. Findings have implications for the prevention and treatment of emotional eating. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Behav Res Methods ; 54(5): 2445-2456, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080556

ABSTRACT

The topic of affective development over the lifespan is at the forefront of psychological science. One of the intriguing findings in this area is superior emotion regulation and increased positivity in older rather than younger adults. This paper aims to contribute to the empirical base of studies on the role of affect in cognition. We report a new dataset of valence (positivity) ratings to 3,600 English words collected from North American and British English-speaking younger (below 65 years of age) and older adults (65 years of age and older) during the COVID-19 pandemic. This dataset represents a broad range of valence and a rich selection of semantic categories. Our analyses of the new data pitted against comparable pre-pandemic (2013) data from younger counterparts reveal differences in the overall distribution of valence related both to age and the psychological fallout of the pandemic. Thus, we found at the group level that older participants produced higher valence ratings overall than their younger counterparts before and especially during the pandemic. Moreover, valence ratings saw a super-linear increase after the age of 65. Together, these findings provide new evidence for emotion regulation throughout adulthood, including a novel demonstration of greater emotional resilience in older adults to the stressors of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Aged , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Semantics , Cognition
3.
Stress Health ; 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075168

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic elicited a lot of concerns among citizens, thereby potentially compromising their well-being. This study sought to examine the role of individuals' emotion regulation styles (i.e., emotional dysregulation, emotional suppression, and emotional integration) in handling these concerns and their experiences of well-being (i.e., satisfaction with life and sleep quality) and ill-being (i.e., anxiety and depressive symptoms). The study had a unique 10-wave longitudinal design (N = 986; Mage  = 41.28; 76% female) and was conducted during the outbreak of the pandemic in March-May 2020. Multilevel analyses showed, first, that weekly variation in COVID-19 related concerns related negatively to weekly variation in well-being and positively to weekly variation in ill-being. Second, at the between-person level, emotional dysregulation and suppression related positively to between-person vulnerability in ill-being and lower well-being (across all waves). Third, between-person differences in emotional dysregulation amplified the strength of the within-person association between concerns and depressive complaints and lowered life satisfaction. Unexpectedly, integrative emotion regulation amplified the strength of the within-person association between concerns and anxiety. The discussion focuses on the critical role of emotion regulation in handling the uncertainty elicited by the pandemic and provides directions for further research.

4.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(12-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2073431

ABSTRACT

There has been a significant rise in mental health needs in adolescents, and the COVID-19 pandemic has severely disturbed everyday life, causing an increase in anxiety and social isolation amongst adolescents throughout the world (CDC, 2017;Yale Child Study Center, 2020). Effective Tier 1 social-emotional universal interventions to foster social-emotion well-being are crucial in that ensuring school districts have the tools to better support high school aged students and their social-emotional needs. The Learning to BREATHE (L2B) program is a preventative Tier 1 program that has been proven to promote social-emotional well-being in students at the secondary level (Broderick, 2014). However, it is not known if the program is effective when administered through remote learning. The aim of this study was to examine whether the L2B program administered as a Tier 1 intervention at the high school age-level through remote learning was effective in (1) fostering emotion regulation and (2) increasing mindfulness skills. Additionally, the researcher gathered treatment acceptability data to determine whether participants viewed the L2B program as a helpful social-emotional intervention when delivered through remote learning. Thirty-six high school student participants received the L2B program through remote learning. Participants completed the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ) and the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-15) at pre-intervention and post-intervention. Paired t-tests found that participants reported a statistically significant mean difference in (ERQ) cognitive reappraisal (p <= .001) and expressive suppression (p < .002) skills with a small effect size (d = .25, d = .24). A second paired t-test also found that participants reported a statistically significant mean difference in (FFMQ-15) mindfulness (p < .001) skills with a large effect size (d = 1.05). Eighty-eight percent of participants reported that the L2B program was beneficial to their social-emotional well-being through remote learning. Eleven percent of participants reported that the L2B program was not beneficial to their social/emotional well-being through remote learning. These results suggest that the L2B program fosters both emotion regulation and mindfulness skills through remote learning. L2B also had a very high satisfaction rate amongst participants with implementation through remote learning. Implications of the study and suggestions for further research are offered. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Klinik Psikiyatri Dergisi-Turkish Journal of Clinical Psychiatry ; 25(3):260-269, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072092

ABSTRACT

Objective: The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are remarkable on individuals' mental health. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an increase in mental health problems and psychological distress in uninfected healthy people. The present study aimed to examine the mediator role of maladaptive cognitive emotion regula-tion strategies in the relationship between cognitive fle-xibility and COVID-19 related psychological distress experienced during the current pandemic. Method: The sample consisted of 351 young adults (86% female and 14% male) who were not infected with COVID-19 aged between 18 to 25 years old. Participants completed the self-report questionnaires, including the Cognitive Flexibility Inventory, Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, and COVID-19 Related Psychological Distress Scale. Mediation analysis estimated total, indi-rect, and direct effects between cognitive flexibility and COVID-19 related psychological distress. Results: The correlation analyses showed that cognitive flexibility -control dimension was negatively associated with both COVID-19 related psychological distress and maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies. Also, maladap-tive cognitive emotion regulation strategies and COVID-19 related psychological distress was found to be posi-tively correlated. In the study sample, the results of the bootstrap mediation indicated that maladaptive cogni-tive emotion regulation strategies, including self-blame, acceptance, rumination, catastrophizing, and blaming others, fully mediated the relationship between cogni-tive flexibility -control and COVID-19 related psycholog-ical distress. Discussion: Our findings would help psy-chological interventions designed for COVID-19 unin-fected healthy people who have lower-level cognitive flexibility -control dimension by highlighting the promi-nence that the fewer people use maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies, the less they feel COVID-19 related psychological distress.

6.
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences ; 12(3):106-113, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072089

ABSTRACT

Objective: The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), spread all over the world in a short time and turned into a pandemic. During COVID-19, individuals' anxiety levels have increased. For this reason, determining the factors that affect anxiety during COVID-19 is crucial for the psychological health of individuals. This study aims to investigate the mediating role of non-adaptive emotion regulation in the relationship between perceived social support and anxiety in the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The sample of the study consisted of 327 university students with an average age of 24.27. The data were collected from the participants between May and June 2020. Demographic Information Form, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale-Brief Form (DERS-16) were used. The independent-sample t-test, One-way ANOVA, Pearson moment product correlation test, and Mediation analysis were all used for statistical analysis. Results: During the COVID-19 pandemic, participants stated that they were mostly concerned about the health status of their families. There was a negative correlation between anxiety level, age and perceived social support. Anxiety level had a positive relationship with non -adaptive emotion regulation strategies. In addition, non-adaptive emotion regulation had a full mediating role in the relationship between anxiety and perceived social support. Conclusion: Our study found that the anxiety-reducing effect of perceived social support disappears when individuals use non-adaptive emotion regulation strategies. For this reason, the studies to develop adaptive emotion regulation strategies may be useful in reducing the COVID-19 anxiety.

7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071471

ABSTRACT

This study focused on COVID-19 perceived risk and Internet addiction among Chinese college students during the lockdown. On the basis of the Social Cognitive Theory, this study proposed a mediating model to evaluate the mediating role of difficulties in regulating emotion between the COVID-19 perceived risk and Internet addiction. A questionnaire survey was conducted among 690 college students during the COVID-19 lockdown in China. The results showed that the COVID-19 perceived risk was significantly positively associated with Internet addiction (r = 0.236, p < 0.001) and difficulties in emotion regulation (r = 0.220, p < 0.001), difficulties in emotion regulation was significantly positively associated with Internet addiction (r = 0.368, p < 0.001). The COVID-19 perceived risk had a significant and positive predictive effect on Internet addiction (ß = 0.233, p < 0.001) among Chinese college students. The analysis of the mediation model showed that difficulties in emotion regulation partially mediated the relationship between COVID-19 perceived risk and Internet addiction (indirect effect value was 0.051 with 95% Confidence Interval ranging from 0.027 to 0.085). The findings not only enhanced our understanding of the internal influence mechanism of COVID-19 perceived risk on Internet addiction but also provided a practical basis for college education works. Finally, discussions and suggestions were provided on the basis of the results.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Humans , Internet Addiction Disorder , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Students/psychology , China/epidemiology , Internet
8.
Ideggyogy Sz ; 75(9-10): 307-315, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067419

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: The problems caused by the COVID-19 epidemic have the worst impact on chronic patient populations. People with chronic pain are one of the most vulnerable groups due to stress, disruption of daily routine, family problems, illness and difficulty in hospital care. It is therefore essential to assess the situation and mental well-being of this group. The aim of this survey was to assess chronic pain patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, addressing psychological background factors that might affect pain symptoms, such as depression, emotion regulation, alexithymia, well-being, health literacy and social support. Methods: 158 people participated in the survey, reporting pain for at least 3 months but had not received medical treatment. Data was collected at two dates: February and December 2021. Participants completed an online questionnaire due to the pandemic situation. The following six psychological questionnaires were used in the survey: Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Beck Depression Inventory 9-item version, Difficulty in Emotion Regulation Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Chew-questions measuring health literacy, WHO Well-being Index. Results: The participants ranged from 20 to 80 years in age, of whom 140 (88%) were female. 42 participants (27%) achieved severe alexithymia. 118 people (75%) had depression, of which 72 people (46%) had mild depression, 26 (16%) had moderate depression, and 20 (13%) had severe depression. The degree of pain and alexithy-mia (r(158) = 0.16, p = 0.004), depression (r(158) = 0.41, p < 0.001), difficulties in emotion regulation (r(158) = 0.26, p = 0.004), and health literacy, and difficulties in emotion regulation (r(158) = 0.25, p = 0.001) were positively and significantly related. Conclusion: In addition to the characteristic comorbidities of people living with pain (e.g. anxiety, emotion disorder, sleep disorder), the epidemic-induced prolonged social isolation, stress and fear of illness may explain the proportion of high depression, emotion regulation difficulties or health literacy problems in the study sample which exacerbate alexithymia and the degree of pain. Based on these results it is important to draw the attention of professionals to the appropriate health care and educational needs of those affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Affective Symptoms/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066036

ABSTRACT

Emotion regulation is an important aspect of psychological functioning that influences subjective experience and moderates emotional responses throughout the lifetime. Adaptive responses to stressful life events depend on the positive interaction between explicit and implicit emotion regulation strategies, such as mindfulness and defense mechanisms. This study demonstrates how these emotion regulation strategies predict psychological health during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. A convenience sample of 6385 subjects, recruited via snowball sampling on various social media platforms, responded to an online survey assessing psychological reaction to social restrictions imposed to limit the spread of COVID-19 in Italy. Psychological distress, post-traumatic stress symptoms, mindfulness, and defense mechanisms were assessed using SCL-90, IES-R, MAAS, and DMRS-30-SR, respectively. Higher mindfulness was significantly associated with higher overall defensive maturity and a greater use of high-adaptive defenses (p < 0.0001). Both mindfulness and defense mechanisms acted as good predictors of psychological health (R2 = 0.541) and posttraumatic symptoms (R2 = 0.332), confirming the role of emotion regulation in protecting against maladaptive responses to stressful situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Mindfulness , Psychological Distress , Defense Mechanisms , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066025

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Although there is accumulating evidence for the associations between resilience, emotion regulation and stress, little is known about the mechanisms of these relations. To extend the existing research, the present study examined cognitive emotion regulation strategies as one potential mechanism between trait resilience and perceived stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2) Methods: Young adults (N = 266; M = 20.05; SD = 3.93) were invited to fill out questionnaires that assessed trait resilience, cognitive emotion regulation strategies and perceived stress. (3) Results: The results showed that resilience was negatively associated with perceived stress and with self-blame, catastrophizing and rumination, and positively associated with positive reappraisal, focus on planning, positive refocus and putting into perspective. Stress was positively associated with self-blame, catastrophizing, rumination, other-blame and acceptance, and negatively associated with positive reappraisal and positive refocus. Moreover, positive refocus, rumination, catastrophizing and self-blame partially explained the associations between trait resilience and perceived stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. (4) Conclusions: These findings highlight the potential utility of targeting cognitive emotion regulation strategies in the development and implementation of preventive interventions for reducing stress during highly challenging situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition , Emotions , Humans , Pandemics , Young Adult
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065922

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between physical activity and negative emotions among college students in the post-epidemic era and determine if emotional regulation plays a mediating role between physical activity and negative emotions. METHODS: 479 college students (293 males, 186 females, M = 19.94, SD = 1.25) who were under closed campus management during the epidemic period were surveyed using the physical activity rating scale (PARS-3), the self-assessment scale for anxiety (SAS), the self-esteem scale for depression (SDS), and the emotion regulation self-efficacy scale (RES). RESULTS: (1) Physical activity, negative emotions, and emotion regulation self-efficacy among college students were significantly different by gender (p < 0.01). (2) Physical exercise was negatively correlated with anxiety and depression (r = -0.236, p < 0.01; r = -0.198, p < 0.01) and positively correlated with emotion regulation self-efficacy (r = 0.256, p < 0.01) in college students. (3) Emotion regulation self-efficacy was negatively correlated with anxiety and depression (r = -0.440, p < 0.01; r = -0.163, p < 0.01). (4) Emotion regulation self-efficacy also partially mediated the relationship between physical activity and negative emotions. CONCLUSION: (1) Physical activity in the post-epidemic era negatively predicted anxiety and depression in school-isolated college students. (2) Emotion regulation self-efficacy in the post-epidemic era partially mediates the relationship between physical activity and anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Emotional Regulation , Self Efficacy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Emotions , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Students/psychology
12.
Neuropsychiatric Investigation ; 60(3):78-84, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2055998

ABSTRACT

Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic affected the usage of social media and other attitudes, such as eating routines. In the present study, the relationship between social media addiction and attachment, eating behavior, and emotion regulation was analyzed in individuals who had an experience of online education or working online during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This study consists of 194 participants who experienced online working or education in Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic. Demographic form, Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale, Inventory of Experiences in Close Relationships, The Emotion Regulation Difficulty Scale Brief Form, and Eating Attitudes Test-Short Form were used to collect related information. According to demographic informa-tion, the present study consists of 141 female and 44 male participants. Results: Anxious attachment, eating behavior and its 2 subscales which were social pressure and preoc-cupation with eating, emotion dysregulation, and its all subscales were found positively correlated with social media addiction. Regression analyses revealed that only anxious attachment (t = 8.01, P < .001) and “goals” that is subscale of emotion dysregulation were found as a predictor of social media addiction (t = 4.96, P < .05). In addition, a statistically significant relationship was found between the increase in the frequency of social media usage during the pandemic and social media addiction. Conclusion: According to the results of the study, the usage of social media has increased during the pandemic period, and this increase has brought up the risk of social media addiction. As a result, it was emphasized that the relationship between attachment types and emotion regulation should be consid-ered in future studies about social media addiction. © Author(s).

13.
Sustainability ; 14(18):11643, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2055365

ABSTRACT

The frequency of smartphone use has been increasing since COVID-19, and the problem of smartphone addiction is expected to intensify in modern society where smartphones have diverse uses. According to a recent study, cognitive emotional regulation strategies have proven to be effective in deepening or alleviating smartphone addiction. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the characteristics of smartphone addiction according to various psychosocial approaches, including the cognitive emotional regulation strategy. The purpose of this study is to classify the potential profiles of smartphone addiction and to verify the trends and differences of the classified groups. A total of 333 college students with an age range of 22–25 were targeted. All subjects were asked to take the Smartphone Addition Scale Based on Behavioral Addiction Criteria (SAS-B), Temperature and Character Inventory (TCI), and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ). In order to conduct a person-centered approach, Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) was used, and it was analyzed using Mplus 7. As a result, there were significant differences in the classification of potential groups for smart addiction. It was found that there is a high correlation between temperament and character in smartphone addiction and cognitive emotional regulation strategies. This study is expected to be useful as basic data for treatment and preventive approaches according to smartphone addiction in the future.

14.
Biol Psychiatry Glob Open Sci ; 2022 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048958

ABSTRACT

Background: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is a major stressor that has been associated with increased risk for psychiatric illness in the general population. Recent work has highlighted that experiences of early-life stress (ELS) may impact individuals' psychological functioning and vulnerability for developing internalizing psychopathology in response to pandemic-related stress. However, little is known about the neurobehavioral factors that may mediate the association between ELS exposure and COVID-related internalizing symptomatology. The current study sought to examine the mediating roles of pre-pandemic resting-state frontoamygdala connectivity and concurrent emotion regulation (ER) in the association between ELS and pandemic-related internalizing symptomatology. Methods: Retrospective life-stress histories, concurrent self-reported ER strategies (i.e., reappraisal and suppression), concurrent self-reported internalizing symptomatology (i.e., depression- and anxiety-related symptomatology), and resting-state functional connectivity data from a sample of adults (N = 64, M age = 22.12, female = 68.75%) were utilized. Results: There were no significant direct associations between ELS and COVID-related internalizing symptomatology. Neither frontoamygdala functional connectivity nor ER strategy use mediated an association between ELS and COVID-related internalizing symptomatology (ps > 0.05). Exploratory analyses identified a significant moderating effect of reappraisal use on the association between ELS and internalizing symptomatology (ß = -0.818, p = 0.047), such that increased reappraisal use buffered the impact of ELS on psychopathology. Conclusions: While frontoamygdala connectivity and ER do not appear to mediate the association between ELS and COVID-related internalizing symptomatology, our findings suggest that the use of reappraisal may buffer against the effect of ELS on mental health during the pandemic.

15.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(11-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2045757

ABSTRACT

Emotion regulation consists of the skills and cognitive strategies used to alter different aspects of emotion, including the subjective and temporal experience of emotion, outward expression of emotion, the ways in which an emotional experience is interpreted, or the emotion-eliciting stimuli itself. Previous research has identified reappraisal, reframing the perception of an emotion-eliciting event to change the emotional experience, and acceptance, allowing the presence of thoughts following an emotional experience to pass through the mind in a nonjudgmental fashion, as adaptive strategies to use when managing negative emotions. The present study compared the efficacy of reappraisal and acceptance in reducing symptoms of generalized anxiety, state anxiety, negative affect, and positive affect over two sessions held four weeks apart. Participants were randomly assigned to learn either strategy (acceptance or reappraisal conditions) or no strategy at all (control condition). All participants then completed an anxiety-induction, with those in the acceptance and reappraisal conditions prompted to use the emotion regulation strategy they learned to manage any anxiety they experienced. One month later, all participants were asked to complete additional ratings of generalized anxiety symptomatology over the past two weeks, state anxiety, negative affect, and positive affect. Analyses first explored the full sample of participants. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in ratings among all three conditions, both immediately after the anxiety induction and one month later. Ethnicity and race were not significantly associated with reductions in generalized anxiety symptoms or state anxiety between the acceptance, reappraisal, or control. Results indicated a small association between female participants and clinically significant reductions in state anxiety pre- and post-anxiety induction. Participants were then divided into Low Anxiety (LA) and High Anxiety (HA) groups based on their baseline generalized anxiety symptomatology. Low Anxiety (LA) participants in the reappraisal and acceptance conditions had significantly lower levels of state anxiety than participants the control condition across all time points. High Anxiety (HA) participants in the control condition reported a significant decrease in positive affect between the initial session and the one-month follow-up. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic occurred mid-data collection, necessitating changes in study administration. Research in this area should continue to explore the efficacy of emotion regulation strategies in reducing anxiety in diverse populations, assessing for both mood and self-identified goals as indicators that a strategy is successful. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Psychiatry Res ; 317: 114863, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042097

ABSTRACT

Existing research proposed that moving from a disorder-level analysis to a symptom-level analysis may provide a more fine-grained understanding of psychopathology. This study aimed to explore the relations between two dimensions (i.e., cognitive reappraisal, CR; expressive suppression, ES) of emotion regulation and individual symptoms of depression and anxiety among medical staff during the late stage of COVID-19 pandemic. We examined depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms and emotion regulation among 420 medical staff during the late stage of COVID-19 pandemic via network analysis. Two networks (i.e. emotion regulation-depression network and emotion regulation-anxiety network) were constructed in the present study. Bridge centrality index was calculated for each variable within the two networks. Among the present sample, the prevalences of depression and anxiety are 39.5% and 26.0%. CR and ES showed distinct connections to symptoms of depression and anxiety. Results of bridge centrality showed that in both networks, CR had a negative bridge expected influence value while ES had a positive bridge expected influence value. The results revealed the specific role of CR and ES in relation to depression and anxiety at a symptom level. Implications for clinical preventions and interventions are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Humans , Depression/psychology , Pandemics , Emotions/physiology , Anxiety/psychology , Medical Staff
17.
Entertain Comput ; : 100530, 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041731

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, video game playing increased exponentially. The question if playing could offer benefits to cope with the pandemic stressors emerged. This study compares how non-players and players who may or may not re-experience (e.g., seeing, hearing) game content after playing [i.e., Game Transfer Phenomena (GTP)] cope with the pandemic stressors, emotion regulation and resilience. It also examines the impact of GTP on the perception of self and the world. A total of 567 completed a survey (59.6% male, MeanAge = 28.55). The measures include emotional regulation (ERC), resilience to stress (BRCS) and fear of contamination (PI). No differences between players and non-players on ERC, BRCS and PI were found. Players with moderate GTP levels were more likely to report contamination fears and show preventive COVID coping behaviours. The positive impact of GTP was associated with high resilience and cognitive reappraisal as an emotion regulation strategy. The results suggest that attention should be paid to players who experience GTP more frequently and with a negative impact. Maladaptive coping styles can exacerbate distress from GTP and situational stressors. Identifying methods of protecting vulnerable individuals from these psychological burdens can guide interventions and mitigate consequences in similar situations.

18.
J Adolesc ; 2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2034803

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study examined the moderating role of adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation in the relationship between general perceived stress and depressive symptoms during the first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown in March-April 2020 in Belgium, while controlling for past depressive symptoms in 2016. METHODS: Participants were 110 adolescents (55% female; Mage = 16, SDage = 1.80) who filled out different questionnaires assessing maladaptive and adaptive emotion regulation strategies (ERS), perceived stress, and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Results revealed that only maladaptive ERS statistically significantly moderated the relationship between perceived stress and depressive symptoms. More specifically, the amount of perceived stress is positively associated with the level of depressive symptoms, especially in adolescents who use more maladaptive ERS. CONCLUSION: The repertoire of adaptive ERS might not be sufficient for adolescents to flexibly cope with a highly stressful situation such as the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown. Study findings highlight the need to support youth, particularly those who use more maladaptive ERS, in adaptively coping with intense stressful life events.

19.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 67: 132-138, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031620

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic created unpredictable circumstances resulting in increased psychological strain. Here we investigate pandemic-related alterations in emotion regulation in adolescents assessed before and during the pandemic. We also take biological age into account in the response to the pandemic. METHODS: Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted to compare baseline data on the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) total scores of a pre-pandemic adolescent cohort (n = 241) with those obtained during the second wave of the pandemic (n = 266). We estimated biological age based on an ultrasonic boneage assessment procedure in a subgroup of males, including grammar school and vocational school students in the 9th and 10th grades, and analyzed their data independently. FINDINGS: There is a gender difference in the timing of vulnerability for pandemic-related stress in grammar school students: females are affected a year earlier than males. Vocational school male students mature faster than grammar school male students, and the timing of emotional vulnerability also precedes that of the grammar school students'. DISCUSSION: We interpret our findings within a developmental model suggesting that there might be a window of highest vulnerability in adolescent emotion regulation. The timing of the window is determined by both chronological and biological age, and it is different for females and males. APPLICATION TO PRACTICE: Defining the exact temporal windows of vulnerability for different adolescent cohorts allows for the timely integration of preventive actions into adolescent care to protect mental health during future chronic stressful situations.

20.
J Behav Health Serv Res ; 2022 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2027623

ABSTRACT

Little is known about factors that contribute to mental health help-seeking during disasters beyond attitudes toward counseling. The COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) global pandemic dramatically impacted individuals, families, and communities worldwide. The pandemic led to significant disruptions to family routines, and evidence suggests an increase in instances of mental health symptoms, like depression and anxiety, and poor utilization of mental health services. To better understand psychological factors associated with help-seeking during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers surveyed respondents (n = 1,533 at time 1) about their mental health and help-seeking using Amazon's MTurk platform. The results indicated that individuals with higher levels of anxiety rate their likelihood of help-seeking as higher and those who do seek psychological help report higher levels of depression. Further, those who began new treatment for behavioral health difficulties during the COVID-19 pandemic reported lower social support and less clarity about how they felt (specifically, emotional clarity when upset). Implications for clinical researchers and public health are discussed.

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