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1.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(Supplement 2):A353-A354, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064042

ABSTRACT

Aims Describe an interdisciplinary hub and spoke healthcare model for children and young people (CYP) with Post COVID-19 Syndrome Methods From November 2020, with NHS London and NHS England support, clinicians and AHP chief with backgrounds in infectious disease, adolescent medicine and psychiatry from across trusts in London collaborated to set up a hub and spoke model for delivering care to CYP with post COVID-19 syndrome. This was an iterative process with involvement of patient cohort. CYP are referred into a central weekly virtual multi-disciplinary 'hub' meeting for discussion with specialists across infectious disease;respiratory;rheumatology;neurology;chronic conditions (including ME/CFS );mental health;and allied health practitioners (AHP) with experience of rehabilitation including occupational therapists, and physiotherapists, dieticians, safeguarding practitioners. The groups has a diversity lead.The group has regular evidence-based CPD. Referrers (local paediatricians or GPs for 17-18 year olds) present patient to the MDT for discussion of diagnosis, investigation and management. Website-housed referral pathways including recommended baseline assessments are provided for referrers. A developing group of local integrated care service paediatric and AHP champions support local management, pathways and education around post COVID-19 syndrome. Patients follow one of two pathways: 1. Local management, using already available services which the MDT support 2. Face-to-face interdisciplinary consultation and rehabilitation for severe or complex cases. Local support MDT discussion, and advice to local team with letters to patients outlining impression and advice;school adjustments letters;leaflets for health professionals and CYP/ family across a range of known Post COVID symptoms and difficulties. AHP delivered virtual groups and webinars include pacing;emotional wellbeing;symptom management;eating, and sleep. As the first established post- COVID-19 service for CYP in England, we have led and supported the development of 14 other MDTs nationally. Results Between 1st April 2021 and 1st February 2022 89 patients were referred to the virtual MDT. All have received information leaflets to aid recovery. 25 CYP/families have attended the virtual groups so far. 57 CYP have received an interdisciplinary consultation and received bespoke MDT input. (see table 1) Conclusion In response to the clinical need of CYP with post COVID symptoms, the collaborative development of a Pan London service across 2 clinical sites, and 3 NHS trusts is an example of how specialist clinical care can be delivered virtually using a hub and spoke model for a proportion of patients with a complex disorder. The service development element is applicable to other future emerging diseases as well as a possible model for conditions that require multiple specialist inputs and can have confused pathways or delays in diagnosis (such as functional disorders or multi-organ pathology).

2.
Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases ; 9:S161, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043399

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the largest pandemic of our times. Pandemics are severe stressors to vulnerable groups (such as patients with chronic diseases) and this highly contagious disease exerts considerable impacts on mental health. We wanted to investigate the possible impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the quality of life (QoL) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients and potential changes during the period of one year. Methods: Data on the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of MG was collected. We used a selfdesigned questionnaire (consisting of 12 questions), a revised 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Questionnaire (MGQOL15r), a 36-item health survey of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF36), Hamilton scales for the assessment of anxiety (HAM-A) and depression (HAMD) were used. The actual severity of the clinical manifestation was estimated using MG activities of daily life (MGADL). We reassessed patients in April and May 2021, who were tested during April 2020 using the same questionnaires. Results: The study included 57 adult MG patients. We noticed a statistically significant difference between the results obtained at these two time points regarding scores on MGQOL15r (p<0.05). The obtained scores were significantly better in 2021. Some scores on SF-36 subscales were also better in 2021 than in 2020 (such as social functioning, emotional well-being, role limitation due to emotional problems) (p<0.05). MGQOL15r and SF36 scores correlate with severe clinical manifestation, high scores on HAM-A and HAM-D (p<0.01). Higher scores on HAM-D and fear that MG symptoms will be worse if the patient gets an upper respiratory infection were independent predictors of the lower SF36 scores. Regarding MGQOL15r independent predictors of the higher score were higher scores on HAM-D. Conclusions: QoL of myasthenia gravis patients improved during the pandemic. It is important for healthcare workers to provide professional therapeutic advice and psychosocial support for this population of patients during the pandemic. eP01.04.07 COVID Spike Antibodies in Neuromuscular Conditions: A KU Experience Pasnoor M1, Tajuddin A1, Jawdat O1, Farmakidis C1, Jabari D1, Heim A1, Higgs K1, Dimachkie M1 1The University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, United States Background: Little is known about the immune response to COVID vaccination in immune suppressed neuromusuclar patients. Multiple studies showed variable data regarding the effect of immunosuppression on the immune response to the vaccination. Objective: To evaluate the COVID spike antibody levels in patients with various neuromuscular conditions who received vaccination and assess the effect of immunosuppressive therapies on antibody levels. Method: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients in neuromuscular clinic who had COVID antibody testing. We collected demographic, clinical, diagnostic and treatment information. Descriptive statistics was performed on the data obtained. Results: The total number of patients enrolled in the study were129, 64 male and 65 female . The mean age of the patients enrolled was 64.82 ±14.50 and the mean duration of antibody acquisition since date of last vaccination dose was 172 days. The number of patients on immunosuppressive therapies was 88(68.2%), 47(53.41%) had high antibody titer (>250), 31(35.23%) had low antibody titer (0.4- 250), 9(10.23%) had undetected antibody titer (<0.4) and 1 (1.1%) had detected unmeasured titer. Immunosuppressive therapies included steroids, methotrexate, azathioprine, myophenolate mofetil, eculizumab, efgartigimod, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab. The other group of patients who were not on immunosuppressive medication were 41 (31.8%) , 28 (68.29%) showed high antibody titer (>250), 9(21.95%) showed low antibody titer (0.4-250) , 1(2.44%) showed undetected titer (>0.4) and 3(7.32%) had detected unmeasured titer. 50% of patient who were on rituximab showed undetected antibody titer and 60% of patients who received eculizumab had low antibody titer. 4 % of patients on immunosuppressive drugs did not develop adequate spike antibodies levels to vaccination, compared to 24% on no immunosuppressive therapies. Conclusions: Our study reveals modest impact of immunosuppression on COVID spike antibody titer. While this finding is limited by small number of patients and heterogeneity in therapies, age and interval between vaccination and antibody testing, our finding supports the importance of booster vaccine in this patient population.

3.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S1372, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041528

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about patients’ interactions with Supported Self-Management (SSM) for early breast cancer (EBC), or confidence in managing their care in this pathway. The PRAGMATIC study allowed us to explore these issues. Methods: Three clinical teams in Surrey and Sussex identified EBC patients due to enter SSM. Patients completed standardised questionnaires (separately reported) +/- semi-structured telephone interviews at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The interviews explored how confident patients felt managing their care, accessing services, managing side effects (SEs), and lifestyle changes. Results: 32/110 patients engaged in interviews;data are available for 30/32 at all timepoints. Participants were representative of the whole group in terms of demographics and treatment received. Patients understood the main reasons for SSM were to: a) assume responsibility for their follow up (18/32;56%) and b) save time and money for them and the hospital (16/32;50%). Most maintained (very/somewhat) confidence over time in managing their care and SEs, but were less confident identifying BC related signs/symptoms especially if screen detected. 19 patients contacted the SSM helpline +/- their GP. 15/19 found the helpline easy to use and 6/19 were seen by a healthcare professional. The main triggers for calling were for advice on signs/symptoms and managing SEs. 5/26 (19%) patients on endocrine therapy (ET) had stopped it completely. Most (29/32) were engaged in exercise before diagnosis, and 8/10 who discontinued during treatment resumed afterwards. The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on exercise and socialising. The interviews’ free text provided a plethora of rich data. Qualitative analysis produced four overarching themes: 1) expectations and experiences, 2) emotional wellbeing, 3) clinical concerns, and 4) effect of COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions: SSM works for most EBC patients. Clinicians could explain that the helpline is available for psychosocial as well as physical concerns. BC teams may want to review how to help screen detected patients recognise BC related signs/symptoms, how to monitor adherence to ET and offer interventions for treatment related SEs. Clinical trial identification: ISRCTN10777283. Legal entity responsible for the study: University of Sussex. Funding: Surrey & Sussex Cancer Alliance. Disclosure: All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

4.
Public Health Rep ; : 333549221121667, 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038479

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: How Right Now (HRN) is an evidence-based, culturally responsive communication campaign developed to facilitate coping and resilience among US groups disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. To inform the development of this campaign, we examined patterns in emotional health, stress, and coping strategies among HRN's audiences, focusing on differences among racial and ethnic groups. METHODS: We used a national probability panel, AmeriSpeak, to collect survey data from HRN's priority audience members in English and Spanish at 2 time points (May 2020 and May 2021). We conducted statistical testing to examine differences between time points for each subgroup (Hispanic, non-Hispanic Black, and non-Hispanic White) and differences among subgroups at each time point. RESULTS: We found disparities in COVID-19-related mental health challenges and differences in coping strategies. Non-Hispanic Black respondents were more likely than non-Hispanic White respondents to report challenges related to the social determinants of health, such as affording food and housing (26.4% vs 9.4% in May 2020) and experiencing personal financial loss (46.6% vs 29.2% in May 2020). In May 2021, 30.6% of Hispanic respondents reported being unable to meet basic food or housing needs versus 8.2% of non-Hispanic White respondents, and 51.6% reported personal financial loss versus 26.5% of non-Hispanic White respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Our study further illuminates what is needed to build emotional well-being pathways for people who historically have been economically and socially marginalized. Our findings underscore the need for public health interventions to provide culturally responsive mental health support to populations disproportionately affected by COVID-19 during the pandemic and into the future, with a focus on racial and ethnic disparities.

5.
Appl Psychol Health Well Being ; 2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2037906

ABSTRACT

This study investigated how time to oneself (solitude) is experienced under conditions of extended togetherness with household members during the pandemic. Both structural (living arrangements) and qualitative characteristics (relationship quality and conflict) were examined for their association with solitude desire and daily solitude-affect links. We expected that people living with others and those with more high-quality as well as those with more conflictual relationships would report better affect quality when experiencing solitude. A Canadian adult lifespan sample (N = 141; Mage = 38.43 years, SDage = 17.51; 81% female; 73% White; data collected from April to August 2020) provided information on household size and relationship characteristics and completed repeated daily life assessments of solitude desire, solitude, and affect. Findings show that living arrangements were not associated with an increased desire for solitude or better affect quality from solitude. Individuals reporting higher relationship quality and individuals reporting more conflict showed more favorable affect quality on days when they had time in solitude than individuals reporting lower quality relationships and lower conflict. Findings add to the growing solitude literature by delineating who seeks and benefits from solitude, and under what conditions.

6.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:432, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009120

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with rheumatic diseases show impaired quality of life (QoL): disease activity, comorbidities and treatment-related side effects contributes to decrease physical, emotional, and social functioning. The COVID-19 pandemic challenged health care systems and patients with chronic conditions: hospital and outpatient clinics delayed access, unpredictable changes like non-adherence to medication, but also negative emotions, psychological conditions recognized as risk factors for the poor QoL [1-2]. Objectives: To describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Qol of Italian patients with rheumatic diseases in the frst period of the national lockdown. Methods: APMARR (Associazione Nazionale Persone con Malattie Reu-matolgoche e Rare) invited Italian patients and caregivers to participate to an online structured survey in the period March-June 2020. Informed consent was retrieved. The questionnaire, promoted by the patient advocacy website, collected demographics, emotional and healthcare pattern information. Results: 87,44% (N=215) complete questionnaires were retrieved (96.3% patients;3.7% caregivers;87.77% female;2% aged <18 years, 16% aged 18-30 years, 82% aged >31 years;0.53% missing data). Respondents were illustrative of the Patient Advocacy regional distribution (Puglia Region predominant). Rheumatoid arthritis regarded 29% of respondents, ankylosing spondylitis 17%, psoriasis 16%, remaining 38% other rheumatoid diseases. 96% of respondents were employed, 39% of which had to discontinue/change working activity during pandemics. 60% of respondents reported being worried about their disease. The deriving sense of fragility was the main cause of anxiety, which was not controlled even by compliance to the treatment plan (88%). 30% of respondents was worried about virus infection. Irritability, appetite and sleep disorders were also reported: anxiety had effects on irritability (46% sometimes more irritable) and sleep quality (38% always disturbed). GPs visits access was limited (40% considered it absent and 76% had to postpone it). Only 32% of specialist centers provided facilitated patterns of care. Respondents suggested possible solutions to improve QoL during COVID-19 pandemic and over it. Psychologist support was suggested as useful by 44% of respondents to manage therapies and by 56% to effort daily life. The home infusion would be of support according to 44% of respondents (18% already got access to it). Patient Advocacy had a main role in the new care and life context: 80% would consider it useful to participate to and 81% was satisfed by the prompt and continuous support received during pandemics. Conclusion: Similar results as far as distress were reported by Italian and foreign evidence, which demonstrated considerable COVID-19 related psychosocial burden in rheumatic disease patients [3-5]. Potential solutions are also with EULAR recent guidelines, which underlined how psychological interventions were found to reduce pain and fatigue even in difficult-to-treat patients [6] and how mental health needs should be periodically assessed, due to the link between better emotional well-being and better self-management [7]. Besides, the reported picture of reorganised care during pandemic corresponded to the real-world experience of the Italian Regions [8]. New approaches of care like home infusions and telemedicine supported by patient organisations should become routinary and may therefore beneft patients.

7.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:1473, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009009

ABSTRACT

Background: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects different organs and systems of the human organism. However, the main target remains the respiratory system and lungs in particular. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is one of the systemic autoimmune diseases that can cause severe lung impairment. Considering the existence of common points of influence on the human organism, the overlapping of these two pathologies can signifcantly increase the negative impact on the patient's health. Objectives: This study was aimed to analyze the common features of articles covering the link between COVID-19 and systemic sclerosis. Methods: We retrieved the literature items in the Scientific bibliometric database Scopus conducting our search on the 26th of January. We didn't set any time limits and did use the following keywords: 'systemic sclerosis' OR 'scleroderma' AND 'Covid-19' OR 'COVID-19' OR 'coronavirus'. The exclusion criteria were: absence of an , literature items in form of conference papers, and articles dedicated to the rheumatological pathology in general with scarce mention of SSc. All selected papers were analyzed in view of the following characteristics: documents' type, authorship, journal, citations score, the origin of an article, language, and keywords. For data visualization, we have used software tool VOSviewer version 1.6.15 which make possible to build authors' and keywords' network (Figure 1 A and B) (the minimum keywords' threshold was 3 and the minimum author occurrence was 5). Results: In the result of our comprehensive literature search only 206 items were obtained. After screening of title, and keywords we omitted 166 articles as they met our exclusion criteria and were irrelevant for our study. The most (87.5%) of remained 40 articles were open access publications, which improves the articles' visibility and simplifes data sharing. The top journals covering this topic were: Annals Of The Rheumatic Diseases (n=7), Journal of Psychosomatic Research (n=4), Journal Of Scleroderma And Related Disorders (n=4), Clinical Rheumatology (n=3), Lancet Rheumatology (n=3) and Scandinavian Journal Of Rheumatology (n=3). The post productive authors originated from Italy (n of articles = 20);other countries with highest number of publications were: UK-10;USA-7;France-7 and Netherlands-6). The majority of papers were written in English and just one was in Chinese. The most prevalent research type among analyzed articles was Letter (47.5%), about a third of the articles were designed as Original Articles (35%), 7.5% were Notes, the number of Reviews and Editorials was 5% for each type. Based on the citations score, the most relevant article was dedicated to COVID-19 course in patients with SSc associated interstitial lung disease (SSC-ILD) using tocilizumab. The second highly cited paper highlighted a disease course of COVID-19 pneumonia in SSc patients treated with rituxi-mab and the third actively cited article was World Scleroderma Foundation preliminary advice for patient management. It should also be noted that a lot of articles (n=7, 17.5%) were dedicated to the emotional wellbeing of SSc patients in time of COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: Based on our literature analysis, it is the frst attempt to overview comprehensively the papers focusing on SSc and COVID-19 overlap. The biblio-metric studies offer an essential opportunity to emphasize the main features and trends in the particular topic and could be used by scientists as a guidance for forthcoming research.

8.
Archivos Venezolanos de Farmacologia y Terapeutica ; 41(4):279-285, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Es | ID: covidwho-2006438

ABSTRACT

Objective: Describe the prevalence of technostress in Peruvian basic education teachers during the COVID-19 pan-demic. Materials and methods: The research had a quantitative approach, the design was non-experimental and the type, descriptive, cross-sectional. The sample consisted of 197 teachers from the city of Cusco to whom a Sociodemo-graphic and Labor Data Questionnaire and the Technostress Questionnaire were applied, an instrument with acceptable levels of reliability and validity. Subsequently, the responses were systematized and analyzed using the SPSS® version 22 program. Results: The 57.9% of the teachers presented high levels of technostress and it was determined that this variable is significantly associated with sex, age group, employment status and marital status (p<0.05). Conclusions: It is necessary that the educational authori-ties regulate the hours of attention that teachers have for students and parents to avoid overexposure to ICT. In the same way, teachers who have the symptoms or are at risk of suffering from it should be identified in order to carry out a timely intervention and reduce the impact on their physical and emotional well-being.

9.
Psychosomatic Medicine ; 84(5):A80, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003524

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to determine how levels of distress and disruption during the COVID-19 pandemic compared between ovarian cancer survivors and a community sample;how clinical and demographic characteristics of survivors were related to COVID-related distress and disruption;and if perceived stress, depression, and emotional well-being at cancer diagnosis predicted COVID-related distress during the first year of the pandemic. Methods: Ovarian cancer patients (N=90) who were part of 3 ongoing studies completed COVID surveys through mail and on REDCAP between 6/20 and 12/20. Responses were compared to those of community females (N=1110) who participated in a COVID survey mailed to an Iowa Statewide Voter Registration-based sample between 8/20 and 12/20. Pre-COVID data on perceived stress, depression, and emotional well-being (EWB) from ovarian cancer patients at the time of diagnosis was available for 30 long-term (≥4 yrs) and 60 shorter-term (<4 yrs) survivors. Hierarchical regressions examined whether psychosocial features at diagnosis, controlling for age, stage, total COVID disruption (healthcare, financial, and daily-life), and time since diagnosis, predicted COVID-related distress. Results: Compared to the community sample, ovarian cancer survivors reported lower levels of healthcare disruption (p=.016), financial hardship (p<.001), and distress (p=.009), but no difference in disruption of daily activities (p=.089). Among survivors, there were no differences in distress or total COVID-related disruptions based on stage or time since diagnosis (all p values ≥0.10). Younger survivors (<63 yr median) showed significantly greater distress (p=.009) and disruption (p=.001) than older survivors. Adjusting for covariates, perceived stress (β=.237, p=.006) and EWB (β= -.338, p<.001) at diagnosis were significant predictors of total COVID-related distress, whereas depression was not. Conclusions: Surprisingly, cancer survivors reported fewer COVID-related disruptions and distress compared to a community sample. Older patients reported less distress and disruptions during COVID, but stage and time since diagnosis were not associated with these factors. The relationship between distress and well-being at diagnosis and COVID-related distress suggests the possibility of identifying patients particularly at-risk during environmental challenges.

10.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003097

ABSTRACT

Background: Childhood obesity is a prevalent chronic disease associated with multiple comorbodities that disproprionately impacts children from minority communities of lower socioeconomic status. Many affected children do not have access to high-quality, evidence-informed treatment programs. The COVID 19 pandemic worsened childhood obesity, but transformed the delivery of care at the WELL Clinic at Children's Primary Care Medical Group, which transitioned to a 100% telemedicine-based program, increasing access for patients affected by obesity across San Diego and Riverside Counties. Methods: The WELL Clinic is a primary-care based specialty clinic at Children's Primary Care Medical Group, a large single-specialty pediatrics group with 35 offices across San Diego and Riverside Counties. When the COVID-19 pandemic began the WELL clinic transitioned to a fully virtual program. The WELL clinic includes 20-minute theme-based telemedicine sessions based on the Wheel of Health which includes nutrition, physical activity, sleep, screen use, and social/emotional wellness. Patients are referred to the WELL clinic from their primary care pediatrician. The visits are held with a specially-trained board-certified pediatrician or nurse practitioner and coded as obesity and any related comorbidities and nutrition and/or exercise counseling. A certified health coach supports patients in scheduling, follow up, and care coordination. Results: In the year since the WELL clinic transitioned from in-person to video visits, pediatricians submitted 2536 referrals from all sites, of which 48% of patients have Medicaid coverage. The WELL clinic team completed 542 initial visits and 1227 follow up visits. The no-show rate decreased with the telemedicine format. All visits were covered by insurance. Conclusion: A primary-care based childhood obesity intervention delivered via telemedicine is a clinically and financially feasible approach to improve access to a high quality evidence-informed childhood obesity management program for children of diverse backgrounds.

11.
Child Care Health Dev ; 48(6): 1071-1080, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During COVID-19 restrictions in England in spring 2020, early years settings for young children were closed to all but a small percentage of families, social contact was limited and play areas in parks were closed. Concerns were raised about the impact of these restrictions on young children's emotional well-being. The aim of this study was to explore parents' perceptions of young children's emotional well-being during these COVID-19 restrictions. METHODS: We interviewed 20 parents of children 3-4 years due to begin school in England in September 2020. Interviews were conducted via telephone (n = 18) and video call (n = 2), audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interviews focused on childcare arrangements, children's behaviour and transition to school. A sample of transcripts were coded line by line to create a coding framework, which was subsequently applied to the remaining transcripts. Coded data were then analysed using a nurture lens to develop themes and further understanding. RESULTS: Participants were predominantly mothers (n = 16), White British (n = 10) and educated to degree level (n = 13), with half the sample living in the highest deprivation quintile in England (n = 10). Five were single parents. Three themes developed from nurturing principles were identified: creating age-appropriate explanations, understanding children's behaviour and concerns about school transition. Parents reported that their children's emotional well-being was impacted and described attempts to support their young children while looking ahead to their transition to primary school. CONCLUSIONS: This study is one of the first to examine in-depth perceptions of COVID-19 restrictions on young children's emotional well-being. The longer term impacts are not yet understood. Although young children may be unable to understand in detail what the virus is, they undoubtedly experience the disruption it brings to their lives. The well-being of families and children needs to be nurtured as they recover from the effects of the pandemic to allow them to thrive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Emotions , Female , Humans , Mothers , Parents/psychology , Qualitative Research
12.
Terapia Psicologica ; 40(1):23-26, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1997911

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the physical activity and psychological health of university students. Objective: To analyze the physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic and its association with subjective well-being and mental health in university students in Chile. Method: Cross-sectional study in a sample of 469 students from different Chilean universities (67.4% women, M = 21.7 SD = 2.45 years). The physical activity, subjective well-being and mental health was measured. Results: Students who maintained a physically active behavior before and during the pandemic presented higher subjective well-being (men: P = 0.020;and women p <0.0001) than those who were physically inactive before and during the pandemic (women M = 4, 84, SD = 1.64;men M = 4.46, SD = 1.27). Women who became physically inactive during the pandemic had fewer negative affective experiences than women who were inactive before the pandemic (F(3,293)=3.118, p=0.026). Mental health symptoms were reported less frequently in physically active than inactive students. Conclusions: Students who were physically active before and during the pandemic showed better indicators of subjective well-being and mental health than those who were physically inactive or became physically inactive during the pandemic. Physical activity should be promoted in higher education, due to its potential protective effect in managing psychological consequences during a pandemic crisis.

13.
J Community Psychol ; 50(6): 2703-2725, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1971281

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has disproportionately affected African American college students, who have experienced significant work-related, academic, financial, and socio-emotional challenges due to COVID-19. The purpose of the study is to investigate how African American students cope with the severe impact of COVID-19 on their emotional well-being leveraging the benefits of self-care coping measures, COVID-19 knowledge, and communication with others to enhance perceived control and social connectedness. A structural equation modeling and a path analysis of 254 responses from a Historically Black College and University showed that emotional well-being was positively predicted by self-care coping strategies, feelings of being in control in life, and social connectedness. In addition, respondents who adopted mind-body balance coping strategies, those who are knowledgeable about COVID-19, and those in more constant communication with others attained a strong sense of being in control, and in turn the empowerment increased their emotional well-being.


Subject(s)
African Americans , COVID-19 , Mental Health , Students , Adaptation, Psychological , African Americans/psychology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Communication , Emotions , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Humans , Internal-External Control , Mental Health/ethnology , Social Cohesion/ethnology , Students/psychology , Universities
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969264

ABSTRACT

Due to their individual developmental and learning needs, adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) benefit from a variety of educational, medical, and therapeutic services. During the COVID-19 pandemic, these services were discontinued or significantly reduced, which may have resulted in increased difficulties in coping with various areas of life. The purpose of this study was to explore how the pandemic affected the psychosocial and educational functioning of students with ASD. A qualitative, problem-focused interview method was used. The obtained material was subjected to interpretive phenomenological analysis. The study involved 10 secondary school students diagnosed with ASD. The assessment of the effects of the pandemic on the functioning of people with ASD is inconclusive. The respondents noted both negative and positive effects of lockdown. On the positive side, they were able to spend time with their family, isolate themselves from difficult social relationships and feel better. Among the negative effects, adolescents point to difficulties in emotional functioning-increased levels of stress and anxiety, as well as increased feelings of loneliness and difficulties with online education. The study showed the varied experiences of young people with autism during the pandemic, highlighting the significant need to support some of them in terms of their emotional, social and educational functioning.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Psychosocial Functioning , Students/psychology
15.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-292-S-293, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967290

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The health care system had to evolve rapidly to adapt to the multiple challenges posed by SARS-CoV-2 pandemic although significant progress has been made with vaccines and immunisation programmes, the challenge seems to be far from over. At Maidstone and Turnbridge Wells NHS trust we provide tertiary paediatric gastroenterology services to paediatric patients from Kent and East Sussex, including new patients with suspected Coeliac disease and long-term follow-up. Objective: We looked at the patient and their family's experience with regards to multiple aspects of management of Coeliac disease (CD) during the government-imposed lockdown and various restrictions from March 2020 to November 2021. Methods: We designed a questionnaire to assess patient's experience of management of their coeliac disease and included identifying symptoms during lockdown, access to gluten free (GF) products, and emotional wellbeing. Patient details were collected from our database. Phone calls were made and data was collected after obtaining verbal consent from patients and caregivers. Results: 50 telephone questionnaires were completed with patients (or parents of the patient) with diagnosed coeliac disease. The patients interviewed were between 3 years to 16 years. Our standard follow-up practice for patients with confirmed diagnosis with CD clinic is an annual review with specialist gastroenterology nurse and dietician and this target was met for 72% (36/50) of patients (both virtual and face to face clinic reviews). 98% (49/50) of patients denied development or worsening of any GI symptoms during the lockdown. 96% (48/50) of patients reported normal development in growth and height since the lockdown. 98% of patients (49/50) were able to procure GF product during the lockdown. During the initial 3-4 weeks of lockdown, some families reported of limited options of GF products but were still able to procure them. Patients and their families reported being emotionally well. All families were made aware to contact MTW nursing team for advice. The primary online resource used by families for guidance was Coeliac UK website with 50% (25/50) of families using the service. Conclusion: During SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, patients with coeliac disease managed CD well despite the lockdown. We managed to see majority of our patients (virtual/face to face clinics) There was no significant impact on procuring GF products and emotional well-being despite multiple challenges.

16.
Journal of Environmental Protection and Ecology ; 23(4):1724-1732, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1958207

ABSTRACT

Emotional well-being during prolonged disasters as the pandemic is difficult to achieve, but it is important for the recovery of the society. The aim of the papers is to analyse social adaptation to stress in the context of emotional well-being during the pandemic with Covid-19. This survey was conducted in Bulgaria in May–June 2020 during the coronavirus pandemic through an online survey with 635 participants. To collect data about psychometric characteristics a questionnaire was created to measure positive affect, negative affect, and emotional well-being. The results show that 23.3% of the subjects experienced emotional distress during the coronavirus pandemic. Forty-eight percent of the subjects had moderate emotional well-being during the coronavirus pandemic. 28.7% of subjects experienced strong emotional well-being during the coronavirus pandemic. Effective coping strategies during the coronavirus pandemic were maintaining control in difficult situations and perceived self-efficacy, which increased emotional well-being. Maintaining control reduced difficulties in work and difficulties in having a good relationship with people, which further increased emotional well-being. © 2022, Scibulcom Ltd.. All rights reserved.

17.
Front Psychol ; 13: 849489, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952616

ABSTRACT

This research set out to measure the impact of the lockdown condition and social distancing imposed on higher education by the Israeli government during the COVID-19 period and the shift to online learning, on students' emotional well-being, the way they perceived their teachers' just behavior, and faculty incivility, compared to pre-pandemic conditions. An additional aim was to explore the set of connections among these factors. The total sample included 396 undergraduate students from three academic colleges. Data were gathered via three questionnaires: Positive/negative affect, Faculty Incivility, and Teacher Justice. Data were analyzed using Partial Least Squares-Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM). The main finding showed that students' negative emotions were informed by the lockdown condition. This perceived negative affect had an impact on how the participants experienced social interactions with their faculty. Those who exhibited higher levels of negative affect perceived themselves as targets of faculty incivility. The same trajectory was detected with the way students experienced their teachers' just behavior. Students who held negative emotions, partly because of the COVID-19 restrictions, also viewed their teachers' behavior toward them as unjust. This study stresses the role of one's emotional condition in instigating negative interpretations of social interactions. Directions for subsequent research and practical implications for promoting students' well-being and civil and just communications in the learning environment are discussed.

18.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; 70(4):S102, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936653

ABSTRACT

Purpose: There is a growing interest in the research and healthcare communities for youth mental health in times of COVID-19. In this line, there are also several calls to pay special attention to the future and the post-pandemic life. The aim of this research was to determine the characteristics of adolescents who reported an optimistic view of their future. Methods: In an online survey on the mental health of adolescents (N=1197;mean age: 16.5) in Switzerland and the Liechtenstein carried out in the spring/summer of 2021, we asked them how they thought their future looked since the beginning of the pandemic, with four possible answers: better (n=183), the same (n=505), worse (n=334), I don’t know (n=175). We divided the sample into two groups: those envisaging a better future (BF) and the other three groups were combined into Other Options. First, we compared the two groups on sociodemographic, and physical and mental health variables using chi2 for categorical variables and student’s t for continuous ones. Results are given as odds ratios (OR). All variables significant at the bivariate level (p<.05) controlling for age and gender, were included in a backward logistic regression. Results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (aOR). Results: At the bivariate level, BF teens reported a significantly higher socioeconomic status (OR: 2.97), better perceived physical health (OR: 3.18), better physical (OR: 3.63) and mental (OR: 7.64) health since the beginning of the pandemic, better emotional wellbeing (OR: 1.87), and better self-esteem (OR: 2.17). They were also significantly less inclined to report having a chronic condition (OR: 0.51) or feeling anxious (OR: 0.49) or depressed (OR: 0.31). No differences were found for age, gender, family structure, sport practice or substance use. At the multivariate level, the only variables that remained in the backward regression were having a better mental (aOR: 5.03) and physical (aOR: 1.98) health since the beginning of the pandemic, reporting an above average socioeconomic status (aOR: 2.53), and being less likely to be depressed (aOR: 0.42). Conclusions: A minority of adolescents think that their future looks better since the beginning of the pandemic. These youths also consider that both their physical and mental health is better and are less likely to be depressed. Additionally, they have an above average socioeconomic status. Interestingly, this phenomenon is independent from age, gender, family structure or substance use. Overall, they seem to be the “optimistic” group that thinks that good things can come out of the pandemic, and the fact that they belong to a more privileged and sure socioeconomic status probably can explain it. Whether these youths were already the optimistic group before the pandemic remains to be studied. In the same line, it will be interesting to analyze if they really are doing better once the pandemic will be over. If this is the case, they could open the way to find new approaches to engage and motivate young people regarding their future. Sources of Support: This research was funded by UNICEF Switzerland and Liechtenstein.

19.
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research ; 46:20A-21A, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1937875

ABSTRACT

The current project explores affective rewards from alcohol in the context of virtual social interactions. The COVID-19 pandemic brought with it a radical shift toward the digital world. In light of pandemic- related changes in drinking and also emotional well-being, it becomes imperative to understand the cognitive and affective processes involved in virtual interactions and the impact of alcohol in these novel social spaces. The current study leverages an eye tracking and an alcohol administration paradigm to examine the impact of alcohol on self-focused attention and affect, as well as the interplay between self-focused attention and affective processes, in the context of a virtual social exchange. Heavy social drinkers (N = 246) were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate dose of alcohol (target BAC = 0.08%) or a non-alcoholic beverage. After beverage consumption, participants engaged in a virtual video call in pairs. Participants viewed video feed in split screen, displaying both themselves and their interaction partner, and their gaze behavior was continuously tracked using the EyeLink 1000. Participants' affect was repeatedly assessed throughout their experimental sessions. Results indicated that, on average, participants spent substantially more time looking at their conversation partner vs. themselves during the video call, b = 2.49, p < 0.0001. Of particular note, there was a significant relationship between gaze direction and alcohol, b = -0.46, p = 0.015. Specifically, relative to sober participants, those consuming alcohol spent more time looking at themselves and less at their conversation partners. There was also a significant relationship between gaze direction and negative affect, b = -0.29, p = 0.015, such that those who spent especially large proportions of their time gazing at themselves vs. their conversation partner reported higher levels of negative affect following the virtual exchange. Lastly, the powerful mood-enhancing properties of alcohol that are typically observed in in-person interaction did not emerge in this online context. Results carry potential implications for understanding factors that increase risk for hazardous drinking and negative affectivity in our increasingly virtual world.

20.
International Journal of Public Health Science ; 11(3):800-807, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1934613

ABSTRACT

Living in a world of unstable and fluctuating economy has put children’s development at risk particularly children from low-income families. Hence their development should be on alert. The concern regarding online learning is crucial towards children’s emotional development as it can positively or negatively affect them. In the volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA), no other performance is relevant due to high-speed change. Children as young generations today have more disruptive behaviours causing adults to be fearful in dealing with their unruly behaviour. This study discovered the impact of the current environmental situation of uncertainty and parent-child relationship on children’s emotional development. In view of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions and preventive measures, the study was conducted with parents’ consent using an online survey tool administered using Google Form. The quantitative survey comprised general population-CORE (GP-CORE) and perceived stress scale (PSS) questionnaires from 108 respondents studying in primary schools around urban areas in Selangor, Malaysia. The findings were analysed and described descriptively. Findings showed that children are greatly affected by parents’ job loss and low-income households’ instability, causing emotional stress when learning from home. Therefore, the study can be the mechanism to aid the educational system in emphasising emotional learning in school. © 2022, Intelektual Pustaka Media Utama. All rights reserved.

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