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1.
Prim Health Care Res Dev ; 23: e67, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106285

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly around the world since the initial outbreak in Wuhan, China. With the emergence of the Omicron variant, South Africa is presently the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Healthcare workers have been at the forefront of the pandemic in terms of screening, early detection and clinical management of suspected and confirmed COVID-19 cases. Since the beginning of the outbreak, little has been reported on how healthcare workers have experienced the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, particularly within a low-income, rural primary care context. METHODS: The purpose of the present qualitative study design was to explore primary healthcare practitioners' experiences regarding the COVID-19 pandemic at two selected primary healthcare facilities within a low-income rural context in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Data were collected from a purposive sample of 15 participants, which consisted of nurses, physiotherapists, pharmacists, community caregivers, social workers and clinical associates. The participants were both men and women who were all above the age of 20. Data were collected through individual, in-depth face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed manually by thematic analysis following Tech's steps of data analysis. RESULTS: Participants reported personal, occupational and community-related experiences related to the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. Personal experiences of COVID-19 yielded superordinate themes of psychological distress, self-stigma, disruption of the social norm, Epiphany and conflict of interest. Occupational experiences yielded superordinate themes of staff infections, COVID-19-related courtesy stigma, resource constraints and poor dissemination of information. Community-related experiences were related to struggles with societal issues, clinician-patient relations and COVID-19 mismanagement of patients. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggest that primary healthcare practitioners' experiences around COVID-19 are attributed to the catastrophic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with the multitude of psychosocial consequences forming the essence of these experiences. Ensuring availability of reliable sources of information regarding the pandemic as well as psychosocial support could be valuable in helping healthcare workers cope with living and working during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Male , Humans , Female , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , South Africa/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Qualitative Research , Primary Health Care
2.
International Journal of Health Policy and Management ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101008

ABSTRACT

Background: Rapid, strategic action is required to mitigate the negative and unequal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the financial well-being (FWB) of global populations. Personal financial strain (FS) worsened most significantly among systematically excluded groups. Targeted government-and community-led initiatives are needed to address these inequities. The purpose of this applied research was to identify what works for whom, under what conditions, and why in relation to community and government initiatives that promote personal and household FWB and/or address FS in high income economies.Methods: We employed a critical realist analysis to literature that reported on FWB/FS initiatives in high income countries. This included initiatives introduced in response to the pandemic as well as those that began prior to the pandemic. We included sources based on a rapid review. We coded academic, published literature (n=39) and practice-based (n=36) reports abductively to uncover generative mechanisms - i.e., underlying, foundational factors related to community or government initiatives that either constrained and/or enabled FWB and FS.Results: We identified two generative mechanisms: 1. neoliberal ideology;and, 2. social equity ideology. A third mechanism, social location (e.g., characteristics of identity, location of residence), cut across the two ideologies and demonstrated for whom the initiatives worked (or did not) in what circumstances. Neoliberal ideology (i.e., individual responsibility) dominated initiative designs, which limited the positive impact on FS. This was particularly true for people who occupied systematically excluded social locations (e.g., low-income young mothers). Social equity-based initiatives were less common within the literature, yet mostly had a positive impact on FWB and produced equitable outcomes.Conclusion: Equity-centric initiatives are required to improve FWB and reduce FS among systemically excluded and marginalized groups. These findings are of relevance now as nations strive for financial recovery in the face of the ongoing global pandemic.

3.
BMC Nurs ; 21(1): 296, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stress can originate from many different unsatisfying work situations. Registered nurses working in municipal care have experience of work-related stress in different ways. AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the work-related stress experienced by registered nurses caring for older people at municipal aged care facilities. METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews according to Polit and Beck were carried out in clinical work at six different municipal aged care facilities in Sweden. Twelve registered nurses participated in the study. RESULTS: The results outlined in one main central theme: Feelings of inadequacy and dissatisfaction contribute to work-related stress and three categories: Difficulty coping with work tasks, Insufficient support, Work-related stress affects private lives. Areas identified were lack of time, staff shortages, high number of patients, lack of communication and teamwork in the working group, showing that inadequacy and dissatisfaction can contribute to work-related stress. This can contribute to work-related stress, and it can be a result of problems in the organizational and social work environment. CONCLUSION: This study showed the everyday experiences of registered nurses' stress at work. The reasons that registered nurses experience a heavy workload were found to be similar in several municipal care facilities. Future interventions should consider the areas of stress found in this study to reduce the risk of further increasing the work-related stress experienced by registered nurses working in municipal aged care.

4.
Teach Teach Educ ; : 103941, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096054

ABSTRACT

This study used latent growth curve models to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the development of teacher self-efficacy in student teachers. Results indicate that the teacher self-efficacy of student teachers taught during the first COVID-19 lockdown increased significantly less across a semester compared to student teachers taught prior to the pandemic, who gained practical experience in schools. There may be a cohort of student teachers at risk of entering the profession with lower self-efficacy than is typical. Universities and schools may wish to provide additional practical experiences to compensate for the missed opportunities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

5.
International Journal of Multidisciplinary: Applied Business & Education Research ; JOUR(10):2106-2111, 3.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2090882

ABSTRACT

The world has been shaken by the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in a dramatic loss of human life and poses an unprecedented challenge to almost all aspects of life, and the Philippines has not been an exception to these challenges. As a result, this deadly situation has flipped the offline teaching process and paved the way towards online-based teaching. This study was conducted to determine the perceptions and experiences of teachers in the remote areas towards online teaching. This study employed a cross-sectional explanatory research design and the analyses reveal that respondents with "high" technological proficiency are more likely to have a "positive" attitude toward online education whereas respondents with "poor" technological skills are more likely to have a "negative" attitude toward online learning. This strongly suggest that educational leaders may venture on training teachers on how to develop their technological knowledge and skills since it has a significant impact to their attitude towards online teaching. Moreover, further analysis also reveals that the relationship between teacher-respondents’ perceptions towards online teaching and their technological knowledge and skills was statistically significant. It is also recommended that training in online teaching needs to be provided to teachers to widen their understanding of online teaching. [ FROM AUTHOR]

6.
Anxiety Stress Coping ; : 1-14, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic both necessitate and obstruct emotional regulation and coping mechanisms. Despite growing interest in the connection between stress and spirituality, multilevel studies addressing day-level variance to understand how spiritual experiences and emotional regulation are linked with stress during this unique situation are scarce. This study aims to analyze how daily spiritual experiences (DSE) and daily emotional labor (EL) connect with the daily stress levels of employees during the pandemic. DESIGN AND METHOD: Data collected from 132 employees for five consecutive workdays (660 d-level, 132 person-level responses) were analyzed via Hierarchical Linear Modeling. RESULTS: Multilevel analysis provided evidence for the negative association between DSE and daily stress. The "faking emotions" and "hiding emotions" dimensions of daily EL were positively and significantly related to daily stress, while the "deep acting" dimension demonstrated no significant relationship. There was no evidence for the moderator role of DSE in the relationship between daily EL and stress. CONCLUSION: The form of daily EL is crucial to understanding how it associates with daily stress. Although its buffering role on the adverse effects of EL is not significant, DSE directly relates to lower stress levels.

7.
(2022) Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience xviii, 160 pp Bingley, United Kingdom: Emerald Publishing|United Kingdom ; CHAP
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087966

ABSTRACT

In this work for academics, international contributors in education, communication, new media, digital learning, and organization studies describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on academics in higher education, and their institutions. The book highlights the personal and professional experiences of academics across varying career stages. Four chapters are devoted to personal stories of sustained resilience in the face of the obstacles and uncertainty of the pandemic. Others chapters demonstrate collective resilience and collaboration, with examples from around the world. In addition, the book presents a conceptual framework, the Academic Resilience Model. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

8.
Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience ; CHAP: 3-22,
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087958

ABSTRACT

The pressures brought about by the COVID-19 global pandemic in 2020 have amplified the significance of academic resilience and highlight the importance of a shared insights into academics' experiences. The responses to academic work within this context has received little research attention despite its universality during the pandemic. Failing to recognise, or 'invisibilising' the roles and needs of academics during a pandemic, is a significant concern. This chapter explores this uncharted terrain, and presents stories of resilience-being a postdoc in a foreign country (de los Reyes), negotiating (yet another) contract (Mahat), navigating research in a different context (Cohrssen), and digital engagement in academia (Blannin)-from academics in different career stages and global contexts. These stories provide points of reflection for those navigating the complex world of academia during these uncertain times. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Psychoanalytic Dialogues ; JOUR(4):347-348, 32.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087548

ABSTRACT

Last August I traveled to California. I visited the Sequoia and the Kings Canyon National Parks. It was a majestic experience. Awe-inspiring thousand-year-old trees, spectacular vistas. Unfortunately, because of the wildfires, the air quality was so bad that I could not stop coughing. Leaving the area, I went on to San Francisco, where the situation was even worse. Eating out presented a dilemma: sit inside a restaurant, and risk COVID or sit outdoors and suffocate right away. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2083782

ABSTRACT

This three-paper dissertation aims to contribute to the growing literature of intensive mothering by providing empirical evidence on the links between endorsement of intensive mothering ideology on parenting-specific psychological well-being and parenting experiences. The first paper focuses on understanding the associations between the endorsement of intensive mothering, involvement in childcare, mental health symptoms, and parenting-specific psychological well-being, and whether mothers' demographic characteristics moderate these associations. Findings of this study illuminate how the message that mothers should engage in parenting behaviors that align with intensive mothering beliefs in order to achieve the status of "good mother" is linked with parenting experiences of mothers of young children. The second paper aims to extend previous studies on intensive mothering and maternal well-being by investigating the existence of different patterns of endorsement of intensive mothering beliefs and whether those different patterns are associated with maternal demographic characteristics, parenting guilt and parental burnout. This study employs Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) to identify intensive mothering profiles based on mothers' endorsement of the five sub-beliefs of the Intensive Parenting Attitudes Questionnaire (IPAQ;Liss et al., 2013). Findings of this study highlight the heterogeneity of endorsement of intensive mothering beliefs and help understand who may be at greater risk of experiencing poor psychological outcomes linked with intensive mothering. The third paper investigates longitudinal associations between intensive mothering and self-reported changes in mothers' parenting behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic, including examining parental burnout as a potential mediator of these associations. Findings of this study provide insight into how feelings of burnout may serve as a risk pathway that explains the impact of subscribing to intensive mothering on parenting behaviors during stressful times, such as the global pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

11.
Apuntes-Revista De Ciencias Sociales ; JOUR(92):61-84, 49.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083229

ABSTRACT

This article analyses the university management developed in a public institution in the initial stage and during the pandemic in Colombia in 2020. The case study method was used to identify the strategies implemented by the institution to face the crisis from the planning, academic management, administrative management, welfare management, research management, and extension. The results show a configuration of university management that was mainly oriented to guarantee the processes of teaching and face-to-face attendance assisted by technology, to support students economically and psychologically through strategies of articulation with other entities, and to withstand the national crisis through academic research and knowledge.

12.
Journal of Professional Nursing ; JOUR:42-52, 43.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083179

ABSTRACT

Background: Increasing the size and diversity of the nursing workforce is an important priority. Here, we describe a student success program to increase students' perceived support, coping, and self-efficacy for completing the nursing program among underrepresented racial/ethnic minority students in nursing education following the dual pandemics of COVID-19 and racial injustice. Methods: In collaboration with the Urban Health Program at the University of Illinois Chicago, we conducted a 15-week online student success pilot program with a volunteer sample of upper-level undergraduate nursing students. The curriculum for the program included topics centered on traditional student success topics and psychological, emotional, and contextual issues associated with student success. The sessions were conducted weekly throughout the Spring and Fall semesters of 2021, lasting 90-min. Quality improvement evaluations included weekly process variables and a post-test assessment. Results: Participants (N = 35) were primarily female and Hispanic. The program was acceptable, with participants very satisfied with the weekly sessions (83 %). Post-evaluations revealed self-reported improvements in peer support (69 %), confidence in reaching educational goals (94 %), handling microaggressions (77 %), coping with adversity (80 %), stress levels (63 %), and thoughts about leaving the program (86 %). Conclusions: This student success program shows promise for improving general and minority-specific factors associated with student success. Additional development and evaluation are needed to determine the program's benefits for a larger group of nursing students.

13.
Journal of Professional Nursing ; JOUR:33-41, 43.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082741

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education worldwide. Most studies have focused on how the pandemic affected students. With an alarming workforce shortage, a better understanding of the pandemic's impact on new nurses is vital to proactively develop strategies to promote success of the profession's newest members. Purpose: This study explored faculty perceptions of the pandemic's impact on new nurses' practice preparedness and recommendations for promoting effective transition to practice. Methods: Using an exploratory-descriptive qualitative approach and convenience sampling, 116 nurse faculty from across North Carolina, United States responded to open-ended questions within an electronic survey. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis. Results: Four themes emerged: 1) Less Hands-On, 2) Transition-to-Practice Opportunities, 3) Key Role of Preceptors, and 4) Provide Additional Support. Conclusions: Findings provide strategies clinical nurses and leaders can implement to meet the needs of new nurses entering professional practice during the ongoing pandemic. Due to less hands-on learning, pandemic graduates may benefit from extended time with a trained preceptor and opportunities to focus on clinical reasoning, managing multiple patients, effective communication, and safe skill performance. Upon entering the clinical environment, pandemic graduates' inexperience may increase the likelihood of transition shock, requiring multi-faceted approaches for providing support.

14.
Paediatrics & Child Health ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082467

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 continues to disproportionately impact families of children with developmental disabilities (DD). There is an urgent need to understand these families' experiences, particularly those that face economic or social marginalization. This qualitative study sought to identify the experiences of families of children with DD during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Using phenomenology, in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with caregivers and health care providers of children with DD living in a large urban Canadian city. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded using inductive coding methods by two independent coders. Transcripts were analyzed within and across stakeholder groups using thematic analysis. Results A total of 25 IDIs were conducted in 2020. 3 main themes and 7 sub-themes emerged related to the experiences of parents and health care providers for children with DD: families reported difficulty adhering to public health measures leading to isolation and increased parental stress;restricted access to in-person services worsened behaviour and development;and worsened household financial security in already marginalized families. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that families of children with DD have been negatively impacted by the evolving environment from the COVID-19 pandemic, and even more so in those who face social and economic challenges. Public health restrictions have impaired the daily lives of these families and our study suggests that limitations to accessing in-person services may have long-lasting impacts on the well-being of families of children with DD. It is imperative that the unique needs of these families be considered and centred for future interventions.

15.
Apuntes-Revista De Ciencias Sociales ; JOUR(92):151-182, 49.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082365

ABSTRACT

One of the main challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic brought was the continuity of education. In this context, this work focuses on analyzing the practice of higher education in the discipline of Engineering and its related academic programs with a future perspective, motivated by the limitations and challenges imposed by the pandemic. To ensure high-quality education, it was relevant to give continuity to the education of students, maintaining active, experiential, student-centered learning experiences that are relevant to developing their skills, despite their remote interaction and frequent technological deficiencies. and educational resources. Thus, this work proposes a conceptual scheme to guide the design and reflection of learning experiences with a post-pandemic perspective. This scheme is composed of six dimensions of innovation and educational leadership for higher education: environment, impact and linkage, educational models and value chain, educational strategies, teaching formats, infrastructure and learning resources, accreditations and learning evaluation. Additionally, this document presents initiatives that exemplify this effort within the MIT Supply Chain And Logistics Excellence network for Latin America and the Caribbean (MIT SCALE LAC), led by the Center for Transportation and Logistics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These initiatives refer to learning experiences in universities in Bolivia, Mexico, and Peru that have sought to maintain active learning in the context of the pandemic, with a link to the contemporary challenges of organizations, communities, and the society in general in which they live. students immersed.

16.
Area ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082358

ABSTRACT

'Muddy glee' by Bracken and Mawdsley made an important contribution to highlighting gender discrimination in fieldwork and the heterogeneity of fieldwork experiences. In the past couple of years, the ability of many researchers to engage in fieldwork has also changed dramatically due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Here, we reflect on Bracken and Mawdsley's paper and our own experiences and perspectives of fieldwork in recent years. We discuss a previous paper we co-authored (entitled 'Pushing the limits': experiences of women in tropical peatland research), and the benefits that these papers (e.g., 'Muddy glee' and 'Pushing the limits') may provide. We highlight the value of sharing personal experiences in science (which is often seen as an 'objective' space), and how writing for ourselves can be an empowering and community-building act.

17.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-346241

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate the productivity, the advantages and disadvantages of work-from-home employees which are based on their actual experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. The mixed-method approach utilizes a descriptive research design and survey questionnaire to gather data from 120 government employees who were chosen by purposive sampling. Data were analyzed by mean score and content analysis. Results showed that employees while working from home are very productive. Less exposure to the risk of getting a disease is the biggest advantage while the lack of data or documents for work is the main disadvantage. The benefits in the qualitative part of the study are time freedom, the ability to balance work and life and reduced travel time. While the drawbacks are the unavailability of documents, internet connection and social interaction. It also revealed that some employees felt that it was boring, nevertheless, they have more positive rather than negative experiences while working from home. It is not only beneficial during a pandemic but also in the future, considering that working from home will likely remain a hybrid form in organizations. The correlations should also become an inspiration for further research.

18.
Front Psychol ; 13: 885890, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080249

ABSTRACT

For music students, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact, forcing them to adapt to certain coronavirus regulations laid down by the state. In this study, the experiences of music students in three consecutive semesters under different coronavirus-related conditions are investigated. At the end of three semesters, the lockdown semester [SS (Summer Semester) 2020: April - July], a partially opened semester [WS (Winter Semester) 2020/21: October - February] and a mostly opened semester (SS 2021), a total of 152 music students at the University of Music Freiburg were asked to fill in an online survey. A mixed-methods approach was used, with results showing that the qualitative statements of the students support the quantitative data. The results of the cross-sectional study demonstrate that self-regulated learning improved during the lockdown semester, through new time management and focused practice with regular breaks. During the partially opened semester, the use of blended learning formats led to organizational problems, such as travel time and change of locations. Furthermore, music students were challenged by the social distancing, which improved during the partially opened, and mostly opened semester. New technologies regarding digital communication formats were emerged, which have evolved over the course of the three semesters. Concerning the overall experience, students stated that the partially-opened semester was most challenging, since distances and change of locations had to be combined with quickly changing public COVID-19-regulations. These findings during different stages of the COVID-19 pandemic provide constructive starting points for future teaching.

19.
J Spinal Cord Med ; : 1-13, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077414

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The impact of COVID-19 lockdowns and social distancing for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are poorly understood. This exploratory online qualitative study collected self-reported COVID-19 experiences from persons with SCI in the United States (US). To enrich understanding, these data were compared to similar previously-published data from a sample of SCI participants from the United Kingdom (UK). DESIGN: Explorative, online qualitative study. Participants completed an online survey of open-ended qualitative questions pertaining to their experiences during the pandemic. Thematic analysis was utilized to generate themes from the US data. These themes were compared to our previously-published thematic analysis of data from the UK. SETTING: Community-based sample of persons with SCI in the US. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were recruited via SCI-focused research registries and social media outlets serving the SCI community, using convenience sampling (n = 36). Key themes identified in the US data were compared to themes identified in a similar sample from the UK (n = 42) collected at the same time and published previously. RESULTS: Analysis resulted in three themes from the US data, each containing positive and negative qualitative reflections. Themes included (1) health and access to care, (2) making sense of the pandemic, and (3) daily life during the pandemic. Each theme captured common facets of life during the pandemic, often shared by those without physical disabilities, but included accounts particularly relevant to persons with disabilities. Comparisons to thematic findings from the UK study revealed similarities (e.g. healthcare access challenges, isolation) and differences (e.g. importance of previous SCI experiences). CONCLUSION: We detailed common experiences of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns and their impact on people with SCI, while contrasting these with sense-making positive reflections and social benefits that appeared to be helpful in managing distress and coping with the pandemic.

20.
Support Care Cancer ; 2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075425

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, teleconsultations have increasingly been used to reduce physical contact and thus risk of infection. This study investigated how patients with cancer experienced the COVID-19 pandemic and how they perceived the change from in-person consultations to telephone consultations in an oncology outpatient clinic. The aim was to provide insights that could optimize the future use of teleconsultations in cancer care. METHODS: This qualitative study included 15 patients with colorectal, breast, gynecological, lung, or prostate cancer treated at the outpatient clinic at the Department of Clinical Oncology and Palliative Care, Zealand University Hospital, Denmark in June or July 2020. Data were collected through semi-structured individual interviews and analyzed by thematic analysis. RESULTS: Patients with cancer experienced social, psychological, and organizational consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic related to their cancer care. Not all patients were comfortable with telephone consultations. Six themes were identified: (1) double burden as a consequence of simultaneous cancer and the COVID-19 pandemic, (2) parameters for patient satisfaction with telephone consultations, (3) the importance of relatives attending consultations, (4) loss of information and nuances during telephone consultations, (5) the impact of physicians' language and communicative skills during telephone consultations, and (6) patients' suggestions for future telephone consultations. CONCLUSION: Beyond the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important that hospitals offering teleconsultations involve patients' preferences, consider for which patients and consultations the solution is suitable, which technology to use, how to prepare patients and relatives, and how to provide physicians with the necessary communicative skills.

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