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1.
World Development Perspectives ; JOUR: 100469,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2106150

ABSTRACT

Although global assessments of the initial impacts of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have focused on income, jobs, and health conditions, this study constitutes one of the first studies that assessed the impact of COVID-19 on food security in DRC and established the short-term implications of the COVID-19 outbreak on rural households’ food security in DRC. In addition, the study recommendations contributed to shaping government interventions toward the pandemic in the Country. The study used data from four western provinces of the country on 1339 households. Our results show that 80% of households experienced an increase in food prices, 61% a noticeable decrease in the availability of food, and 54% a decrease in their dietary diversity. Due to changes in food availability, dietary diversity, and food accessibility imposed by the COVID-19 outbreak, more than 70% of households experienced either a decrease in the consumption of meat, milk, fish, and cereals or an increase in their consumption of traditional vegetables. In addition, COVID-19 significantly affected food security dimensions in larger households, households with a greater number of members aged 35 years and above, households headed by women, households where members participate in associations or cooperatives, households that depend on crop sales as the major source of income, and in poorer households. These findings highlight the significant implications of the COVID-19 outbreak on household food security in western DRC and underscore the need for emergency interventions to strengthen the resilience of rural people and accelerate their recovery and other long-term measures toward sustainable and inclusive development.

2.
Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence ; JOUR: 105617,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2104871

ABSTRACT

Water scarcity has urged the need for adequate water demand forecasting to facilitate efficient planning of municipal infrastructure. However, the development of water consumption models is challenged by the rapid environmental and socio-economic changes, particularly during unforeseen events like the COVID-19 pandemic. This study investigated the impact of COVID-19 on the efficiency of water demand prediction models, considering the lockdown measures and various exogenous features, such as previous consumption (PC) and socio-demographic (SDF), seasonal (SF), and climatic (CF) factors. Multiple ensemble models, gradient-boosting machines (GBM), extreme-gradient-boosting (XGB), light-gradient-boosting, random forest (RF), and stack regressor (STK) were examined, compared to other machine-learning techniques, multiple-linear regression (MLR), decision trees, and neural networks. The models were tested using 3-year metering records for 128,000 consumers in Dubai. The feature importance analysis indicated that PC and SDF had a significant impact on consumption rates with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.74, respectively, as opposed to SF and CF, which had negligible effect. The results showed that, before COVID, RF and STK outperformed other models with a coefficient-of-determination (R2) and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) of 0.928 and 0.039, followed by XGB at 0.923 and 0.041, respectively. However, MLR achieved the highest prediction accuracy amid COVID with R2 and RMSE of 0.90 and 0.05, followed by GBM and XGB equally at 0.83 and 0.06, respectively. An ensemble-based error prediction model was applied, resulting in up to 9.2% improvement in predictions. Overall, this research emphasized the efficiency of ensemble models in handling fluctuating data with a high degree of nonlinearity.

3.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 69(3): 547-571, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105692

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. More than 5 million children have been infected in the United States. Risk factors for more severe disease progression include obesity, pulmonary disease, gastrointestinal disorders, and neurologic comorbidities. Children with COVID-19 are admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit because of severe acute COVID-19 illness or COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. The delta surge of 2021 was responsible for an increased disease burden in children and points to the key role of vaccinating children against this sometimes-deadly disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , United States/epidemiology
4.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 82: 103337, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105059

ABSTRACT

Research indicates that stress increased across the globe after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Community resilience has been suggested as a central protective factor for stress related to disasters and emergency crises. This study examined the contribution of community resilience reported three years prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, together with related worries and personal risk factors, to perceived stress among Israeli adults following the first wave of COVID-19 in Israel. We performed a two-period 3-year longitudinal study (Period 1 [P1]: July-September 2017; Period 2: [P2] May-June 2020). The final sample included 578 participants. Participants completed a community resilience self-report questionnaire during P1 as well as measures regarding perceived stress and COVID-19 worries during P2. Using linear hierarchical regression, we tested the additional explanatory effect of community resilience and found it to be negatively associated with perceived stress. While health-related worries were not significantly associated with perceived stress, worries related to the functioning of governmental and health institutions regarding the COVID-19 pandemic were significantly associated with perceived stress. Additionally, being single, living in a smaller residence and income reduction during the pandemic predicted higher perceived stress. The current study highlights the potential buffering role of community resilience in protecting against COVID-19 stress. Assessing community resilience may help identify vulnerable groups, and focusing on community building may be an effective strategy to mitigate stress in future disasters.

5.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102267, 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104952

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the trend in life expectancy (LE), healthy life expectancy (HLE) and socio-economic inequalities by neighbourhood in Barcelona from the pre-pandemic period (2018-2019) to the pandemic period (2020-2021). METHOD: LE and HLE at birth were computed using the municipal register of inhabitants and quality of life (EuroQol) from the Barcelona Health Survey of 2016. Inequalities were assessed with the gap between quantiles of neighbourhood income. RESULTS: In 2020, there was a reduction in LE among men (-1.98 years) and women (-2.44) and in HLE among men (-1.44). Socio-economic inequalities in LE and HLE between neighbourhoods widened since 2019 to 2021 (LE: from 3.92 to 4.86 years for men, and from 1.30 to 3.60 for women; HLE: from 6.88 to 7.70 years for men, and from 7.85 to 9.31 for women). CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has substantially reduced LE and HLE, with larger effects among low-income neighbourhoods, especially among women.

6.
Cardiovascular Disease in Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations, 2 Edition ; CHAP: 1-11,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2102083
7.
African Health Sciences ; JOUR:486-494, 22(3).
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2100080

ABSTRACT

Background: Lagos State has the highest burden of COVID-19 in Nigeria. We assessed associated factors with death from COVID-19 among hospitalized patients in Lagos, Nigeria. Method(s): A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted using de-identified records of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted into 15 isolation centers in Lagos State between February 27, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Result(s): A total of 2,858 COVID-19 patients were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 41.9+/-15.5 years. A higher proportion of patients were males (65.8%), asymptomatic (55.5%), had no comorbid condition (72.2%) and had the mild disease (73.8%). The case fatality rate was 6.5%. The odds of death from COVID-19 infection increased by 4% with every increase in age (AOR 1.04, 95%CI 1.03-1.05, p<0.001). The chance of dying was 50% fold more among males (AOR 1.5, 95%CI 1.0 - 2.2, p = 0.042), 60% fold more among patients with comorbidity (AOR 1.6, 95%CI 1.3 - 2.4, p = 0.037) and 9 fold more among patients with severe COVID-19 infection (AOR 9.6, 95% CI 4.9 - 19.1, p <0.001). Conclusion(s): The odds of dying was higher among males, the elderly, patients with comorbidity and severe COVID-19. Copyright © 2022 Adejumo OA et al. Licensee African Health Sciences.

8.
Frontiers in Education ; JOUR, 7.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2099122

ABSTRACT

This article aims to study the incidence of extracurricular factors relating to (a) personal work situation and place of residence;(b) family finances;and (c) access to the virtual environment on the academic results of university students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regression models were used to determine the impact of the different factors on academic performance in a sample of 138 students of the Primary Education Teaching Degree at a Spanish Public University. The results show that students who devote themselves wholly to studying without having to work obtain better academic results than those who have to combine study and work. Furthermore, internet access affects academic results, with students having ADSL and Wi-Fi via smartphones reporting the highest grades.

9.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 299: 63-74, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099072

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has affected people in several countries around the world. They experience respiratory symptoms that can be mild, moderate, or severe. Several reviews that characterize the risk factors of COVID-19 have been performed, but most address only risk factors associated with medical conditions, ignoring environmental and sociodemographic-socioeconomic factors. OBJECTIVE: This study aims at characterizing different risk factors in the published literature that influence contagion by COVID-19. METHODS: The review consists of three stages, including a systematic mapping with studies found in the Scopus database, an analysis of results, and finally the identification of relevant COVID-19 risk factors. RESULTS: A map of studies id provided considering two main groups: the type of research and context. Most studies consider risk factors associated with medical conditions, while research on other factors is scarce. CONCLUSIONS: Medical conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and factors such as age and sex, appear to be the ones that increase the risk of contracting COVID-19. Further research is needed on environmental, sociodemographic, and socioeconomic risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Risk Factors
10.
Anaesthesia ; 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097689

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed substantial burdens on clinicians and there is a need to better understand the impact on mental health and well-being. This scoping review investigates the prevalence of mental health concerns in anaesthetists, risk and protective factors for mental well-being, and anaesthetists' pandemic-related concerns and support. We searched online databases for articles published between January 2020 and May 2022, using search terms related to: anaesthesia; burnout, well-being, mental health or stress; and COVID-19. We identified 20 articles comprising 19 different populations of anaesthetists (n = 8680) from 14 countries. Studies identified the prevalence of the following condition in anaesthetists: burnout (14-59%); stress (50-71%); anxiety (11-74%); depression (12-67%); post-traumatic stress (17-25%); psychological distress (52%); and insomnia (17-61%). Significant risk factors for poorer mental health included: direct COVID-19-related issues (fear of self and family exposure to infection; requirement for quarantine); practitioner health factors (insomnia; comorbidities); psychosocial factors (loneliness; isolation; perceived lack of support at home and work); demographic factors (female gender; non-white ethnicity; LGBTQIA+); and workplace factors (redeployment outside area of clinical practice; increased work effort; personal protective equipment shortages). Protective factors identified included: job satisfaction; perceived organisational justice; older age; and male sex. Anaesthetists' self-reported concerns related to: personal protective equipment; resource allocation; fear of infection; fear of financial loss; increased workload; and effective communication of protocols for patient treatment. Support from family, colleagues and hospital management was identified as an important coping mechanism. Findings from this review may support the design of interventions to enhance anaesthetists' psychological health during pandemic conditions and beyond. Future research should include consistent psychological outcome measures and rigorous experimental design beyond cross-sectional studies.

11.
British Journal of Social Work ; JOUR(7):4358-4377, 52.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2097319

ABSTRACT

This article aims to contribute to understanding the main social impacts of the pandemic caused by COVID-19 by highlighting the present and future challenges of social intervention and proposing a research agenda for social workers. Based on main indicators collected from international reports, we categorise the terms associated and analyse 284 Scopus articles that address social work issues in face of the COVID-19 through a text mining literature analysis. By applying topic modelling, we are able to identify relations within the body of knowledge between the main indicators. The results enable to highlight the current trends of research, contributing to leverage knowledge in social work in face of a complex and uncertain society. We find that most articles are focused on professional practice, as well as areas such as health, education and employment. In contrast, we argue that issues related to women or migrants have been less explored. These aspects could bring new perspectives in future research within the pandemic context.

12.
British Journal of Social Work ; JOUR(7):4089-4107, 52.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2097318

ABSTRACT

This study was intended to explore the experiences of social workers in Community Welfare Centres for People with Disabilities (CWCPDs) to understand their practices and challenges during COVID-19. It considered the essential role that CWCPD social workers play in responding to 'new normal' settings. Zoom interviews were conducted with twenty supervisory and manager-level social workers of CWCPDs nationwide. This study showed the unexpected cross-regional nature of risks and burdens. The high level of uncertainty and complexity allowed for the centres to operate safely under the COVID-19 legislation and for them to change and deliver alternative service provisions. Social workers had to develop new ways to deal with unprecedented risks, challenges, and dilemmas within 'the new normal'. COVID-19 means that centres must recalibrate their relationships with service users, communities and the government. CWCPDs need to change their service provision model from a large group-centred to a person-centred model to meet individual demands. Changes are needed in terms of clarity of communication, the application of step-by-step guidelines to service provisions and a shift away from an exclusive focus on quantitative performance needs in how centres are evaluated. In all these processes, both close cooperation and support from local authorities are needed.

13.
Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research ; JOUR(8):823-841, 27.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2097098

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 have led companies and organizations to carefully decide overseas business travel after borders reopen. This study aims to develop a theory to guide a structural analysis of the situational factors that companies and organizations would consider in overseas business travel decisions and how to measure these factors. A qualitative research approach was adopted. Bunn's situational characteristics were used as the starting point to guide the study. The findings suggest that the decision results from a struggle between carry-on and hold-back forces, which were affected by two and six situational factors respectively. Their measuring dimensions and ten propositions are suggested.

14.
Preventive Medicine Reports ; JOUR: 102037,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2095895

ABSTRACT

Becoming homebound can be devastating for older adults in rural communities. This study aimed to identify protective or high-risk social activities associated with homebound status among the rural young old (ages 65–74) and the oldest old (ages ≥75). We used data from a survey of older adults in a rural community of Japan in 2014. Questions covered sociodemographic characteristics, homebound status (i.e., going out less than once a week), physical and psychological status, and social activities. Using survey data, we conducted logistic regression analysis to identify protective and high-risk social activities associated with homebound status. Of the 1,564 participants, 51.0% were the oldest old, and the mean age was 75.2 (±7.0) years. The prevalence of homebound status was 10.5% total: 5.2% among the young old and 15.7% among the oldest old and highest among the female oldest old (19.4%). The main protective social activity for the young and the oldest old was visiting friends’ houses (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.64–17.64 and AOR 3.49, 95% CI 1.07–11.42, respectively). For the young old, specific high-risk social activities were advising family and friends (AOR 0.07, 95% CI 0.01–0.62) and activities to support older adults (AOR 0.17, 95% CI 0.03–0.84). For the oldest old, a protective social activity was participating in long-term care prevention programs (AOR 28.94, 95% CI 1.90–441.63). To prevent rural older adults from becoming homebound, support should be provided according to protective and high-risk social activities for age groups, with particular attention to safe socialization amid the threat of COVID-19.

15.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(10): ofac507, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097433

ABSTRACT

Background: Estimates of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) seroprevalence in young children and risk factors for seropositivity are scarce. Using data from a prospective cohort study of households during the pre-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine period, we estimated SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence by age and evaluated risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. Methods: The SARS-CoV-2 Epidemiology and Response in Children (SEARCh) study enrolled 175 Maryland households (690 participants) with ≥1 child aged 0-4 years during November 2020-March 2021; individuals vaccinated against COVID-19 were ineligible. At enrollment, participants completed questionnaires about sociodemographic and health status and work, school, and daycare attendance. Participants were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in sera. Logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations (GEE) to account for correlation within households assessed predictors of individual- and household-level SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. Results: Of 681 (98.7%) participants with enrollment serology results, 55 (8.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.3%-10.4%) participants from 21 (12.0%) households were seropositive for SARS-CoV-2. Among seropositive participants, fewer children than adults reported being tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection before enrollment (odds ratio [OR] = 0.23; 95% CI, .06-.73). Seropositivity was similar by age (GEE OR vs 0-4 years: 1.19 for 5-17 years, 1.36 for adults; P = .16) and was significantly higher among adults working outside the home (GEE adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.4) but not among children attending daycare or school. Conclusions: Before study enrollment, children and adults in this cohort had similar rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection as measured by serology. An adult household member working outside the home increased a household's odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection, whereas a child attending daycare or school in person did not.

16.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 2022 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097392

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine received emergency use authorization for persons ≥16 years in December 2020 and for adolescents 12-15 years in May 2021. Despite the clear benefits and favorable safety profile, vaccine uptake in adolescents has been suboptimal. We sought to assess factors associated with COVID-19 non-vaccination in adolescents 12-18 years of age. METHODS: Between June 1, 2021 and April 29, 2022, we assessed factors associated with COVID-19 non-vaccination in hospitalized adolescents ages 12-18 years enrolled in the Overcoming COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness network. Demographic characteristics and clinical information were captured through parent interview and/or electronic medical record abstraction; COVID-19 vaccination was assessed through documented sources. We assessed associations between receipt of COVID-19 vaccine and demographic and clinical factors using univariate and multivariable logistic regression and estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for each factor associated with non-vaccination. RESULTS: Among 1,665 hospitalized adolescents without COVID-19, 56% were unvaccinated. Unvaccinated adolescents were younger (median age 15.1 years vs. 15.4 years, p<0.01) and resided in areas with higher social vulnerability index (SVI) scores (median 0.6 vs 0.5, p<0.001) than vaccinated adolescents. Residence in the Midwest [aOR 2.60 (95% CI: 1.80, 3.79)] or South [aOR 2.49 (95% CI: 1.77, 3.54)] US census regions, rarely or never receiving influenza vaccine [aOR 5.31 (95% CI: 3.81, 7.47)], and rarely or never taking precautions against COVID-19 [aOR 3.17 (95% CI: 1.94, 5.31)] were associated with non-vaccination against COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to increase COVID-19 vaccination of adolescents should focus on persons with geographic, socioeconomic, and medical risk factors associated with non-vaccination.

17.
Rev Clin Esp (Barc) ; 222(8): 468-478, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Various studies have identified factors associated with risk of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their sample size has often been limited and their results partially contradictory. This study evaluated factors associated with COVID-19 mortality in the population of Madrid over 75 years of age, in infected patients, and in hospitalized patients up to January 2021. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This population-based cohort study analyzed all residents of the Community of Madrid born before January 1, 1945 who were alive as of December 31, 2019. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from primary care electronic medical records (PC-Madrid), data on hospital admissions from the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD, Minimum Data Set), and data on mortality from the Índice Nacional de Defunciones (INDEF, National Death Index). Data on SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization, and death were collected from March 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021. RESULTS: A total of 587,603 subjects were included in the cohort. Of them, 41,603 (7.1%) had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, of which 22,362 (53.7% of the infected individuals) were hospitalized and 11,251 (27%) died. Male sex and age were the factors most closely associated with mortality, though many comorbidities also had an influence. The associations were stronger in the analysis of the total population than in the analysis of infected or hospitalized patients. Mortality among hospitalized patients was lower during the second wave (33.4%) than during the first wave (41.2%) of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Age, sex, and numerous comorbidities are associated with risk of death due to COVID-19. Mortality in hospitalized patients declined notably after the first wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Pandemics
18.
Neuromodulation ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095853

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common therapeutic surgical procedure for patients with Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations, dyskinesia, or tremor. Routine follow-up of patients allows clinicians to anticipate replacement of the DBS battery reaching the end of its life. Patients who experience a sudden stop of the DBS battery experience a rapid worsening of symptoms unresponsive to high dose of levodopa, in a life-threatening phenomenon called "DBS-withdrawal syndrome." In the current context of the COVID-19 pandemic, in which many surgeries are being deprogrammed, it is of utmost importance to determine to what extent DBS battery replacement surgeries should be considered an emergency. In this study, we attempt to identify risk factors of DBS-withdrawal syndrome and provide new insights about pathophysiological hypotheses. We then elaborate on the optimal approach to avoid and manage such a situation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the subject and reported the cases of 20 patients (including five from our experience) with DBS-withdrawal syndrome, comparing them with 15 undisturbed patients (including three from our experience), all having undergone neurostimulation discontinuation. RESULTS: A long disease duration at battery removal and many years of DBS therapy are the main potential identified risk factors (p < 0.005). In addition, a trend for older age at the event and higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score before initial DBS implantation (evaluated in OFF-drug condition) was found (p < 0.05). We discuss several hypotheses that might explain this phenomenon, including discontinued functioning of the thalamic-basal ganglia loop due to DBS-stimulation cessation in a context in which cortical-basal ganglia loop had lost its cortical input, and possible onset of a severe bradykinesia through the simultaneous occurrence of an alpha and high-beta synchronized state. CONCLUSIONS: The patients' clinical condition may deteriorate rapidly, be unresponsive to high dose of levodopa, and become life-threatening. Hospitalization is suggested for clinical monitoring. In the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to widely communicate the replacement of DBS batteries reaching the end of their life. More importantly, in cases in which the battery has stopped, there should be no delay in performing replacement as an emergent surgery.

19.
Hospital Employee Health ; JOUR(11):1-12, 41.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2092081

ABSTRACT

The article offers information that Telehealth services proved to be of great use to the Indian Health Service during the epidemic in both patient reach ing outlying places and in rising caregiver contentment.

20.
Pediatrie pro Praxi ; JOUR:287-291, 23(4).
Article in Czech | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2091712

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of the study was to identify and analyse factors which are related to burden and stress of parents with disabled children. Method(s): The systematic review includes full-text primary research papers, published in English, in the period 2005-2021. Freely accessible as well as licensed databases CINAHL EBSCO, SCOPUS, Wiley Library Online, ProQuest a Web of Science have been used for the search. Result(s): The literature review shows that over a period of fifteen years, numerous studies have been published that address the factors causing stress and burden n parents taking care for children with disabilities. A total of 325 studies have been found. In four studies, a positive effect on the reduction of burden and stress was confirmed. In eight studies, fifteen factors increasing the stress and burden of parents of children with disabilities were identified. Positive factors included using respite care, acquiring a dog, governmental financial support and religion. Negative factors included the child incontinence, single-parent family, child depression, learning disorders, unusual behaviour of the child in public, impaired cognitive ability of the child, Asperger syndrome, female gender, more prestigious and lucrative occupation of parents, low level of support from relatives in taking care of the child, night enuresis, difficult behaviour of the child and high demands on child care, the COVID-19 pandemic, obese child. Conclusion(s): Factors affecting parents can have positive as well as negative influence on the education of the child. Early identification of negative factors that can cause burden and stress on parents of disabled children is very important. The paediatric nurse acts as a link between the parents, the doctor and the child. Therefore, it should be involved not only in nursing care, but also in the early detection and identification of risk factors. Healthcare professionals should help parents in all areas of childcare. Copyright © 2022 SOLEN s.r.o.. All rights reserved.

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