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1.
The Nigerian Journal of Medicine ; JOUR:315-318, 31.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-2092131

ABSTRACT

AJOL : Background: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 was first reported by the World Health Organization in December 2019 and thereafter declared a pandemic. Its emergence affected all spheres of daily life including widespread lockdowns at the peak of the first wave of the pandemic. Several nonpharmacological preventive practices were adopted to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus amid the initial paucity of supporting scientific data. Aim: The study aimed to evaluate the level of awareness and preventive practices among the family caregivers of the patients admitted to a mixed hospital during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Nigeria. Methods to Materials: This study was a self-administered questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey carried out in June 2020 during the lockdown for the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study participants were selected by the convenience sampling method. Participants consisted of one hundred family caregivers of the inpatients admitted for various ailments other than COVID-19 in our hospital. Data on demography, awareness of COVID-19, and preventive practices were obtained and analysed using IBM SPSS version 20. The results were presented using tables. Categorical data were summarised by frequencies and percentages, whereas continuous data were summarised using means and standard deviations (SDs). Results: The respondents were mainly married young adults (74%) with an age range between 15 and 66 years. The mean age was 37.7 ± 13.9 SD. Sixty-four percent of the respondents were female, 92% were of the Yoruba ethnic group, and 60% were university graduate. Most family caregivers were first-degree relatives (86%), and 14% were acquaintances or friend. The findings showed that 98% of the respondents were aware of the COVID-19 pandemic, and 56% never experienced fear of contracting the disease. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents observed physical distancing, whereas the remaining 42% practiced normal physical interaction despite the pandemic. Regular handwashing and the use of face masks were the most common nonpharmacological preventive practices. Cloth face masks were the most commonly used. Only 38% of the respondents were aware of the inhospital COVID-19-positive patients, and a majority of them got the information through the radio and from discussions among the patients' relatives. Conclusion: Family caregivers are an integral part of the health-care system, and females are more involved than males. Regular handwashing and the use of cloth face masks were the most common COVID-19 nonpharmacological preventive practices among the family caregivers

2.
Cureus ; 14(9): e29267, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080874

ABSTRACT

Background and objective The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the shortcomings worldwide in terms of preparedness protocols related to epidemics. A key area of research that is evidently overlooked across the globe is the mental health of family caregivers taking care of patients with COVID-19. In light of this, this study aimed to engage in a comparative analysis between the two worst affected countries, India and the United States of America (USA), which differ considerably in their demography, socio-epidemiological factors, and health system efficiency. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,250 family caregivers of patients with COVID-19 in India and the USA to assess their stress, anxiety, and sleep disturbance levels using the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. Psychological assessment questionnaires were administered through online mode, which gathered demographic information and responses on several self-reporting scales. The main outcome measures were self-reported ratings on PSS, GAD-7 scale, and PSQI. Results We found that 75.4% of the family members of COVID-19 patients suffered from mental health issues. The scores of all three scales were higher in caregivers from the USA than in India, more evident and pronounced in caregivers of hospitalized patients. The test scores were statistically significant (p<0.05) indicating a negative impact of having a dependent member in the family, being married, being of younger age, and having a longer duration of COVID-19 infection. Vaccines were found to have a life-enhancing effect. Conclusion Our findings highlight that the mental health of family caregivers is an ignored aspect and must be addressed. We recommend the implementation of well-researched and appropriate legislation, treatment programs, and health policies that involve not only the patients but also their families.

3.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(11-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2047047

ABSTRACT

Literature review revealed that stress and coping strategies utilized in caring for a family member with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia were understudied among Chinese American caregivers in the United States in relation to cultural values. The focus of the study was to examine the lived experiences of the Chinese American caregivers caring for a family member with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. The purpose of the study was to explore Chinese American caregivers' stress and coping strategies and how cultural values and attitudes towards traditional values affected the experiences. Alzheimer's can be a burdensome disease to the individuals who live with the disease and to their families and informal caregivers (often are family members), which appeared to have increased in recent years. Though there has been much research on dementia care, there is a lack of studies on racial and ethnic minorities, the impact of the cultures, and the generational differences and attitudes towards caregiving. The participants met the following criteria: (a) must be self-identified as a Chinese American, (b) must currently live in the San Francisco Bay Area, (c) must be 21 years and older, (d) must be fluent in English, (e) must have a family member who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia, and (f) must be providing care for a family member with Alzheimer's or other dementia. Eight Chinese American caregivers participated in a virtual interview, due to COVID-19 restrictions. A Conventional Content Analysis approach was used to understand the participants' lived experiences by examining emerging categories (themes). Four categories emerged regarding caregiving stressors: Care Recipient's Diagnosis and Treatments, Finances, Care Recipient's Behaviors, and Physical Strains. Five categories emerged regarding emotional reactions towards caregiving: Happiness, Anger, Inadequacy, Fear, and Remorse. Three categories emerged regarding cultural factors: Acculturation, Stigma, and Family Dynamics. Four categories emerged regarding coping strategies: Physical Escape, Social Supports, Problem-Solving, and Unhelpful Coping. Study results provided a better understanding of the types of stressors and of the emotional responses, further insights into the influence of the Chinese values, and the coping strategies among Chinese American caregivers. Implications for clinicians working with the Chinese American families were provided to help mental health professionals understand the importance of developing culturally appropriate and sensitive interventions and programs to meet the needs of the Chinese American Alzheimer's and other dementia caregivers and care recipients. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Geriatr Nurs ; 48: 65-73, 2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041763

ABSTRACT

Visiting restrictions had to be imposed to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus and ensure the safety of long-term care home (LTCH) residents. This mixed method study aimed to explore residents' and family caregivers' acceptability of electronic tablets used to preserve and promote contact. Semi-structured individual interviews with 13 LTCH residents and 13 family caregivers were done to study their experiences, as well as the challenges and resources encountered in the implementation and use of videoconferencing. They had to rate, on a scale from 0 to 10, each of the 6 Theoretical Framework of Acceptability' constructs of the acceptability of the intervention. The results confirm acceptability of videoconferencing, giving residents and caregivers the opportunity to talk to and see each other during the pandemic. Videoconferencing had some benefits, such as being less expensive, and taking less time and effort for family caregivers.

5.
Clin Gerontol ; : 1-12, 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2037148

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Project VITAL At Home aimed to combat social isolation and loneliness in family caregivers of people with dementia through purposeful engagement and connection. This project examined the effects of technology on caregiver loneliness and well-being, as well as their technology experiences, during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Family caregivers were provided iN2L tablets and access to Alzheimer's Association supportive programs. Caregivers (n = 124) completed online surveys at pre and post evaluation points (average 7 months apart) to assess loneliness, subjective well-being (affect), supportive program usage, and tablet experiences. RESULTS: Family caregivers had positive perceptions of the tablets for both themselves and their family members. Tablets had positive effects on caregiver well-being, including giving them an additional caregiver tool, alleviating stress, increasing satisfaction with quiet time, and improving access to supportive programs. Caregiver positive affect decreased, but no changes were observed for negative affect or loneliness. CONCLUSIONS: Family caregivers found value in the tablets and showed improvements in some aspects of well-being. Randomized trials are needed to more fully assess the benefits of the intervention. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Pairing tablets with caregiving supports is a promising intervention to improve caregivers' access to vital resources and services and to improve their well-being.

6.
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior ; 5(2):51-56, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2033329

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is a severe mental illness causing significant problems in the lives of individuals with the disorder and those who care for them as well are. Most of the time people with mental illness are taken care of by mental health professionals, while little priority is given to their caregivers. There are numerous studies in India attempting to understand the impact of illness on caregivers and the problems faced by the caregivers of persons with BPAD. Methods: The study aimed to assess the family caregivers' stress and burden among caregivers of persons with BPAD at a tertiary care center in Dharwad, India. Descriptive research design and simple random sampling was used for recruiting 50 samples. Apart from sociodemographic schedule, burden assessment scale and perceived stress scale (PSS) were used for data collection. Results: The mean age of caregivers was 44.76 years. The average duration of illness of the patients was 9.80 years and their mean annual income was 35,500 rupees reported in the study. The mean score of impact of wellbeing subscale was higher (11.34) when compared with other sub scales of the burden assessment scale, and the overall score of burden assessment scale (31.82) indicated high levels of burden. PSS mean was 21.44, indicating high stress levels. Conclusion: The study concludes that burden and perceived stress were elevated among the caregivers of people with BPAD during the COVID-19 pandemic.

7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023659

ABSTRACT

A large proportion of the global burden of childhood cancer arises in China. These patients have a poor quality of life (QoL) and their family caregivers have high unmet needs. This paper examined the association between the unmet needs of family caregivers and the care recipient's QoL. A total of 286 childhood cancer caregivers were included in this cross-sectional study. Unmet needs and depression among caregivers were assessed by the Comprehensive Needs Assessment Tool for Cancer Caregivers (CNAT-C) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), respectively. The patient's QoL was proxy-reported by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Measurement Models (PedsQL 3.0 scale Cancer Module). Descriptive analyses, independent Student's t-tests, one-way ANOVA, and mediation analyses were performed. The mean scores (standard deviations) for unmet needs, depression, and QoL were 65.47 (26.24), 9.87 (7.26), and 60.13 (22.12), respectively. A caregiver's unmet needs (r = -0.272, p < 0.001) and depression (r = -0.279, p < 0.001) were negatively related to a care recipient's QoL. Depression among caregivers played a mediating role in the relationship between a caregiver's unmet needs and a care recipient's QoL. As nursing interventions address depression among caregivers, it is important to standardize the programs that offer psychological support to caregivers.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Neoplasms , Caregivers/psychology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Inpatients , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , Quality of Life/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Dementia (London) ; 21(8): 2517-2535, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021020

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This article describes the development and feasibility evaluation of an empowerment program for people living with dementia in nursing homes. METHODS: Development and feasibility evaluation of the empowerment program was guided by the British Medical Research Council's (MRC) framework. In the developmental phase, we used intervention mapping to develop the theory- and evidence-based intervention. During the feasibility phase, two care teams utilised the program from September to December 2020. We evaluated the feasibility in terms of demand, acceptability, implementation, practicality, integration and limited efficacy. FINDINGS: This study showed that, according to healthcare professionals, the program was feasible for promoting empowerment for people living with dementia in a nursing home. Healthcare professionals mentioned an increased awareness regarding the four themes of empowerment (sense of identity, usefulness, control and self-worth), and greater focus on the small things that matter to residents. Healthcare professionals experienced challenges in involving family caregivers. CONCLUSION: An important step is to take into account the implementation prerequisites that follow from our findings, and to further investigate feasibility, as the use of the program and data collection was hindered by the COVID-19 pandemic. Subsequent research could investigate the effects of the empowerment program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Humans , Aged , Homes for the Aged , Feasibility Studies , Pandemics , Nursing Homes , Caregivers , Quality of Life
9.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 697, 2022 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has required restrictions of daily activities, which has been found to impact the lives of persons living with dementia (PLWDs) and their family caregivers, who have multiple care demands. The lack of relevant studies in Taiwan emphasized the need to explore the experiences of family caregivers of older PLWDs faced with the intensified restrictions to control the spread of COVID-19, and the impact of the availability of a smart-clothes home nursing program. METHODS: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with family caregivers of older PLWDs. Participants were recruited from dementia clinics of a medical center in northern Taiwan from a subset of a sample from a larger study on smart-clothes assisted home nursing care. A total of 12 family caregivers who participated in the original study were interviewed during the follow-up period; seven family caregivers of a PLWD wearing a smart-vest, which transmitted information to a home care nurse; five caregivers of a PLWD not wearing a smart-vest. Interviews were conducted by telephone because the conditions of the pandemic prevented face-to-face interviews. Recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: Interview data showed family caregivers' felt the care recipient's health was compromised and functional conditions intensified as Covid-19-related pandemic restrictions increased. Specific concerns included a lack social interactions, decreased daily activity levels, loss of interest and lack of motivation for activities, increased mood and behavioral problems, a decline in physical function and an increase in health problems. Family caregivers were also impacted by these restrictions, with significant increases in severity of caregiver role strain, including feeling trapped, a lack of in-home support, profound powerlessness, and worries about the PLWD contracting the coronavirus. The smart-clothes assisted home nursing care program offered supplementary support to family caregivers by providing on-time interactions, helping them manage health problems, enhancing predictability of the care recipient's behaviors, and providing caregivers with emotional support. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study support alternative care such as implementation of technology-assisted home health services to meet caregiver needs to facilitate family caregiving of PLWDs during the necessary restrictions in activities implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Record NCT05063045.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers/psychology , Clothing , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Home Nursing , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being ; 17(1): 2113021, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991956

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: It is well known that being a family caregiver of a palliative patient in general is rewarding as well as burdensome. The COVID-19 pandemic may have exacerbated this situation. We therefore explored the significance of the COVID-19 pandemic for family caregivers of non-COVID-19 patients in need of specialized palliative care at home. METHODS: Open-ended, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 15 family caregivers of patients treated by a specialized palliative outpatient unit in a Danish hospital. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four themes concerning the significance of the COVID-19 pandemic were identified: 1) being a family caregiver of a patient whose lifespan is already limited, 2) dealing with the risk of passing on COVID-19 oneself, 3) dealing with the risk of others passing on COVID-19 to the patient at home, and 4) living with modified specialized palliative care. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had a radical impact on some family caregivers causing emotional despair. They feared not only infecting the patient with SARS-CoV-2 to cause an untimely death but also being unable to be there for the patient during hospitalization, especially in the patient's final days.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Caregivers/psychology , Humans , Palliative Care/psychology , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Intellect Disabil Res ; 66(8-9): 677-689, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted family caregivers of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). This study evaluated a virtual course for family caregivers from across Canada, focused on supporting the mental health and well-being of adults with IDD and their families. The evaluation examined the feasibility and acceptability of the course, as well as the impact of the intervention on participants' overall health and well-being. METHODS: The 6-week virtual course, informed by a parallel Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) course for service providers, combined didactic instruction with applied activities. A total of 126 family caregiver course participants consented to be part of the research evaluation delivered over three cycles between October 2020 and April 2021. Attendance was measured at each weekly session. Satisfaction was assessed weekly and post-program. Learning, self-efficacy, and well-being were assessed pre- and post-course, and again at follow-up (8 weeks post-course). Mixed-effects models assessed changes between and within individuals across time. RESULTS: Participants had consistent attendance, low-dropout rates, and reported high satisfaction, with 93% of participants reporting that their expectations for the course were met. Compared with pre-course, participants reported improved self-efficacy and well-being post-course, which were maintained at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: An interactive and applied virtual education course delivered to a large group of family caregivers of adults with IDD was both feasible and acceptable. It positively impacted participants' well-being by offering much needed mental health support and creating a peer-led community of practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Adult , Caregivers/psychology , Child , Developmental Disabilities/psychology , Developmental Disabilities/therapy , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
12.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963783

ABSTRACT

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, earlier acute care patient discharges, restricted admissions to long-term care, and reduced home care services increased the amount and complexity of family caregivers' care work. However, much less is known about rural caregivers' experiences. Thus, our aim in this sequential mixed-methods study was to understand how COVID-19 affected rural family caregivers. Thematically analyzed interviews and linear regression on survey data were used to understand family caregiver stress. Fourteen rural caregivers participated in interviews. They acknowledged that they benefitted from the circle of support in rural communities; however, they all reported having to cope with fewer healthcare and social services. 126 rural caregivers participated in the online survey. About a third (31%) of these caregivers had moderate frailty, indicating that they could benefit from support to improve their health. In linear regression, frailty, social loneliness, financial hardship, and younger age were associated with caregiver anxiety. Contrary to the qualitative reports that people in rural communities are supportive, over two-thirds of the rural caregivers completing the survey were socially lonely. Rural family caregivers are vulnerable to anxiety and social loneliness due to the nature of caregiving and the lack of healthcare and social service supports in rural areas. Primary healthcare and home care teams are well-positioned to assess caregivers' health and care situation as well as to signpost them to needed supports that are available in their areas.

13.
BMC Prim Care ; 23(1): 185, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Taking care of patients with Covid-19 is regarded as a challenging task for family caregivers. Hence, a Family-Centered Empowerment Model (FCEM) should help them achieve greater psychological strength throughout the home healthcare process. METHODS: This study is a randomized clinical trial with two groups; besides, pre-test and post-test designs were conducted based on the CONSORT checklist from April to July 2020, in Iran. Seventy family caregivers were randomly assigned to FCEM (n = 35) and control (n = 35) groups. Then, four stages of FCEM in four online sessions were provided to the participants of the intervention group via WhatsApp messenger. The procedure started at the patient's discharge and continued for two weeks. The demographic information questionnaire and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21) were employed before and five days after the FCEM sessions to gather the required data. RESULTS: The sample was made up of 55.8% women and 44.2% men caregivers, with a mean age of 42.5 years. The results demonstrated a substantial difference in the average score of stress (p = 0.023), anxiety (p = 0.003), and depression (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of a face-to-face orientation session and online methods of FCEM is likely to lower stress, anxiety, and depression in family caregivers, which can be contributed to the practicability, simplicity, and effectiveness of this home health intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study (no. IRCT20180429039463N2 ) was registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials on 10/04/2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938798

ABSTRACT

Family caregiving is a public health issue because of caregivers' significant contribution to the health and social care systems, as well as the substantial impact that giving and receiving care has on the health and quality of life of care receivers and caregivers. While there have been many studies that associate caregivers' care work, financial difficulty, navigation, and other caregiving factors with family caregivers' psychological distress, we were interested not only in the factors related to family caregiver anxiety but also in hypothesizing how those effects occur. In this study, we used Andrew Hayes' PROCESS moderation analysis to explore the link between caregiver frailty, weekly care hours, and perceptions of financial difficulty, social support, and anxiety. In this analysis, we included 474 caregivers with relatively complete data on all of the variables. In regression analysis after controlling for gender and age, social loneliness (ß = 0.245), frailty (ß = 0.199), financial difficulty (ß = 0.196), care time (ß = 0.143), and navigation confidence (ß = 0.131) were all significant. We then used PROCESS Model 6 to determine the significance of the direct, indirect, and total effects through the serial mediation model. The model pathway from frailty to care time to financial difficulty to social loneliness to anxiety was significant. The proportions of family caregivers who were moderately frail, anxious, and experiencing social loneliness after eighteen months of the COVID-19 pandemic found in this survey should be of concern to policymakers and healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Family/psychology , Humans , Mediation Analysis , Pandemics , Quality of Life
15.
J Clin Med ; 11(13)2022 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917556

ABSTRACT

During humanitarian crises, such as a pandemic, healthcare systems worldwide face unknown challenges. This study aimed to explore and describe the effect of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on the needs of non-infected patients and family caregivers in specialist palliative care, using qualitative, semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis, following the framework approach. Thirty-one interviews were conducted with patients/family caregivers (15/16) in palliative care units/specialist palliative home care (21/10) from June 2020 to January 2021. Well-known needs of patients and family caregivers at the end of life remained during the pandemic. Pandemic- dependent themes were (1) implications of the risk of contagion, (2) impact of the restriction of social interactions, (3) effects on the delivery of healthcare, and (4) changes in the relative's role as family caregiver. Restriction on visits limited family caregivers' ability to be present in palliative care units. In specialist palliative home care, family caregivers were concerned about the balance between preserving social contacts at the end of life and preventing infection. Specialist palliative care during a pandemic needs to meet both the well-known needs at the end of life and additional needs in the pandemic context. In particular, attention should be given to the needs and burden of family caregivers, which became more multifaceted with regards to the pandemic.

16.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917414

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19, the workload experienced by caregivers has increased markedly which has led them to experience fatigue, anxiety and depression. This study aims to determine the relationship between quality of life and depression in caregivers of post-COVID-19 patients in two regions of Peru. In a cross-sectional analytical study, the sample was non-probabilistic and by snowball, and consisted of 730 caregivers, to whom the questionnaires "Modified Betty Ferell Quality of Life" and the "Beck Depression Inventory" were applied. It was determined that being a male caregiver (OR: 2.119; 95% CI: 1.332-3.369) was associated with a good quality of life. On the other hand, caregivers who had children (OR: 0.391; 95% CI: 0.227-0.675), were vaccinated against COVID-19 (OR: 0.432; 95% CI: 0.250-0.744), were immediate family members (OR: 0.298; 95% CI: 0.117-0.761) and had high depression (OR: 0.189; 95% CI: 0.073-0.490) were associated with poor quality of life. The results of this study allow us to conclude the association between depression and poor quality of life in caregivers of these patients so it is necessary to monitor the mental health of caregivers, and to develop adaptation strategies to pandemic conditions.

17.
J Fam Nurs ; 28(3): 231-242, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916829

ABSTRACT

Caregivers of persons with dementia (PWDs) were socially isolated with little support during the COVID-19 pandemic "Stay-At-Home" order in the United States. To enhance social and emotional connection for diverse caregivers, a culturally/linguistically appropriate telephone intervention provided compassionate listening, mindful breathing, and COVID-19 safety education. The study purpose was to understand caregiving challenges and to evaluate the intervention for caregivers during the early pandemic using a qualitative approach. Twenty-three caregivers participated in the intervention provided by bilingual research assistants for 3 months. Call logs were used to describe the caregivers' dialogue. Thematic analysis identified (a) the challenges, including fear of coronavirus disease, providing around-the-clock care, and forced isolation and negative emotions; and (b) caregivers' experience with the intervention, including connecting with the outside, relief from emotional stress, reliable COVID-19 information, and reinformed caregiving skills. Results suggest that the telephone support was of benefit to diverse caregivers of PWDs during the pandemic by promoting social connection and reducing emotional distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers/psychology , Family/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Telephone
18.
J Fam Nurs ; 28(3): 219-230, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883445

ABSTRACT

This study examines the experiences and needs of family caregivers (FCGs) for people living with dementia (PLWD) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Six focus groups were conducted with 21 FCGs from across the care continuum and thematic analysis was used to illuminate FCGs descriptions of their experiences and needs. Three main themes were identified that highlight the disruption the pandemic caused for FCGs: changes in the caregiving role, information use and needs, and mental and physical health outcomes. To better support FCGs during COVID-19 and future public health emergencies, we recommend that (a) information is accessible, specific, and centralized; (b) resources are tailored to the caregiving dyad (FCG and PLWD) and creatively adapted to public health restrictions; and (c) opportunities for the caregiving dyad to receive physical, social, and emotional engagement and support are maintained.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Humans , Pandemics
19.
J Fam Nurs ; 28(3): 183-194, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883444

ABSTRACT

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, community-dwelling people living with dementia and their family caregivers have experienced many challenges. The unanticipated consequences of public health measures have impacted these families in a myriad of ways. In this interpretive policy analysis, which used a longitudinal, qualitative methodology, we purposively recruited 12 families in British Columbia, Canada, to explore the impacts of pandemic public health measures over time. Semi-structured interviews were conducted every 3 months and participants completed diary entries. Twenty-eight interviews and 34 diary entries were thematically analyzed. The findings explore ways that families adopted and adapted to public health measures, loss of supports, both formal and informal, and the subsequent consequences for their mental and physical well-being. Within the ongoing context of the pandemic, as well as potential future wide-spread emergencies, it is imperative that programs and supports are restarted and maintained to avoid further harm to these families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , British Columbia , Caregivers , Humans , Independent Living , Pandemics , Public Health
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869596

ABSTRACT

Public health responses to COVID-19 in long-term residential care facilities (LTRCFs) have restricted family engagement with residents. These restrictions impact on quality of care and the psychosocial and emotional well-being of family caregivers. Following a national cross-sectional web-based survey, respondents were invited to provide personal reflections on visitor restrictions. This study aims to describe the consequences of these restrictions for individuals living in LTRCF and their families during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from open-ended questions contained within the survey were analyzed using Braun and Clarke's (2006) method of thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: 1. Altered Communication and Connection; 2. Emotional and Psychological Impact; 3. Protecting and Caring Role of Staff; 4. Family Role. Throughout the narrative accounts, it is evident that the visitor restrictions impacted on the emotional and mental well-being of families. Some respondents expressed frustration that they could not assist staff in essential care provision, reducing meaning and purpose in their own lives. COVID-19 LTRCF visitor restrictions made little distinction between those providing essential personal care and those who visit for social reasons. A partnership approach to care provision is important and should encompass strategies to maintain the psychosocial and emotional well-being of families and their relatives during times of self-isolating or restrictive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Nursing Homes
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