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1.
Revista Medica Herediana ; 33(1):15-23, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822664

ABSTRACT

In Peru, one of the first interventions to flattened the epidemiologic curve of the pandemic was quarantine that changed eating behavior, physical activity and mental health of the population. Objective: to determine modifications in eating behavior, physical activity and mental health in young adults before and after the quarantine. Methods: cohort study involving 384 adults from 18 to 24 years of age that were subjected to a virtual interview and application of an international questionnaire to evaluate changings in eating behavior, physical activity and mental health contrasted by Chi square. Results: an increase in the distribution of daily foods [breakfast (p<0.001), morning snack (p<0.05), lunch (p<0.001), afternoon snack (p<0.001), dinner (p<0.05)] and an increase in ingestion of fruits (p=0.005) and reduction in the ingestion of fast food (p<0.05) and candies (p=0.03). Physical activity decreases specially in males vs females (28.4% vs. 25.3%) and there was a reduction in the total number of sleep hours, mental health was severely affected. Conclusions: quarantine induced variations in eating behavior, reduction in physical activity and increase in mental health disorders. These modifications put the population at risk for weight gain or obesity and eventually to non-transmissible diseases.

2.
Progress in Nutrition ; 24(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1819021

ABSTRACT

Background: Eating behaviour and lifestyle are highly susceptible to changes in the individual’s external environment. COVID-19 pandemic resulted in policies that severely impacted individual habits and daily routines. Growing literature highlights the adverse psychological impact of COVID-19 on eating behaviour and lifestyle. Methods: This study aimed to assess eating behaviour and lifestyle in Saudi Arabia during the strict lockdown. A self-reported online questionnaire was used to assess eating behaviour and lifestyle changes, including physical activity, sleep, and digital device use compared to that pre-lockdown. Results: A total of 1,860 participants completed the questionnaire. Weight gain was reported by 31%, whereas 41% reported decreased physical activity. The use of digital devices increased by 70%, with 59% of participants reporting symptoms of digital eyestrain. Mostly, 72% reported decreased fast-food delivery, mainly due to fear of contracting the virus. This decrease paralleled a 66% increase in home cooking. On the contrary, 15% reported weight loss, and 21% increased their physical activity. Conclusion: These findings provide important insight into the effects of COVID-19-related lockdown on eating behaviour and lifestyle.

3.
Revista Chilena de Nutricion ; 49(1):79-88, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818329

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated various changes in the daily routine of people worldwide, affecting the usual food environments and related habits. Among university students, the change in food environments has had a strong impact due to the closure of university campuses. However, there is little information in the country about the consequences that this modification has caused. The study aim was to explore how the environments and eating habits of university students changed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A qualitative descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out. Participants co-rrespond to students of a public university in Chile. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted online. Interview narratives were analyzed through a thematic analysis, using an inductive approach. The results show two main themes: I) Purchase and access to food, where great changes were not seen in the supply environment, but in the food environments of restaurants and public roads;II) Transition from the institutional food environment to the domestic environment, a situation that modified the eating habits of most of the students, who declared consuming more homemade preparations, in addition to perceiving more time available at the time of consuming food, compared to that given in context pre-pandemic college. It is necessary to reflect on how the positive aspects in the environments and eating habits could be favored in a return to the presence in the academic environment.

4.
Food and Health ; 8(2):118-126, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1817895

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the effects of the COVID-19 phobia on mindful eating, eating habits and body weight change among university students. This study was carried out with 385 university students who have been in social isolation at home for at least 2 months. The online survey was constituted via an internet-based questionnaire on Google forms. The survey includes demographics features, body weight, eating habits, change in appetite and consumption of food/food groups. COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S) and the Mindful Eating Questionnaire (MEQ) were used.

5.
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation ; 12:55-56, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1817123

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Falls are a major health problem in older adults, leading to serious injuries and burdening their quality of life and functionality. Social isolation is predictive of falls, so a need for effective distance interventions is of great importance in this vulnerable population. Methods: An interdisciplinary programme for falls prevention was designed in community-dwelling older adults at falls risk, including physical exercise, nutritional education and falls prevention training. Screening measurements took place before and after the intervention for a complete assessment of the participants' physical, mental and social state. The implementation of the programme coincided with the lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic and this led us to a forceful transformation to a pilot digital programme. Thus, the new version of the programme had driven us to minimize face-to face contact and at the same time ensure that the participants' healthcare and social support needs were addressed. Moreover, new engagement techniques had to be used. Therefore, a digital platform was created and hosted by the FFN Greece website and 6 zoom teleconferences were organized with health professionals (orthopaedic, social worker, geriatrician, nutritionist). In addition, the participants could communicate with a psychologist and had zoom dancing lessons once a week. The digital educational material was adapted in order to provide the participants with health information regarding copying with falls incidents during the pandemic home restriction. Results: 20 people participated in the programme (95% women, mean age: 69 years). Among the most important results of the intervention were: The reduction of Fear of Falls (FES-I mean score before and after the intervention 28.1 vs 26.3, respectively);The improvement of important aspects of quality of life (SF-36 Physical Functioning mean score and SF-36 Emotional Well-being mean score before and after the intervention 81.8 vs 88.2 and 75.0 vs 90.2, respectively);The improvement of nutritional habits (Mediterranean Diet Scale mean score before and after the intervention 32.2 vs 34.2, respectively). Conclusion: This pilot programme indicates that health professionals need to be vigilant in adapting falls prevention programmes effectively, even in unpredicted situations like the recent COVID-19 pandemic. The results were encouraging, since there were no falls incidents, the physical, the emotional well-being of the participants and their falls related knowledge and skills were improved.

6.
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils ; 8(5):10281-10296, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1812634

ABSTRACT

This research aims to find changes in the consumption behavior of restaurant consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic, taking into account the attributes of the COVID-19 Protocol and Halal and Tayyib. This research uses a quantitative method. Through 681 responses, the sample of this research only uses 666 restaurant consumers in Indonesia during pandemic Covid-19. The data used are primary data through the distribution of questionnaires to respondents. Structural Equation Model (SEM) with Partial Least Square (PLS) is conducted for data analysis to verify the relationship between variables. The findings of this study are COVID-19 Protocol attributes are the essential variables on buying intention during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. Other attributes tested proved to have a change in the effect on satisfaction and to purchase intent of restaurant consumers. The implications of this research are to bridge the needs of industry and research related to restaurant consumers. Restaurant industry players can use the results of this study to adjust the attributes they have to remain able to flow revenue during the COVID-19 pandemic. This research focuses on restaurant consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic by improving variables related to the COVID-19 Protocol and Halal and Tayyib.

7.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(SUPPL 2):95, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1798737

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The presence of millions of bacteria in the gut aids in immune homeostasis, involved in the synthesis of vitamins, innate and adaptive immunity, IgA production, modulation of immune response and suppression of pathogenic bacteria etc. Any disturbance will cause immune imbalance, predisposes individuals to diseases such as metabolic syndromes, central nervous system disruption, cardiovascular diseases and abnormal blood coagulation profile. The sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy dietary habits, nonexposure to sunlight results in a weakened immune system. Several studies reported that the generation of free radicals, oxidative stress, depletion of vitamin D in the body leads to various dysfunctions. Prolonged usage of medications, antibiotics and unhealthy food habits will increase free radicals, inflammation, DNA damage and cell injury. Therefore, the body is more prone to infections by bacteria, viruses, fungi etc. Studies reported the depletion of gut bacteria with immunomodulatory potential in COVID-19 patients. Materials and method: It is crucial to have stronger immune system to combat diseases. Regular use of probiotics, inclusion of dietary fibre helps in the growth of good bacteria in the gut. Results: A healthy life style, good dietary habits, regular exercise, exposure to sunlight, antioxidants and intake of probiotics will help in the growth of good bacteria which will boost the immunity. The microbiota acts like a protective shield against harmful microbes. Conclusion: Maintenance of gut microflora and healthy life style will help us fight against various non-infectious and infectious diseases such as novel COVID-19.

8.
Turkish Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism ; 26(1):23-29, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1791405

ABSTRACT

Objective: Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatments for morbid obesity. Postoperatively, patients should be followed up regularly. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery because of morbid obesity. Material and Methods: For the telephone survey, 157 patients aged 18–65 years who had bariatric surgery due to morbid obesity from 2015–2019 were con-tacted. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on weight gain in patients who underwent obesity surgery and the severity of the patients who had COVID-19 were investigated. The patients were evaluated nine months after the COVID-19 pandemic started. Results: During the pandemic, weight gain was recorded in 94 patients (59.9%). Eating behavior was enhanced in 80 (51%) patients in total, from which 69 (73.4%) patients were in the weight gain group (p<0.001). COVID-19 was found in 21 (13.3%) patients;no intensive care was needed, and no mortality due to COVID-19 occurred. Conclusions: It was observed that patients who had bariatric surgery during the pandemic chan-ged their diet and eating patterns, mostly resulting in weight gain. The follow-up of operated patients due to morbid obesity should not be interrupted during a pandemic like COVID-19.

9.
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences ; 7(4):148-154, 2021.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1780384

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of the study is to examine the eating attitudes of the students studying at the Nigde ..mer Halisdemir University Faculty of Sports Sciences during the Covid-19 epidemic.

10.
Obshta Meditsina / General Medicine ; 24(1):23-29, 2022.
Article in Bulgarian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1777056

ABSTRACT

COVID confinement measures during the pandemic have changed our daily lives. A number of researchers have established an association between the measures imposed and the reinforcement of negative eating habits. This is also a major topic in the recommendations of the World Health Organization to address the psychological impact of health restrictions. The current study is aimed to describe the change in eating habits and behavior as a consequence of the imposed COVID confinement among the elderly population in Bulgaria. In addition, it is intended to identify potential social factors associated with such changes. In the period 1-7 February, 2021, a cross-sectional online study among adults took place. In the analysis 900 respondents were included. Among the respondents with an observed change in eating behavior, the most common manifestation was an increase in the intake of bakery and confectionery products n=310 (34.44%), and an increase in the number of snacks n = 287 (31.89%). The univariate regression model found an association between female sex (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.087-1.887, p = 0.01), age under 30 (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.33-2.35, p < 0.001), switching to a remote electronic environment (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1,495-2,559, p < 0.001) and lower level of education (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1,200-2.044, p = 0.001) with worsening eating behavior. These observations can be used to integrate planned and targeted health-promotion policies in synchrony with already known epidemic countermeasures.

11.
Food and Nutrition Sciences ; 13(2):108-123, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1771492

ABSTRACT

Appetizing peculiarities are formed from childhood and can vary throughout life. Although they are conditioned by genetic factors, over time, the internal regulation of eating behaviors is reduced, being influenced by a complex interaction of various external factors. According to the Behavioral Susceptibility (BST) Theory of Obesity, Food Sensitivity in Response to Food Stimuli (such as Food Sight and Smell) and Satiety Responsiveness (i.e. the ability to adjust diet in response to internal feelings of satiety) contribute to individual differences in terms of energy intake and weight status. The present research intended to assess the eating patterns and behavior of Moldovan students, especially those from Technical University of Moldova during the social isolation imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted, based on the questionnaires (AEBQ - Adult Eating Behavior Questionnaire), on a group of 602 students from Technical University of Moldova. Participation in the survey was entirely voluntary, did not involve any invasive procedure, nor did it induce changes in participants' food patterns. The obtained results could contribute to the formation of the database for the study of the behavioral phenotype associated with the risk of obesity, but also for the study of eating behavior in crises. The questionnaire was distributed, in the form of a link, on the corporate emails of all TUM students. Respondents completed the questionnaire on the Google platform between 13.10.2021 - 25.11.2021, and the final database has been downloaded as a Microsoft Excel file. It was established a positive correlation between, Emotional Over-Eating and Emotional Under-Eating. Nervousness and anger were the most incriminating emotions of students that would cause both overeating and under eating. The results of the AEBQ questionnaire appear to be largely in line with previous studies, and the collected data present interest, in particular to prevent the risk of obesity.

12.
J Obes Metab Syndr ; 31(1): 51-60, 2022 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766128

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity is of grave concern as a comorbidity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We examined the factors associated with weight gain among Korean adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We conducted an online survey of 1,000 adults (515 men and 485 women aged 20-59 years) in March 2021. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the factors associated with weight gain. The analysis was adjusted for sex, age, region, depressive mood, anxiety, eating out, late-night meals, alcohol consumption, exercise, sleep disturbance, meal pattern, subjective body image, comorbidities, marital status, living alone, and income. Results: After adjusting for confounding variables, the odds for weight gain increased in the group aged 20-34 years compared with the group aged 50-59 years (1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-3.32). Women were more associated with the risk of weight gain compared with men. The odds for weight gain increased in the lack of exercise group compared with the exercise group (4.89; 95% CI, 3.09-7.88). The odds for weight gain increased in the eating-out and late-night meal groups compared with that in the groups not eating out and not having late-night meals. Individuals watching a screen for 3-6 hr/day were more associated with the risk of weight gain compared with those who rarely watched a screen. The odds for weight gain increased in participants who considered themselves obese compared with those who did not consider themselves obese. Conclusion: A healthy diet and regular physical activity tend to be the best approach to reduce obesity, a risk factor for COVID-19.

13.
Health ; 14(1):96-103, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1744781

ABSTRACT

Diet remains a key factor that significantly influences the outcomes of the disease. There are some factors that place one at a higher risk of morbidity from the disease, with the common ones being elderly age and coexistent comorbidities. The dietary consumption of the patient is vital since some Western Diets that are largely refined predispose one to cardio-metabolic diseases. In addition to that, the consumption of such diets largely influences the immunity of the individual, whereby it reduces the disease-fighting capability of the immune system. The health education on the patient with the condition has largely widened to encompass the healthy eating habits that one should emulate to reduce the disease severity. Further, in an attempt to promote the awareness of the importance of healthy eating, Eat Well Saskatchewan (EWS) has formulated some social media outreach to ensure that the importance of healthy eating reaches a larger population.

14.
Turkish Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health ; 28(Supplement 1):14-18, 2021.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1726482

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our study aimed to evaluate the eating patterns of children as well as parental anxiety on virus transmission along with associated factors in the first month of the Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to compare the results to pre-epidemic patterns. Materials and Methods: This study was planned as a multi-center (n=8), cross-sectional study. Informed consent forms and questionnaires were sent to the parents of the children between the ages of 6 and 18 years who applied to the study centers and accepted study participation via e-mail or instant messaging applications.

15.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 48: 220-226, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Social distancing may lead to changes in lifestyle, such as the reduction in physical exercise practice, dietary changes, weight alterations, as well as intestinal rhythm. Our study aimed to investigate the intestinal transit rhythm of adults during social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in association with sociodemographic variables, physical activity, nutritional status, frequency of food intake, and water intake. METHODS: Our cross-sectional study comprised an online questionnaire that was shared by the internet concerning demographic information (sex and age); physical activity; anthropometric data (reported weight and height); dietary habits information (food frequency of simple high-carbohydrates foods, whole food, and processed foods; water intake; intestinal transit rhythm). The survey was conducted from April and July 2020. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's chi-square test (χ2) or Fisher's exact test, considering p < 0.05. RESULTS: During social distancing, 72.5% of the respondents presented an adequate intestinal transit rhythm, and 27.5% had inadequate intestinal transit rhythm (19.0% slow and 8.5% rapid intestinal transit rhythm). Intestinal transit rhythm differs between sex, with women presenting significantly higher odds for altered bowel rhythm, compared to men (OR (95% CI) = 2.324 (1.027-5.257); p = 0.043). Also, results showed that individuals who frequently ingest simple high carb foods have high prevalence of slow intestinal transit rhythm (63%, p = 0.032). CONCLUSION: In this study, we found a higher prevalence of adequate intestinal transit during social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Women had significantly higher odds for altered bowel rhythm, compared to men. Frequent consumption of simple carbohydrates was associated with a higher prevalence of slow intestinal transit rhythm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fast Foods , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects
16.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(E):92-96, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1690126

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia has made changes in the learning system from face-to-face learning to online learning. With these conditions, technology should be utilized by making an innovation to improve the quality of learning. In this regard, innovations that can be done include the implementation of website seminar activities (webinar) in the midst of a pandemic. Webinars are a learning resource that can be widely accessed by students, academics, and the general public. Of course, this webinar activity is very useful to increase knowledge and insight. The prevalence of obesity in Indonesia according to Riskesdas 2018 shows that 13.6% of adults aged >18 years are overweight while 21.8% are obese. One of the challenges in this phase of life is how to influence and encourage young adults to adopt healthy eating behaviors. Therefore, one way that can be done to increase knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward eating habits is to provide nutrition education through social media. This study aims to increase knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward the habit of ordering food online, nutrient-dense food and energy-dense food, food safety, physical activity, sugar-sweetened beverage, and intake of energy, protein, fat, and fiber through the platform. Social media is widely used by the target. This is a randomized control trial study by giving nutrition education intervention related to reduction of obesity in adults age 17–25 years. This study targets adults using a quasi-experiment design with a pre-and post-test control group design. The study will be conducted online in Indonesia. A total of 311 adults aged 17–25 years are joining in this research.

17.
Sleep Medicine Research ; 12(2):101-109, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1667816

ABSTRACT

Background and ObjectiveaaOur aim is to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on screen time among Lebanese high school students (grades 9–12).MethodsaaAn anonymous online questionnaire was distributed among 510 school students fromdifferent governorates in Lebanon;this included questions regarding screen time, food habits, andphysical activity. Psychological symptoms were assessed using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7items and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items. Effects of screen time on sleep was evaluated usingthe Insomnia Severity Index and Bedtime Procrastination Scale.ResultsaaFemale students reported higher depression (p = 0.018) and anxiety (p = 0.023) thanmale students;however, there was no difference in their sleep. Insomnia, depression, and anxietywere highest among phone users. A screen time of more than 7 hours per day was significantly associatedwith higher depression (67.9%), anxiety (61.6%), insomnia (82.1%), and bedtime procrastination.It also indicated a shift toward a less healthy diet and light exercise.ConclusionsaaSeven hours of screen was found to develop depression and anxiety, exercisingless, eating a less healthy diet, and experiencing disturbed sleep among school adolescents

18.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(E):116-120, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1667402

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To suppress the COVID-19 transmissions, almost all activities related to physical and social activities between individuals are restricted. Activity restrictions such as lockdowns or physical-social distancing can trigger an elevation in stress. AIM: This study aimed to determine the correlation between stress levels and food habits among adolescents in Indonesia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted through an online questionnaire involving 5924 adolescents in all regions in Indonesia using the snowball sampling technique. RESULTS: The survey showed that most adolescents experienced high stress (55.6%). During the COVID-19 outbreak, they seemed rarely consumed or had an intake frequency of fewer than 3 times a day on carbohydrates (89.1%), animal protein (87.5%), vegetable protein (88.9%), vegetables (84.8%), fruit (90.6%), and snacks (86.3%). Statistically, their stress level did not significantly correlate to the consumption of those carbohydrates, animal protein, vegetable protein, vegetables, and fruit (p > 0.05), except for snacks (p < 0.002) at α = 0.05. Thus, the high-stress level was 1.267 times more at risk of snacking habit more often (more than 3 times a day) among adolescents in Indonesia during the COVID-19 outbreak. CONCLUSION: Stress level did not significantly correlate to the consumption of those carbohydrates, animal protein, vegetable protein, vegetables, and fruit. However, stress levels did not significantly correlate to snacks consumption.

19.
Revista Espanola De Nutricion Humana Y Dietetica ; 25:19, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1622863

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic caused by COVID-19 has led to taking extreme actions aimed at reducing the spread of the virus by drastically changing the lifestyles of students, and causing negative effects in situations that influence the quality of sleep and eating behavior. The aim was to associate sleep quality and eating behavior in Mexican university students during confinement by SARS-Cov-2 (COVID-19). Methodology: Cross-sectional study carried out using a web form, in a sample of 821 students, the quality of sleep was evaluated with the self-application of the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index validated in Spanish and eating behavior with the validated Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Statistical analyzes for the association between sleep quality and eating behavior were determined with chi square, with statistical significance of 5%. OR were calculated by binary logistic regression using SPSS 25.0 software. Results: Alterations in sleep quality were found with association to unhealthy eating behaviors, mainly in the following behaviors;students who eat less than 3 meals a day during the week (OR=0.74;95%CI: 0.60,0.92), those who showed liking for alcoholic beverages (OR=1.1;95%CI: 1.04,1.18), those who showed liking for the habitual consumption of packaged foods (OR=1.12;95%CI: 1.01,1.24), students do not include vegetables or salads in their main meal time during the day with a risk of 1.07 times more of having poor quality of sleep (OR=1.07;95%CI: 1.01,1.13) young people do not consume fruits in their main meal of the day (OR=1.05;95%CI: 1.02,1.12), compared to good sleepers. Conclusions: Weight loss was mainly mediated by energy restriction, REI was not superior to REC as a therapeutic intervention, since weight loss seems to be mediated by the level of energy restriction and not because it is performed continuously or discontinuous.

20.
Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617073

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has inevitably affected children and their families. This study examines the impact of the COVID-19 measures in children with chronic somatic conditions (CSC) and their parents and compares them with a Dutch general population sample. Methods: We included a sample of children with CSC (0-18 years, n=326) and compared them with children (8-18 years, n=1,287) from the Dutch general population. Perceived stress, coping, social interaction with friends and family, physical activity, eating behavior, family support, and financial situation were assessed with the digitally administered COVID-19 child check questionnaire between November 2020 and May 2021. Results: During the COVID-19 pandemic, children with CSC engaged less in physical activity and social interaction with friends compared with children from the general population. Children with CSC and their parents experienced less stress than children and parents from the general population. Moreover, parents of children with CSC aged 0-7 years and children aged 8-18 years from the general population experienced less support and more financial deterioration than parents of children with CSC aged 8-18 years. In the parents from the general population only, this deteriorated financial situation was associated with more stress, worse family interaction and parenting perception, and less received support. Conclusions: The impact of COVID-19 measures in children with CSC and their parents differed from those in the general population. Addressing the collateral damage of COVID-19 measures in children and their families can give direction to policy and potentially prevent (long-term) negative consequences.

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