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1.
Canadian Social Work Review ; 37(2):185-195, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025302

ABSTRACT

The Psychiatry Emergency Services (PES) virtual clinic is an innovative clinical program that was established to enhance access to psychiatric crisis follow-up care during COVID-19. The clinic provides psychiatric follow-up via scheduled phone calls or videoconference for patients that have been seen by the PES team. The social worker has an important role on the PES virtual clinic team: they initiate initial assessments, collaboratively develop follow-up plans, and facilitate community care. The clinic meets the provincial agenda to reduce Emergency Department (ED) visits, ED/PES wait times, ED/PES overcrowding, and inappropriate admissions, while addressing both psychiatric needs and social determinants of health in an acute care setting. Throughout our survey of relevant literature, we found little research to inform the implementation of virtual care in Canadian healthcare emergency services (Hensel et al., 2020;Serhal et al., 2017). More specifically, there is a void in research regarding a collaborative psychiatric and social work care model in the context of a global pandemic. Further robust studies are needed and encouraged that use emergency psychiatric settings as critical prevention sites of mental health crises.Alternate :La clinique virtuelle des Psychiatry Emergency Services (PES) est un programme clinique innovant qui a été mis en place pour améliorer l’accès aux suivis lors des crises psychiatriques pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19. La clinique assure un suivi psychiatrique par le biais d’appels téléphoniques ou de vidéoconférences pour les patients qui ont été vus par l’équipe des PES. La travailleuse sociale joue un rôle important au sein de l’équipe de la clinique virtuelle du PES : elle initie les évaluations initiales, élabore en collaboration des plans de suivi et facilite les soins de proximité. La clinique répond au plan provincial visant à réduire les visites aux services d’urgence, les temps d’attente aux services d’urgence/PES, l’engorgement des services d’urgence/PES et les admissions inappropriées, tout en répondant à la fois aux besoins psychiatriques et aux déterminants sociaux de la santé dans un contexte de soins aigus. Lors de la recension des écrits, nous avons trouvé peu de recherches permettant d’informer la mise en oeuvre des soins virtuels dans les services d’urgence canadiens (Hensel et coll., 2020;Serhal et coll., 2017). Plus précisément, il n’existe pas de recherche concernant un modèle de soins psychiatriques et sociaux collaboratifs dans un contexte de pandémie mondiale. D’autres études approfondies au sujet des milieux psychiatriques d’urgence utilisés comme sites de prévention des crises en santé mentale sont nécessaires.

2.
Lancet ; 399(10334):1551-1560, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1865978

ABSTRACT

The number of survivors of cancer is increasing substantially. Current models of care are unsustainable and fail to address the many unmet needs of survivors of cancer. Numerous trials have investigated alternate models of care, including models led by primary-care providers, care shared between oncology specialists and primary-care providers, and care led by oncology nurses. These alternate models appear to be at least as effective as specialist-led care and are applicable to many survivors of cancer. Choosing the most appropriate care model for each patient depends on patient-level factors (such as risk of longer-term effects, late effects, individual desire, and capacity to self-manage), local services, and health-care policy. Wider implementation of alternative models requires appropriate support for non-oncologist care providers and endorsement of these models by cancer teams with their patients. The COVID-19 pandemic has driven some changes in practice that are more patient-centred and should continue. Improved models should shift from a predominant focus on detection of cancer recurrence and seek to improve the quality of life, functional outcomes, experience, and survival of survivors of cancer, reduce the risk of recurrence and new cancers, improve the management of comorbidities, and reduce costs to patients and payers. This Series paper focuses primarily on high-income countries, where most data have been derived. However, future research should consider the applicability of these models in a wider range of health-care settings and for a wider range of cancers.

3.
J Cancer Surviv ; 2022 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638669

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Long-term follow-up (LTFU) care is essential to optimise health outcomes in childhood cancer survivors (CCS). We aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on LTFU services and providers. METHODS: A COVID-19 working group within the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group (IGHG) distributed a questionnaire to LTFU service providers in 37 countries across Europe, Asia, North America, Central/South America, and Australia. The questionnaire assessed how care delivery methods changed during the pandemic and respondents' level of worry about the pandemic's impact on LTFU care delivery, their finances, their health, and that of their family and friends. RESULTS: Among 226 institutions, providers from 178 (79%) responded. Shortly after the initial outbreak, 42% of LTFU clinics closed. Restrictions during the pandemic resulted in fewer in-person consultations and an increased use of telemedicine, telephone, and email consultations. The use of a risk assessment to prioritise the method of LTFU consultation for individual CCS increased from 12 to 47%. While respondents anticipated in-person consultations to remain the primary method for LTFU service delivery, they expected significantly increased use of telemedicine and telephone consultations after the pandemic. On average, respondents reported highest levels of worry about psychosocial well-being of survivors. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic necessitated changes in LTFU service delivery, including greater use of virtual LTFU care and risk-stratification to identify CCS that need in-person evaluations. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Increased utilisation of virtual LTFU care and risk stratification is likely to persist post-pandemic.

4.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(4): 344-347, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study aimed to evaluate possible diagnostic delays in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma recurrences due to the changed follow-up protocol during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: The follow-up appointments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated more than one year prior to the pandemic were changed to telephone appointments in order to reduce physical visits to the hospital. All contacts, reasons for contact and recurrent cancers were recorded. RESULTS: There were 17 recurrences during a seven-month study period among 178 patients treated in the previous year (10 per cent); 14 of these recurrences occurred in patients whose treatment had ended less than one year previously and 3 occurred more than one year after treatment had ended. There was no delay in diagnoses of recurrent tumours or treatment despite reduced visits because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. CONCLUSION: According to our analyses, no delay was caused in the diagnoses of recurrent diseases. Follow up by telephone or telemedicine can be considered as part of the follow-up protocol one year after the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma when necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Finland/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 625691, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090390

ABSTRACT

The exceptional circumstances of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic are making the grief processes challenging for families who are losing a relative for COVID-19. This community case study aimed to describe a phone-based primary preventive psychological intervention that has been delivered to these families by the Clinical Psychology unit of an Italian hospital. In particular, the article reports how the intervention has been organized within the overall hospital care pathway for families, the specific contents and components of the intervention, and the seven-phase structure of the intervention. The unique features and related challenges of the intervention, along with the implications for clinical practice, are discussed.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Family/psychology , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Telephone , Home Care Services, Hospital-Based , Humans , Italy , Psychiatric Department, Hospital
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