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2.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816941

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Determine the role of social determinants of health (SDOH), including socioeconomic status (SES) (education, income in predicting intent to vaccinate for COVID-19 among a diverse community-based population, over sampled for cancer survivors in Connecticut (CT). Background: Race, ethnicity, and the SDOH (e.g., food insecurity, housing instability, trouble paying utilities bills) have a known impact on COVID-19 incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Although the impact on cancer survivors is not as well understood, this population may also face disproportionately severe outcomes. To our knowledge, there are no published studies that address intention to vaccinate in community based populations that are predominantly African American/Black (AA) or Hispanic/Latinx (H/L), nor in the cancer survivors who live in these communities. Prior studies have suggested that some vulnerable populations have lowered willingness to vaccinate (e.g., for influenza) than other groups. This study will explore the role of the high burden of SDOH barriers and selected socio-cultural factors such as perceived risk, medical mistrust, and source of health information. Methods: Data for this study are from 252 CT residents, collected from August - December, 2020 using Qualtrics, an online survey platform. Using an extensive network of community partners, we recruited through list serves and social media, targeting communities known to be most impacted by the pandemic. The intent was to enroll a population that was similar to the racial/ethnic sociodemographic profile of the city of New Haven, while oversampling cancer survivors. Using SAS 9.4, we conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to identify the role of SDOH in willingness to vaccinate. Results: The study population was disproportionately African American/Black (23.5%) and Hispanic/Latinx (17.5%) and included 83 (32.9%) cancer survivors. In this high-risk population, 38.9% of the sample were unwilling or uncertain whether they would vaccinate against Covid-19 in the future. In multivariate adjusted model, individuals reporting at least one SDOH barrier (food insecurity, trouble paying utilities bills, or housing instability) were significantly less likely to vaccinate (odds ratio=2.26;95% Confidence Interval 1.17-4.36). Other significant predicators included low perceived risk and lacking confidence in information provided through the health care system. Conclusion: Social determinants of health play a critical role in predicting intent to vaccinate for COVID-19. Special efforts are needed to ensure that vulnerable populations understand their individual risk, the benefits and risks of getting the COVID-19 vaccine, with interventions aimed at enlisting trusted entities that may not be recognized as traditional sources of health information.

3.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816932

ABSTRACT

Background: Food insecurity can negatively impact adherence to and receipt of high-quality cancer care. The purpose of the study was to (1) compare the prevalence of COVID-19 associated food insecurity among cancer survivors to adults without a history of cancer and (2) examine determinants associated with COVID-19 related food insecurity among cancer survivors. Methods: We used nationally-representative data from the COVID-19 Household Impact Survey (n = 10,760), collected at three time points: April 20-26, May 4-10, and May 30-June 8 of 2020. Our primary exposure was cancer survivor status, based on participant's self-report of a cancer diagnosis (n=854, 7.1%). Primary outcomes of food insecurity were categorized on how often (response options: often true, sometimes true, never true) participants reported the following: “We worried our food would run out before we got money to buy more” or “The food that we bought just didn't last, and we didn't have money to get more”;respondents were categorized as food insecure if they chose often true or sometimes true. We also examined use of food pantry assistance or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits during the pandemic period;respondents were also categorized as food insecure if they received or applied for these benefits. We compared reported food insecurity among cancer survivors to other U.S. adults using Chi-square tests. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to identify demographic determinants of food insecurity among cancer survivors. Results: Thirty-two percent of cancer survivors were food insecure. Cancer survivors aged 30-44 years and those aged ≥60 were more likely to report being food insecure compared to respondents without a history of cancer in the same age categories (30-44 years, 59.9% versus 41.2% p = 0.01, ≥60 years 27.2% versus 20.2%, p = 0.01). Cancer survivors without a high school diploma were more likely to report food insecurity compared to adults without a high school diploma and no history of cancer (87.0% versus 64.1%, p = 0.001). In examining determinants of food insecurity among cancer survivors, adults aged 45-49 years when compared to those ages ≥60 (aPR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.03), adults with no high school diploma (aPR = 2.63, 95% CI 1.53-4.50) or a high school degree (aPR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.08-3.49) compared to those with a baccalaureate or above, adults with an annual household income <$30,000 (aPR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.15-4.07) compared to those earning ≥$100,000, and cancer survivors in rural areas (aPR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.07-2.12) compared those living in urban areas were more likely to report being food insecure. Uninsured cancer survivors (aPR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.46-3.92) and those on Medicaid (aPR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.40-3.17) were more likely to report being food insecure than their counterparts. Conclusions: Food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic is vast but varies considerably among cancer survivors and adults without a history of cancer. Among cancer survivors, differences in food insecurity were observed by age, SES, and area of residence.

4.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition ; : 9, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1815986

ABSTRACT

Background Ultra-processed foods contribute to risks of obesity and cardiometabolic disease, and higher intakes have been observed in low-income populations in the United States. Consumption of ultra-processed foods may be particularly higher among individuals experiencing food insecurity and participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Objectives Using data from the 2007-2016 NHANES, we examined the associations between food insecurity, SNAP participation, and ultra-processed food consumption. Methods The study population comprised 9190 adults, aged 20-65 y, with incomes <= 300% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Food insecurity was assessed using the Household Food Security Survey Module and SNAP participation over the past 12 mo was self-reported. Dietary intake was measured from two 24-h dietary recalls. Ultra-processed food consumption (percentage of total energy intake) was defined using the NOVA food classification system. Linear regression models were used to examine the associations between food insecurity, SNAP participation, and ultra-processed food consumption, adjusting for sociodemographic and health characteristics. Results More severe food insecurity was associated with higher intakes of ultra-processed foods (P-trend = 0.003). The adjusted means of ultra-processed food intake ranged from 52.6% for adults with high food security to 55.7% for adults with very low food security. SNAP participation was also associated with higher intakes of ultra-processed foods (adjusted mean: 54.7%), compared with income-eligible participants (adjusted mean: 53.0%). Furthermore, the association between food insecurity and ultra-processed foods was modified by SNAP participation (P-interaction = 0.02). Among income-eligible nonparticipants and income-ineligible nonparticipants, more severe food insecurity was associated with higher consumption of ultra-processed foods. Among SNAP participants, the association between food insecurity and consumption of ultra-processed foods was nonsignificant. Conclusion In a nationally representative sample of adults, food insecurity and SNAP participation were both associated with higher levels of ultra-processed food consumption.

5.
The Lancet Public Health ; 7(4):e291, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815338
6.
1st International Conference in Information and Computing Research (ICORE) - Adapting to the New Normal - Advancing Computing Research for a Post-Pandemic Society ; : 90-95, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1806923

ABSTRACT

Food insecurity has been a chronic and significant issue in our society, specifically in low-income areas. Hunger, poor nutrition and health, and early death are only a few of the terrible impacts. Hunger is caused more often than not by a lack of food;rather, it is a matter of figuring out how to make the food that is available, accessible to everybody. Non-profit organization work to alleviate the negative consequences of food insecurity by giving food and services to those who are hungry. This organization rely on the generosity of donors, food donations, to achieve their goals. This paper focuses on creating a mobile and web application called Foodernity with the goal of easing the burden of needy people who require food to survive. This is critical, especially in times of crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic, where most of the people in low-income areas don't have enough budget for their food every day. Furthermore, the application also wants to help in reducing the problem of food waste. The whole process of developing both mobile and web application, in particular, followed the Agile Model's formal and logical processes. This study recommends that the beneficiary to use this application to evaluate its functionality. Those who are hungry or needy people who relies mostly on food donation from the organization will benefit from this application by allowing the donors to give donation to the organization that helps needy people to have access to food.

7.
Matern Child Health J ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1803027

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Food insecurity (FI), an inadequate access to healthy, affordable food, is a public health concern primarily driven by material hardship. Optimal antenatal nutrition promotes best health outcomes for the mother and baby. Pregnant women experiencing FI are less able to access healthy foods, increasing the risk of complications such as gestational diabetes and preterm labour. Little is known about the experiences of food-insecure pregnant women in obtaining sufficient, nutritious food, their perceptions regarding antenatal nutrition and how this contributes to their food choices. METHODS: This qualitative study conducted from August to November 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, examined the experiences and coping strategies of food-insecure pregnant women, and the factors influencing their food choices. Seven English-speaking food-insecure pregnant women participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were thematically analysed, informed by grounded theory methodology. RESULTS: Three themes were identified through analysis of the interviews related to strategies that managed household food supply, factors that influenced food choices, and experiences of pregnancy during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result of a limited food budget, pregnancy symptoms, the cognitive overload that attends the FI experience, and the acute yet significant impact of the pandemic, food-insecure pregnant women in this study defaulted to cheap and convenient food choices despite acknowledging the importance of eating well for pregnancy. CONCLUSION: FI during pregnancy is burdensome, relentless and undermines women's wellbeing. Supportive strategies within antenatal healthcare settings are urgently required to deliver an equitable health response for vulnerable women.

8.
PLoS ONE Vol 16(7), 2021, ArtID e0255392 ; 16(7), 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1801624

ABSTRACT

Background: This study examines the association between food insecurity and mental health of women during the COVID-19 pandemic in a resource poor setting. Materials and methods: Data were collected at two time-points (wave 1 and 2) from 2402 women, one per house-hold, participating in a larger study during extended COVID-19 lockdown in the rural areas of the southwest region of Bangladesh. The primary outcome of the analyses is the association between food insecurity, measured using the Food Insecurity Experience Scale (FIES), and stress level, measured using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), for women during the lockdown. General awareness about COVID-19 and attitude towards prescribed preventive measures were also measured since COVID-19 health concerns could exacerbate food insecurity. Results: An individual-level evaluation of the effect of wave 2 FIES score on PSS score showed that worsening of the food security status increasing the stress level of the participants (95% CI: 1.61;2.13;p-value: <0.001). Additionally, a significant negative association was observed between the PSS score and change in food security status between the two waves (Coefficient: -1.15, 95% CI: -1.30;-0.99, p-value: < 0.001), indicating that deterioration in food security status over the pandemic period increasing the stress level. At the village level, the results showed a similar pattern. General awareness around ways coronavirus spreads was high, yet there were misperceptions at a higher level. Maintaining hand hygiene, wearing face masks outside the home, and going outside only when necessary were widely practised. Fewer respondents could maintain a 1.5-metre distance from others in the outside and maintained cough and sneeze etiquette. Conclusion: The results indicate a higher stress level, a potential contributor to poor mental health, as food insecurity deteriorated. Policy initiatives in ameliorating immediate food insecurity dur- ing crises, improving long-term wellbeing, and expanding the reach of mental health support are warranted. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-11, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799616

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore best practices and challenges in providing school meals during COVID-19 in a low-income, predominantly Latino, urban-rural region. DESIGN: Semi-structured interviews with school district stakeholders and focus groups with parents were conducted to explore school meal provision during COVID-19 from June to August 2020. Data were coded and themes were identified to guide analysis. Community organisations were involved in all aspects of study design, recruitment, data collection and analysis. SETTING: Six school districts in California's San Joaquin Valley. PARTICIPANTS: School district stakeholders (n 11) included food service directors, school superintendents and community partners (e.g. funders, food cooperative). Focus groups (n 6) were comprised of parents (n 29) of children participating in school meal programmes. RESULTS: COVID-19-related challenges for districts included developing safe meal distribution systems, boosting low participation, covering COVID-19-related costs and staying informed of policy changes. Barriers for families included transportation difficulties, safety concerns and a lack of fresh foods. Innovative strategies to address obstacles included pandemic-electronic benefits transfer (EBT), bus-stop delivery, community pick-up locations, batched meals and leveraging partner resources. CONCLUSIONS: A focus on fresher, more appealing meals and greater communication between school officials and parents could boost participation. Districts that leveraged external partnerships were better equipped to provide meals during pandemic conditions. In addition, policies increasing access to fresh foods and capitalising on United States Department of Agriculture waivers could boost school meal participation. Finally, partnering with community organisations and acting upon parent feedback could improve school meal systems, and in combination with pandemic-EBT, address childhood food insecurity.

10.
Oncology Issues ; 37(2):10-11, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1795512
11.
J. Agribus. Dev. Emerg. Econ. ; : 17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1794899

ABSTRACT

Purpose In the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic, Vietnam imposed many drastic restrictions to curb the outbreak of this virus. Such restrictions interrupted the normal functioning of various economic sectors, including agriculture. This research examined disruptions to agricultural activities, income loss and perceived food insecurity among farm households during the pandemic, and then explored the relationships among these economic factors. Design/methodology/approach Household data from Vietnam and Generalized Structural Equation Model (GSEM) were used for empirical analysis. Findings Descriptive analyses found that only a small proportion of farm households suffered from the COVID-19 disruptions to their agricultural activities, a large percentage experienced income loss, and a medium number were worried about their food insecurity. GSEM results also revealed that the COVID-19 disruptions to agricultural activities significantly increased the likelihood of worrying about food insecurity, mediated by income loss. Research limitations/implications Due to data limitations, the authors could not use better indicators to define and measure the variables of interest (e.g. COVID-19 disruptions to agricultural activities, income loss and food insecurity). Another similar concern was that our models did not account for unobservables, causing some estimation biases. Originality/value This research is among the first attempts that examined the direct and indirect (mediated by income loss) effects of the COVID-19 disruptions to agricultural activities on food insecurity.

12.
Journal of Place Management and Development ; : 17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1794886

ABSTRACT

Purpose Coronavirus has accentuated the cracks within the fragile UK food system. Empty shelves and empty stomachs, the damaging consequences of coronavirus have led to an unprecedented increase in food insecurity and food access. The purpose of this paper is to provide in-depth insight into varied and innovative rural localised responses to food access during the pandemic. Design/methodology/approach This study draws on multiple perspectives of those working to combat food insecurity, inequality and inaccessibility in Gwynedd, exploring food access initiatives and their responses to the pandemic, innovative food distribution collaborations and the role of maintaining already fragile rural communities. Findings This study concludes that the need for transformative place-making to build stronger, more resilient communities has never been more pressing, with support from public sector funding to help alleviate some of the hardships and pressure with the rise in poverty and austerity, coronavirus imposed or not. Originality/value This study focuses on a single local authority area in North Wales, Gwynedd, an area where little food research has been published to date. The coronavirus pandemic also places the timely research within the scope of food access and distribution during hardship. This study discusses the impacts exposed by the pandemic and lessons that can be drawn and reflected on for future benefit.

13.
Portuguese Journal of Public Health ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1794331

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The current worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has been having a considerable impact not only on health but also on the economy of societies, emphasizing food insecurity as a significant public health concern. Aim: The objective of this study was to characterize the scenario of food insecurity in Portugal during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore its related sociodemographic characteristics. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study, using data from an online survey, performed from November 2020 until February 2021, including 882 residents aged 18 years or older in Portugal. Data on sociodemographics and food security status were collected, the latter was evaluated using the United States Household Food Security Survey Module: Six-Item Short Form. Crude and adjusted logistic regression models were performed (covariates: education, household income perception, and the working status during the COVID-19 pandemic). The odds ratio (OR) and respective 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results: Most participants were women (71.3%), with a mean age of 36.8 years (SD 11.0). Food insecurity prevalence was 6.8%. Less-educated individuals (≤12 years of schooling;OR 2.966;95% CI 1.250-7.042), and those who were and remained unemployed since the beginning of the pandemic (OR 2.602;95% CI 1.004-6.742) had higher odds of belonging to a food-insecure household, regardless of education, working status during the COVID-19 pandemic, and household income perception. Moreover, lower odds of belonging to a food-insecure household were observed among those reporting a comfortable household income (OR 0.007;95% CI 0.001-0.062) than those who perceived their household income as insufficient, independently of education and the working status during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions: These findings highlight the population groups that are at a greater risk of food insecurity during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Effective public health strategies should be developed aiming to address food insecurity during this crisis, especially among the higher risk groups.

14.
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can ; 42(5)2022 Mar 16.
Article in English, French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789866

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Household food insecurity (HFI) is a persistent public health issue in Canada that may have disproportionately affected certain subgroups of the population during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this systematic review is to report on the prevalence of HFI in the Canadian general population and in subpopulations after the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. METHODS: Sixteen databases were searched from 1 March 2020 to 5 May 2021. Abstract and full-text screening was conducted by one reviewer and the inclusions verified by a second reviewer. Only studies that reported on the prevalence of HFI in Canadian households were included. Data extraction, risk of bias and certainty of the evidence assessments were conducted by two reviewers. RESULTS: Of 8986 studies identified in the search, four studies, three of which collected data in April and May 2020, were included. The evidence concerning the prevalence of HFI during the COVID-19 pandemic is very uncertain. The prevalence of HFI (marginal to severe) ranged from 14% to 17% in the general population. Working-age populations aged 18 to 44 years had higher HFI (range: 18%-23%) than adults aged 60+ years (5%-11%). Some of the highest HFI prevalence was observed among households with children (range: 19%-22%), those who had lost their jobs or stopped working due to COVID-19 (24%-39%) and those with job insecurity (26%). CONCLUSION: The evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic may have slightly increased total household food insecurity in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially in populations that were already vulnerable to HFI. There is a need to continue to monitor HFI in Canada.

15.
2021 IEEE MIT Undergraduate Research Technology Conference, URTC 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1788801

ABSTRACT

With the increased cost of living, exacerbated by COVID-19, thousands in New Jersey lack secure access to nutritious food. Given the importance of the issue, this research aims to produce an accurate metric using accessible data to quantify food insecurity. 16 potential explanatory variables, such as median household income and homeless population, were chosen as their values were defined across all NJ counties from 2015-2019. Using multiple linear regression, 14 unique metrics were created after four different variable pruning methods. The leading metric, with an adj. R2 value of 0.932, demonstrates the correlation between food insecurity, population, median household income, total population with health insurance, and population with private health insurance. The implementation of this metric could serve as a tool in predicting areas of food insecurity, highlighting affiliated factors, and revealing connections between racial populations. © 2021 IEEE.

16.
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787641

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic initially caused worldwide concerns about food insecurity. Tweets analyzed in real-time may help food assistance providers target food supplies to where they are most urgently needed. In this exploratory study, we use natural language processing to extract sentiments and emotions expressed in food security-related tweets early in the pandemic in U.S. states. The emotion joy dominated in these tweets nationally, but only anger, disgust, and fear were also statistically correlated with contemporaneous food insufficiency rates reported in the Household Pulse Survey;more nuanced and statistically stronger correlations are detected within states, including a negative correlation with joy. © 2022 The Authors. Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Agricultural & Applied Economics Association.

17.
Front Nutr ; 9: 790519, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785384

ABSTRACT

Food insecurity (FI) is a dynamic phenomenon, and its association with daily affect is unknown. We explored the association between daily FI and affect among low-income adults during a 2-seasonal-month period that covered days both pre- and during the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 29 healthy low-income adults were recruited during fall in 2019 or 2020, 25 of whom were followed in winter in 2020 or 2021. Daily FI (measured once daily) and affect (measured 5 times daily) were collected over the 2nd-4th week in each month. Time-Varying-Effect-Models were used to estimate the association between daily FI and positive/negative affect (PA/NA). Overall, 902 person-days of daily-level data were collected. Daily FI was associated with lower PA in the 3rd and 4th week of fall and winter and with higher NA in the second half of winter months. Similar patterns of FI-affect relations were found pre- and during COVID-19 in the second half of a given month, while unique patterns of positive affect scores in the 2nd week and negative scores in the 1st week were only observed during COVID days. Our study supports a time-varying association between FI and affect in low-income adults. Future large studies are needed to verify the findings; ultimately, better understanding such associations may help identify, target, and intervene in food insecure adults to prevent adverse mental health outcomes.

18.
Womens Health (Lond) ; 18: 17455057221091350, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785099

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Food insecurity has long been associated with poor physical and mental health, especially among women from underrepresented minorities. Despite efforts to reduce food insecurity, rates continue to rise and remain disproportionately high among Latinx living in the United States, a group reporting worse mental health symptoms than any other ethnic group during the COVID-19 pandemic. The need to reduce the health burden associated with food insecurity among Latinas is urgent and requires a more targeted and innovative approach. Interventions using a popular education approach have proven effective among underserved populations, especially when these are delivered by community health workers. However, food insecurity status of the participants is often unreported and it is not clear whether or not results vary between those with and without food insecurity. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this quasi-experimental study was to examine physical and mental health changes among Latinas with, and without, food insecurity following a multicomponent health intervention led by community health workers using a popular education approach. METHODS: Enrolled obese Latinas (N = 98) with and without food insecurity responded to demographic, health behaviors and mental health surveys and completed biometric measurements at baseline, immediately following the intervention and at 3 months. RESULTS: At baseline, participants with food insecurity reported more anxiety and depression than those without, but average body mass index was comparable. Depression, anxiety and body mass index were lower at 3 months post and no statistically significant differences were seen between the groups. Participants with food insecurity benefited as much from the intervention as those without.We found that, although community health workers are not licensed healthcare professionals, with proper training and support, they were able to successfully reduce the risk of chronic diseases and improve mental health symptoms among food-insecure Latinas. CONCLUSION: Given the promising results, similar interventions should be implemented on a larger scale in Latino communities among food insecure women. Long-term sustainability should also be explored.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Food Insecurity , Humans , Life Style , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology
19.
Am J Health Promot ; : 8901171221089627, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785017

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine the interaction effects of adult and child food insecurity on parents' and children's mental well-being. DESIGN: An online survey study was conducted. SETTING: Two Head Start organizations and the Qualtrics Panel. SUBJECTS: Four hundred and eight parents under poverty level and having a child aged 3-5 years participated. MEASURES: Food insecurity was assessed by the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module. Parents' stress, anxiety and depression; and children's sadness, fear, anger, and positive affect were measured using instruments from HealthMeasures. ANALYSIS: Multivariate general linear models were performed in SPSS. RESULTS: Mean age was 31 years, 17% Hispanic, 21% Black. About 51% parents and 37% children were food insecure. After adjusting for demographics and child food insecurity, parents with adult food insecurity had higher stress (B = 2.65, p = .002), anxiety (B = 3.02, p = .001), and depression (B = 3.66, p = .001); and fear in their children (B = 5.03, p = .002) than those without adult food insecurity. Similarly, parents reporting child food insecurity had greater depression than those having no child food insecurity (B = 4.61, p = .020). Black parents had lower stress (B = -1.91, p = .018), anxiety (B = -2.26, p = .012), and depression (B = -4.17, p < .001) than their White counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: The study's results underscore the importance of reducing food insecurity in both parents and children as a whole family system to promote mental well-being of low-income families.

20.
Emerald Open Research ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1786615

ABSTRACT

Background: Evidence suggests that people living in poverty often experience inadequate nutrition with short and long-term health consequences. Whilst the diets of low-income households have been subject to scrutiny, there is limited evidence in the UK on the diet quality and food practices of households reporting food insecurity and food bank use. We explore lived experiences of food insecurity and underlying drivers of diet quality among low-income families, drawing upon two years of participatory research with families of primary school age children. Methods: We report on a mixed-methods study of the relationship between low income, food bank use, food practices and consumption from a survey of 612 participants, including 136 free text responses and four focus groups with 22 participants. The research followed a parallel mixed-methods design: qualitative and quantitative data were collected separately, although both were informed by participatory work. Quantitative data were analysed using binary and multinomial logistic regression modelling;qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results: Lower income households and those living with food insecurity struggle to afford a level of fruit and vegetable consumption that approaches public health guidance for maintaining a healthy diet, despite high awareness of the constituents of a healthy diet. Participants used multiple strategies to ensure as much fruit, vegetable and protein consumption as possible within financial constraints. The quantitative data suggested a relationship between higher processed food consumption and having used a food bank, independent of income and food security status. Conclusions: The findings suggest that individualised, behavioural accounts of food practices on a low-income misrepresent the reality for people living with poverty. Behavioural or educational interventions are therefore likely to be less effective in tackling food insecurity and poor nutrition among people on a low income;policies focusing on structural drivers, including poverty and geographical access to food, are needed.

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