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2.
New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations (Online) ; 45(2):77-88, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824411

ABSTRACT

In this short article, we explore the implications of Covid-19 and its response for employment in Aotearoa ;New Zealand, focusing on the potential effect in Māori communities. To prevent the foreclosure of possible alternative futures, we emphasise the need to envisage economies in different ways, and the potential for alternative understandings of work within these visions. We argue that, rather than creating conditions for economic transformation in Aotearoa ;New Zealand, Covid-19 has merely revealed preexisting conditions with strong transformative potential. The pre-existing conditions that we will focus on in this paper are the enduring understandings of economy and work within Te Ao Māori (the Māori world) and at the meeting place of worlds represented by Te Tiriti ;The Treaty of Waitangi. We write as an exploratory partnership between a Ngāi Tahu/Pākehā scholar living and working in the Ngāi Tahu takiwā (territory) and a Pākehā scholar living and working on the lands of the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation.

3.
Agrarian Perspectives XXX. Sources of competitiveness under pandemic and environmental shocks, Proceedings of the 30th International Scientific Conference, Prague, Czech Republic ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1824358

ABSTRACT

During this uncertain time while the whole globe faces the pandemic of COVID-19, humanity has become aware of the importance of agriculture in general, as well as of food selfsufficiency. Regardless of huge development in all industry sectors, agriculture is still affected by several adversities and faces the requirements regarding the sustainable eco-system, climate changes, biodiversity, production innovations. Assuming the lack of financial resources is one of the major problems agriculturists face, as well as one that could impact the resolving of other problems, finding a proper source of funding could be crucial for agriculturists, whether individuals (families) or cooperatives. The EU funds have a great role in that context, assuring the vital resources through the common agricultural policy. Standing on the transition from one financial perspective (2014-2020) to another (2021-2027), a fresh capital seeks proposals that are in line with the set objectives. This paper aims to present the success of chosen countries in withdrawing the EU funds from 2014 to 2020 and the analysis among those countries with special emphasis on the EAGF and EAFRD. It also gives some possible areas in agriculture which should be given due attention since they are acceptable for funding. The manuscript deals with available funds intended for agriculture and covers the main objectives of the EU common agricultural policy. To present the former allocations, but also with an emphasis on the new ones, a comparative analysis has been conducted on a sample of 10 selected central and south-east European countries. To get an insight on the allocations from the most significant funds aimed at agriculture, the analysis has been conducted for 6 years from the last financial perspective, as well as for the new 2021-2027 financial perspective. The analysis has been conducted using both absolute and relative values. Research results show that developing countries benefit a lot from the EU cohesion policy and there is a room for further improvements in national agricultural policies.

4.
HEM/ONC Today ; 23(4):3, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1824127

ABSTRACT

[...]COVID-19 affected all things in everybody's lives, but for patients with cancer it was really a much harder time," Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, FAACR, professor of medicine, surgery and molecular and medical pharmacology at University of California, Los Angeles, director of the tumor immunology program at Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, past AACR president, and chair of the report's steering committee, told Healio ;HemOnc Today. Building off the pandemic shining a light on the necessities of science and research, the AACR report included a call and action with recommendations for federal lawmakers to further support efforts to expand and enhance health care. The AACR called for: * at least $10 billion for the NIH and its grantees to offset pandemicrelated research costs as emergency supplemental funding, as proposed in the Research Investment to Spark the Economy (RISE) Act of2021;* funding increases of at least $3.5 billion for NIH and $1.1 billion for the NCI in fiscal year 2022, for total funding of $46.4 billion for NIH and $7.6 billion for NCI;* policies that broaden health care coverage and reduce inequities in access to health care, such as expanding Medicaid;and * increased diversity in clinical trials and efforts to alleviate the financial burden on prospective trial participants by reimbursing patients for ancillary trial-related costs, such as transportation and lodging, as established in the DIVN1 -https://media.proquest.com/media/hms/PFT/1/CaCpM?_a=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&_s=ASRlzCrgmzWR0jTNPlDJ055q%2FU4%3D ERSE Act.

5.
Working Paper - Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad|2021. (2021-11-03):20 pp. 19 ref. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1824065

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper estimates the impact of the government-mandated intensity of the lockdown across various zones on the period product consumption for menstruating women in India.

6.
Public Health ; 206:94-101, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1821458

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Concerns have been raised about the quantity and quality of research conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly related to the mental health and wellbeing of health care workers (HCWs). For understanding the volume, source, methodological rigour and degree of overlap in COVID-19, studies were conducted among HCWs in the United Kingdom (UK). Study design: Mixed methods approach, literature review and audit. Methods: First, a literature review of published research studies and second, an audit of studies HCWs have been invited to complete. For the literature review, we searched Medline, PsycINFO and Nexis, webpages of three medical organisations (Royal Society of Medicine, Royal College of Nursing and British Medical Association), and the YouGov website. For the audit, a non-random purposive sample of six HCWs from different London NHS Trusts reviewed email, WhatsApp and SMS messages they received for study invitations. Results: The literature review identified 27 studies;the audit identified 70 study invitations. Studies identified by the literature review were largely of poor methodological rigour: only eight studies (30%) provided response rate, one study (4%) reported having ethical approval, and one study (4%) reported funding details. There was substantial overlap in the topics measured. In the audit, volunteers received a median of 12 invitations. The largest number of study invitations were for national surveys (n = 23), followed by local surveys (n = 16) and research surveys (n = 8). Conclusion: HCWs have been asked to complete numerous surveys that frequently have methodological shortcomings and overlapping aims. Many studies do not follow scientific good-practice and generate questionable, non-generalisable results.

7.
Management Theory and Studies for Rural Business and Infrastructure Development ; 43(4):442-456, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1818811

ABSTRACT

Corporate social responsibility in the food production and distribution sector in Europe is currently mainly linked to the activities of food banks. Food banks in the current form provide their services free of charge, however, these activities are closely associated with support from public budgets and volunteering. Currently, there is a growing tendency to revise the current funding scheme and the overall provision of food banks' activities, as well as the efficiency aspects of their operation. It is, therefore, necessary to identify the essential aspects of the social responsibility framework, in particular from the side of participating entities as donors to food banks. The new situation calls for a revision of food banks' operation schemes, including supportive voluntary intentions within the business environment. Specifically, the importance of the social responsibility of business entities can be seen in their inclusive assistance in the recent global COVID-19 crisis. This article aims at the identification of financial aspects behind voluntary donations to food banks, using the exploratory approach, namely via identification of major differences between voluntary donors and the respective industry benchmark in the field of financial criteria, focusing on Central and Eastern European countries (CEE). It was employed a methodological approach for testing independent observed samples to compare selected financial performance indicators' mean values, using a two-sample T-test for equal and non-equal variances. Subsequently, a dynamic decomposition of observed financial performance indicators is conducted for a revision of the existence of mutual correlations. Differently from the main areas of interest of identified previous research on food banks' activities, our effort is focusing on business entities in the role of food banks' stakeholders. Corporate micro-financial data of foodstuff donors in Central and Eastern European countries according to their accessible annual reports and lists of donors to foodbanks are employed. Authors thus point out, based on provided empirical evidence, a need for a more inclusive type of attitude to food banks' operations from the foodstuff production and distribution chain and its participants.

8.
Anti - Trafficking Review ; - (17):91-112, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1818763

ABSTRACT

For university instructors who teach human trafficking as a comprehensive course, design decisions often begin with determining scope, disciplinary orientation, and learning goals. Further decisions involve pedagogical approaches and how to best support and sustain student learning. With civic engagement principles, universities can situate themselves within local anti-trafficking initiatives by offering courses to expand organisational capacities to end human trafficking. Using Human Trafficking 4160 at Metropolitan State University of Denver as an example, this paper provides key design questions to create a civically-engaged multidisciplinary course, partnered with agencies statewide, and equipped to support students primed for social justice and systems change. It offers suggestions for community partnerships to deliver content and co-create learning activities. It also provides pedagogical techniques to facilitate inclusive, trauma-informed learning spaces.

9.
PLoS One ; 17(4), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1817487

ABSTRACT

Introduction Reduced rates of help seeking by those who self-harmed during the COVID-19 pandemic have been reported. Objectives To understand changes in healthcare service contacts for self-harm during the COVID-19 pandemic across primary, emergency and secondary care. Methods This retrospective cohort study used routine electronic healthcare data for Wales, United Kingdom, from 2016 to March 14, 2021. Population-based data from primary care, emergency departments and hospital admissions were linked at individual-level. All Welsh residents aged ≥10 years over the study period were included in the study. Primary, emergency and secondary care contacts with self-harm at any time between 2016 and March 14, 2021 were identified. Outcomes were counts, incidence, prevalence and proportion of self-harm contacts relative to all contacts in each and all settings, as well as the proportion of people contacting one or more settings with self-harm. Weekly trends were modelled using generalised estimated equations, with differences between 2020 (to March 2021) and comparison years 2016–2018 (to March 2017–2019) quantified using difference in differences, from which mean rate of odds ratios (μROR) across years was reported. Results The study included 3,552,210 individuals over the study period. Self-harm contacts reduced across services in March and December 2020 compared to previous years. Primary care contacts with self-harm reduced disproportionately compared to non-self-harm contacts (μROR = 0.7, p<0.05), while their proportion increased in emergency departments during April 2020 (μROR = 1.3, p<0.05 in 2/3 comparison years) and hospital admissions during April-May 2020 (μROR = 1.2, p<0.05 in 2/3 comparison years). Despite this, those who self-harmed in April 2020 were more likely to be seen in primary care than other settings compared to previous years (μROR = 1.2, p<0.05). A lower proportion of those with self-harm contacts in emergency departments were subsequently admitted to hospital in December 2020 compared to previous years (μROR = 0.5, p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that those who self-harmed during the COVID-19 pandemic may have been less likely to seek help, and those who did so faced more stringent criteria for admission. Communications encouraging those who self-harm to seek help during pandemics may be beneficial. However, this needs to be supported by maintained provision of mental health services.

10.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816912

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound effects on healthcare systems worldwide. It has also had global economic impacts that will continue to be felt for years. The effects have implications for how cancer research is conducted and funded. The REPRISE project aims to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic to provide opportunities to redefine cancer research priorities in low- to middle-income countries (LMICs). We aim to characterize the nature of these practical and economic impacts and use this information to redefine research priorities in a changed world moving forward. Methods: As a first step, we conducted a snapshot survey of members of the 'Cancer and COVID-19 Global Task Force', which consists of experienced cancer researchers across the world. We asked about the extent to which the COVID-19 outbreak and resulting public health measures had affected cancer research in their centers. Results: We received 57 responses to our questionnaire. The respondents worked in 22 countries, representing all Word Health Organization (WHO) regions. 67% of respondents worked in either an academic/university setting, or in a public teaching hospital. The specialities of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgery, and epidemiology were each represented by >25% of all respondents, which also included those with backgrounds in nursing, palliative care, survivorship, psychology, pathology, and prevention. Respondents in 17/22 countries reported that some (n=10) or all (n=7) cancer research studies were suspended at their center following the outbreak of COVID-19. Respondents in 5 countries reported that suspension of these studies had lasted >6 months. Respondents in 8/22 countries reported that staff redeployment, furlough, or restriction from clinical areas had had a 'large impact' on the conduct of research they were involved with. Respondents in 4 further countries reported that these factors had had a 'moderate impact'. Respondents also reported local impacts on cancer research from in-center outbreaks of COVID-19 (14 countries);government-imposed 'lockdowns' (20 countries);compliance with COVID-19 safety (18 countries);decreases in participant accrual (11 countries);and decreased patient access to diagnostics or treatment (19 countries). Nine countries yielded reports of funding cuts in their center. Twenty countries yielded reports of concerns about future funding cuts. Fifteen countries yielded reports of issues from delays to postgraduate education. Additionally, respondents were concerned about future impacts on cancer research from COVID-19 safety measures, funding cuts, and decreased patient access to diagnostics or treatments. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted on the conduct of cancer research in many different countries and in several different ways. The process of redefining cancer research priorities throughout the REPRISE project will ensure that the impacts we have documented here are mitigated as far as possible and that moving forward, we can begin to address global disparities in cancer research.

11.
Respirology ; 27(SUPPL 1):154, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816639

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Development of a new interventional bronchoscopy (IP) unit is a challenge due to requirement of equipment and skilled staff. Organising this in a public-private model was not well explored. Methods: Our IP unit at Northern Beaches Hospital (NBH) was established in August 2020. This audit was from August 2020 to Sept 2021. All equipment required were obtained through research funding. The number of procedures, types and complications analysed. The staff training sessions and ongoing training noted. Results: During the 12-month period: 129 flexible bronchoscopies, 77 Linear-Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Biopsies (EBUS), 30 Radial-EBUS, 10 cryo-biopsy for lung nodules, 10 rigid-bronchoscopies, 7 de-bulking and two tracheal dilatations and one stent placements were performed. There was one unplanned admission for hypoxia and one patient developed a vocal cord polyp following a Radial/ cryo-rigid procedure. No pneumothorax or significant bleeding. Staff had staged introduction to multiple procedures and ongoing training during sessions. One nurse specialist and one interventional bronchoscopist with IP fellowship training conducted the sessions. With 12-month data it was easy to convince management of the workload and revenue, enabling purchase of a full fleet of two EBUS scopes, EMU 2 processor, Radial-EBUS probe driver, one ultra-thin scope, Cryobiopsy machine and Rigid equipment. Nursing staff turnover was high and required multiple training sessions. COVID-19 resulted in 3-month closure. Conclusion: The new IP unit at NBH was accomplished with full fleet of equipment including rigid-cryo capability in a short time with reasonable case numbers during COVID-19 lockdown. Being a private hospital, demonstrating revenue with grant funded equipment resulted in funding approval. Having a partnership enabled both public an private list to be combined to maximise usage of equipment. Staff turnover was high and needed constant education.

12.
International Journal of Pharmacy Practice ; 30(SUPPL 1):i21-i22, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816102

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Community pharmacy has played a frontline role during the COVID-19 pandemic (1,2). Governments and professional organisations in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland (RoI) have acknowledged the need to support and maximise community pharmacy to maintain delivery of patient care. However, the pandemic's impact on day-to-day changes to community pharmacy practice has not been comprehensively examined across the island of Ireland. Aim: To identify changes as communicated by policy and professional bodies to community pharmacy practice across the island of Ireland in preparation for and/or response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and to compare identified changes in Northern Ireland (NI) and RoI. Methods: Government, health service, regulatory and professional organisation websites in both NI and RoI were searched using relevant search terms (e.g. pharmacist, COVID- 19). Any document (e.g. official publications/reports, website pages, circulars) containing information relating to changes to community pharmacy-related infrastructure, funding/resourcing, legislation, guidelines or policies in preparation for, and/ or response to, COVID-19, published between 1st January and 31st October 2020 was included. Guidelines on clinical use of medicines were excluded as this was considered a separate topic. Initial screening of each website was undertaken by one reviewer. Brief details of potentially relevant documents were collated in a spreadsheet. Following removal of duplicates, full-texts of identified documents were assessed for inclusion by two reviewers independently, with discrepancies resolved through discussion. A content analysis was undertaken. Results: In total, 253 documents were identified. Following removal of duplicates and screening, 98 documents were included in the analysis. Most documents were published in the first three months of the pandemic (March-May 2020). A key theme related to medication prescribing and supply, with changes implemented to ensure continued access to medicines. In both NI and RoI, significant changes were made to emergency supply arrangements (e.g. increase in allowable duration of supply at the request of patients). In RoI, legislative changes were made to recognise Healthmail as the national electronic prescription transfer system and to temporarily extend prescription validity. In NI, many community pharmacy services (e.g. Minor Ailments Service, Medicines Use Review) were 'stood down' during initial months of the pandemic. Much of the communication in NI and RoI related to operational changes to ensure business continuity. In both jurisdictions a temporary register of pharmacists was introduced to allow previously registered pharmacists to contribute to the health service response. Additionally, in NI, General Dental Practitioners were redeployed to assist with community pharmacy response. Other areas of focus across both jurisdictions included infection control within a workplace setting, dealing with situations where staff were affected by COVID-19, and the use of personal protective equipment during pharmacy service provision. Conclusion: This study examined changes in community pharmacy practice across two jurisdictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Whilst our searches were limited to publicly accessible documents only, the overlap in identified changes reflects the similarities in challenges faced by community pharmacists in adapting and responding to COVID-19. The cross-country comparison may help pharmacists and policy-makers to identify optimal approaches for responding to any future public health crises.

13.
Health Secur ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1815943

ABSTRACT

The National Emerging Special Pathogens Training and Education Center (NETEC) was established in 2015 to improve the capabilities of healthcare facilities to provide safe and effective care to patients with Ebola and other special pathogens in the United States. Through NETEC, a collaborative network of 10 Regional Emerging Special Pathogen Treatment Centers (RESPTCs) undertook readiness activities that included potential respiratory pathogens. These preparations, which took place before the COVID-19 pandemic, established a foundation of readiness that enabled RESPTCs to play a pivotal role in the US COVID-19 pandemic response. As initial COVID-19 cases were detected in the United States, RESPTCs provided essential isolation capacity, supplies, and subject matter expertise that allowed for additional time for healthcare systems to prepare. Through the Special Pathogen Research Network, RESPTCs rapidly enrolled patients into early clinical trials. During periods of high community transmission, RESPTCs provided educational, clinical, and logistical support to a wide range of healthcare and nonhealthcare settings. In this article, we describe how NETEC and the RESPTC network leveraged this foundation of special pathogen readiness to strengthen the national healthcare system's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. NETEC and the RESPTC network have proven to be an effective model that can support the national response to future emerging special pathogens.

14.
Brain Injury ; 36(SUPPL 1):121-122, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815742

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a disproportionate disruption to the delivery of in-person services in a multitude of essential and non-essential health service organizations. Management teams have had to seek alternative methods for effective service delivery while meeting appropriate safety precautions. COVID-19 mediated work changes have sparked an increasing concern about allied health worker's well-being and health in the work environment. Vista Centre Brain Injury Services (VCBIS), a Canadian organization committed to providing services to individuals with acquired brain injury, has modified in-person services and transitioned to remote work in response to the pandemic. This study aims to investigate and compare the impact of the pandemic among VCBIS workers. We surveyed individual staff members to assess their physical, psychological and social well-being in their work environment. Additionally, we investigated the staff's perspective on current management strategies and pandemic prospects. Methods: Between March 16th, 2021 and April 2nd, 2021, staff members were surveyed on changes in service due to COVID- 19 and its effect on workflow and well-being. In total, there were ninety-two questions containing a mixture of binary and linear numeric response formats. Fifty-seven questions asked staff members to reflect on their experience since the onset of the pandemic (?Retrospective component?) and thirty-five questions asked about thoughts and feelings about the future of the pandemic as it relates to their employment (?Prospective component?). For descriptive statistics, numeric variables are presented as means with standard deviations and categorical variables are presented with frequencies and percentages. We tested for the differences in responses between genders, age groups, employment status, and program involvement using a student's t-test, or single factor Anova and Tukey-kramer test post hoc. Results: Twenty-five staff members responded to the survey during the response period (32% female, 68% male). Most reported their age in the 30-39 range (28%), followed by the 60 or older, (24%), 18-29 (16%), 40-49 (16%) and 50-59 (16%) age ranges. Statistical analysis is in progress to elucidate significant differences across gender, age groups, employment status and program involvement. Conclusions: The results of this study have important implications for VCBIS service delivery, team management and funding distribution. Due to the long-lasting impact of the pandemic, it is important to consider these findings as VCBIS operates through the pandemic and transitions back to normal services. Preliminary results demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic service changes have impacted staff, suggesting the need for additional support and resources to improve staff work productivity, satisfaction and overall well-being. Given that many health organizations have had to readjust as a result of the pandemic, it is expected that staff outside VCBIS may share similar experiences.

15.
Nature ; 604(7907):625, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1815506
16.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815386

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic s need for life-saving treatments and a "warp speed" vaccine challenged the National Institutes of Health s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) recipients to improve their methods and processes in conducting clinical research. While CTSA recipient, New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science (NJ ACTS), responded to this call to action with significant clinical research milestones, a comprehensive understanding of regulatory metrics during the COVID-19 pandemic is uncertain. The objective of this research is to identify, compare, and contrast metrics that illustrate the effectiveness of NJ ACTS s research mobilization efforts during COVID-19. Methods: Data was collected from the IRB, the Clinical Research Units (CRUs), and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP). IRB data detailed the volume and types of protocols approved and turnaround time (TAT) for approval in 2020 vs. 2019. CRU data examined study metrics of adult and pediatric clinical trials across 2018-2020. ORSP data documented awards received in 2019 and 2020. Results: Analysis revealed a 95% increase in IRB-Approved studies in 2020, with a significant decrease in TAT for COVID-19 studies. All CRUs observed a median 5.2-fold increase in the enrollment of adult and pediatric participants for COVID-19-related research. Study income was 106% and 196% greater than 2019 and 2018 respectively, with more than half funded through federal sponsors and 89% for COVID-19 trials. ORSP data revealed that 9% of awards and 26% of 2020 funding were COVID-19 studies. Conclusion: This study demonstrates NJACTS effectively responded to challenges posed by the pandemic.

17.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(5):576, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1815329

ABSTRACT

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has expressed concerns over President Joe Biden's suggested funding for the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H), at the expense of funding for the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Cancer Institute (NCI). According to a March 29, 2022, statement by ASCO board chair Howard A “Skip” Burris III, there is a robust belief within ASCO in the stated mission of ARPA-H and its possibilities to introduce and accelerate research works, but equally there are concerns over the substantial investment in ARPA-H compromising funding for the NIH and NCI. According to ASCO's statement, in the past few years, investment in the NCI showed a modest increase, but it has not kept pace with the increase in applications for research grants;it is important that the baseline budget for the NCI keeps on growing to keep up with the studies required for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of cancers.

18.
Journal of Critical Care ; 69, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1814669

ABSTRACT

[...]our study suggests the COVID-19 pandemic may impact strongly on the design and execution of clinical trials in the ICU worldwide, with non-COVID-19 studies severely hindered and COVID-19 studies boosted. All authors revised and approved the final submitted version of the manuscript.Declaration of Competing Interest The authors declare to have no competing interests.Acknowledgements The authors express their gratitude to Yuli Huang working at Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University, Foshan, China, for his critical review and comments about the manuscript. Characteristicsa All ICU trials (2016–2020), N = 1792 Traditional trials in 2020, N = 267 COVID-19 trials in 2020, N = 305 Year of trials initiated 2016 284 (15.8) – 2 (0.7)b 2017 305 (17.0) – 0 2018 309 (17.2) – 1 (0.3)b 2019 329 (18.4) – 4 (1.3)b 2020 565 (31.5) 267 (100) 298 (97.7) Region Europe – 108 (40.4) 113 (37.0) North America – 66 (24.7) 96 (31.5) Asia – 63 (23.6) 57 (18.7) South America – 7 (2.6) 27 (8.9) Africa – 18 (6.7) 11 (3.6) Oceania – 5 (1.9) 1 (0.3) Number of participants 0–100 1012 (56.5) 128 (47.9) 187 (61.3) 101–1000 684 (38.2) 123 (46.1) 109 (35.7) >1000 96 (5.3) 16 (6.0) 9 (3.0) Recruitment status Not yet recruiting 218 (12.2) 121 (45.3) 52 (17.0) Active, not recruiting 90 (5.0) 5 (1.9) 21 (6.9) Recruiting or enrolling 737 (41.1) 128 (47.9) 178 (58.4) Completed 409 (22.8) 8 (3.0) 37 (12.1) Suspended 15 (0.8) 0 1 (0.3) Terminated 67 (3.7) 0 7 (2.3) Withdraw 51 (2.9) 5 (1.9) 9 (3.0) Unknown status 205 (11.4) 0 0 Study design Randomized control trials 1357 (75.7) 210 (78.7) 217 (71.1) Others 435 (24.3) 57 (21.3) 88 (28.9) Study primary purpose Treatment 1046 (58.4) 142 (53.2) 261 (85.6)c Others 746 (41.6) 125 (46.8) 44 (14.4) Intervention Drug/biological – 96 (36.0) 223 (73.1) Device – 56 (21.0) 21 (6.9) Behavioral/procedure – 41 (15.4) 21 (6.9) Other – 74 (27.7) 40 (13.1) Funding sourced Industry – 34 (12.7) 67 (22.0) Government – 5 (1.9) 1 (0.3) Other – 254 (95.1) 278 (91.2) Table 1 Characteristics of clinical trials conducted in the intensive care unit registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

19.
Journal of Clinical Anesthesia ; 79, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1814642

ABSTRACT

Consultant for Rubin Anders, Medical malpractice defense expert for Amrity Schaub, Editorial Board Member for Journal of Perioperative Care and OR Management, Editor of a medical textbook on Problem Based Learning.CRediT authorship contribution statement Erin M. Adams: Conceptualization, Investigation, Writing – original draft. Consultant for Rubin Anders, Medical malpractice defense expert for Amrity Schaub, Editorial Board Member for Journal of Perioperative Care and OR Management, Editor of a medical textbook on Problem Based Learning.Acknowledgements This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. Category Annual Savings⁎ Supply Waste $223,117 Disposable supply cost $50,337 Reusable supply cost $157,080 COVID-19 Precautions supply cost $15,700 Waste Disposal Weight 1.46 metric tons CO2 Emissions 3.05 MTCO2E⁎⁎ Removal costs $1,609 Human Power Waste Time 148 h, 45 min Salary $17,676 Table 1 Estimated annual savings from replacing the nightly emergency set-up with a mobile emergency case cart.

20.
Journal fur Kardiologie ; 28(11-12):380-383, 2021.
Article in German | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1812944

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine has gained immense momentum in heart failure, not least as a result of the Corona pandemic. In symptomatic patients the use of telemonitoring is associated with a reduction in hospital admissions and mortality as well as an improvement in quality of life. Data is acquired either via non-invasive as well as invasive sensors. In the future, in addition to innovations in sensor technology, we can expect to see the use of wearables, complex predictive algorithms that combine a variety of information, and self-learning artificial intelligence. However, a prerequisite for the widespread application of telemedicine in routine clinical practice is the availability of adequate funding.

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