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1.
Rev Panam Salud Publica ; 44: e114, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893623

ABSTRACT

Given the uncertainty that accompanies the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the need to respond to multiple chronic and acute health problems affecting the general population, including those requiring surgical intervention, the recommendations implemented in clinics and hospitals in Colombia are presented as a guide to achieve a reopening of elective surgery services in a safe, staggered and monitored manner in accordance with the dynamics imposed by the pandemic, national and international guidelines and the speed of production of scientific evidence related to COVID-19.

2.
Metas de Enfermeria ; 24(7):72-77, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1893702

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused many deaths in geriatric homes. The commitment by female Primary Care doctors and nurses with the population they manage made it essential to conduct community actions in order to improve the care for these persons The general objective was to implement the "Plan of Action for Managing Persons in the Nursing Home Setting and Healthcare during the COVID-19 Pandemic" of the Government of Catalonia, and to adap t it to the specific needs in thecen tres managed. The intervention was conducted by female Primary Care nurses and doctors, in two nursing homes from an urban area of Barcelona between March and May, 2020. It consisted of three stages: 1) Assessment: Both nursing homes cared for 41 persons (78.6% were female;mean age: 84.5 years). Of these, 100% had a chronic condition, 41.5% presented total dependence, 21.9% presented severe dependence, and 26.8% suffered cognitive deterioration;63.4% of them were asymptomatic. Lack of materials, infrastructures, and knowledge were detected. 2) Coordination actions: Disinfection of nursing homes by the Fire Department, and extraction of PCR samples, which tested negative in 100% of patients and positive in four caregivers. 3) Health Education Workshop for staff in direct contact with the persons living in the nursing home. Nursing homes stayed free of COVID-19 until the start of de-escalation by the end of May, 2020. Subsequent contact was maintained with nursing homes. Community intervention might have contributed to the lack of infection cases among workers and persons living in the nursing homes. © 2021 DAE Editorial, Grupo Paradigma. All rights reserved.

3.
Journal of Indonesian Tourism and Development Studies ; 9(3):180-186, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1893559

ABSTRACT

Before Covid-19 happened, the tourism industry had been faced overtourism problems as the effect of mass tourism growth. Tourism environment quality reduction and the social problem happened to the local people become a problem behind all glitters of tourism growth. Since the Covid-19 outbreak, the overtourism problem changes into nontourism. The spread of Covid-19 in tourism can change the tourism development's paradigm from the visit quantity to the visit quality. Policy about the limitation on the number of visitors applied as the requirement for reopening the tourism sector. This policy is related to the tourism carrying capacity about the maximum amount contained in one tourism area without causing any damages to the environment. This visitor's limitation indirectly solved two problems at once, concerns about the spread of Covid-19 and overtourism repeats. The research was done in Pulau Merah Beach as the destination with the highest visitors in Banyuwangi regency, which has 574 visitors each day and did the tourism opening simulation in a new normal era with visitors' limitation. The tourism manager has determined that 750 people are the maximum number of visitors per day. This research aimed to evaluate the consistency of the number of maximum visitors with Covid-19 policy about visitors limitation using the tourism carrying capacity concept Mix methods were used in this study to deepen data and analysis. Thus, complete and clearer research was gained. Based on the analysis, the physical carrying capacity value of 1.074 people per day, the real carrying capacity value, and effectiveness of 468 people per day. It means the limitation of visitors in new normal tourism in Red Island is safe and by the Covid-19 protocol because it decreased about 30% from the tourism physical carrying capacity. However, if it was evaluated from the real carrying capacity value and effectiveness, those amounts are still exceeding the capacity of the tourism carrying capacity.

4.
Food Processing: Techniques and Technology ; 52(1):178-188, 2022.
Article in Russian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1893555

ABSTRACT

Healthy diet and lifestyle are especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, more and more people of all age groups are getting involved into various sports and healthy diets. These factors have boosted the development of the sports nutrition industry. The current situation requires detailed studies of consumer preferences and digital marketing communications. The present research objective was to identify the role of digital marketing communications in sports nutrition. The study featured the consumer preferences in the market of sports nutrition and included an on-line survey of 500 residents of the Kuzbass Region engaged in various sports. The obtained results underwent statistical, economic, and graphic analyses. Men aged 18-29 appeared to be the main consumers of sports nutrition in Kuzbass. Most of them (90%) relied on the competent advice from the seller or coach and purchased sports foods in specialized shops or online. The target audience of sports nutrition consumers is expanding, which requires new promotion means. Digital marketing tools proved extremely effective as they bring information to the target audience in a tailored manner via social nets or influential bloggers. The article contains some recommendations for producers and sellers of sports foods based on the requirements of the main target consumers and their preferences regarding the place of purchase, content, communication channels, etc. The priority is shifting from traditional marketing communication channels to digital ones, i.e. contextual, targeted, and viral advertising, social media promotion, consultations with a shop assistant or a fitness club coach, direct online marketing, sponsorship of various sports events, joint online promotions with fitness club, etc.

5.
Seguranca Alimentar e Nutricional ; 28(43), 2021.
Article in Portuguese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1893518

ABSTRACT

This study aims to understand the ways in which hunger has been represented by the mainstream press in Brazil during the COVID-19 pandemic. From Discourse Analysis, a total of twenty-four news were analyzed, fifteen from the Folha de Sao Paulo and nine from the O Globo newspaper, published from february to july 2020. Discourses were found that evoke fundamentally for the neoliberal understanding of poverty, transferring the responsibility of the State on hunger to the subjects. However, despite the discourses showing hunger as a circumstance potentially increased by the pandemic period, the analysis of the results reveals that hunger occupies places in the causes and consequences of this health crisis, both in an emergency and in a structural way. From the results, the visibility of the narratives of the subjects who experience hunger is also highlighted, however, it was observed that there is a fine line between narrating the consequences of hunger and reproducing stigmas that echo in the collective imagination of society. In this perspective, the study reveals the need to deepen, review and critically read the media narratives about hunger and their contribution to the constitution of the social imaginary about the phenomenon.

6.
Middle East Journal of Family Medicine ; 20(6):29-39, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1893247

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Even though the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak was first reported in late 2019 in Wuhan, China, it is still prevalent across the globe and continues to create mayhem. According to WHO, on March 26, 2021, SARS-CoV-2 virus has infected a total of 125 million people worldwide and caused 3 million casualties. There have been 14.5 million confirmed cases in Southeast Asia, out of which 6.5 lac confirmed cases of COVID-19 are from Pakistan alone, with 14,028 deaths. In Sindh, Pakistan, there have been 2.6 lac confirmed cases of COVID-19 out of which 2 lac 56 thousand have recovered while 4,487 died. Since the outbreak, countless research has been undertaken pertaining to the virus transmission cycle and different countries have strived to come up with a vaccine to protect the masses. The continued dissemination of this coronavirus vaccine emphasizes the role of international collaboration in the development of vaccines and therapeutics. Factors contributing towards vaccine hesitancy include unknown adverse effects of the vaccine, perceived threats, lack of awareness, religious beliefs, myths surrounding the pandemic and vaccine, lack of confidence in the health system and lack of community awareness about vaccine-preventable diseases. Moreover, since the vaccine is new and there is a lack of research pertaining to its efficacy and detrimental effects, people are reluctant to get vaccinated. The findings of this study might help the government figure out the best way to introduce mass vaccination programs in Pakistan and other South Asian countries. Moreover, lockdowns and social distancing may be eased if a COVID-19 vaccination offers immune defense, which will be beneficial for the country's economy. Objective: To gauge the percentage of citizens who are willing to become vaccinated, their overall attitude towards the vaccination programs and the factors contributing towards vaccine hesitancy at the COVID Vaccination Center, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Center, Karachi, Pakistan. Methodology: A cross sectional study from May 2021 to August 2021 was conducted at the COVID Vaccination Center, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Center in Karachi. The study was conducted on 400 persons who were either the vaccination staff of the COVID Vacination Center or the persons coming for COVID vaccination. The sampling technique was non probability purposive sampling. The data was collected by rotating a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was given to the data collectors who distributed them to the vaccination staff and the visitors. Written consent was taken from the participants and all ethical considerations and research protocols were observed. Data was collected in the form of pre-tested self-administered questionnaires. In order to standardize the questionnaires, a pilot study was conducted among research participants for the purpose of examining content validity. Data collected was analyzed using SPSS software version 20. The statistical analysis was conducted with 95% confidence interval and a pvalue of <0.05 was taken as threshold of statistical significance. Results: 400 subjects were approached to fill in the questionnaires. The age group of participants was less than 25 years were 48.2%(n=204), 25 to 50 years were 38.8% (n=164) and more than 50 years were 7.6%(n=32) Males were 40.%(n=169) while females were 54.5%(n=231). Among the participants 40.4% (n=171) were married and 54.1%(n=229) were unmarried. Coming to the educational background, the majority had a bachelor's degree or beyond. Not Formally educated were 1.7%(n=7), those who studied till fifth grade or below were 1.2%(n=5), those educated up until matriculation were 3.3%(n=14), those who were intermediate educated were 14.3%(n=63), Diploma holders were 31%(n=131) and those who were university educated were 42.5%(n=180. When the participants were asked about their opinion regarding their health status, 21.5%(n=91) said it was excellent, 47.8%(n=202) said it was good, 21.3%(n=90) said it was fair, while 4%(n=17) said it was poor. Whe the participants were asked whether they were they suffering from any illness (e.g: asthma, high BP, diabetes mellitus), 16.3%(n=69) said yes while 78.3%(n=331) said no. When the participants were asked whether COVID-19 existed, 86.5% (n=366) said yes while 8%(n=34) said no. When asked if COVID-19 was dangerous, 82.7%(n=350) said yes while 11.8% (n=50) said no. Replying to the question had the participants ever been infected by COVID in past, 13.9%(n=59) said yes while 54.8%(n=274) said no. When asked whether any members of their family, friends or neighbours had been affected by COVID-19, 61.9%(n=262) said yes and 32.6%(n=138) said no. When asked had they ever heard about COVID-19 vaccination, 39%(n=165) said yes and 55%(n=235) said no. 92.7%(n=392) said yes while 1.9%(n=8) said when asked whether had they received COVID-19 vaccination, 39%(n=165) said yes while 61 %(n=235) said no. When those who had not taken the vaccine were asked the reasons for not doing so, 6.5%(n=28) said that the COVID-19vaccine was not effective, 9.5%(n=40) said that it had side effects, 4.7%(n=20) believed that they had alternate protection against COVID-19 while 36.9%(n=156) gave other reasons. When the participants were asked whether they considered themselves at risk of getting COVID-19,43.7%(n=185) said yes, 27.2%(n=115) said no and 23.6%(n=100) said that they were not sure. Replying to the question would they prefer a vaccine with lower efficacy for the time being, 50.6%(n=214) said yes and 44%(n=186) said no. When asked which vaccine would they prefer, 35.5%(n=150) said Sinopharm/Sinovac (China), 5.2%(n=22) said Sputnik-V (Russia), 3.1%(n=13) said AstraZeneca(United Kingdom), 17.5%(n=74) said Pfizer(USA), 18.9%(n=80) said any vaccine and 14.4(n=61) were not in favour of any vaccine. When asked in detail regarding the participants' major concerns and reservations regarding COVID 19 vaccine, about 29.6%(n=125) participants did not trust a vaccine made in such a short period of time, 35.7%(n=151) trusted the vaccine and 29.3%(n=124) were not sure. When asked whether the Vaccine's contents were not permissible in their religion, 7.1%(n=30) agreed, 60.3%(n=255) disagreed and 27.2%(n=115) were not sure. When asked whether they did not need a vaccine as they had already contracted COVID-19, 8%(n=34) agreed, 70.7%(n=299) disagreed and 15.8%(n=57) were not sure, Replying to the question whether the Vaccine could cause infertility, 7.8%(n=33) agreed, 49.9%(n=211) disagreed and 36.9%(n=156) were not sure. When the participants were asked whether COVID-19 vaccine was a conspiracy of the West, 17%(n=72) agreed, 52.2%(n=221) disagreed while 25.3%(n=107) were not sure. Responding to the question whether the participants would wait and see vaccine outcomes on other recipients, 38.8%(n=154) agreed, 45.4%(n=132) disagreed while 10.4%(n=44) were not sure. Responding to the question that vaccination would not be effective for different mutated forms, 34.3%(n=145) agreed, 23.9%(n=121) disagreed and 36.4%(n=154) were not sure. When asked whether they suspected that Vaccine inserts a chip inside the body, 6.9%(n=19) agreed, 59.8%(n=253) disagreed while 27.9%(n=118) were not sure. When the participants were asked whether they would get a booster dose if required, 49.4%(n=209) said yes and 22.7%(n=96) said no. When asked what were their reason/s for getting vaccinated, 51.1%(n=216) said that they wanted to protect their family and friends, 21.7%(n=92) said that they were at high risk of contracting COVID 19, 1.9%(n=8) said that they were suffering from co-morbidities while 15.4%(n=65) gave other reasons and 4.5%(n=19) said that they did not want to get vaccinated. Conclusion: The population's acceptance rate for COVID-19 vaccine is only thirty nine percent according to this study. In this research, key characteristics are emphasized that have significant consequences for formulating vaccine policy that maximizes vaccine uptake. Religious leaders should be involved in developing successful communication strategies, particularly for low-income families. Public me saging should dispel any worries about the vaccine's safety and efficacy, as well as emphasize the vaccine's potential for containing the pandemic. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Middle East Journal of Family Medicine is the property of Medi+WORLD International Pty. Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

7.
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine ; 12(1):10-29, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1893112

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study is to assess the knowledge on Balanced Nutrition and its practices among pre-school teachers in Subang district, West Java, Indonesia before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (before March 2020 vs. October 2021) and to seek differences in the knowledge and practices of teachers who attended nutrition training and those who did not attend any nutrition training. We evaluated the knowledge and practice of 142 teachers based on 10 messages of the 2014 Indonesian Balanced Nutrition Guidelines, using google online survey platform. The top three messages mostly selected by the teachers were consuming a variety of staple foods (87%), drinking adequate and safe water (87%), and eating plenty of vegetables and fruits (86%), while the least selected were enjoying a variety of foods (41%) and reading food labels (28%). A slight increase was found in teachers who consumed fruits daily, while the practice of washing hands before and during the pandemic was statistically and significantly increased (58% to 72%;p < 0.05). A slight decrease was found in teachers who consumed vegetables and animal protein, as well as performed physical exercise daily. Majority of teachers (80%) participated in some kinds of nutrition training in the last four years. The top three gaps of knowledge between trained and non-trained teachers were on physical activity and maintaining ideal body weight (64% vs. 33%;statistically significant at p < 0.05);limit intake of sweet, salty, and fatty food;and consuming high protein food, with the range between 20 to 35 percentage points. We concluded that teachers acquired knowledge on nutrition to some degree, but its application faced limitations during the pandemic. Dissemination of Balanced Nutrition should continue.

8.
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care ; 11(5):1604-1609, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1893101

ABSTRACT

This critical narrative review is intended to emphasize the comprehensive ecological issues related to the evolution of the novel coronavirus, the environmental factors associated with the disease progress, and the impact the pandemic is having on the environment. Approximately 60% of the emerging infectious disease of the last century (including deadly viruses like HIV, Ebola, Influenza, coronavirus strains like SARS, MERS) are linked to zoonotic spillover. Therefore, to escape the emergence of newer cross-species infections, proper precautionary measures should be taken. Every country has specific rules to deal with the biomedical waste produced in hospitals. But the COVID-19 pandemic has posed a unique global challenge due to the overwhelming amount of biomedical waste generated from dedicated COVID hospitals, diagnostic facilities, quarantine centers, and home quarantine facilities. Moreover, inappropriate disposal of masks by the general public may contaminate the environment turning it into a potential health hazard. Therefore, strict adherence to Biomedical Waste Management Guidelines for proper disposal of masks and other medical waste by all concerned is a must. Lockdown has brought about tremendous improvement in conditions of the world's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Dramatic improvement in air quality index, decrease in water, and noise pollution are some of the positive aspects of lockdown. However, these effects are temporary. But these teach an important lesson to the world to take some permanent measures to bring down greenhouse gases and other toxic emissions. Some harmful effects of lockdown are illegal deforestation, wildlife trafficking, encroachment of reserved areas etc.

9.
Polish Journal of Public Health ; 131(1):11-15, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1892558

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) many people give up exercises. International physical activity guidelines recommend 150 minutes per week of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes at high intensity per week. Healthy adults should take 10,000 steps per day. Wearable devices (smartwatches, step counters, physical activity monitoring applications) have the potential to promote a healthy lifestyle at the time of COVID-19 pandemic. They are accepted by the youth. Aim. The aim of the study was to find out if using step counting devices affects the level of physical activity and body mass index (BMI) in students. Material and methods. A total of 303 participants (227 women, 76 men) studying in Lublin, Poland of mean age 19.5 years participated in the study conducted with use of an internet questionnaire. Results. Before the COVID-19 pandemic their mean BMI was 22.17 kg/m2 and after 9 months of COVID-19-related restrictions it was 22.57 kg/m2. Among the respondents 204 (67.3%) did a physical activity for 50 min 3 times a week in 2019 and 99 (32.7%) did not. In December 2020 there was a significant decrease in the number of students doing physical activity to 128 (42.2%) (p < 0.05) and an increase in the number of students who did not do any physical activity to 175 (57.8%) (p < 0.05). In 2019 as many as 110 (36.3%) of the respondents used to use step counting devices and 192 (63.7%) did not. In 2020 the number of students using activity tracking devices significantly decreased to 58 (19.2) (p < 0.05). The number of students who did not use any step counting device in 2020 was 245 (80.8%). Conclusion. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic the number of students who don't do enough physical activity significantly increased. The use of step counting devices helps students in continuing physical activity despite COVID-19-related restrictions.

10.
Revista Brasileira de Saude Ocupacional ; 47(ecov2), 2022.
Article in Portuguese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1892430

ABSTRACT

Objective: to identify working conditions and their effects on nursing professionals' health during the COVID-19 pandemic, based on the workers' own perceptions.

11.
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society ; 103(2):103-105, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1892031

ABSTRACT

Within this context, fundamental questions regarding the life cycle of convective clouds, aerosols, and pollutants have brought together a diverse, integrated, and interagency collaboration of scientists to collect and analyze measurements, in the Houston, Texas, area, from the summer of 2021 through the summer of 2022, with subsequent modeling studies to address these important research objectives. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) Physical and Dynamic Meteorology Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Tropospheric Composition Research and Health and Air Quality Applied Sciences Programs and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) are collaborating on a joint set of field campaigns to study the interactions of cloud, aerosol, and pollutants within the coastal, urban environment. Measurement platforms to be deployed: (a) Stony Brook University Weather Truck including dual-polarization X-band phased array radar (ESCAPE), (b) NCAR C-130 aircraft (ESCAPE) (photo credit: C. Wolff), (c) Pandora Spectrometer (TAQ) (photo credit: B. Swap), (d) ARM Tethered Balloon System (TRACER), (e) ARM Mobile Facility (TRACER), (f) C-Band ARM Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (TRACER), (g) Baylor University–University of Houston–Rice University Mobile Air Quality Laboratory (TAQ, TRACER), (h) Johnson Space Flight Center Gulfstream V aircraft (TAQ). Measurement platforms to be deployed: (a) Stony Brook University Weather Truck including dual-polarization X-band phased array radar (ESCAPE), (b) NCAR C-130 aircraft (ESCAPE) (photo credit: C. Wolff), (c) Pandora Spectrometer (TAQ) (photo credit: B. Swap), (d) ARM Tethered Balloon System (TRACER), (e) ARM Mobile Facility (TRACER), (f) C-Band ARM Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (TRACER), (g) Baylor University–University of Houston–Rice University Mobile Air Quality Laboratory (TAQ, TRACER), (h) Johnson Space Flight Center Gulfstream V aircraft (TAQ). Measurement platforms to be deployed: (a) Stony Brook University Weather Truck including dual-polarization X-band phased array radar (ESCAPE), (b) NCAR C-130 aircraft (ESCAPE) (photo credit: C. Wolff), (c) Pandora Spectrometer (TAQ) (photo credit: B. Swap), (d) ARM Tethered Balloon System (TRACER), (e) ARM Mobile Facility (TRACER), (f) C-Band ARM Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (TRACER), (g) Baylor University–University of Houston–Rice University Mobile Air Quality Laboratory (TAQ, TRACER), (h) Johnson Space Flight Center Gulfstream V aircraft (TAQ). On the ground, multiple fixed and mobile radar systems (Fig. 1a) will be used to track convective cells and perform multi-Doppler analysis for the derivation of velocities within the convective systems over the course of their life cycle.

12.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(6): e38754, 2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is a threat to global health and requires collaborative health research efforts across organizations and countries to address it. Although routinely collected digital health data are a valuable source of information for researchers, benefiting from these data requires accessing and sharing the data. Health care organizations focusing on individual risk minimization threaten to undermine COVID-19 research efforts, and it has been argued that there is an ethical obligation to use the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) scientific research exemption during the COVID-19 pandemic to support collaborative health research. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to explore the practices and attitudes of stakeholders in the German federal state of Bavaria regarding the secondary use of health data for research purposes during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a specific focus on the GDPR scientific research exemption. METHODS: Individual semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted between December 2020 and January 2021 with a purposive sample of 17 stakeholders from 3 different groups in Bavaria: researchers involved in COVID-19 research (n=5, 29%), data protection officers (n=6, 35%), and research ethics committee representatives (n=6, 35%). The transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis. RESULTS: Participants identified systemic challenges in conducting collaborative secondary-use health data research in Bavaria; secondary health data research generally only happens when patient consent has been obtained, or the data have been fully anonymized. The GDPR research exemption has not played a significant role during the pandemic and is currently seldom and restrictively used. Participants identified 3 key groups of barriers that led to difficulties: the wider ecosystem at many Bavarian health care organizations, legal uncertainty that leads to risk-adverse approaches, and ethical positions that patient consent ought to be obtained whenever possible to respect patient autonomy. To improve health data research in Bavaria and across Germany, participants wanted greater legal certainty regarding the use of pseudonymized data for research purposes without the patient's consent. CONCLUSIONS: The current balance between enabling the positive goals of health data research and avoiding associated data protection risks is heavily skewed toward avoiding risks; so much so that it makes reaching the goals of health data research extremely difficult. This is important, as it is widely recognized that there is an ethical imperative to use health data to improve care. The current approach also creates a problematic conflict with the ambitions of Germany, and the federal state of Bavaria, to be a leader in artificial intelligence. A recent development in the field of German public administration known as norm screening (Normenscreening) could potentially provide a systematic approach to minimize legal barriers. This approach would likely be beneficial to other countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Artificial Intelligence , Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ecosystem , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Qualitative Research
13.
BMC Prim Care ; 23(1): 149, 2022 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892174

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: PCR testing is considered the gold standard for SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis but its results are earliest available hours to days after testing. Rapid antigen tests represent a diagnostic tool enabling testing at the point of care. Rapid antigen tests have mostly been validated by the manufacturer or in controlled laboratory settings only. External validation at the point of care, particularly in general practice where the test is frequently used, is needed. Furthermore, it is unclear how well point of care tests are accepted by the practice staff. METHODS: In this prospective multicenter validation study in primary care, general practitioners included adult individuals presenting with symptoms suggesting COVID-19. Each patient was tested by the general practitioner, first with a nasopharyngeal swab for the point of care test (Roche SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antigen Test) and then with a second swab for PCR testing. Using the RT-PCR result as a reference, we calculated specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value, with their 95% confidence intervals. General practitioners and medical assistants completed a survey to assess feasibility and usefulness of the point of care tests. RESULTS: In 40 practices in Würzburg, Germany, 1518 patients were recruited between 12/2020 and 06/2021. The point of care test achieved a sensitivity of 78.3% and a specificity of 99.5% compared to RT-PCR. With a prevalence of 9.5%, the positive predictive value was 93.9% and the negative predictive value was 97.8%. General practitioners rated the point of care test as a helpful tool to support diagnostics in patients with signs and symptoms suggestive for infection, particularly in situations where decision on further care is needed at short notice. CONCLUSION: The point of care test used in this study showed a sensitivity below the manufacturer's specification (Sensitivity 96.25%) in the practice but high values for specificity and high positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Although widely accepted in the practice, measures for further patient management require a sensitive interpretation of the point of care test results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity
14.
Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance ; 24(3):259-273, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1891303

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The education sector is increasingly targeted by malicious cyber incidents, resulting in huge financial losses, cancelation of classes and exams and large-scale breaches of students’ and staff’s data. This paper aims to investigate education technology (EdTech) vendors’ responsibility for this cyber (in)security challenge, with a particular focus on EdTech in India as a case study.Design/methodology/approach>Theoretically, building on the security economics literature, the paper establishes a link between the dynamics of the EdTech market and the education sector’s cyber insecurities and investigates the various economic barriers that stand in the way of improving EdTech vendors’ security practices. Empirically, the paper analyses publicly reported cyber incidents targeting the Indian education sector and EdTech companies in the past 10 years as published in newspapers, using the LexisNexis database. It also examines existing EdTech procurement challenges in India and elsewhere and develops a number of policy recommendations to address the misaligned incentives and information asymmetries between EdTech vendors and educational institutions.Findings>Market forces alone cannot create sufficient incentives for EdTech vendors to prioritise security in product design. Considering the infant stage of the EdTech industry, the lack of evidence about the efficacy of EdTech tools, the fragmentation in the EdTech market and the peculiarities of educational institutions as end-users, a regulatorily and policy intervention is needed to secure education through procurement processes.Originality/value>This paper introduces a novel exploration to the cybersecurity challenge in the education sector, an area of research and policy analysis that remains largely understudied. By adding a cybersecurity angle, the paper also contributes to the literature using a political economy approach in scrutinising EdTech.

15.
Annals of Tourism Research ; 94(75), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1889197

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the influence of mortality salience on preference for humanoid robot service. Six studies confirm that consumers/tourists are reluctant to adopt humanoid (vs. non-humanoid) service robots and robotic services when mortality is salient. The effect is driven by the perceived threat to human identity. However, temporal distance can alleviate the mortality salience effect. Eliciting a distant-future temporal perspective can reduce consumers'/tourists' existential anxiety, and then attenuate negative reactions to humanoid service robots. This research provides an innovative standpoint on consumers' reactions to service robots under conditions of mortality salience (e.g., during the COVID-19 pandemic). It also offers insight into service robot implementation and design in the hospitality and tourism industry.

16.
International Journal of Quantum Chemistry ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1888806

ABSTRACT

In medical sciences, the molecular structure is discussed under the consideration of the topological index, and related biological, pharmaceutical, medical and chemical properties of various drugs are examined by computing topological indices. Many scientific experiments are ongoing for the medication of COVID‐19 by using redeliver. In this paper, our objective is to calculate the degree‐based temperature indices and their respective temperature entropies for the molecular graph of remdesivir R. In this study, we derived some degree‐based temperature descriptors. Also, we computed temperature entropies of molecular structure by constructing the relation of degree‐based temperature descriptors with the help of specific information functions. Moreover, we analyzed and provided a graphical comparison of the calculated outcomes. These computed results maybe lead to the discovery of more effective drugs and modified vaccines for the overcome with COVID‐19. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Quantum Chemistry is the property of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences ; 32(209):93-103, 2022.
Article in Persian | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1888336

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Coronaviruses are a type of virus that can cause death due to pneumonia and respiratory problems. Pregnant women are at higher risk for developing COVID-19 and the disease has posed challenges to anesthesia in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia in expectant mothers with COVID-19 candidates for cesarean section. Materials and methods: This descriptive-analytical study was performed in 80 pregnant women with COVID-19 candidates for cesarean delivery in Sari Imam Khomeini Hospital and Qaemshahr Razi Hospital, 2021. The expectant mothers underwent general (n= 40) or spinal anesthesia (n= 40). A researcher-made checklist was completed before, during, and after the delivery. Data were analyzed applying Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-test, One-way analysis of variance, and repeated measure ANOVA. Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups in demographic characteristics (P> 0.05), but there was a significant difference between urgent surgery and the type of anesthesia (P <0.05). Significant differences were seen in heart rate and mean oxygen saturation between the two groups (P= 0.0001 and P< 0.05, respectively). Nausea and vomiting, and chills were observed to be more common during spinal anesthesia (P= 0.007 and P= 0.002). Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure occurred more in spinal anesthesia group than the general anesthesia group (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: Both general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia in mothers with COVID-19 can be safe for both the mother and baby if carefully planned and performed by experienced anesthesiologists. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (JMUMS) is the property of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

18.
China Review ; 22(2):285-313, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1888310

ABSTRACT

According to a joint statement issued by the two countries, Sino-Russian relations have reached "the highest level in their history" and exceeded the form of a military and political alliance during the Cold War.1 In the meantime, Russian President Vladimir Putin called China's President Xi Jinping his "dear friend" and the relations with China a real model of interstate cooperation in the 21st century.2 Despite the warm words exchanged between the two leaders, in a contradictory manner, Russia was one of the first countries to shut the border with China during the early outbreak of COVID-19 in the Chinese city of Wuhan. [...]there have been concerns that COVID-19 could have shaken the strategic partnership between Russia and China.3 These concerns are not simply unfounded fears since China's mishandling of COVID-19 during the early phases resulted in severe global backlash from the world. According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, the majority of advanced economies believe the Chinese government poorly handled the COVID-19 outbreak and negative views of China have reached historic highs.4 Given the gap between rhetoric and reality in the Sino-Russian strategic partnership and the global backlash faced by China, this research examines two fundamental questions related to the development of the bilateral relationship: (1) What is the real nature of the strategic partnership between Russia and China? (2) Does Russia's response to COVID-19 pandemic indicate its shift in attitude toward China? [...]Sino-Russian cooperation was more political than economic at the time.

19.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:1, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1888299

ABSTRACT

This article briefly describes a series of extension materials created by LSU AgCenter and Louisiana Sea Grant to assist different sectors of the community to respond to public health concerns associated with COVID-19. The materials created included a series of fact sheets on a variety of issues, including food delivery and take-out, fishing safety information and seafood processing plants. In addition, a series of six posters was developed to create awareness of social distancing among store employees and customers. Two fact sheets were created for the seafood industry. "Fishing Safety and Information During a Public Health Emergency" highlights the health of people working on the boats, the proper use of disinfectants, and considerations when fishers sell their catch directly to consumers. The other fact sheet is "Public Health Emergency Response for Seafood Processing Plants During COVID-19," which provides guidance on the risks associated for processing plants during the pandemic, how to identify high-risk areas, and how to control and prevent the transmission of the virus among employees and visitors. The goal is to minimize person-to-person contact in the plant and during processing. To help create awareness on the control and prevention of the transmission of COVID-19, graphics and videos are available on the LSU AgCenter website for sharing through social media.

20.
Louisiana Agriculture ; 64:1, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1888278

ABSTRACT

This paper provides information on the many similarities between plant and human viruses concerning their detection, spread and control methods, such as in Tobacco mosaic virus and COVID-19.

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