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1.
Am Surg ; : 31348211031848, 2021 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244398

ABSTRACT

Virtual residency interviews during COVID-19 pandemic created a need for residency programs to use social media to increase their visibility and connect with potential applicants. This was, however, new and a road never travelled for many programs. This report describes how our General Surgery Residency Program increased its presence through social media by using various exposure methods and approaches, including diversifying presence and developing candid personalized content. Results suggest that these methods have increased our exposure and reach from an average of 7 people per post to posts reaching over 4500 people. Moreover, the video posts introducing our residents and faculty provided the highest activity and reach. Thus, appropriate use of social media with described interventions and new content creation could exponentially increase the visibility of a residency program. Moreover, educating faculty and residents on the use and importance of social media could increase their interest and participation as well.

2.
J Osteopath Med ; 2023 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239730

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic caused the largest disruption to graduate medical education in modern history. The danger associated with SARS-CoV-2 necessitated a paradigm shift regarding the fundamental approach to the education of medical residents and fellows. Whereas prior work has examined the effect of the pandemic on residents' experiences during training, the effect of the pandemic on academic performance of critical care medicine (CCM) fellows is not well understood. OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between CCM fellow's lived experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and performance on in-training examinations. METHODS: This mixed-methods study consisted of a quantitative retrospective analysis of critical care fellows' in-training examination scores and a qualitative, interview-based phenomenological examination of fellows' experiences during the pandemic while training in a single large academic hospital in the American Midwest. Quantitative: Prepandemic (2019 and 2020) and intrapandemic (2021 and 2022) in-training examination scores were analyzed utilizing an independent samples t test to determine whether a significant change occurred during the pandemic. Qualitative: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with CCM fellows exploring their lived experiences during the pandemic and their perception of the effect on their academic performance. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for thematic patterns. These themes were coded and categorized, and subcategories were developed as indicated during the analysis. The identified codes were then analyzed for thematic connections and apparent patterns. Relationships between themes and categories were analyzed. This process was continued until a coherent picture could be assembled from the data to answer the research questions. Analysis was performed from a phenomenological perspective with an emphasis on interpretation of the data from the participants' perspectives. RESULTS: Quantitative: Fifty-one in-training examination scores from 2019 to 2022 were obtained for analysis. Scores from 2019 to 2020 were grouped as prepandemic scores, while scores from 2021 to 2022 were grouped as intrapandemic scores. Twenty-four prepandemic and 27 intrapandemic scores were included in the final analysis. A significant difference was found between mean total prepandemic and intrapandemic in-service examination scores (t 49=2.64, p=0.01), with mean intrapandemic scores being 4.5 points lower than prepandemic scores (95 % CI, 1.08-7.92). Qualitative: Interviews were conducted with eight CCM fellows. Thematic analysis of the qualitative interviews revealed three main themes: psychosocial/emotional effects, effects on training, and effects on health. The factors that most effected participants' perceptions of their training were burnout, isolation, increased workload, decreased bedside teaching, decreased formal academic training opportunities, decreased procedural experience, a lack of an external reference point for normal training in CCM, fear of spreading COVID-19, and neglect of personal health during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: In-training examination scores decreased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic for CCM fellows in this study. The fellows in this study reported perceived effects of the pandemic on their psychosocial/emotional well-being, medical training, and health.

3.
Cureus ; 15(5): e38782, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236613

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the residency match process by eliminating away rotations and changing from in-person to virtual interviews. In this study, we explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the geographic match distance of United States (US) senior medical students across all specialties. METHODS: We collected publicly available student match data between 2018 and 2021 from US allopathic medical schools and calculated match distance between medical school and residency training using a novel metric - the "match space." Match space was codified by whether the student matched at their home institution, home state, adjacent state, same or adjacent US census division (non-adjacent state) or skipped at least one US census division. Adjusting for covariates, ordinal logistic regression correlated school and specialty characteristics with match distance pre- and post-pandemic for all specialties. We defined and ranked specialty competitiveness using predictive values from factor analysis. RESULTS: A total of 34,672 students representing 66 medical schools from 28 states matched into 26 specialties in 50 states and Canada. Fifty-nine percent of students were from public institutions, and 27% of schools ranked in the top 40 for research. The mean percentage of in-state students by school was 60.3% (range 3-100%). Match space was lower after the pandemic (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.94, 95% CI 0.90-0.98; p=0.006), from schools with higher in-state percentages (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.72-0.76), from top National Institutes of Health-funded institutions (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.85-0.92), from the Northeast (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.67-0.75; Midwest reference), and the West (OR 0.67, 95% 0.60-0.74). Match space was higher for students graduating from private schools (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.19), from the South (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.2-1.33), and matching into more competitive specialties (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02-1.14). The top five most competitive specialties were Plastic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Dermatology, Orthopedic Surgery, and Otolaryngology. Internal Medicine ranked eighth. CONCLUSIONS: After the COVID-19 pandemic, students graduating from US allopathic schools matched closer to their home institution. Students attending public schools, schools with more in-state matriculants, and schools with higher research rankings also matched closer to their home institutions. Specialty competitiveness and US census region also impacted match distance. Our study adds insight into how geographic match patterns were influenced by school, specialty choice, and the pandemic.

4.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 371, 2023 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way medical education is delivered. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the education and procedural volume of critical care and pulmonary critical care fellows. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, internet-based, voluntary, anonymous, national survey of adult critical care fellows and academic attending physicians in critical care and pulmonary critical care fellowship programs in the United States between December 2020 and February 2021. Survey questions covered both didactic and non-didactic aspects of education and procedural volumes. Answers were ranked on a 5-point Likert scale. Survey responses were summarized by frequency with percentage. Differences between the responses of fellows and attendings were assessed with the Fisher's exact or Chi-Square test, using Stata 16 software (StataCorp LLC, College Station, TX). RESULTS: Seventy four individuals responded to the survey; the majority (70.3%) were male; less than one-third (28.4%) female. Respondents were evenly split among fellows (52.7%) and attendings (47.3%). 41.9% of survey respondents were from the authors' home institution, with a response rate of 32.6%. Almost two-thirds (62.2%) reported that fellows spend more time in the ICU since the onset of the pandemic. The majority noted that fellows insert more central venous catheters (52.7%) and arterial lines (58.1%), but perform fewer bronchoscopies (59.5%). The impact on endotracheal intubations was mixed: almost half of respondents (45.9%) reported fewer intubations, about one-third (35.1%) more intubations. Almost all respondents (93.0%) described fewer workshops; and one-third (36.1%) fewer didactic lectures. The majority (71.2%) noted less time available for research and quality improvement projects; half (50.7%) noted less bedside teaching by faculty and more than one-third (37.0%) less fellow interaction with faculty. Almost one-half of respondents (45.2%) reported an increase in fellows' weekly work hours. CONCLUSION: The pandemic has caused a decrease in scholarly and didactic activities of critical care and pulmonary critical care fellows. Fellows spend more time in ICU rotations, insert more central and arterial lines, but perform fewer intubations and bronchoscopies. This survey provides insights into changes that have occurred in the training of critical care and pulmonary critical care fellows since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Female , Male , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Status , Critical Care
5.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; : 10499091221116078, 2022 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235705

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique opportunity to adapt in-person communication skills training to a virtual format. Objective: Examine use of serious illness communication skills by learners after participating in an intensive virtual communication skills training. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting/Subjects: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Clinical Fellows. Measurements: Family Meeting Communication Assessment Tool (FAMCAT) assessed fundamental and advanced communication skills. Results: As compared to a historical benchmark obtained after a prior in-person course, the virtual course showed equivalent or better use of communication skills across fundamental skills and advanced skills. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a virtual communication skills training is associated with the use of serious illness communication skills in the clinical setting by learners.

6.
JMIR Med Educ ; 9: e43190, 2023 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312825

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine use increased as a response to health care delivery changes necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, lack of standardized curricular content creates gaps and inconsistencies in effectively integrating telemedicine training at both the undergraduate medical education and graduate medical education levels. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a web-based national telemedicine curriculum developed by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine for medical students and family medicine (FM) residents. Based on the Association of American Medical Colleges telehealth competencies, the asynchronous curriculum featured 5 self-paced modules; covered topics include evidence-based telehealth uses, best practices in communication and remote physical examinations, technology requirements and documentation, access and equity in telehealth delivery, and the promise and potential perils of emerging technologies. METHODS: A total of 17 medical schools and 17 FM residency programs implemented the curriculum between September 1 and December 31, 2021. Participating sites represented 25 states in all 4 US census regions with balanced urban, suburban, and rural settings. A total of 1203 learners, including 844 (70%) medical students and 359 (30%) FM residents, participated. Outcomes were measured through self-reported 5-point Likert scale responses. RESULTS: A total of 92% (1101/1203) of learners completed the entire curriculum. Across the modules, 78% (SD 3%) of participants agreed or strongly agreed that they gained new knowledge, skills, or attitudes that will help them in their training or career; 87% (SD 4%) reported that the information presented was at the right level for them; 80% (SD 2%) reported that the structure of the modules was effective; and 78% (SD 3%) agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied. Overall experience using the national telemedicine curriculum did not differ significantly between medical students and FM residents on binary analysis. No consistent statistically significant relationships were found between participants' responses and their institution's geographic region, setting, or previous experience with a telemedicine curriculum. CONCLUSIONS: Both undergraduate medical education and graduate medical education learners, represented by diverse geographic regions and institutions, indicated that the curriculum was broadly acceptable and effective.

7.
Med Sci Educ ; 33(2): 375-384, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2310683

ABSTRACT

Background: As the pandemic wanes, there is an opportunity to reevaluate resultant changes in graduate medical education (GME), particularly from the viewpoints of those affected most. We aimed to assess both trainee and faculty perceptions on the educational changes and innovations resulting from the pandemic to inform future educational planning. Methods: We surveyed trainees and core education faculty at three New York City children's hospitals. Surveys assessed perceived changes to educational activities, skills, scholarship, effectiveness of virtual teaching, future desirability, and qualitative themes. Results: The survey was completed by 194 participants, including 88 (45.4%) faculty and 106 (54.6%) trainees. Trainees were more likely to report a negative impact of the pandemic compared with faculty (75.5% vs. 50%, p < 0.01). Most respondents reported a decrease in formal educational activities (69.8%), inpatient (77.7%) and outpatient (77.8%) clinical teaching. Despite this, most perceived clinical and teaching skills to have stayed the same. Most (93.4%) participated in virtual education; however, only 36.5% of faculty taught virtually. Only 4.2% of faculty had extensive training in virtual teaching and 28.9% felt very comfortable teaching virtually. In the future, most (87.5%) prefer a hybrid approach, particularly virtual didactic conferences and virtual grand rounds. Faculty themes included challenges to workflows and increased empathy for trainees, while trainee themes included increased work/life balance and support, but increased burnout. Conclusion: Many changes and innovations resulted from the pandemic. Hospital systems and GME programs should consider this data and incorporate viewpoints from trainees and faculty when adapting educational strategies in the future. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s40670-023-01737-8.

8.
Front Digit Health ; 4: 861579, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298509

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic drove a rapid transition to virtual care experiences for graduate medical trainees. Core training competencies have expanded to incorporate virtual contexts, however there is limited knowledge of the optimal design of virtual care training tools for learners. In this study, we describe the application of a Design Thinking approach to the identification and co-design of novel training tools to support residents and precepting attending physicians in virtual ambulatory care practice. We applied the model of "Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, and Test" via a mixed methods approach to (1) explore the needs, preferences, and concerns of Internal Medicine residents and outpatient precepting attendings regarding virtual ambulatory care training environments, and (2) evaluate, prototype, and test potential training tools. Eleven residents and eight attending physicians participated. Identified learner needs and problem areas included: improving virtual visit technical skills; acquiring virtual communication skills; adapting to the loss of shared in-person learning space and optimizing virtual learning environments; remediating non-virtual procedural competencies; and educating on new documentation requirements. Key solution areas included: virtual precepting support tools; digital information and education dissemination tools; and strategies for management of technical issues. Several prototypes were proposed, with a single tool (a virtual preceptor tip sheet) deployed in clinical practice. Residents found the workshop program improved their understanding of Design Thinking and its relevance to healthcare. Ultimately, Design Thinking can be deployed to engage medical trainees and precepting attendings in the effective development of novel educational tools for the virtual care learning environment.

9.
Urol Oncol ; 2021 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261041

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 public health emergency forced the conversion of in-person SUO fellowship interviews into virtual interviews. We sought to understand applicant perspectives and preferences related to virtual interviews and whether programs should consider virtual interviews in the future. We distributed a survey to 2020 SUO Fellowship interview participants at 4 SUO urologic oncology fellowship programs. Response items were on a Likert scale scored 1-5 with higher scores indicating greater agreement with the survey item construct. Survey responses were collated and thematic mapping used to describe open text responses. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis of survey and open text results. Fifty-eight SUO fellowship applicants completed the survey. Virtual interviews successfully promoted interaction with SUO fellowship program faculty (mean 4.6, SD 0.6), outlined program research opportunities (mean 4.5, SD 0.7), and proffered opportunities to ask questions about the fellowship (mean 4.7, SD 0.5). Applicants exhibited weakly positive orientation to the adequacy of the virtual format (mean 3.5, SD 1.1). 63% of applicants would prefer a virtual format in the future. Qualitative feedback noted the benefits of virtual interviews were lower cost and reduced time away from residency. SUO fellowship applicants exhibited mixed preferences for virtual and in-person interviews. Although virtual fellowship interviews have benefits such as cost savings and time efficiency, notable weaknesses included challenges observing the culture of the programs. Following the pandemic, SUO fellowship programs may consider virtual interviews but should consider incorporating opportunities for informal interactions between faculty, fellows, and fellow applicants.

10.
Adv Med Educ Pract ; 14: 245-255, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282894

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The exponential use of handheld electronic devices (HEDs) among healthcare providers has shown the potential to enhance clinical workflows and improve patient care. However, the challenges and risks of carrying these devices during ward rounds and their impact on postgraduate trainees' (PGTs') training in general and more specifically during the COVID-19 pandemic need to be explored. Methods: A cross-sectional mixed-methods online survey was conducted to evaluate the perceptions of trainees and faculty at Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International accredited residency and fellowships programs in Qatar on the use of HEDs on clinical workflow, trainees' education, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. One hundred and fifty-eight participants were enrolled in the study (87 postgraduate trainees and 71 faculty). Exploratory data analysis and descriptive statistics were performed using STATA version 12 and thematic analysis of 301 qualitative responses to the survey open-ended questions using Atlas. ti qualitative software, version 9.4.0. Results: Almost all PGTs, 83 (95.4%), and faculty 43 (62.3%) use HEDs during ward rounds. Accessibility of patient information by PGTs 73 (94.8%) and faculty 46 (84.4%) and work efficiency were the main perceived benefits. Hindering communication between team members, disruption of interaction with patients, increased risk of infection and breach of patient confidentiality were among the challenges associated with their use. Carrying devices reduced the frequency of hand hygiene practices and physical examinations of patients by trainees. The COVID-19 pandemic led to a decrease in the use of HEDs by both faculty [38(64%)] and PGTs [42(60%)]. Conclusion: HEDs' use is valued by both faculty and PGTs in enhancing workflow, trainees' education, patient experience, and patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Graduate medical education leaders should adopt measures to monitor their use during ward rounds as they can negatively impact trainees' education, reduce interaction with patients, increase the risk of infection, and breach patient confidentiality.

11.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 152, 2023 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287823

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Academic departments universally communicate information about their programs using static websites. In addition to websites, some programs have even ventured out into social media (SM). These bidirectional forms of SM interaction show great promise; even hosting a live Question and Answer (Q&A) session has the potential for program branding. Artificial Intelligence (AI) usage in the form of a chatbot has expanded on websites and in SM. The potential use of chatbots, for the purposes of trainee recruitment, is novel and underutilized. With this pilot study, we aimed to answer the question; can the use of an Artificially Intelligent Chatbot and a Virtual Question-and-Answer Session aid in recruitment in a Post-COVID-19 era? METHODS: We held three structured Question-and-Answer Sessions over a period of 2 weeks. This preliminary study was performed after completion of the three Q&A sessions, in March-May, 2021. All 258 applicants to the pain fellowship program were invited via email to participate in the survey after attending one of the Q&A sessions. A 16-item survey assessing participants' perception of the chatbot was administered. RESULTS: Forty-eight pain fellowship applicants completed the survey, for an average response rate of 18.6%. In all, 35 (73%) of survey respondents had used the website chatbot, and 84% indicated that it had found them the information they were seeking. CONCLUSION: We employed an artificially intelligent chatbot on the department website to engage in a bidirectional exchange with users to adapt to changes brought on by the pandemic. SM engagement via chatbot and Q&A sessions can leave a favorable impression and improve the perception of a program.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19 , Humans , Fellowships and Scholarships , Pilot Projects , Pain
12.
J Educ Perioper Med ; 25(1): E699, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286398

ABSTRACT

Background: The move toward telemedicine has markedly accelerated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Anesthesia residents must learn to provide preoperative assessments on a virtual platform. We created a pilot telemedicine curriculum for postgraduate year-2 (PGY2) anesthesiology. Methods: The curriculum included a virtual didactic session and a simulated virtual preoperative assessment with a standardized patient (SP). A faculty member and the SP provided feedback using a checklist based on the American Medical Association Telehealth Visit Etiquette Checklist and the American Board of Anesthesiology Applied Examination Objective Structured Clinical Examination content outline. Residents completed surveys assessing their perceptions of the effectiveness and helpfulness of the didactic session and simulated encounter, as well as the cognitive workload of the encounter. Results: A total of 12 PGY2 anesthesiology residents in their first month of clinical anesthesia residency training participated in this study. Whereas most (11/12) residents felt confident, very confident, or extremely confident in being able to conduct a telemedicine preoperative assessment after the didactic session, only 42% ensured adequate lighting and only 33% ensured patient privacy before conducting the visit. Postencounter survey comments indicated that the SP encounter was of greater value (more effective and helpful) than the didactic session. Residents perceived the encounter as demanding, but they felt successful in accomplishing it and did not feel rushed. Faculty and SP indicated that the checklist guided them in providing clear and useful formative feedback. Conclusions: A virtual SP encounter can augment didactics to help residents learn and practice essential telemedicine skills for virtual preoperative assessments.

13.
Cureus ; 15(2): e35547, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262122

ABSTRACT

Background Undergraduate medical education aims to prepare learners to become capable residents. New interns are expected to perform clinical tasks with distant supervision reliant on having acquired a medical degree. However, there is limited data to discuss what entrustment residency programs grant versus what the medical schools believe they have trained their graduates to perform. At our institution, we sought to foster an alliance between undergraduate medical education (UME) and graduate medical education (GME) toward specialty-specific entrustable professional activities (SSEPAs). These SSEPAs create a bridge to residency and help students structure the final year of medical school while striving for entrustability for day one of residency. This paper describes the SSEPA curriculum development process and student self-assessment of competence. Methodology We piloted an SSEPA program with the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, and Obstetrics & Gynecology. Utilizing Kern's curriculum development framework, each specialty designed a longitudinal curriculum with a post-match capstone course. Students participated in pre-course and post-course self-assessments utilizing the Chen scale for each entrustable professional activity (EPA). Results A total of 42 students successfully completed the SSEPA curriculum in these four specialties. Students' self-assessed competence levels rose from 2.61 to 3.65 in Internal Medicine; 3.23 to 4.12 in Obstetrics and Gynecology; 3.62 to 4.13 in Neurology; and 3.65 to 3.79 in Family Medicine. Students across all specialties noted an increase in confidence from 3.45 to 4.38 in Internal Medicine; 3.3 to 4.6 in Obstetrics and Gynecology; 3.25 to 4.25 in Neurology; and 4.33 to 4.67 in Family Medicine. Conclusions A specialty-specific curriculum utilizing a competency-based framework for learners traversing the UME to GME journey in the final year of medical school improves learner confidence in their clinical abilities and may lead to an improved educational handoff between UME and GME.

14.
BMJ Open Qual ; 12(1)2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2254504

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated increased synchronous distance education (SDE) in graduate medical education, presenting challenges for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QIPS) best practices, which call for integration with daily clinical care and investigation of real patient safety events. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate educational outcomes for QIPS training after conversion of a mature, in-person curriculum to SDE. METHODS: 68 postgraduate year (PGY)-1 residents were surveyed before and after the SDE Culture of Patient Safety training in June 2020, and 59 PGY-2s were administered the Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool-Revised (QIKAT-R) before and after the SDE QIPS seminar series in July-August 2020. Values before and after training were compared using sign tests for matched pairs (PGY-1) and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests (PGY-2). RESULTS: 100% (68 of 68) of PGY-1s and 46% (27 of 59) of PGY-2s completed precourse and postcourse surveys. Before the course, 55 PGY-1s (81%) strongly agreed that submitting patient safety event reports are a physician's responsibility, and 63 (93%) did so after (15% increase, p=0.004). For PGY-2s, the median composite QIKAT-R score was 17 (IQR 14.5-20) before and 22.5 (IQR 20-24.5) after the seminars, with a median difference of 4.5 (IQR 1.5-7), a 32% increase in QIPS competency (p=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patient safety attitudes and quality improvement knowledge increased after SDE QIPS training at comparable levels to previously published results for in-person training, supporting SDE use in future hybrid curricula to optimise educational value and reach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Internship and Residency , Humans , Quality Improvement , Patient Safety , Pandemics/prevention & control
15.
J Pathol Inform ; : 100162, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243067

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic forced us to adapt our recently developed informatics training serving a variety of students as well as faculty and staff. The successful flipped classroom course series (a hybrid-format with both asynchronous online learning and in-person synchronous components) was shifted to a fully online format with the synchronous portion now held via web-based video conference. We repeated our participant survey at the end of each of the 3 one-credit courses to compare student satisfaction and learning outcomes achievement to the original offering. The responses were overall very positive again and while there were no differences in satisfaction levels for 2 of the courses, overall satisfaction was higher for the new, fully online Python Programming course. Likewise, students reported similar achievement of the learning outcomes across all courses with 1 of the 12 objectives receiving higher competency agreement in the new, fully online version. Overall, the fully online version of the course series was equally successful, if not more so, than the original version with a physical classroom session each week. Given that participants also had strong agreement with a new question that they would prefer online class meetings instead of in a classroom, even if there wasn't a global pandemic (citing a variety of logistical reasons such as "convenience of screen sharing," parking issues, and job-related time constraints), the fully online version of the informatics training will be retained.

16.
Acad Pediatr ; 2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243018

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Training disruptions, such as planned curricular adjustments or unplanned global pandemics, impact residency training in ways that are difficult to quantify. Informatics-based medical education tools can help measure these impacts. We tested the ability of a software platform driven by electronic health record data to quantify anticipated changes in trainee clinical experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We previously developed and validated the Trainee Individualized Learning System (TRAILS) to identify pediatric resident clinical experiences (i.e. shifts, resident provider-patient interactions (rPPIs), and diagnoses). We used TRAILS to perform a year-over-year analysis comparing pediatrics residents at a large academic children's hospital during March 15-June 15 in 2018 (Control #1), 2019 (Control #2), and 2020 (Exposure). RESULTS: Residents in the exposure cohort had fewer shifts than those in both control cohorts (P < .05). rPPIs decreased an average of 43% across all PGY levels, with interns experiencing a 78% decrease in Continuity Clinic. Patient continuity decreased from 23% to 11%. rPPIs with common clinic and emergency department diagnoses decreased substantially during the exposure period. CONCLUSIONS: Informatics tools like TRAILS may help program directors understand the impact of training disruptions on resident clinical experiences and target interventions to learners' needs and development.

17.
Int J Ophthalmol ; 16(2): 280-285, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242883

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the flipped classroom model for teaching horizontal strabismus didactics in an ophthalmology residency program in China as part of a visiting professorship from the United States. METHODS: Residents from an ophthalmology residency program in China were invited to participate in flipped classroom sessions taught by an experienced American ophthalmology faculty in 2018. Residents were instructed to watch a pre-class video lecture prior to the in-class-case-based activity. Content tests (5 Ophthalmic Knowledge Assessment Program style questions) and surveys were administered before and after the classroom sessions (100% response rate). These results were compared to that of an American cohort who were taught the same content. RESULTS: The Chinese cohort of 12 residents preferred the flipped classroom to the traditional classroom at higher rates than the American cohort of 40 residents (92% vs 55%, P=0.04) and felt that all ophthalmology topics would be appropriate for the flipped classroom teaching style (P-values between 0.008 and <0.001). In both Chinese and American cohorts, we found that the exotropia curriculum saw a small but significant improvement in performance following the flipped classroom session (P=0.025 for Chinese residents; P=0.001 for US residents), whereas scores in both groups for the esotropia course did not significantly improve. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to evaluate the flipped classroom model implemented by a visiting ophthalmology professor in a global outreach setting. The flipped classroom sessions are viewed favorably by the Chinese residents relative to the US cohort with a modest impact on knowledge. Decreased in-person interpreter requirement and increased student engagement make this model valuable in cross-cultural visiting professorship settings. Finally, the flipped classroom may lend itself well to a virtual format to prevent the transmission of COVID-19, although such a format requires further study.

18.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 9, 2023 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to explore residents' and teachers' perceptions of the digital format of Metis (a national education network in Sweden) didactic courses for psychiatry residents in Sweden to guide post-pandemic curriculum development. METHODS: An online attitude survey was developed and sent out to 725 residents in psychiatry and 237 course directors/teachers. Data were examined descriptively and group differences were analysed with independent sample t-tests. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 112 residents and 72 course directors/teachers. Perceptions of digital formats were quite similar between the two groups with some significant differences i.e., residents agreed more strongly than directors/teachers with the statement that Metis courses in digital format were of the same quality (or better) than the classroom-based format. Residents perceived the positive effects of using interactive tools more than directors/teachers. More than 40% of the responders in both groups preferred a return to classroom-based course meetings. Responders in both groups suggested that different forms of digital elements (e.g., video-based and sound-recorded lectures, digital-group discussions, virtual patients) could be incorporated into different phases in the courses. CONCLUSIONS: The study represents the current largest survey among residents in psychiatry and a teaching faculty in Sweden, to understand the impact of digitalization on the quality of residents' education during the pandemic. The results point towards applying a mixed format for training and education going forward, incorporating digital aspects into the national curriculum.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Psychiatry , Humans , Sweden , Surveys and Questionnaires , Curriculum , Psychiatry/education
19.
Cureus ; 15(1): e33500, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230541

ABSTRACT

Background The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic substantially altered operations at hospitals that support graduate medical education. We examined the impact of the pandemic on an anesthesiology training program with respect to overall case volume, subspecialty exposure, procedural skill experience, and approaches to airway management. Methods Data for this single center, retrospective cohort study came from an Institutional Review Board approved repository for clinical data. Date ranges were divided into the following phases in 2020: Pre-Pandemic (PP), Early Pandemic (EP), Recovery 1 (R1), and Recovery 2 (R2). All periods were compared to the same period from 2019 for case volume, anesthesia provider type, trainee exposure to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) index case categories, airway technique, and patient variables. Results 15,087 cases were identified, with 5,598 (37.6%) in the PP phase, 1,570 (10.5%) in the EP phase, 1,451 (9.7%) in the R1 phase, and 6,269 (42.1%) in the R2 phase. There was a significant reduction in case volume during the EP phase compared to the corresponding period in 2019 (-55.3%; P < .001) that improved but did not return to baseline by the R2 phase (-17.6%; P < .001). ACGME required minimum cases were reduced during the EP phase compared to 2019 data for pediatric cases (age < 12 y, -72.1%; P < .001 and age < 3 y, -53.5%; P < .006) and cardiopulmonary bypass cases (52.3%, P < .003). Surgical subspecialty case volumes were significantly reduced in the EP phase except for transplant surgery. By the R2 phase, all subspecialty volumes had recovered except for plastic surgery (14.9 vs. 10.5 cases/week; P < .006) and surgical endoscopy (59.2 vs. 40 cases/week; P < .001). Use of video laryngoscopy (VL) and rapid sequence induction and intubation (RSII) also increased from the PP to the EP phase (24.6 vs. 79.6%; P < .001 and 10.3 vs. 52.3%; P < .001, respectively) and remained elevated into the R2 phase (35.2%; P < 0.001 and 23.1%; P < .001, respectively). Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic produced significant changes in surgical case exposure for a relatively short period. The impact was short-lived, with sufficient remaining time to meet the annual ACGME program minimum case requirements and procedural experiences. The longer-term impact may be a shift towards the increased use of VL and RSII, which became more prevalent during the early phase of the pandemic.

20.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 36(1): 190-192, 2023 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2236318

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare a problem that many people have managed behind the scenes for years: how to balance work and family caregiving responsibilities. For physicians, many of whom were already experiencing burnout prior to the pandemic, the extra burden of COVID-19-related work stress combined with fewer options for childcare and other support has made coping all but untenable. In early 2022, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) promulgated new paid family and medical leave policy for residents and fellows. This editorial considers the importance of this step by the ACGME as well as the remaining gaps in paid leave policy in medical education, graduate training, and practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Graduate , Salaries and Fringe Benefits , Policy , Accreditation
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