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1.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; 70(4):S45, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936670

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the experience of young people aged 12-18 who had a virtual outpatient medical appointment with a healthcare professional at The Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children (Northern Ireland), during a period of the COVID- 19 pandemic. Further, it was intended to evaluate current service delivery, and to assess youth engagement in virtual consultations. Methods: A letter was sent out to a sample of young people aged 12-18 who had attended a virtual outpatient medical appointment at The Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, between January and March 2021, during the COVID- 19 pandemic. Young people were invited to complete an anonymous online survey about their experience of having a virtual appointment. It was stated that the survey should be filled out by young people themselves if possible, but parents/guardians may assist. The survey was developed using Microsoft Forms, and responses were collected and collated on this platform, as well as Microsoft Excel. Responses were analysed by the two authors independently to determine common themes and findings. Results: 28 responses were submitted for this survey, with all participants having had a virtual appointment over the phone. Most of these appointments were with a doctor, however some consultations were with a specialist nurse or other health care professional, such as a physiotherapist. 60.7% of participants found their virtual appointment helpful, however only 42.9% agreed that they would find further virtual appointments helpful, with half stating they would prefer a combination of virtual and face to face appointments. Good understanding of explanations about care and treatment were reported with 79% saying they completely/ sort of understood explanations given during the appointment. Further, 71% stated they were definitely/sort of involved in decisions about their care and treatment and 79% stated they were given an opportunity to ask questions. Key benefits of having a virtual appointment were found to be minimising travel time/costs;and being seen more quickly than waiting for a face to face appointment. However, 50% of the responses stated that the health care professional did not talk to the young person, just the parent or guardian. Conclusions: Virtual appointments were deemed to be helpful by young people and their families, however there is some concern over the level of youth engagement in this setting. Sources of Support: The survey was deemed as a service evaluation project, and registered with the Standards, Quality and Audit Department of the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust. It was also supported by staff from the Trust's Quality Improvement Team.

2.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; 70(4):S40-S41, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936612

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care for adolescents includes implementation of youth-friendly clinical practices (e.g., practices that support minor’s rights to confidential care) and provision of recommended clinical services (e.g., access to the full range of contraceptive methods). There is limited data from providers regarding the quality of SRH care for adolescents in the United States. This analysis examines physician-reported prevalence of youth-friendly practices and SRH services overall and by physician specialty to inform focused improvement efforts. Methods: Data were from the DocStyles online panel survey administered with U.S. healthcare providers September-October 2020. The survey assessed whether the following youth-friendly practices were in place just before the COVID-19 pandemic: walk-in hours, evening/weekend hours, time alone with a provider at every visit, confidentiality policy communicated at every visit, and routine encouragement of parent-adolescent communication. SRH services assessed included long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) insertion and removal, clinic-based sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing, and counseling about STI prevention at contraception initiation. We restricted the analytic sample to family practitioners (n=364), internists (n=247), pediatricians (n=180), and obstetricians/gynecologists (n=213) primarily working in outpatient settings who reported providing family planning or STI services to at least one patient aged 15-19 years per week just before the pandemic. Descriptive statistics were calculated overall and for each physician specialty, and chi-squared tests were used to examine differences. We also explored associations between physician-report of adolescent SRH quality improvement (QI) efforts in the year just before the pandemic and each youth-friendly practice and SRH service. Generalized linear models were used to produce adjusted prevalence ratios (APR) controlling for physician specialty, individual versus group practice, and adolescent patient volume for SRH services. Results: Among physicians who provided SRH services to adolescents overall, the proportion with youth-friendly practices in place ranged from 44.7% for weekend/evening hours available to 60.5% for routine encouragement of parent-adolescent communication. Walk-in hours and evening/weekend hours available were highest for pediatricians and lowest for obstetricians/gynecologists. Nearly three-quarters of pediatricians and obstetricians/gynecologists reported always providing time alone and communicating the confidentiality policy whereas only about half of family physicians and one-third of internists reported each of these practices. Overall, 37.6% reported their practice provided LARC placement and removal, 79.3% provided clinic-based STI testing, and 66.3% always discussed STI prevention with adolescents initiating contraception. Across these services, prevalence was consistently highest for obstetricians/gynecologists and lowest for internists, although the proportion of internists and pediatricians providing LARC services was similarly low (12.2% and 13.3%, respectively). Overall, about one-quarter (28.5%) of physicians reported that adolescent SRH QI efforts were conducted in the past year, and QI was associated with increased likelihood of having youth-friendly practices in place and providing SRH services for all indicators except weekend/evening hours and LARC services (APR range: 1.10-1.55). Conclusions: Findings suggest opportunities to improve youth-friendly practices and delivery of SRH services for adolescents, which vary by physician specialty. Implementing adolescent-focused SRH QI initiatives may be one approach to strengthening certain youth-friendly practices and clinical services. Sources of Support: None.

3.
Supportive Care in Cancer ; 30:S21-S22, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935788

ABSTRACT

Introduction the risk of healthcare workers (HCWs) burnout is affected by individual and organizational factors and has been dramatically increased by the COVID-19 pandemic. Since 2007 the Oncology Department of the Udine University-Hospital has cooperated with a network of psychologists to explore the organizational climate and prevent work-related stress. The last survey was conducted from april to june 2021. Methods the items included were: job burnout, emotional intelligence, quality of communication among HCWs, ethical dimension, leadership, relationship with cancer and death. Anonymous questionnaires were administered to 94 HCWs: medical oncology consultants and trainees, nurses, HC assistants, psychologists and administrative staff. Professional category, age and length of service were the variables considered. Results despite the work overload observed in 2021, our group remained solid as critical situations were contained. Emotional health in the end-of-life setting was nurtured to prevent HCWs distress. Job burnout remains a critical issue, also due to a growing administrative burden, tensions experienced by HCWs and the absence of caregivers in the oncologic ward. To limit job burnout, it may be crucial to train HCWs in communication, doctor-patient relationship skills and team-building activities. Conclusions preventing job burnout with targeted interventions to promote teamhealth is crucial, especially during the pandemic.

4.
Supportive Care in Cancer ; 30:S49, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935780

ABSTRACT

Introduction Caring for older adults with cancer is more demanding than ever. A key challenge during the COVID-19 pandemic has been the transition of care provision to telehealth. Methods Surveys were developed and distributed in April 2020 and summer 2021 by the Cancer and Aging Research Group Advocacy Committee and Association of Community Cancer Centers. Data on telehealth and demographics presented will be analyzed using descriptive statistics and chisquares. Results Most of the respondents in both cohorts were physicians, APPs, and social workers, and predominately US-based. More than 80% used telehealth during COVID compared to only 28.4% before COVID. In 2020 and 2021, respectively, the top barriers to telehealth were patient technology challenges (90.5%, 95.7%), patient access to technology (91.2%, 95.7%), patient perception (44.2%, 87.8%), treatment inappropriate for telehealth (31.4%, 81.3%), and patient impairments (e.g., auditory acuity, which was not included in 2020) to technology use (96.5%). In 2021, benefits noted included: lower need for transportation (81.9%), decreased patient exposure (78.5%%), caregiver availability (68.1%%), healthcare worker safety (66.7%%), and ease of scheduling (45.6%). Conclusions A year into the COVID crisis, cancer care providers face consistent barriers to providing telehealth to older adults with cancer. Further studies are needed to evaluate telehealth's long-term impact and determine if patients' perceptions are congruent with their healthcare providers.

5.
Sleep Science ; 15:30, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935183

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Sleep contributes to the proper functioning of the body and the immune system. During the COVID-19 pandemic, isolation was a strategy to contain the spread of the virus and altered daily routine and sleep. Some studies have shown improved sleep in some populations, while others have reported worsening, especially in health shift worker groups. Objective: To compare the sleep behavior of shift workers at a mining company, who remained active before and during the isolation period of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The sample consisted of 15 workers (14 men and 1 woman) of a mining company in the State of Minas Gerais, aged 38.9 ± 3.5 years. All worked 6 hours a day in a fast-rotating shift (4x1) for 10.2±3.8 years on average. To assess sleep behavior, the actigraphy method was used, which assesses sleep onset latency (SOL), wake after sleep onset (WASO), total sleep time (TTS) all in minutes and sleep efficiency (ES) in percentage values. The assessments were carried out in October and November 2019 for the pre-pandemic moment and November and December 2020 for the postpandemic moment. For comparison between moments, the paired t-test was used, considering the value of p ≤ 0.05. Results: Clinically, sleep behavior in this group of shift workers did not change. Only SOL (3.4±1.7 vs. 1.9±0.9) showed a statistical difference (t(14)=4.399, p=0.001), while WASO (t(14)=0.916;p=0.375) with means 18.1±8.5 vs. 16.9±6.4, TTS (t(14)=-1.258;p=0.229) 422.5±36.9 vs. 437.2±68.9 and ES (t(14)=-0.934, p=0.366) 92.8±2.8 vs. 93.3±2.9 before and after the pandemic, respectively, showed no difference. Conclusion: The maintenance of external work, in the mining company, even with social restrictions in the workplace and outside it, contributed to the maintenance of the routine and sleep behavior. However, the workers in this study did not face increased workload, anxiety and greater risk of contagion associated with the work environment as health workers. Our results indicate that the improvement or worsening of sleep before and after the pandemic should be related to the group and culture that will be evaluated. The authors thank the support given by Pró-Reitoria De Pesquisa (PRPq) and PPG em Ciências do Esporte UFMG, Instituto Tecnológico VALE (ITV), CEPE (Centro De Estudos em Psicobiologia e Exerćcio), CEMSA (Centro Multidisciplinar De Sonolência e Acidentes), CNPq, FAPEMIG, CAPES e FEPE-UFMG.

6.
Sleep Science ; 15:45, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935151

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic appears to affect the sleep quality of healthcare workers, according to recent studies. Objective: To evaluate health personnel sleep quality, at a tertiary hospital reference in COVID-19 patient's care in southern Brazil, when its resources were under clear overload, and 25% of these workers had already contracted the virus. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between November 2020 and January 2021. All 7500 healthcare workers received an online questionnaire with sociodemographic, and occupational information, as well as questions on the subjective perception of sleep quality according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. Descriptive data are presented as absolute and relative frequencies (n, n%) and mean and standard deviation. For factors associated with sleep quality, we used the chi-square test and multivariate robust Poisson regression. Study was approved by Research Ethics Committee by the number 200502. Results: Of the 1441 participants answering the questionnaire, 995 were included in the sample. The mean age was 44.1±10.6 years, 764 (76.8%) were women, and 739 (74.3%) were married/ in a stable relationship. Personnel distribution according to occupation area: 483 (48.5%) administrative, 230 (23.1%) surgical unit/obstetrics, 176 (17.7%) emergency/intensive care unit, and 106 (10.7%) outpatient clinics. Most reported working 20 to 40 hours a week (53.6%), and 486 (48.8%) reported having contact with COVID-19 patients. According to PSQI individual components, healthcare workers in contact with COVID-19 patients showed higher sleep latency (p=0.038), less habitual sleep efficiency (p=0.024), more sleep medication use (p=0.011), and more daytime dysfunction (p=0.036). According to overall PSQI score, those in contact with COVID-19 had worse sleep quality (p=0.013), as well as from the total sample, 689 (70.7%) had poor sleep quality. In the multivariate analysis, younger age and female gender were aggravating factors for poor sleep quality (p=0.039;p<0.001). Conclusion: Most participants reported poor sleep quality, including those who had direct contact with COVID-19 patients during the work. Age was an important factor, in other words, the younger the healthcare worker, worse is the sleep quality, as well as be female sex.

7.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(6):333-334, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939794

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the risk perception mental health impact and coping strategies during Covid-19 pandemic among health care workers. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Community Dentistry, Frontier Medical & Dental College, Abbottabad from 1st January 2021 to 31st December 2021. Methodology: Two hundred health care workers were given questionnaire for complete detailing their information regarding demographic, occupational, anxiety scoring and depression state. Results: The age of the health care workers was mostly within 26-40 years followed by greater than 18 years. It was observed that anxiety was presented at a mild score within doctors and other health care worker staff while it was seen to a moderate level within the nursing health care workers. Furthermore, the gender distribution of anxiety showed higher level of anxiety among females than males. Within genders a low risk perception was seen within males than females. Among the health care workers, the risk perception was highest in nurses followed by paramedic and other health care staff. Conclusion: Covid-19 has caused devastating effects on the psychological stability of the health care workers which needs to be properly assessed and addressed.

8.
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development ; 13(3):242-247, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939758

ABSTRACT

Background Mask-related dermatoses among health-care workers can impact their quality of life, work and the safety afforded by the mask. Hence their prompt recognition and remedial measures assume importance during the pandemic. To collect data about-types of masks used, facial skin problems encountered and factors involved, skin care practices followed and attitude to mask-wearing among medical students and healthcare workers of South India, a cross-sectional survey was conducted using an online structured questionnaire filled by the respondents after informed consent.Data was analysed using appropriate statistical tests. Results and Conclusion Of the 576 respondents, majority used unscientific combinations of masks. Most common mask-related dermatosis was new-onset acne. Female gender, younger age, oily skin and longer hours of mask-wearing were predisposing factors. Improper care of skin and mask and reluctance to seek medical advice was observed. Majority had a positive attitude to wearing mask during the pandemic and found several other benefits to mask-wearing. Information about scientific mask-wearing practices and common mask-related skin problems must be disseminated among the medical fraternity and remedial measures offered. A general positive attitude to mask-wearing gives assurance of adherence to mask wearing even during the trough phase of pandemic.

9.
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development ; 13(3):233-237, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939757

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic threat that affects every aspect of life on the planet. Hundreds of thousands of cases were diagnosed around the world in a short period of time. Health workers are critical to the health-care system and play a critical role during global pandemics. They are also a high-risk group that must wear a face mask for extended periods of time. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged facemask use on healthcare workers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at Shahid Gangalal National Heart Centre, Kathmandu, Nepal. The information from 335 healthcare personnel was collected using a self-administered questionnaire technique. This study included all of the hospital’s healthcare workers from various departments. The descriptive analysis was carried out using SPSS statistical software, version 26. Out of 355 respondents, the majority of responders (69.9%) were under 30 years old, with a mean age of 29.03 (± 4.7) years. Regarding the effects of wearing a face mask for a longer length of time, 99.70 % of the health workers experienced some sort of effect. The most prevalent effects were pain behind the ear (84.2%), difficult during exertion (71.0%), headache (57.6%), and the least common was alteration in sense of smell (15.2 %). According to the findings, almost all of the participants experienced some form of effect from wearing a face mask, hence necessary action by concerned authorities and participants is required to minimize these effects.

10.
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development ; 13(3):83-90, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939755

ABSTRACT

Background: Mission Indradhanush was launched in December 2014 to achieve more than 90% full immunization coverage in the country by the year 2020. The Intensified Mission Indradhanush (IMI) was launched in October 2017 for reaching the drop-out and left-out children for immunization. Recently IMI 3.0 has been launched, “Focus of the IMI 3.0 were the children and pregnant women who have missed their vaccine doses during the COVID-19 pandemic. In urban areas, a large group of vulnerable population lives in slums, where mothers are illiterate and have numerous myths about vaccination;this results in children being unimmunized and increased susceptibility to diseases. Methodology: A descriptive, community based, cross sectional study was conducted for a period of two months i.e in the month of Feb. and March 2021, among the residents of slums of urban field practice area (Manikeshwari) of Gulbarga Institute Of Medical Sciences, Kalaburgi, Kanataka. A preformed, pretested, semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information regarding Socio-demographic data of respondents, Immunization status of children and Knowledge regarding Mission Indradhanush and Immunization. Results: Out of 200 children included in the study 81.5% of the children were completely vaccinated according to their age. Statistically significant association was seen between father’s occupation and socioeconomic status with the immunization status of children. 46% of the respondents told that they had heard the word Mission Indradhanush, and the source of information was from the health care workers (60.9%) followed by friends (35.9%). A total of 77.1% of the respondents had an adequate knowledge about Mission Indradhanush and immunization. Sex of the child, religion, literacy status of father and occupation of father had a significant association with knowledge about MI and immunization. Conclusion: Our study concludes that immunization coverage is satisfactory. Of the 200 participants only 92 respondents told that they had heard of the word “Mission Indradhanush, hence there is need for strengthening of Information, Education, Communication (IEC) activities regarding the program—Mission Indradhanush.

11.
Journal of the Nepal Medical Association ; 60(251):612-616, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939703

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 outbreak brought unprecedented pressure on dental and oral health care workers leading to increased depression. This study aimed to find the prevalence of depression among online respondent oral healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from 24 June 2020 to 13 July 2020 among oral health care workers in a tertiary care centre. Ethical approval was taken from the Ethical Review Board (Reference number: 2710). Convenience sampling method was used. The data were collected using a questionnaire through Google Forms. Point estimate and 95% Confidence Interval were calculated. Results: Among 133 oral health care workers, the prevalence of depression was found to be 29 (21.80%) (14.78-28.82, 95% Confidence Interval). Conclusions: The prevalence of depression among oral health care workers was lower than similar studies done in similar settings.

12.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(6):6430-6446, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939459

ABSTRACT

Background: healthcare workers (HCWs) are on the front lines of SARS-Cov-2 Omicron pandemic defense. Inadequate knowledge and inappropriate attitudes among HCWs can have a direct impact on practices, resulting in delayed diagnosis, reduced infection control practice and disease extent. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess healthcare workers' knowledge and attitudes toward Sars-Cov-2 Omicron. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was directed in Aseer Province at Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Cairo, Egypt, among 450 HCWs developing a self-limited questionnaire for data collection. The questionnaire concealed the following parts: (I) Demographic characteristics: age, sex and source of information about SARS-Cov-2 Omicron. (II) Knowledge of Sars-Cov-2 Omicron: the important basic information, method of transmission, and disease prevention measures (III) Attitude regarding Sars-Cov-2 Omicron: such as a preventable and manageable disease and their guidelines to overcome SARS-Cov-2 Omicron pandemic situation. Results: The most of HCWs (99.4%) agreed that infection control precautions can protect against Omicron. Overall knowledge and attitude level across subgroup were highly statistical significant differences (p< 0.001). Conclusion: This study discovered that HCWs had a high level of knowledge and attitude toward actions to prevent and control the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron. Recommendations: Continuous providing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and teaching of all HCWs on correct infection prevention actions.

13.
Nevrologiya, Neiropsikhiatriya, Psikhosomatika ; 14(1):45-51, 2022.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939446

ABSTRACT

Over the past two years, healthcare workers have been daily saving patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in life-threatening conditions. These circumstances contribute to an increase in the psychopathological disorders in this social group. However, today there is no validated questionnaire that allows to quickly and effectively identify the group of healthcare workers with high levels of stress and anxiety during the pandemic in Russia. Objective: to validate the Russian version of Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemic scale (SAVE-9). Patients and methods. The study was a cross-sectional online survey of 1090 frontline healthcare workers. Stress and anxiety symptoms were assessed using SAVE-9 and General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scales, respectively. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was performed to determine the internal structure of SAVE-9 scale. ROC-analysis was used to identify the validity of the SAVE-9 compared with GAD-7 and its cut-off score. Results and discussion. The principal component analysis showed a two-factor structure of SAVE-9. Factor 1 was associated with anxiety and somatic symptoms, factor 2 - with social stress. Cronbach's alpha=0,787. The total score of SAVE-9 with a high degree of confidence predicted the GAD-7 value in ROC-analysis. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.808;95% confidence interval 0.768-0.847 (p=0.0001), which corresponded to the model's good quality. The appropriate cut-off score was determined as 18. Conclusion. We demonstrated the validity of the new SAVE-9 scale, which can be used as a specific screening method to detect high levels of anxiety and stress in healthcare workers during a viral outbreak.

14.
Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology ; 32(2):149-152, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939289

ABSTRACT

Background: The study aims to investigate the willingness of physicians for the coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination, factors contributing to their attitude, and the effects of vaccination on their mental health. It is conducted online with physicians between February 17 and March 17, 2021, corresponding to a period of at least 1 month after the first dosage. Methods: Sociodemographic and professional characteristics are investigated along with coronavirus disease 2019 experiences. The Fear of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Scale, Attitudes Toward the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccine, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Beck Hopelessness Scale are given to evaluate the effects on mental health. Results: Among 578 participants, the total vaccination rate was 91.5% and the main reason for non-vaccination is being already infected by coronavirus disease 2019. Vaccination affected mental health positively in more than half of the participants (59.2% in the vaccinated group). Advanced age (odds ratio = 0.985, P <.05), positive attitude toward vaccination (odds ratio = 0.918, P <.001), and high fear of coronavirus disease 2019 (odds ratio = 0.937, P =.001) were among the predictors of being positively affected by the vaccination. Fear of coronavirus disease 2019 was positively correlated with hopelessness (r =.239, P <.001), depression (r = 0.387, P <.001), and anxiety (r = 0.531, P <.001). The negative thoughts about the vaccination were found to be correlated with hopelessness levels (r = −0.093, P <.05). Conclusions: Physicians have positive attitudes toward vaccination and vaccination has positive effects on their mental health. As vaccination is a key point during the fight against the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, studies on vaccination and its effects on mental health gained importance. The role of physicians in this regard is inevitable.

15.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:492-498, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939101

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a comorbid factor with a double risk of increased morbidity and mortality due to COVID-19. Therefore, diabetic patients need to prevent COVID-19 seriously. However, they also need to regularly check their condition in health-care services, such as hospitals and community health centers, making them more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. One factor playing a significant role in controlling diabetes is self-management. Self-management activities can increase independence in caring for and controlling the health of diabetic patients. Then, it also enhances self-efficacy to improve the quality of life among diabetic patients. AIM: This study aimed to examine the effect of self-management on quality of life among patients with Type 2 DM. METHODS: Fifty patients with type 2 DM consented to participate in the study. The patients were assigned to either the control group receiving standard care or the experimental group receiving standard care and self-management. The program was constructed using Kanfer’s three self-management steps, including self-monitoring, self-assessment, and self-reinforcement. The effect of the intervention was measured by the WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), consisting of 26 statement items on a 5-point Likert scale and a self-management intervention evaluation checklist. Data were analyzed using an independent sample t-test. RESULTS: The results showed a significant difference between the pre-and post-intervention in the experimental group’s quality of life of type 2 DM patients (P = 0.000 and α = 0.01). CONCLUSION: This study found that self-management effectively increases the quality of life among diabetic patients. The health-care providers, especially the nurses interested in community and family health nursing, are suggested to improve the self-management of diabetic patients to prevent complications and improve the quality of life of the patients.

16.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:865-874, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939093

ABSTRACT

AIM: Since there were pros and cons, and insufficient knowledge among Indonesian regarding the vaccines, this research aims to investigate the knowledge regarding COVID-19 vaccination among employees who work in an Islamic University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional design was used to investigate the people’s knowledge of COVID-19 vaccination. The survey was conducted before the first vaccination of COVID-19 in March 2021. A descriptive analysis method was performed. Seven hundred sixty-two respondents completed the questionnaire. RESULTS: Respondent’s average age was 34.61 years old (standard deviation = 11.821, range 20–64), 54.1% of female and 45.9% of male. 448 (58.8%) respondents did not have any comorbid history. Respondents mostly obtained vaccination information through social media (86.25%). Most respondents had sufficient knowledge about the COVID-19 vaccine (83.2%), particularly those aged 20–29. For side effects, 585 (76.8%) respondents answered that they experienced pain in the injection area after getting the COVID-19 vaccination. This study showed that the respondents aged 20–29 years old had sufficient knowledge regarding COVID-19 vaccination. CONCLUSION: As knowledge plays an essential role in accepting vaccinations, health-care workers’ efforts to promote COVID-19 vaccination should be directed toward the middle-aged and elderly population to support the government’s plan to increase the rate of COVID-19 vaccinations in Indonesia.

17.
Emerging Infectious Diseases ; 28(7):1537-1539, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1938598
18.
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes ; 15, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1938110

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To determine the costs and trends of telehealth utilization before and during the COVID-19 pandemic for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Methods: We calculated the proportions of patients with CVD who used telehealth before (January 2019-February 2020) and during (March 2020-April 2021) the pandemic using MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters. We compared the trends of telehealth utilization among CVD patients by sex, age, claim type, payment plan, and rural/urban status. We calculated mean, SD, median, and IQR of total and average telehealth costs. Results: The results show that telehealth utilization spiked in March 2020 and further rapidly increased and peaked in April 2020. Telehealth utilization increased from 0.021% in March 2019 to 6.7% in March 2020 and from 0.024% in April 2019 to 39.8% in April 2020. After peaking in April 2020, telehealth utilization rapidly fell in May-June 2020 and then gradually decreased before rebounding in October-December 2020. It resumed the decline through April 2021 remained much higher than the prepandemic level. Telehealth utilization was higher during the pandemic for females than males;for younger age groups (aged 18-44 or 45-64) than older age group (aged 65+);for commercial claims than Medicare supplemental insurance;for capitated insurance plans than non-capitated insurance plans;and for patients in urban areas than rural areas. From March 2020-February 2021, the mean (SD) telehealth cost per visit was $115.7 (66) (median [IQR], $104.8 [$75.8-$139.4]), with patient out-of-pocket cost $25.5 (42.8) (median [IQR], $10 [$0-$30]), insurance cost $90.4 (71.0) (median [IQR], $83 [$45.3-$121.3]), and the mean (SD) number of telehealth utilizations per patient was 1.67 (1.8) (median [IQR], 1 [1-2]). Conclusions: Policymakers, health care practitioners, and insurance companies should be aware of trends and costs of telehealth utilization among patients with CVD. Our results show that telehealth would facilitate better management of CVD. Our results may inform future policies and practices to meet the increased demand for telehealth.

19.
Heart ; 108:A18-A19, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1938031

ABSTRACT

Introduction Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are a growing, heterogeneous group requiring lifelong follow-up to detect occurrence of known complications. In contrast to other cardiovascular disorders and chronic conditions, those with ACHD generally remain within the specialist tertiary hospital setting throughout their lives. The costs and burden on the patient of outpatient healthcare are increasingly recognised in the wider healthcare setting. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate present ambulatory healthcare in ACHD for ability to detect clinically relevant problems and consider patient and service provider costs. An additional aim was to define levels of non-attendance. We also summarise clinic activities during the COVID-19 pandemic when a hybrid approach of virtual and face to face consultations were arranged according to clinician perceived priority.Methods The clinic attendances of 100 patients attending the general ACHD clinic, selected by hospital number to minimise bias, were reviewed over a five-year period (1/01/2014-30/11/2019) and the Covid 19 period (23/03/2020-23/07/2021) by interrogation of the electronic patient record. This period represented 1/6 of their total lifetime clinic attendance. Results100 patients (Table 1) were invited to clinic annually. Non-attendance was 10% with 15 patients recurrently non-attending. 80% (459/ 575) of appointments resulted in no decision other than continued review (Figure 1). Electrocardiograms and echocardiograms were performed frequently but new findings were rare (5.1% and 4.0%). Other investigations required separate attendance. Decision-making was more common with higher ACHD AP class and new symptoms. There were 25 elective admissions, and 40 emergency admissions over half following appointments where no notable findings were recorded (Figure 2). Distance travelled to the ACHD clinic, which was supported by six clinical staff, was 14.9km (range 1.6-265) resulting in an estimated 433-564 workdays lost. During Covid 19, 56% appointments were in-person;41% telephone;5% video. Decisions were made at 37% in-person and 19% virtual consultations. Non-attendance was 3.9% and there were 8 emergency admissions. Conclusion The primary purpose of ACHD ambulatory care is surveillance. Despite this, emergency hospital admissions exceed elective hospital admissions. There is a high burden of care for patient and healthcare provider with the traditional outpatient model. The Covid-19 pandemic necessitated provision of ambulatory care in a different way and should encourage development of a new more patient-centred approach to ambulatory care delivery in ACHD.

20.
The Lancet Respiratory Medicine ; 9(12):1361, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1937335
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