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1.
Oxford Review of Economic Policy ; 38(4):851-875, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20240812

ABSTRACT

How effective were investments in pandemic preparation? We use a comprehensive and detailed measure of pandemic preparedness, the Global Health Security (GHS) Index produced by the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security (JHU), to measure which investments in pandemic preparedness reduced infections, deaths, excess deaths, or otherwise ameliorated or shortened the pandemic. We also look at whether values or attitudinal factors such as individualism, willingness to sacrifice, or trust in government - which might be considered a form of cultural pandemic preparedness - influenced the course of the pandemic. Our primary finding is that almost no form of pandemic preparedness helped to ameliorate or shorten the pandemic. Compared to other countries, the United States did not perform poorly because of cultural values such as individualism, collectivism, selfishness, or lack of trust. General state capacity, as opposed to specific pandemic investments, is one of the few factors which appears to improve pandemic performance. Understanding the most effective forms of pandemic preparedness can help guide future investments. Our results may also suggest that either we aren't measuring what is important or that pandemic preparedness is a global public good. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press.

2.
Nephrology News & Issues ; 37(5):16-18, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-20240474
3.
The International Journal of Technology Management & Sustainable Development ; 22(1):7-20, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239204

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic brought up issues with healthcare costs, national economic development and welfare of the society in forefront. Nations across the globe followed different approaches to deal with COVID-19, such as zero tolerance, herd immunity, containment to build treatment capability. National healthcare became a contentious sociopolitical issue involving healthcare costs, technologies and societal health. In the United States even during the COVID-19 pandemic, the government approach was pursuing a sustainable improvement in patient care through adoption of medical and information technologies. The national healthcare policies are framed around technological interventions with the assumption that deployment of technologies could keep healthcare costs under control and at the same time improve health outcomes. However, evidences show that the healthcare costs are in the rise even with impressive progress in technological deployment. This article highlights some of the recent trends in healthcare costs, technological preparedness, medical technology developments in managing COVID-19 pandemic. The US government mandated electronic health record (EHR) systems implementation and assess its impact on healthcare costs and health outcomes. This article emphasizes the need for understanding the interconnectedness of costs, technology and societal health.

4.
Mitteilungen der Osterreichischen Geographischen Gesellschaft ; 164:111-144, 2022.
Article in German | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20238056

ABSTRACT

The article deals with the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and related measures on the social interactions of refugees from Afghanistan and Syria in Vienna during the first lockdown in March/April 2020. The focus is on the challenges for these vulnerable groups in the field of tension between the contact minimisation prescribed in the Corona regulations of the federal government on the one hand and cramped housing conditions, precarious labour market positions, homeschooling and the "digital divide” on the other. Further focal points are how refugees deal with the measures of "social/physical distancing”, its consequences in view of the colliding cultural norms, the extent of contact reduction and its causal factors. The empirical basis was provided by a quantitative online survey and qualitative interviews with refugees as well as experts from refugee support NGOs and organisations from both groups of origin, who were involved in the underlying project within the framework of a community-based participatory approach. Contrasting with the criticism sometimes voiced in the media that primarily certain groups with a migration background have been less compliant with the measures to contain the pandemic, a more differentiated picture is drawn. Above all, the factors of family status, age and housing conditions have had a strong influence on compliance with the distancing measures. The inaccessibility of public space, which is a particularly important resource for the refugees, as well as the discontinuation of social services offered by NGOs have particularly affected these vulnerable groups. © 2022 Austrian Geographical Society. All rights reserved.

5.
Revista de Salúd Publica ; 22(2):1-9, 2020.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20236141

ABSTRACT

Objetivo El trabajo tiene como objetivo analizar la dinámica del comportamiento de la COVID-19 en el Perú, estimar y evaluar el impacto de la política pública de supresión (cuarentena). Métodos El modelo epidemiológico SIR y la estimación con el método de Mínimos Cuadrados Ordinarios (MCO). Resultados Se encontró que el número básico de propagación (Ro) cayó de 6,0 a 3,2 habiéndose reducido en 54% por efecto de la estrategia de supresión, y dos meses después cayó a 1,7. Sin embargo, sigue siendo alto y evidencia que aún continúa en expansión el nivel de infectados, con los efectos sociales y económicos adversos que esta medida implica. Conclusión La COVID-19 es una enfermedad que crece exponencialmente, por lo cual, la política de salud basada en la estrategia de supresión ha permitido aplanar la curva de contagio, evitando el colapso del Sistema de Salud. Objective The objective of the study is to analyze the behavior dynamics of COVID-19 in Peru, estimate and evaluate the impact of the suppression public policy (quarantine). Methods The SIR epidemiological model and the estimation with the ordinary Least Squares (OLS) method. Results It was found that the basic number of propagation (Ro) fell from 6,0 to 3,2 having been reduced by 54% due to the suppression strategy;and two months later it falls to 1,7. However, it remains high and evidence that the level of those infected continues to expand with its adverse social and economic effects. Conclusion COVID-19 is a disease that grows exponentially, and that the health policy based on the suppression strategy has allowed to flatten the contagion curve, thus avoiding the collapse of the Health System.

6.
Journal of Medical Ethics: Journal of the Institute of Medical Ethics ; 47(5):296-299, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20234660

ABSTRACT

Although empirical evidence may provide a much desired sense of certainty amidst a pandemic characterised by uncertainty, the vast gamut of available COVID-19 data, including misinformation, has instead increased confusion and distrust in authorities' decisions. One key lesson we have been gradually learning from the COVID-19 pandemic is that the availability of empirical data and scientific evidence alone do not automatically lead to good decisions. Good decision-making in public health policy, this paper argues, does depend on the availability of reliable data and rigorous analyses, but depends above all on sound ethical reasoning that ascribes value and normative judgement to empirical facts. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Sports Economics Review ; : 100013, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-20233793

ABSTRACT

We analyze the impact of professional sporting events on local seasonal influenza mortality to develop evidence on the role played by spectator attendance at sporting events in airborne virus transmission. Results from a difference-in-differences model applied to data from a sample of US cities that gained new professional sports teams over the period 1962–2016 show that the presence of games in these cities increased local influenza mortality by between 4% and 24%, depending on the sport, relative to cities with no professional sports teams and relative to mortality in those cities before a new team arrived. Influenza mortality fell in cities with teams in some years when work stoppages occurred in sports leagues. Health policy decisions, and decisions about the subsidization of professional sports, should take into account the role played by sporting events in increasing airborne virus transmission and local influenza and coronavirus mortality.

8.
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar ; 52(1), 2023.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20233627

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In Peru, mining companies had to register and implement the Plan for the surveillance, prevention, and control of COVID-19 at work (requested by the Ministry of Health), prior to restarting activities suspended due to the pandemic. Objective: To describe the situational status of the plans for the surveillance, prevention, and control of COVID-19 at work in the mining sector (1st and 2nd phases of economic reactivation, 2020). Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out of the database from the SISCOVID-Empresas system. Frequencies and proportions of the characteristics of the plans were reported (region of origin, number of workers, number of health professionals, existence of an occupational health and safety committee or supervisor, status of registration and budget report) according to the number of company workers. Results: In total 2,236 plan records were reviewed. Of the total, 6.2% of the registered plans indicate that they do not have an occupational health and safety supervisor or committee, and 71.5% do not have a health professional. Furthermore, 81.2% of the companies with more than 500 workers had medicine and nursing professionals, and 89.2% of companies with 1 to 20 workers did not have health professionals. Conclusions: Three out of 4 companies in the mining sector fail to comply with the requirements of the plan for the surveillance, prevention, and control of COVID-19 at work. © 2023, Editorial Ciencias Medicas. All rights reserved.

9.
International Journal of Travel Medicine and Global Health ; 11(1):210-214, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20233374

ABSTRACT

Health is a multifaceted issue and providing and promoting all its dimensions is an interdisciplinary task. Examination of crisis conditions shows that the retention of health human resources is very important due to the high volume of work in these conditions. Due to the severity of the prevalence of COVID-19, the health system must have an acceptable plan for dealing with this disease. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the factors affecting the retention and stability of human resources in crises. We used a critical review method using specific keywords ("human resources retention", "COVID-19", and some other related keywords) in, Pubmed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and SID databases until September 2022 without time limitation. Reviewers screened founded studies separately and finally, we summarized the main results of 12 eligible articles. Four main strategies (Organizational management and leadership, risk reduction, improving the mental health of health workers, and financial and welfare support) are possible solutions to reduce healthcare workers' burnout and increase their resilience to this hard situation. It seems that planning, appropriate policy-making to implement the solutions found, division of tasks, and compilation of a national document on human resource protection in crises with the cooperation of people and officials can be very helpful.

10.
International Journal of Human Rights ; 27(5):809-829, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20233282

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world in Spring 2020, the Trump administration invoked war against the coronavirus to severely restrict admission of migrants and asylum seekers into the United States. At the same time, it declined to enact national measures to control viral community spread and sharply criticised public health policies. We analyse this notable inconsistency as a case of opportunistic oppression whereby policymakers take advantage of a crisis to pursue pre-existing, and often unrelated, policy preferences. We identify how the securitisation of health and the crisis-enabled politics of enmity allowed the Trump administration to cynically erode migrant human rights protections while simultaneously failing to contain the pandemic. Opportunistic oppression represents an attractive strategy for states facing real and imagined emergencies to pursue political agendas that are not necessarily part of a coherent and effective response to the crisis at hand. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Human Rights is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

11.
Indonesian Journal of Health Administration ; 10(2):155-164, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20232097

ABSTRACT

Background: The Covid-19 pandemic has led to the closure of health facilities and a decrease in the usage of contraceptives. Therefore, the government and professional organizations initiated telehealth services to improve the quality of health services and minimize the risk of Covid-19 transmission. Aims: This study explored the perceptions, attitudes, and usage of telehealth by independent midwives during the Covid-19 pandemic in Surabaya. Methods: This qualitative phenomenology study was conducted from March to April 2021, and it involved independent midwives in Surabaya. The purposive sampling technique was used to select informants, and it obtained seven informants that met the inclusion criteria. Primary data were retrieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews. Results: This is due to the influence of their age, knowledge, the intensity of previous telehealth use, gaps in technology use, availability of facilities and infrastructure, self-motivation, social support, and efforts to find solutions through telehealth. Conclusion: Five out of the seven midwives decided to continue using telehealth in their services after the pandemic because of its benefits and impacts. Midwives, professional organizations, and policymakers need to consider the use of telehealth to improve the future services. © 2022 Avina Oktaviani Agifnita, Budi Prasetyo, Ivon Diah Wittiarika.

12.
BMJ Glob Health ; 8(5)2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233471

ABSTRACT

Despite progress on the Millennium and Sustainable Development Goals, significant public health challenges remain to address communicable and non-communicable diseases and health inequities. The Healthier Societies for Healthy Populations initiative convened by WHO's Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research; the Government of Sweden; and the Wellcome Trust aims to address these complex challenges. One starting point is to build understanding of the characteristics of successful government-led interventions to support healthier populations. To this end, this project explored five purposefully sampled, successful public health initiatives: front-of-package warnings on food labels containing high sugar, sodium or saturated fat (Chile); healthy food initiatives (trans fats, calorie labelling, cap on beverage size; New York); the alcohol sales and transport ban during COVID-19 (South Africa); the Vision Zero road safety initiative (Sweden) and establishment of the Thai Health Promotion Foundation. For each initiative a qualitative, semistructured one-on-one interview with a key leader was conducted, supplemented by a rapid literature scan with input from an information specialist. Thematic analysis of the five interviews and 169 relevant studies across the five examples identified facilitators of success including political leadership, public education, multifaceted approaches, stable funding and planning for opposition. Barriers included industry opposition, the complex nature of public health challenges and poor interagency and multisector co-ordination. Further examples building on this global portfolio will deepen understanding of success factors or failures over time in this critical area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Government , Health Status , Chile , Dietary Supplements
13.
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res ; : 1-11, 2023 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233352

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine preferences for COVID-19 vaccinations in the young adult population in the United Kingdom (UK). METHOD: A discrete choice experiment survey was conducted in UK young adults. Participants were asked to choose between two hypothetical vaccines the one they preferred the most. Vaccines were defined by five attributes (effectiveness, risk of side effects, duration of protection, number of doses, confidence in available evidence), identified following a systematic literature review and qualitative interviews with 13 young adults. A random parameters logit model, a latent class model, and subgroup analyses were used to identify preferences. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-nine respondents were included (70% women, mean age 23 years). All five attributes significantly influenced respondents' vaccination decisions. Respondents valued higher effectiveness, lower risk of side effects, longer protection duration, and a smaller number of doses. Based on the range of levels of each attribute, vaccine effectiveness was the most important attribute (relative importance 34%), followed by risk of side effects (32%), and duration of vaccine protection (22%). CONCLUSIONS: The five investigated vaccine attributes appear to play an important role in young adults' decision-making process. Results of this study may help health authorities designing appropriate strategies in future vaccines campaigns in the younger UK population.

14.
BMJ Open ; 13(6): e072650, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232924

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The continuous monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 infection waves and the emergence of novel pathogens pose a challenge for effective public health surveillance strategies based on diagnostics. Longitudinal population representative studies on incident events and symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection are scarce. We aimed at describing the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic during 2020 and 2021 through regular monitoring of self-reported symptoms in an Alpine community sample. DESIGN: To this purpose, we designed a longitudinal population representative study, the Cooperative Health Research in South Tyrol COVID-19 study. PARTICIPANTS AND OUTCOME MEASURES: A sample of 845 participants was retrospectively investigated for active and past infections with swab and blood tests, by August 2020, allowing adjusted cumulative incidence estimation. Of them, 700 participants without previous infection or vaccination were followed up monthly until July 2021 for first-time infection and symptom self-reporting: COVID-19 anamnesis, social contacts, lifestyle and sociodemographic data were assessed remotely through digital questionnaires. Temporal symptom trajectories and infection rates were modelled through longitudinal clustering and dynamic correlation analysis. Negative binomial regression and random forest analysis assessed the relative importance of symptoms. RESULTS: At baseline, the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection was 1.10% (95% CI 0.51%, 2.10%). Symptom trajectories mimicked both self-reported and confirmed cases of incident infections. Cluster analysis identified two groups of high-frequency and low-frequency symptoms. Symptoms like fever and loss of smell fell in the low-frequency cluster. Symptoms most discriminative of test positivity (loss of smell, fatigue and joint-muscle aches) confirmed prior evidence. CONCLUSIONS: Regular symptom tracking from population representative samples is an effective screening tool auxiliary to laboratory diagnostics for novel pathogens at critical times, as manifested in this study of COVID-19 patterns. Integrated surveillance systems might benefit from more direct involvement of citizens' active symptom tracking.


Subject(s)
Anosmia , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 11(5)2023 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240953

ABSTRACT

Vaccination rates against SARS-CoV-2 in children aged five to eleven years remain low in many countries. The current benefit of vaccination in this age group has been questioned given that the large majority of children have now experienced at least one SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, protection from infection, vaccination or both wanes over time. National decisions on offering vaccines to this age group have tended to be made without considering time since infection. There is an urgent need to evaluate the additional benefits of vaccination in previously infected children and under what circumstances those benefits accrue. We present a novel methodological framework for estimating the potential benefits of COVID-19 vaccination in previously infected children aged five to eleven, accounting for waning. We apply this framework to the UK context and for two adverse outcomes: hospitalisation related to SARS-CoV-2 infection and Long Covid. We show that the most important drivers of benefit are: the degree of protection provided by previous infection; the protection provided by vaccination; the time since previous infection; and future attack rates. Vaccination can be very beneficial for previously infected children if future attack rates are high and several months have elapsed since the previous major wave in this group. Benefits are generally larger for Long Covid than hospitalisation, because Long Covid is both more common than hospitalisation and previous infection offers less protection against it. Our framework provides a structure for policy makers to explore the additional benefit of vaccination across a range of adverse outcomes and different parameter assumptions. It can be easily updated as new evidence emerges.

16.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e070975, 2023 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239135

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Previous research highlighted that in the early 2000s a significant share of the Italian population used and paid out of pocket for private healthcare services even when they could potentially have received the same treatments from the National Health Service (NHS). The decrease in public investments in healthcare and the increase in health needs due to the population ageing may have modified the use of private health services and equity of access to the Italian NHS. This study aims to investigate the change in the prevalence of individuals who have fully paid out of pocket for accessing healthcare services in Italy between 2006 and 2019 and the main reasons behind this choice. DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparative study. PARTICIPANTS AND COMPARISON: Two representative samples of the Italian population were collected in 2006 and 2019. OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of access to fully paid out-of-pocket private health services; type of service of the last fully paid out-of-pocket access; main reasons for the last fully paid out-of-pocket access. RESULTS: We found an increase in the prevalence of people who declared having fully paid out of pocket at least one access to health services during their lifetime from 79.0% in 2006 to 91.9% in 2019 (adjusted OR 2.66; 95% CI 1.98 to 3.58). 'To avoid waiting times' was the main reason and it was significantly more frequent in 2019 compared with 2006 (adjusted OR 1.75; 95% CI 1.45 to 2.11). CONCLUSIONS: This comparative study, conducted the year before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighted an increase in the prevalence of Italian residents who have fully paid out of pocket for access to health services to overcome long waiting times. Our findings may indicate a reduced access and possible worsening of the equity of access to the public and universalistic Italian NHS between 2006 and 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , State Medicine , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Health Services , Health Services Accessibility
17.
Med Humanit ; 2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239053

ABSTRACT

Medical humanities has tended first and foremost to be associated with the ways in which the arts and humanities help us to understand health. However, this is not the only or necessarily the primary aim of our field. What the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed above all is what the field of critical medical humanities has insisted on: the deep entanglement of social, cultural, historical life with the biomedical. The pandemic has been a time for reinstating the power of expertise of a particular kind, focusing on epidemiology, scientific modelling of potential outcomes and vaccine development. All of this delivered by science at speed.It has been challenging for medical humanities researchers to find purchase in these debates with insights from our more contemplative, 'slow research' approaches. However, as the height of the crisis passes, our field might now be coming into its own. The pandemic, as well as being productive of scientific expertise, also demonstrated clearly the meaning of culture: that it is not a static entity, but is produced and evolves through interaction and relationship. Taking a longer view, we can see the emergence of a certain 'COVID-19 culture' characterised by entanglements between expert knowledge, social media, the economy, educational progress, risk to health services and people in their socio-economic, political ethnic and religious/spiritual contexts. It is the role of medical humanities to pay attention to those interactions and to examine how they play out in the human experience and potential impact of the pandemic. However, to survive and grow in significance within the field of healthcare research, we need to engage not just to comment. There is a need for medical humanities scholars to assert our expertise in interdisciplinary research, fully engaged with experts by experience, and to work proactively with funders to demonstrate our value.

18.
Health Serv Res Manag Epidemiol ; 10: 23333928231175801, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238478

ABSTRACT

Objective: As the fourth wave of COVID-19 spread in South Korea in 2022, society experienced various adverse effects, including COVID-19 phobia, depression, and loneliness. Addressing these factors became a vital part of the anti-COVID-19 individual and public mental health efforts, conducted partly by fostering COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with public prevention practice guidelines under the controversial policy of living "with COVID-19". Method: The study used a cross-sectional online survey-based design. Participants comprised a convenience sample of Korean university students (n = 460). A survey was distributed to the participants to measure their agreement/disagreement with the policy "with COVID-19" and a structural equation model and path analysis to examine the impact of the latent variables of COVID-19 phobia and COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and practice as of April 2022. Results: The mean COVID-19 phobia score was 48.13/100, with psychological and social phobia scores higher than in previous studies, while psychosomatic and economic phobia scores were lower than in previous research. Higher psychological phobia significantly increased COVID-19 practices and attitudes. Conversely, higher psychosomatic phobia decreased practices and attitudes. Moreover, higher psychological phobia was significantly associated with disagreement with the policy. Conclusion: The results suggest that efforts to increase South Korean university students' acceptance of easing COVID-19 restrictions should focus on mitigating psychological phobia.

19.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1182328, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238208

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Violence against healthcare workers is a global health problem threatening healthcare workforce retention and health system resilience in a fragile post-COVID 'normalisation' period. In this perspective article, we argue that violence against healthcare workers must be made a greater priority. Our novel contribution to the debate is a comparative health system and policy approach. Methods: We have chosen a most different systems comparative approach concerning the epidemiological, political, and geographic contexts. Brazil (under the Bolsonaro government) and the United Kingdom (under the Johnson government) serve as examples of countries that were strongly hit by the pandemic in epidemiological terms while also displaying policy failures. New Zealand and Germany represent the opposite. A rapid assessment was undertaken based on secondary sources and country expertise. Results: We found similar problems across countries. A global crisis makes healthcare workers vulnerable to violence. Furthermore, insufficient data and monitoring hamper effective prevention, and lack of attention may threaten women, the nursing profession, and migrant/minority groups the most. There were also relevant differences. No clear health system pattern can be identified. At the same time, professional associations and partly the media are strong policy actors against violence. Conclusion: In all countries, muchmore involvement from political leadership is needed. In addition, attention to the political dimension and all forms of violence are essential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Violence , Policy , Health Personnel
20.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 11(5)2023 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238018

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 booster vaccinations have been recommended as a primary line of defence against serious illness and hospitalisation. This study identifies and characterises distinct profiles of attitudes towards vaccination, particularly the willingness to get a booster dose. A sample of 582 adults from Australia completed an online survey capturing COVID-related behaviours, beliefs and attitudes and a range of sociodemographic, psychological, political, social and cultural variables. Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) identified three subgroups: Acceptant (61%), Hesitant (30%) and Resistant (9%). Compared to the Acceptant group, the Hesitant and Resistant groups were less worried about catching COVID-19, used fewer official COVID-19 information sources, checked the news less, were lower on the agreeableness personality dimension and reported more conservatism, persecutory thinking, amoral attitudes and need for chaos. The Hesitant group also reported checking the legitimacy of information sources less, scored lower on the openness to new experiences personality dimension and were more likely than the Resistant and Acceptant groups to report regaining freedoms (e.g., travel) and work requirements or external pressures as reasons to get a booster. The Resistant group were higher on reactance, held more conspiratorial beliefs and rated their culture as being less tolerant of deviance than the Hesitant and Acceptant groups. This research can inform tailored approaches to increasing booster uptake and optimal strategies for public health messaging.

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