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4.
Routledge international handbook of therapeutic stories and storytelling ; : 43-44, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20245505

ABSTRACT

This chapter is about, what impact can the corona crisis have on our mental health? Besides the relational tensions that can arise from living on top of each other, many of us are also stuck in one negative story. The chapter is about the importance making room for stories that are not about corona. It discusses about work that consisting of broadening people's horizon by letting participants discover that they consist of multiple stories. This will have an enormous impact on the mental well-being of a large part of the population, which will have lots of consequences. That is why it is important to actively make room for other stories right now, in the middle of the pandemic. Memories from the past and dreams for the future. This is a responsibility one has to take towards one's own mental health (and resilience), just as we have to do for others. Sharing other stories and making sure people don't get stuck in that one difficult story is just as much part of caring about each other and will help us get through this crisis healthier. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Risk Anal ; 2022 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244483

ABSTRACT

This study seeks guidance from the planned risk information avoidance model to explore drivers of risk information avoidance in the context of COVID-19. Data were collected early during the pandemic. Among our most notable results is that participants who are more oriented toward social dominance and are more skeptical of scientists' credibility have (1) more supportive attitudes toward risk information avoidance and (2) feel social pressure to avoid risk information. The findings of this study highlight how the role of skepticism in science and intergroup ideologies, such as social dominance, can have important implications for how people learn about health-related information, even in times of heightened crisis.

6.
Telemed J E Health ; 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243816

ABSTRACT

Background: Telehealth has seen breakthroughs in many fields of medicine, but utilization remains limited in orthopedic sports medicine. The purpose of this investigation was to compare patient satisfaction, duration of care, and overall patient experiences with telehealth and in-person clinical visits for sports-related injuries. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted at an orthopedic sports medicine clinic during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic between March and November 2020. Anonymous electronic surveys were used to record patient responses and statistical comparisons were drawn through two-sample t-tests. Results: A total of 175 patients (82 telehealth vs. 93 in-person) consented to participate in this investigation, and all were included in the final analysis. The overall composite satisfaction score, when compared between the two groups, did not differ (p = 0.63). Duration of care was significantly longer in the 93 patients who had in-person clinical visits as compared with the 82 patients who had telehealth visits (61/93: >31 min vs. 75/82: <30 min; p < 0.001). Finally, of the 82 patients who had telehealth, 3 respondents said they were "very unlikely" and "unlikely" to request another virtual clinical visit and/or recommend this mode of health care delivery to friends or family. Of the 93 patients had in-person clinical visits, only 15 respondents stated they were uninterested in telehealth under any circumstance. Conclusion: Most patients presenting to an orthopedic sports medicine clinic are open to telehealth, recognize its utility, and believe it to be just as comparable with in-person clinical visits. Level of Evidence: IV.

7.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 2022 Nov 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243666

ABSTRACT

We examined the impact of COVID-19 on Black barbershops and their potential role as public health extenders. A 30-item survey was distributed to predominantly Black barbershop owners and barbers across 40 different states/territories in the US between June and October 2020. The survey addressed the impact of COVID-19 on Black barbershops, and barbers' interest in engaging in health outreach programs. The majority reported that stay-at-home orders had significant to severe impact on their business; few were prepared for the financial impact and less than half thought they qualified for government assistance. The majority were already providing health education and outreach to the Black community and showed interest in continuing to provide such services, like information on COVID-19. Barbers in Black-serving barbershops, a well-documented effective place for public health outreach to the Black community, show promise as public health extenders in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
J Clin Nurs ; 2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242902

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the perspectives of parents during the perinatal period amid the COVID-19 pandemic and explore the experiences of Singaporean parents receiving perinatal support via the Supportive Parenting App (SPA). BACKGROUND: The stressors accompanying parenting responsibilities often affect the overall well-being of the family unit. With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, Singaporean parents are forced to shoulder childcare responsibilities with minimal support due to safety restrictions. The Supportive Parenting Application (SPA) was introduced to parents during the start of the pandemic to offer timely additional support. It is a mobile health application-based educational support for parents across the perinatal period, consisting of features such as peer support, expert advice and discussion forums. DESIGN: Descriptive qualitative study. METHODS: Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted with 33 parents (16 from the control group, 17 from the intervention group) in an ongoing randomised controlled trial between June 2021 and February 2022. The COREQ checklist was used to guide the reporting of the data. RESULTS: Four themes with 10 subthemes describing the perinatal experiences of parents were identified. The themes include 'Ups and downs' of parenting experiences; Perinatal care from 'best care' to 'flying blind'; What kept couples going and Use of technology-a way forward. CONCLUSION: Although COVID-19 negatively affected parents' availability of care and support, most could still access other support sources to help them. Additionally, the SPA was found to be a dependable information source for the intervention group parents. Future research could work on improving technology-based support based on the feedback given to offer better quality perinatal care for parents. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Technology-based support provided by healthcare professionals helps provide reliable perinatal information and support for parents. More efforts should be directed towards developing quality informational resources and support to improve perinatal care. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Patients/members of the public contributed to the data collected and were involved in member checking to ensure the rigour of the study. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NHG DSRB: 2019/00875.

9.
J Med Ethics ; 48(9): 611-615, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242516

ABSTRACT

The success of digital COVID-19 contact tracing requires a strategy that successfully addresses the digital divide-inequitable access to technology such as smartphones. Lack of access both undermines the degree of social benefit achieved by the use of tracing apps, and exacerbates existing social and health inequities because those who lack access are likely to already be disadvantaged. Recently, Singapore has introduced portable tracing wearables (with the same functionality as a contact tracing app) to address the equity gap and promote public health. We argue that governments have an ethical obligation to ensure fair access to the protective benefits of contract tracing during the pandemic and that wearables are an effective way of addressing some important equity issues. The most contentious issues about contact tracing apps have been the potential infringements of privacy and individual liberty, especially where the use of apps or other technology (such as wearables or QR codes) is required for access to certain spaces. Here we argue that wearables, as opposed to apps alone, will make a digital contact tracing mandate more practical and explain some conditions under which such a mandate would be justified. We focus on Singapore as a case study that has recently deployed contact tracing wearables nationally, but also reference debate about wearables in Australia and New Zealand. Our analysis will be relevant to counties trialling similar portable tracing wearables.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Wearable Electronic Devices , Contact Tracing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Behav Med ; 2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242508

ABSTRACT

To identify factors that increase risk for nonadherence to recommended health protective behaviors during pandemics, this study examined the prospective relations of substance use frequency to both adherence to social distancing recommendations and social distancing intentions during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the role of social distancing self-efficacy in these relations. A U.S. community sample of 377 adults completed a prospective online study, including an initial assessment between March 27 and April 5, 2020, and a follow-up assessment one-month later. Results revealed a significant direct relation of baseline substance use frequency to lower adherence to social distancing recommendations one-month later. Results also revealed significant indirect relations of greater substance use frequency to lower levels of both social distancing behaviors and intentions one-month later through lower social distancing self-efficacy. Results highlight the relevance of substance use and social distancing self-efficacy to lower adherence to social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

11.
J Agromedicine ; : 1-19, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242138

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this paper, we use a UK case study to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the mental health (emotional, psychological, social wellbeing) of farmers. We outline the drivers of poor farming mental health, the manifold impacts of the pandemic at a time of policy and environmental change, and identify lessons that can be learned to develop resilience in farming communities against future shocks. METHODS: We undertook a survey answered by 207 farmers across the UK, focusing on drivers of poor mental health and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. We also conducted 22 in-depth interviews with individuals in England, Scotland and Wales who provide mental health support to farmers. These explored how and why the COVID-19 pandemic affected the mental health of farmers. These interviews were supplemented by 93 survey responses from a similar group of support providers (UK-wide). RESULTS: We found that the pandemic exacerbated underlying drivers of poor mental health and wellbeing in farming communities. 67% of farmers surveyed reported feeling more stressed, 63% felt more anxious, 38% felt more depressed, and 12% felt more suicidal. The primary drivers of poor mental health identified by farmers during the pandemic included decreased social contact and loneliness, issues with the general public on private land, and moving online for social events. Support providers also highlighted relationship and financial issues, illness, and government inspections as drivers of poor mental health. Some farmers, conversely, outlined positive impacts of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic is just one of many potential stressors associated with poor farming mental health and its impacts are likely to be long-lasting and delayed. Multiple stressors affecting farmers at the same time can create a tipping point. Therefore, there is a need for long-term support and ongoing evaluation of the drivers of poor mental health in farming families.

12.
Risk Anal ; 2022 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241589

ABSTRACT

Social media analysis provides an alternate approach to monitoring and understanding risk perceptions regarding COVID-19 over time. Our current understandings of risk perceptions regarding COVID-19 do not disentangle the three dimensions of risk perceptions (perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, and negative emotion) as the pandemic has evolved. Data are also limited regarding the impact of social determinants of health (SDOH) on COVID-19-related risk perceptions over time. To address these knowledge gaps, we extracted tweets regarding COVID-19-related risk perceptions and developed indicators for the three dimensions of risk perceptions based on over 502 million geotagged tweets posted by over 4.9 million Twitter users from January 2020 to December 2021 in the United States. We examined correlations between risk perception indicator scores and county-level SDOH. The three dimensions of risk perceptions demonstrate different trajectories. Perceived severity maintained a high level throughout the study period. Perceived susceptibility and negative emotion peaked on March 11, 2020 (COVID-19 declared global pandemic by WHO) and then declined and remained stable at lower levels until increasing once again with the Omicron period. Relative frequency of tweet posts on risk perceptions did not closely follow epidemic trends of COVID-19 (cases, deaths). Users from socioeconomically vulnerable counties showed lower attention to perceived severity and susceptibility of COVID-19 than those from wealthier counties. Examining trends in tweets regarding the multiple dimensions of risk perceptions throughout the COVID-19 pandemic can help policymakers frame in-time, tailored, and appropriate responses to prevent viral spread and encourage preventive behavior uptake in the United States.

13.
HIV Med ; 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241034

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to examine the public response to public health and media messaging during the human monkeypox virus (MPXV) outbreak in the UK, focusing on at-risk communities. METHODS: A co-produced, cross-sectional survey was administered in June and July 2022 using community social media channels and the Grindr dating app. Basic descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and odds ratio p values are presented. RESULTS: Of 1932 survey respondents, 1750 identified as men, 88 as women, and 64 as gender non-conforming. Sexual identity was described as gay/lesbian/queer (80%), bisexual (12%), heterosexual (4%), and pansexual (2%); 39% were aged <40 years; 71% self-identified as White, 3% as Black, 8% as Asian, 2%as LatinX, and 11% as 'Mixed or Other' heritage groups. In total, 85% were employed and 79% had completed higher education. A total of 7% of respondents identified themselves as living with HIV. Overall, 34% reported limited understanding of public health information, 52% considered themselves at risk, 61% agreed that people with MPXV should isolate for 21 days, 49% reported they would first attend a sexual health clinic if symptomatic, 86% reported they would accept a vaccine, and 59% believed that MPXV originated from animals. The most trusted sources of information were healthcare professionals (37%), official health agencies (29%), and mainstream media (12%). CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine acceptability was very high, yet the understanding and acceptance of public health information varied. Social determinants of health inequalities already shaping the UK landscape risk were compounded in this new emergency. Engagement with structurally disadvantaged members of affected communities and better dissemination of public health messaging by trusted healthcare professionals are essential for the public health response.

14.
Phys Ther ; 2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240505

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Participation in life situations is a critical aspect of health recognized by the World Health Organization. Guidelines to prevent spreading of COVID-19 place older adults at risk for worsening participation. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors associated with participation during the COVID-19 pandemic among community-dwelling older adults living in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. METHODS: Participants were recruited from identified census dissemination areas in Hamilton. Participants completed surveys either by phone or online during the months of May to August 2020. Measures were organized into factors related to body functions and structures, activities, participation, as well as personal and environmental contextual factors using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework. Multivariable regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with participation as measured by the Late-Life Disability Instrument's (LLDI) frequency and limitations scales. RESULTS: A total of 272 older adults completed the survey (78 y [SD = 7.3 y]; 70% female). Use of a walking aid, driving status, perceived mental health status, nutrition risk, and physical function explained 48.2% of the variance observed in the LLDI-frequency scale scores. Use of a walking aid, driving status, perceived mental health status, receiving health assistance, and physical function explained 38.5% of the variance observed in the LLDI-limitation scale scores. CONCLUSION: Results highlighted factors across multiple ICF domains that are associated with participation restriction among a sample of community-dwelling older adults during the pandemic. Participation during the pandemic was greatest in those that were able to walk without needing to use a walking aid, being a licensed and current driver, perceiving good to excellent mental health, and having greater physical function. IMPACT: Our findings contribute to the literature on older adult participation during lockdowns, restrictions, pandemics, and/or other similar circumstances.

15.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-10, 2022 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240408

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused increased anxiety among medical students due to the uncertainty of the long-term effects on the future of medical education. There are currently insufficient studies aimed at investigating the changes in the mental health and studying habits of medical students during public health emergencies such as this pandemic, as well as methods that can be incorporated to appropriately manage anxiety effectively. To investigate the psychological impact and associated factors on medical students during the pandemic. This retrospective, cross-sectional study consisted of 291 medical students of the faculty of medical sciences at the university of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus, Trinidad and Tobago. The mental health and study habits of said students were assessed with the use of questionnaires via an online survey platform. Data of our study showed that 56% of the students were experiencing increased stress and anxiety. Students of 82.8% experienced irregular sleeping habits and 76.3% of participants experienced a change in eating habits brought on by the pandemic. Participants of 67.4% studied less than 4 hrs. a day, 61.5% were less productive, 62.2% showed an inability to focus and avoid distractions in their study environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a need for proper supportive strategies to assist students in effectively managing anxiety and depression during public health emergencies such as COVID-19. It is suggested that all universities, colleges and education bodies alike implement a pandemic preparedness course as well as an accessible online support forum.

16.
Discov Ment Health ; 2(1): 3, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240223

ABSTRACT

In the current COVID-19 pandemic there are reports of deteriorating psychological conditions among university students in lower-middle-income countries (LMICs), but very little is known about the gender differences in the mental health conditions on this population. This study aims to assess generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among university students using a gender lens during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study was conducted using web-based Google forms between May 2020 and August 2020 among 605 current students of two universities in Bangladesh. Within the total 605 study participants, 59.5% (360) were female. The prevalence of mild to severe anxiety disorder was 61.8% among females and 38.2% among males. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, females were 2.21 times more likely to have anxiety compared to males [AOR: 2.21; CI 95% (1.28-53.70); p-value: 0.004] and participants' age was negatively associated with increased levels of anxiety (AOR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.05-0.57; p = 0.001). In addition, participants who were worried about academic delays were more anxious than those who were not worried about it (AOR: 2.82; 95% CI 1.50-5.31, p = 0.001). These findings of this study will add value to the existing limited evidence and strongly advocate in designing gender-specific, low-intensity interventions to ensure comprehensive mental health services for the young adult population of Bangladesh.

17.
J Infect Dis ; 226(Suppl 3): S372-S374, 2022 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240048
18.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240036

ABSTRACT

Refugee girls may be unprepared for the sexual risk challenges facing teens in the US. We sought to understand refugee girls' general experience, discussions with parents and motivations related to participation in an evidence-based sexual risk reduction program. Through semi-structured interviews with twelve girls ages 15-17 years from nine countries, we acquired insight into the girls' reactions to the program, if they had discussed their experiences, and reflections on their decision to participate. Qualitative analysis of verbatim transcriptions identified three themes: (1) my cultural norm is not to ask; (2) groups were a safe way for me to learn and share; and (3) I learned to use my voice. As the numbers of adolescent refugees grow, we cannot ignore their need for tailored sexual health research and programming. This first-of-its-kind study provides insight into acceptability, motivation for participation, and impact of a sexual health promotion program.

19.
Telemed J E Health ; 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239939

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine chronic diseases, clinical factors, and sociodemographic characteristics associated with telemedicine utilization among a safety-net population. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adults seeking care in an urban, multisite community health center in the Northeast United States. We included adults with ≥1 outpatient in-person visit during the pre-COVID-19 period (March 1, 2019-February 29, 2020) and ≥1 outpatient visit (in-person or telemedicine) during the COVID-19 period (March 1, 2020-February 29, 2021). Multivariable logistic regression models estimated associations between clinical and sociodemographic factors and telemedicine use, classified as "any" (≥1 visit) and "high" (≥3 visits). Results: Among 5,793 patients who met inclusion criteria, 4,687 (80.9%) had any (≥1) telemedicine visit and 1,053 (18.2%) had high (≥3) telemedicine visits during the COVID-19 period. Older age and Medicare coverage were associated with having any telemedicine use. Older and White patients were more likely to have high telemedicine use. Uninsured patients were less likely to have high telemedicine use. Patients with increased health care utilization in the pre-COVID-19 period and those with hypertension, diabetes, substance use disorders, and depression were more likely to have high telemedicine engagement. Discussion: Chronic conditions, older patients, and White patients compared with Latinx patients, were associated with high telemedicine engagement after adjusting for prior health care utilization. Conclusion: Equity-focused approaches to telemedicine clinical strategies are needed for safety-net populations. Community health centers can adopt disease-specific telemedicine strategies with high patient engagement.

20.
Z Gesundh Wiss ; 30(4): 925-930, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239690

ABSTRACT

Aim: More and more frequently outbreaks of infectious diseases force the international community to urgent health action and lead to an increasing security focus on global health. Considering the limiting character of resource allocation, all other medical conditions must compete with the top spot of health security matters, as we currently see with the outbreak of COVID-19. Surgery is an integral part of universal health offering life-saving therapy for a variety of illnesses. Amidst the increasing nexus of infectious diseases and health security and in the view of Public Health Emergencies of International Concern (PHEIC), is there a risk of global surgery falling behind? Subject and Methods: While the global undersupply of surgical care is well recorded, contextual explanations are absent. Our research introduces the constructivist concept of securitization according to the Copenhagen School to explain the structural handicap of global surgery and by that presents a structural explanation. We investigate the securitizing potential of surgical diseases in comparison to infectious diseases. Results: Surgical conditions are non-contagious without the risk for disease outbreaks, hardly preventable and their treatment is often infrastructurally demanding. These key features mark their low securitizing potential. Additionally, as PHEIC is the only securitizing institution in the realm of health, infectious diseases have a privileged role in health security. Conclusion: Surgery substantially lacks securitizing potential in comparison to communicable diseases and by that is structurally given an inferior position in a securitized health order.

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