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1.
Polish Otorhinolaryngology Review ; 11(2):29-33, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2025197

ABSTRACT

Our work aimed to review the literature about sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) treatment and the approach to this problem during the COVID-19 pandemic. Current knowledge on SSNHL was sought and presented based on literature published in English-language journals from the Master Journal List. We searched for articles in the MEDLINE, PubMed, and Scopus databases. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a relatively common pathology in otolaryngology. The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery published guidelines for managing SSNHL, specifying systemic and intratympanic (IT) steroid therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) as the optional adjunctive treatment. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the standard treatment of SSNHL needed to be verified to identify possible interference of virus infection with pharmacological and hyperbaric therapy. The general use of standard treatment of SSNHL with steroids and HBO according to internationally approved guidelines should ensure safe medical procedures due to epidemiological restrictions. Potential relations between COVID-19 and SSNHL, as well as concomitant use of anticoagulants, should be investigated. © Polish Otorhinolaryngology Review.

2.
Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology ; 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007162
3.
Journal of Critical Care Medicine ; 8(3):176-181, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2005825

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hyperbaricoxygen therapy (HBOT) is breathing100% oxygen in pressurised chamber. This therapy ensures quick oxygen delivery to the bloodstream. In patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, progressive hypoxemia occurs. Oxygen therapy hasa significant role in its management. Aim of the study: The objective was to study the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) as adjuvant therapy for reducing the requirement of additional oxygen supplementationin patients with moderate to severe ARDS diagnosed with COVID-19. Methods: A single-centre prospective pilot cohort study was conducted ata tertiary care hospital from December 2020 to February 2021 over two months. Fifty patients with COVID-19 needingoxygen, satisfying the selection criteria, were included. Hyperbaricoxygen therapy wasgiven to all patients. The patient received30-45 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen with 15 minutes of pressurizing and depressurizing at 2.0 atmosphere absolute (ATA) with or without airbrakesas per the critical care team. Oxygen requirement, Pa02, andcondition at discharge were considered as primary outcome variables. Results: Among the 50 participants studied, the mean age was 53.64 +/- 13.26 years. Out of 50 participants, 49(98.00%) had PaO2 <= 80 mmHg, and one (2.00%) had >80 PaO2. All the participants 50(100%) had PaO2 as 90 mmHg after three sittings. Conclusion: This studyshows promising results in using HBOT to overcome respiratory failure in COVID-19. HBOT reduced the need for oxygen by improving the oxygen saturation levels.

4.
European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences ; 26(15):5618-5623, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1988909

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus illness 2019 (COVID-19) was first observed to induce fever, dry cough, pneumonia, and dyspnea in the lower respiratory tract. Atypical manifestations, including digestive problems and cardiac symptoms, were also observed. The rate of mortality in the older population is greater than in the younger group, as well as in individuals suffering from comorbidities. Oxygen supplementation through a face-mask, non-invasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation ECMO are some of the available supportive techniques. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) is thought to boost tissue oxygenation by increasing plasma soluble oxygen levels. HBOT also reduces inflammatory responses in COVID-19 patients, minimizing the negative impacts of the cytokine storm. Because the existing data on the efficacy of HBOT in COVID-19 patients is limited, the purpose of this article is to review the possible mechanisms of HBO, as well as data available on potential advantages, side effects and uses in the treatment of COVID-19 patients.

5.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925218

ABSTRACT

Objective: To report a rarely isolated central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) following Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) Vaccine Moderna (mRNA-1273). Background: COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus was firstly reported in Dec 2019 and became pandemic as of Mar 2020. Fortunately, novel rapidly developed COVID-19 vaccines are capable of lessening the pandemic effectively. As billions of people vaccinated, however, COVID-19 vaccine-induced thrombosis (VIT) are gradually emerging. Design/Methods: A previously healthy 70-year-old man presented with acute painless visual loss of the right eye five days after the first dose of Moderna vaccine. On examination of the right eye, visual acuity (VA) was counting finger at 15 cm. Fundoscopy revealed a diffuse whitened retina with cherry-red spot. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed hyperreflectivity. Screening tests for platelet and D-Dimer levels were unremarkable. CRAO was treated with clopidogrel and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The serum level of anti-platelet factor-4 (PF4) antibody was 73.34 ng/ml (ref, 0-49.99 ng/ml).Two months later, VA was counting finger at 10 cm3 and OCT revealed hyperreflectivity and mild inner retina atrophy Results: COVID-19 vaccine-induced thrombosis and thrombocytopenia (VITT) based on the victims receiving AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines is through autoimmune antibody against PF4. VITT is typically manifested within 6-24 days post-vaccination;thrombotic sites are in the cerebral sinus, portal vein, splanchnic vein, and pulmonary emboli;as well as thrombocytopenia and increased level of D-Dimer. Our patient had isolated CRAO five days post-Moderna vaccination but normal platelet count and D-Dimer level. Moreover, VIT with isolated CRAO was not published on PubMed. Conclusions: VIT could occur in the unusual site such as CRAO in our case. Normal platelet and D-Dimer levels might not be sensitive tools to exclude VIT. Suspected patient with thrombotic event after COVID-19 vaccines should have anti-PF4 antibody test to assure an effective treatment.

6.
Journal, Indian Academy of Clinical Medicine ; 23(1-2):42-46, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1894164

ABSTRACT

The use of oxygen has gained much prominence in the Covid era. However, there are still lacunae in the practical knowledge of health workers regarding proper use of this medical gas. Daily clinical experience still reveals instances of over-and under-use of oxygen. There are various aspects of oxygen use, including choosing the proper source, the proper delivery device, and the proper duration, which must be decided appropriately for maximum benefit of the patient. This article aims to present certain practical aspects of oxygen use for the clinician. While this is an essential knowledge for the Covid era, the learning will be useful for the future too.

7.
Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine ; 52(1):1, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1894127
8.
Acta Clinica Belgica: International Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine ; 77(sup1):1-33, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1886341
9.
Biochemical and Cellular Archives ; 21(2):1-2, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1812557
10.
J Med Case Rep ; 16(1): 80, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has resulted in a growing population of individuals who experience a wide range of persistent symptoms referred to as "long COVID." Symptoms include neurocognitive impairment and fatigue. Two potential mechanisms could be responsible for these long-term unremitting symptoms: hypercoagulability, which increases the risk of blood vessel occlusion, and an uncontrolled continuous inflammatory response. Currently, no known treatment is available for long COVID. One of the options to reverse hypoxia, reduce neuroinflammation, and induce neuroplasticity is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In this article, we present the first case report of a previously healthy athletic individual who suffered from long COVID syndrome treated successfully with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 55-year-old Caucasian man presented 3 months after severe coronavirus disease 2019 infection with long COVID syndrome. His symptoms included a decline in memory, multitasking abilities, energy, breathing, and physical fitness. After evaluation that included brain perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, computerized cognitive tests, and cardiopulmonary test, he was treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Each session included exposure to 90 minutes of 100% oxygen at 2 atmosphere absolute pressure with 5-minute air breaks every 20 minutes for 60 sessions, 5 days per week. Evaluation after completing the treatment showed significant improvements in brain perfusion and microstructure by magnetic resonance imaging and significant improvement in memory with the most dominant effect being on nonverbal memory, executive functions, attention, information procession speed, cognitive flexibility, and multitasking. The improved cognitive functions correlated with the increased cerebral blood flow in brain regions as measured by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. With regard to physical capacity, there was a 34% increase in the maximum rate of oxygen consumed during exercise and a 44% improvement in forced vital capacity. The improved physical measurements correlated with the regain of his pre-COVID physical capacity. CONCLUSIONS: We report the first case of successfully treated long COVID symptoms with hyperbaric oxygen therapy with improvements in cognition and cardiopulmonary function. The beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen shed additional light on the pathophysiology of long COVID. As this is a single case report, further prospective randomized control studies are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , COVID-19/complications , Diffusion Tensor Imaging , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2
11.
SN Compr Clin Med ; 2(8): 1041-1044, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1694093

ABSTRACT

Medical collapse became a major concern under coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak; prevention of medical accidents is essential during disinfection either. The objective of this review is to enhance the awareness regarding the safety aspects towards infection prevention practices and to offer solutions for safe patient care practices including side effects of disinfectants and precaution in specific medical facilities especially in hemodialysis rooms, intensive care unit, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) chambers, or patient transport vehicle. Literature was researched that was obtained from studies of human coronavirus infections, including the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and created a summary of the characteristics of these disinfectants. This review is not intended to replace infection prevention policies and procedures established by hospitals, and manufacturers, but to provide some update confidence in the safety measures that each medical facility already uses and to offer additional input that should optimally reduce the risk of infection.

12.
International Journal of Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences ; 12(4):2548-2556, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1554033

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the SARS CoV2 ’Coronavirus pandemic’ is believed to have originated in Wuhan in 2019 as a zoonotic spread from bats to humans. It is a highly communicable infection-causing rapid human to human transmission of the virus by virtue of its infectious and pleomorphic nature. The virus has affected millions of people worldwide, with numbers still rising with each passing day. Depleting oxygen saturation levels is amongst the prime concerns in the majority of infected patients. Nasal prongs, face masks, mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane (ECMO) are the commonly used modes of oxygen delivery in such patients. These methods though mostly successful, at times fail to restore the depleting oxygen levels to normal. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) involves the administration of 100% O2 in a special chamber whose pressure is maintained at a level greater than 1 ATP. The main purpose for raising the pressure within the chamber is that as the atmospheric pressure increases, the saturation levels of oxygen in the blood also increase, which eventually result in increased overall tissue oxygenation. This article provides a systematic and wholesome review on the basic principle of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, its effects on the body at a microscopic and macroscopic level, its various uses and its suitability as an adjuvant for the treatment of select COVID-19 infected patients.

13.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 21(6): e629-e632, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551861

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long COVID is a common occurrence following COVID-19 infection. The most common symptom reported is fatigue. Limited interventional treatment options exist. We report the first evaluation of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for long COVID treatment. METHODS: A total of 10 consecutive patients received 10 sessions of HBOT to 2.4 atmospheres over 12 days. Each treatment session lasted 105 minutes, consisting of three 30-minute exposures to 100% oxygen, interspersed with 5-minute air breaks. Validated fatigue and cognitive scoring assessments were performed at day 1 and 10. Statistical analysis was with Wilcoxon signed-rank testing reported alongside effect sizes. RESULTS: HBOT yielded a statistically significant improvement in the Chalder fatigue scale (p=0.0059; d=1.75 (very large)), global cognition (p=0.0137; d=-1.07 (large)), executive function (p=0.0039; d=-1.06 (large)), attention (p=0.0020; d=-1.2 (very large)), information processing (p=0.0059; d=-1.25 (very large)) and verbal function (p=0.0098; d=-0.92 (large)). CONCLUSION: Long COVID-related fatigue can be debilitating, and may affect young people who were previously in economic employment. The results presented here suggest potential benefits of HBOT, with statistically significant results following 10 sessions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(9)2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399336

ABSTRACT

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) consists of using of pure oxygen at increased pressure (in general, 2-3 atmospheres) leading to augmented oxygen levels in the blood (Hyperoxemia) and tissue (Hyperoxia). The increased pressure and oxygen bioavailability might be related to a plethora of applications, particularly in hypoxic regions, also exerting antimicrobial, immunomodulatory and angiogenic properties, among others. In this review, we will discuss in detail the physiological relevance of oxygen and the therapeutical basis of HBOT, collecting current indications and underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, potential areas of research will also be examined, including inflammatory and systemic maladies, COVID-19 and cancer. Finally, the adverse effects and contraindications associated with this therapy and future directions of research will be considered. Overall, we encourage further research in this field to extend the possible uses of this procedure. The inclusion of HBOT in future clinical research could be an additional support in the clinical management of multiple pathologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , Humans , Hypoxia , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 96, 2021 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365397

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxygenation serves as a cornerstone in the treatment of COVID-19, and several methods have been extensively studied so far. Herein, we aimed to systematically review the studies discussing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to examine its reported efficacy and adverse events in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We systematically searched and retrieved the relevant articles using keywords on the online databases, including PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases up to April 11th, 2021. The retrieved records underwent a two-step title/abstract and full-text screening process, and the eligible papers were identified. National Institutes of health (NIH) quality assessment tool was used for this study. This study was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) with ID CRD42021269821. RESULTS: Eight articles from three countries were included. All the included studies had good and fair quality scores, with no poor studies included in this systematic review (Good: n = 5, Fair: n = 3). Studies were divided into clinical trials and case reports/series. Most of the studies used HBOT less than 1.5-2 absolute atmospheres (ATA) for 90 min sessions and thereafter sessions were decreased to 60 min. Trials demonstrated most of the patients recovered after receiving HBOT, and blood oxygen saturation increased after several sessions of HBOT. CONCLUSION: Overall, HBOT seems to be a safe and effective oxygenation method in patients with COVID-19. However, there is limited knowledge and evidence regarding the effects and mechanism of HBOT in COVID-19 treatment, and further evaluations require extensive well-designed studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/methods , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Hypoxia , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United States
17.
Undersea Hyperb Med ; 47(3): 405-413, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-762605

ABSTRACT

Objective: Given the high mortality and prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation of COVID-19 patients, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen for COVID-19 patients with respiratory distress. Methods: This is a single-center clinical trial of COVID-19 patients at NYU Winthrop Hospital from March 31 to April 28, 2020. Patients in this trial received hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 2.0 atmospheres of pressure in monoplace hyperbaric chambers for 90 minutes daily for a maximum of five total treatments. Controls were identified using propensity score matching among COVID-19 patients admitted during the same time period. Using competing-risks survival regression, we analyzed our primary outcome of inpatient mortality and secondary outcome of mechanical ventilation. Results: We treated 20 COVID-19 patients with hyperbaric oxygen. Ages ranged from 30 to 79 years with an oxygen requirement ranging from 2 to 15 liters on hospital days 0 to 14. Of these 20 patients, two (10%) were intubated and died, and none remain hospitalized. Among 60 propensity-matched controls based on age, sex, body mass index, coronary artery disease, troponin, D-dimer, hospital day, and oxygen requirement, 18 (30%) were intubated, 13 (22%) have died, and three (5%) remain hospitalized (with one still requiring mechanical ventilation). Assuming no further deaths among controls, we estimate that the adjusted subdistribution hazard ratios were 0.37 for inpatient mortality (p=0.14) and 0.26 for mechanical ventilation (p=0.046). Conclusion: Though limited by its study design, our results demonstrate the safety of hyperbaric oxygen among COVID-19 patients and strongly suggests the need for a well-designed, multicenter randomized control trial.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Propensity Score , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Aged , Atmospheric Pressure , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Survival Analysis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
18.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1289: 27-35, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-660247

ABSTRACT

The recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic produced high and excessive demands for hospitalizations and equipment with depletion of critical care resources. The results of these extreme therapeutic efforts have been sobering. Further, we are months away from a robust vaccination effort, and current therapies provide limited clinical relief. Therefore, several empirical oxygenation support initiatives have been initiated with intermittent hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy to overcome the unrelenting and progressive hypoxemia during maximum ventilator support in intubated patients, despite high FiO2. Overall, few patients have been successfully treated in different locations across the globe. More recently, less severe patients at the edge of impending hypoxemia were exposed to HBO preventing intubation and obtaining the rapid resolution of symptoms. The few case descriptions indicate large variability in protocols and exposure frequency. This summary illustrates the biological mechanisms of action of increased O2 pressure, hoping to clarify more appropriate protocols and more useful application of HBO in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2
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