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1.
Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery ; 167(1 Supplement):P228, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064403

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Critically ill patients intubated in the intensive care unit experience prolonged intubation leading to increased frequency of laryngeal injuries, and there is an increasing need for intubation and mechanical ventilation currently due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It is important to fill the literature gaps regarding the incidence of laryngeal injury following prolonged intubation due to COVID-19. Method(s): This study is a retrospective review of patients with swallowing, voice, or airway concerns identified by their primary physician or speech-language pathologist who were evaluated using flexible laryngoscopy from August 14, 2020, to August 18, 2021. A total of 25 patients with COVID-19 and 27 patients without COVID-19 were included. Specific injuries evaluated for were edema/erythema, granulation tissue/ ulceration, posterior glottic stenosis, subglottic stenosis, vocal cord immobility, and vocal cord paralysis. Severe lesions were those that caused significant airway obstruction or required operative treatment or tracheostomy dependence. Result(s): Within the COVID-19 group, 80% of patients had laryngeal injury, with 45% of these in the severe category. In the non-COVID-19 group, 62.9% of patients had a laryngeal injury, with 23.5% being severe. Mild injuries were seen in 44% of COVID-19 patients and 48% of non-COVID-19 patients. The most common injury category seen was granulation tissue/ulceration. Patients with severe injuries were intubated for 6 to 39 days (mean 14.8), those with mild injuries were intubated for 0 to 31 days (mean 10.4), and patients with no injuries were intubated for 0 to 34 days (mean 9.53). Conclusion(s): Patients who were intubated for COVID-19 were more likely to have severe clinically significant laryngeal injuries than non-COVID-19 patients, even when they were intubated for similar amounts of time. Interestingly, the incidence of mild injuries was similar between the 2 groups. Based on these results, it may be beneficial to have a lower threshold for performing flexible laryngoscopy on postintubated COVID-19 patients to evaluate for laryngeal injury. This would allow for earlier intervention and, it is hoped, reduction of morbidity.

2.
British Journal of Surgery ; 109:vi17, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2042525

ABSTRACT

Aim: Has lockdown and COVID-19 led to a change into the characteristics of DVT's and patients who have them alongside a review of the DVT service. Method: Data was collected retrospectively from electronic patient records system for the following periods: 1st April until 30th June 2019 and 1st April until 30th June 2020. These were the key months during the first United Kingdom national lockdown. Data was analysed for patient demographics, risk factors, characteristics of the DVT, management and DVT reoccurrence. Statistical analyses were preformed using GraphPad Prism 8. Results: 227 patients sustained community DVT's in 2019 and 211 patients in 2020 during the study period. 13 of these patients in 2020 were COVID-19 positive. There was a difference in gender distribution (p= 0.0128) with 128 males and 99 females in 2019, 93 males and 118 females in 2020. No significant difference was noted for the incidence of thrombophilia with 9 in 2019 and 3 in 2020 (p=0.1437). Fewer long-haul journeys were made (p=0.012) with 16 in 2019 and only 2 in 2020. Fewer patients had immobility as a risk factor with 79 in 2019 and 55 in 2020 (p=0.0494). However, there were more patients using the contraceptive pill (p=0.0086) with 1 in 2019 and 9 in 2020. Conclusion: There is no significant difference in the characteristics, extent, and management of DVT's prior to and during Lockdown during COVID-19. National Lockdowns do not affect community DVT's however it is important to highlight the surrounding inpatient numbers.

3.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB56, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031375

ABSTRACT

Previous literature has identified important principles of geriatrics to consider in older adult dermatology patients, including cognition, polypharmacy, mobility, and social support. We aimed to assess provider perceptions and attitudes about the unique needs of older adult patients in dermatology. 169 health care practitioners completed the survey. 92.9% of the survey respondents were dermatologists, and 6.5% were dermatology advanced practice providers. The following barriers to care in older adult patients were identified by dermatology providers (%): hearing problems (82.9%), lack of a social support system (82.8%), immobility (74.4%), ability of the patient to communicate clearly (69.5%), transportation (77.5%), financial limitations (72.2%), Medicare limitations (66.9%), poor psychosocial functioning (77.5%), and telehealth due to the COVID-19 pandemic (71.2%). In addition, providers identified the following barriers to treatment in the older adult population: poor psychosocial functioning (89.9%), polypharmacy (87.8%), lack of social support system (88.5%) poor adherence to medications (81.1%), and lack of a primary care physician (72.3%). Overall, practitioners selected lack of social support system, difficulty in comprehending treatment plans and limited financial means as the 3 most pressing issues affecting the care of older adult patients. Additional research is warranted to develop interventions to reduce barriers to care and treatment for older adult patients in dermatology clinics.

4.
Asian Ethnology ; 81(1-2):107-124, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011759

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic at the time of writing this article (November 2020), the 2008 Lehman Shock, and governmental revitalization policies introduced by the Abe government have resulted in a rise in urban lifestyle migrants who relocate to rural areas across Japan for noneconomic reasons. This ethnographic article focuses on individuals in Tokushima and Shimane Prefectures. Critically questioning conventional notions of work and lifestyle, these individuals struggle to implement their ideal lifestyles in their rural environments that are often characterized by deeply ingrained local societal norms and values. Drawing on longitudinal fieldwork since 2016, I will examine three cases of lifestyle migrants who have chosen to pursue radically different careers. While they make great efforts to blend into the community that they have relocated to, they also refer to transnational features in their pursuit of experimental lifestyles. This multi-sited ethnography aims to explore the “power of the between” by Paul Stoller (2009) and the “potential of the liminal” coined by Vincent Crapanzano (2004) as my interlocutors courageously carve out original careers that are catered to their own needs, but also engage with the local community. © 2022, Nanzan University. All rights reserved.

5.
Journal of General Internal Medicine ; 37:S390, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1995825

ABSTRACT

CASE: A 64-year-old woman was brought in by husband for inability to care for patient. Previously active, she developed gait instability, slurred speech, and memory lapse to the point of selective mutism and being bed-bound within three months. Her medical history was notable for hypertension and Covid four months prior. She had had mild upper respiratory symptoms and recovered in ten days. Examination revealed general encephalopathy, dysarthria, limited ability to follow commands. She had decreased strength but increased tone and rigidity in all extremities. She had rhythmic jaw movement and bradykinesia with scatter myoclonic movements. Cerebellar exam was notable for ataxia, but she had normal cranial nerve and sensory exams and normal reflexes. MRI of the brain revealed restricted diffusion and T2/Flair signal abnormality involving bilateral basal ganglia, ventral medial thalami, hippocampi, and cerebral cortices. Toxic metabolic workup was unrevealing. CSF was positive for 14-3-3 protein and elevated total tau protein, confirming Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. IMPACT/DISCUSSION: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a prion disease with one in a million prevalence. Patients present with rapidly progressing dementia, myoclonus, and signs of cerebellar, corticospinal and extrapyramidal involvement including nystagmus, ataxia, hyperreflexia, spasticity, hypokinesia, bradykinesia, dystonia, and rigidity. CJD is fatal within months to two years. Patients with end stage disease may have akinetic mutism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalogram (EEG), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis are important for evaluation of CJD. Most sensitive in early stages, MRI Brain commonly shows hyperintense signal involving the cerebral cortex, corpus striatum, caudate, and putamen. EEG may capture pattern of periodic bi-or triphasic period sharp wave complexes. CSF might detect 14-3-3 protein with elevation of tau protein but real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) has the highest specificity for diagnosis for CJD. Though brain biopsy is the sole method of definitive diagnosis, results of MRI, EEG, and CSF analysis along with presenting signs and symptoms are sufficient for clinical diagnosis of CJD. Our patient's dementia, myoclonus, ataxia, hypokinesia, bradykinesia, dystonia, and rigidity all progressing to akinetic mutism within three months are classic presentation of CJD. EEG was normal, but MRI with hyperintensity of basal ganglia and cerebral cortices and CSF analysis with positive 14-3-3 and elevated tau proteins are all lead to diagnosis of CJD. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates a classic case of a Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a rare prion disease marked by rapidly progressive dementia with neuropsychiatric features.

6.
Transfers ; 11(3):3-21, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1987432

ABSTRACT

In this article, I discuss immobility as both an analytical concept and a lived experience. I review contemporary scholarly understandings of immobility and disentangle the unavoidable relational dynamics with its positive linguistic opposite, mobility. Concrete illustrations from migration studies and the global coronavirus crisis illustrate how immobility, at various scales of analysis and experience, is not only theoretically but also socially, economically, and politically relevant. Together with the in-depth review of existing scholarship, these examples confirm that the conceptual distinction made between immobility and mobility is often purely heuristic. In the messiness of people's lives, mobility and immobility are not mutually exclusive categories but, rather, two dynamic sides of the same coin. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Transfers is the property of Berghahn Books and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

7.
J Anxiety Disord ; 90: 102604, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983340

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has exposed healthcare workers (HCW) to traumatic situations that might lead to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). An important vulnerability factor for PTSD is the peritraumatic tonic immobility (TI) reaction, an involuntary and reflexive defensive response evoked by an intense and inescapable threat. TI is largely understudied in humans and has not been investigated during trauma related to COVID-19. For HCW, the pandemic context might be experienced as an intense and potentially inescapable threat, i.e., an overwhelming situation. Here, we investigated if TI response occurred during traumatic events related to the pandemic and its association with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). An online survey of 1001 HCW investigated COVID-19-related traumatic experiences, TI and PTSS. TI was reported for all types of traumatic events, and multivariate regression models revealed that TI was significantly associated with PTSS severity. HCW who reported high TI scores exhibited an increase of 9.08 times the probability of having a probable diagnosis of PTSD. Thus, TI was evoked by pandemic-related traumatic situations and associated with PTSS severity and higher odds of a PTSD diagnosis. Tonic immobility occurrence should be screened, and psychoeducation about its reflexive biological nature should be introduced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Immobility Response, Tonic/physiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis
8.
Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry ; 63:S87-S88, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1966676

ABSTRACT

Background: Catatonia is a syndrome comprised of motor and behavioral symptoms that can have many different etiologies including psychiatric and neuromedical1. The modified Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS) is a widely used screening instrument used for both diagnostic and symptom-severity tracking purposes. BFCRS items can be assessed through observation (patient or chart), verbal interactions, and physical exam. The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced limitations in hands-on evaluation due to infection control measures. We conducted a literature review to assess how often physical exam findings are used in diagnosing catatonia and hypothesize whether the pandemic is increasing under-diagnosis of catatonia. Method: We conducted a search of PubMed, Medline, and psycINFO of case reports from 1996 (when the BFCRS was published2) to present day for each individual item on the BFCRS that appeared in the title and/or and excluded publications that did not use the search terms to describe patient symptoms or did not describe catatonia. We then compared the relative appearances of the physical exam items to the non-physical exam items over the past 25 years. Finally, we compared the number of reports collected June 2020 – May 2021 (to approximate cases occurring from March 2020 – February 2021 during the height of COVID) to the average over the previous 25 years and previous 10 years, to determine if there were less reported cases of catatonia during COVID compared to previous years. Results: The most commonly reported symptoms were mutism (19.4%, z=20.1), immobility/stupor (19.1%, z=19.7), posturing/catalepsy (12.2%, z=10.5), and rigidity (9.3%, z=6.6), chi2=88.2, p < 0.0001. Physical exam symptoms were reported less frequently (14.8% of cases) compared to observed (55.1%) and interviewed symptoms (30.1%), chi2=115.19, p < 0.0001. Physical exam symptoms occurred less frequently than expected (14.8% vs 21.7%) based on number of criteria, chi2=21.34, p < 0.0001. There was no decrease in case reports in June 2020 – May 2021;case reports during COVID made up 8.9% of reports in the last 25 years, and 15.9% of reports in the last 10 years, chi2=13.56, p = 0.0002. Discussion: Our data suggests that physical exam items in the BFCRS are used less frequently than non-physical exam items when diagnosing catatonia. Despite a pandemic with increased isolation precautions, the collected data from case reports suggests that there was not a significant increase in missed catatonia diagnoses. However, catatonia is an under-diagnosed condition generally and physical exam of a suspected catatonic patient by a psychiatrist can be a key element to accurate diagnosis.3 Conclusion: While our literature review has limitations (e.g. searching for terms available only in the title and , not in the body of the paper), we feel confident in saying that physical-exam findings are not used as frequently as non-physical exam findings in diagnosing catatonia. While the physical exam should always be done when possible and can lead to more accurate diagnoses, we do not feel that any potential reduction in physical exams during the pandemic has lead to a significant increase in missed catatonia diagnoses. References: 1. Rosebush PI, Mazurek MF. Catatonia and its treatment. Schizophr Bull. 2010 Mar;36(2): 239-42. 2. Bush G, Fink M, Petrides G, Dowling F, Francis A. Catatonia. I. Rating scale and standardized examination. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996;93(2): 129-136. 3. Walther S, Stegmayer K, Wilson JE, Heckers S. Structure and neural mechanisms of catatonia. Lancet Psychiatry. 2019 Jul;6(7):610-619.

9.
Population, Space and Place ; 28(5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1930083

ABSTRACT

From the perspective of migrant times/temporalities, this paper focuses on the temporal experiences among Chinese international students (CIS) who planned to enrol overseas in 2020 but instead chose to stay in China due to the COVID‐19. Specifically, it adopts 'sticky and suspended times' and 'asynchronous and precarious times' to investigate how they encounter a set of temporal disruptions at both everyday and life course levels while staying put in China. Particularly, the paper asks how CIS exercises agency to navigate through temporal dissonances and enhance their immobile state and capital accumulation. Critically, the paper develops a temporally sensitive framework to unpack the multiple kinds of temporalities CIS confront during the pandemic, further advancing studies on 'international student mobility' and 'time in migration'. Additionally, existing studies have largely focused on how time shapes people's mobility and this paper provides an empirical case on the potential of the temporal approach to understanding immobilities.

10.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205(1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1927873

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Enrollment and retention of participants for any research study is challenging. The unpredictable nature of the ICU environment coupled with tenuous physiological status of patients can significantly thwart clinical trial accrual goals. The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed ICU census numbers to unprecedented levels with severely ill patients experiencing lengthy hospitalizations, delaying turn-over of beds. Anecdotal reports suggest challenges in achieving trial recruitment goals. The aims of this study were to describe the impact of the pandemic on a non-COVID-19 ICU clinical trial's screening and accrual of patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. METHODS: A descriptive, retrospective design was used to address the study aims. Screening and accrual data were obtained from a Midwestern academic medical center in North America's parent clinical trial (R01HL130881). The primary aims of the efficacy trial are to test if patient selfadministration of dexmedetomidine (n = 190) reduces anxiety, delirium, ventilator days and ICU stay. A 3-step screening process prior to informed consent consists of (1) electronic health record (EHR) automated ICU census reports of mechanically ventilated patients, (2) in-depth review of the EHR for inclusion criteria, then (3) bedside assessment of grip strength to use a push-button medication delivery device and ability to follow commands. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square were used to compare screening and accrual data from a pre-pandemic timeframe (8/27/2018- 3/15/2020) to a pandemic timeframe (3/16/2020-12/31/2021). RESULTS: Of 91 eligible patients, 49 were accrued (53.8%) during the pre-pandemic timeframe. Patients were not accrued due to patient/LAR declination (78%) or primary medical team declination (22%). The three most frequent reasons for ineligibility were unarousable (25%), hypotension (11%) and not following commands (9%). While the pandemic timeframe had 30 fewer eligible patients, 40 of 61 (67%) were accrued. Patients were not accrued due to patient/LAR declination (87%) or medical team declination (13%), similar to pre-pandemic timeframe (p = 0.7). Pandemic timeframe had significantly more unarousable patients (32%, p < 0.0001) with fewer patients hypotensive (7%, p < 0.0001) or not following commands (7%, p = 0.01). Once COVID-19 infection was resolved, lengthy ventilator days, higher sedation levels, and prolonged immobility contributed to extremely weak grip strength, precluding trial eligibility. CONCLUSIONS: These retrospective data confirm this trial's enrollment was hampered by the COVID-19 pandemic due to fewer eligible, unarousable patients. Declinations from patients/LARs were similar during both timeframes. Inability to meet accrual milestones risks continued.

11.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925582

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe treatment with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) of severe central, peripheral and autonomic (CNS, PNS, ANS) post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) in a child. Background: PASC is defined as failure to recover from acute COVID-19 in those persistently symptomatic for>30 days from onset of infection with any pattern of tissue injury that remains evolving including the nervous system. Design/Methods: A child underwent extensive evaluation of the CNS, PNS and ANS according to the authors protocol for COVID-19 neurologic illness. Results: A 12-year-old girl was initially well until March 2020 until exposure to other family members testing positive for COVID-19 infection she contracted an upper respiratory infection illness with loss of taste, and excessive fatigue followed in July 2020 by burning, weakness, slurred speech and impaired cognition leading to a bedbound state and a concern she was suffering from conversion disorder. Examination in September 2020 showed mild delirium, tetraparesis, stocking sensory loss and areflexia. Electrodiagnosis showed mixed chronic distal demyelinating and axonal changes. Epidermal nerve fiber studies showed reduced calf and thigh densities. Autonomic studies showed symptomatic hypotension with tilting and reflex tachycardia. Brain FDG PET/MRI showed hypometabolism of bilateral anterior and mesial temporal, superior parietal, and lateral occipital lobes, anterior cingulate cortices, and the cerebellar hemispheres with hippocampus volumes <5% of age-matched controls. Lumbar puncture showed a total protein of 136 mg/dL. EEG and Mayo Clinic ENS2 panel did not show evidence of autoimmune encephalitis. From October 2020 to February 2021, she received monthly 2 g/kg/month of intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) with overall clinical improvement. Conclusions: The underlying basis of PASC, especially in the CNS, has not yet been fully appreciated awaiting controlled clinical and autopsy studies. IVIg is effective initial therapy of PASC to modulate neurologic post-infectious immunity. COVID Long Hauler and Long COVID are inappropriate terms for PASC.

12.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925285

ABSTRACT

Objective: Determine neuromuscular manifestation incidence in COVID-19 patients from the longitudinal electronic health record database Optum. Background: Both central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) manifestations of COVID-19 have been reported. A Chinese retrospective case series, on 214 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, found that 8.9% presented with peripheral nerve disease and 7% had muscular injuries. Other studies looking at the prevalence of PNS manifestations are limited and have significantly lower numbers. Design/Methods: The COVID-19 data is sourced from more than 700 hospitals and 7000 clinics in the US. Patients with numerous neuromuscular diagnoses were identified based on ICD-10 coding. Examples include carpal tunnel syndrome, radial nerve lesion, sciatic nerve lesion, myasthenia gravis, acute transverse myelitis, Bell's palsy, and trigeminal neuralgia. Results: We reviewed a total of 598,847 patients with positive COVID-19 PCR and/or diagnosis coding. Neuromuscular complications must have been within 45 days of diagnosis to be included. Incidence of similar neuromuscular complaints was evaluated in 3,001,153 controls without COVID-19. Critical illness neuropathy was found in 35,782 COVID-positive patients and 6,281 of those without. Retrospective study limitations include temporal relationship to COVID-19 does not necessarily indicate causality and inability to confirm the coding by record review or EMG/NCS. Conclusions: Incidence of neuromuscular disorders is generally lower or equivalent in COVID19 patients than in the general population, except for critical illness neuropathy and myopathy. This finding may be explained by more COVID-19 patients being in the intensive care unit and bedbound for longer periods. It is worth noting that a small case series of COVID-related critical illness neuropathy and myopathy patients showed no histopathological or clinical differences compared to non-COVID patients. To our knowledge, this report includes an analysis of neuromuscular manifestations in one of the largest cohorts of COVID-19 patients. This can assist with risk-benefit discussions regarding treatment initiation, etiology of diagnoses, and counseling for COVID-19 questions.

13.
Vox Sanguinis ; 117(SUPPL 1):269, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1916362

ABSTRACT

Background: In approximately 30% of COVID-19 cases, the hospitalized patients are developing venous thrombo-embolic complications, due to imune-mediated hypercoagulable responce and inadequate thromboprophylaxis. D-dimer elevattion can be seen in severe critically ill COVID-19 patients. and those with other medical conditions associated with increased thrombotic risk. Aims: The aim of the study was to analyse the fibrinolytic activity, and to monitor the anticoagulation therapy in the hospitalized COVID-19 patients at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases and Febrile States in Skopje. Methods: In a retrospective study, 1728 patients with COVID -19 infection hospitalized at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases and Febrile States with COVID-19 from March-September 2020 were analized. The D-dimers level was measured with the coagulometer Dade Behring BCS XP-Siemens with commercial reagents from Siemens. The anti-factor Xa level was measured with chromogenic anti-Xa assay. Results: Analized data from 1728 hospitalized patients showed increased level of D-dimers. The average level was 1974 ng/ml (0- 500 ng/ml). Peak D-dimer levels were seen in some patients during the hospitalization period (>35,000 ng/ml). Patients received anticoagulation therapy with low-molecular heparin. The anti-factor Xa assay was analized in nine patients, three of them were in the prophylactic range (0.2-0.5 IE), and 6 were in the therapeutic range (0.5-1.2 IE). Summary/Conclusions: Increased D-dimers in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19 are common laboratory findings, and the are prognostic marker for in-hospital mortality. Prolonged immobility and other risk factors for VTE in those patients may lead to thrombotic complications. The dosage regimen of low molecular weight heparin must be evaluated in every patient, especially in patients with severe renal impairment, low platelet count and weight disproportions, in order for appropritate anticoagulation and avoiding the associated bleeding risk.

14.
Regional Science Policy & Practice ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1916280

ABSTRACT

To limit the spread of Covid-19, most countries in the world have put in place measures which restrict mobility. The co-presence of several people in the same place of work, shopping, leisure, or transport is considered a favourable vector for the transmission of the virus. However, this hypothesis remains to be verified in the light of the daily data available since the first wave of contamination. Does immobility reduce the spread of Covid-19 pandemics? Does mobility contribute to the increase in the number of infections for all activities? This paper applies several Pooled Mean Group?Autoregressive Distributed Lag (PMG-ARDL) models to investigate the impact of immobility and daily mobility activities on the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic in the European countries using daily data for the period 12 March 2020 to 31 August 2021. The results of the PMG-ARDL models show that immobility and higher temperatures play a significant role in reducing the Covid-19 pandemic. The increase in mobility activities (grocery, retail, use of transit) is also positively associated with the number of new Covid-19 cases. The combined analysis with the Granger test shows that the relationship between mobility and Covid-19 goes in both directions, with the exception of grocery shopping, visits to parks and commuting mobility. The former favours the spread of Covid-19, while the next two has no causal relationship with Covid-19. The results confirm the role of immobility in mitigating the spread of the pandemic, but call into question the drastic policies of systematically closing all places of activity.

15.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 54(1): 29-32, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914001

ABSTRACT

Seated immobility thromboembolism syndrome (SIT) is the association of prolonged seated immobility with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The advent of COVID-19 resulted in implementation of lockdowns to curb its spread. This resulted in compulsory work from home and minimization of outdoor activities. Consequently, this would have likely led to increased prolonged sitting and reduced mobility. Few case reports and studies have observed an increase in VTE incidence during the lockdown period. We likewise performed a clinical audit of our weekly thrombosis clinic cases and revealed three cases of VTE associated with prolonged sitting during Singapore's COVID-19 lockdown. Notably, all had other minor VTE risk factors in addition to prolonged sitting. All cases had intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism and were given extended anticoagulation. With the pandemic still ongoing, periodic lockdown and quarantine measures may continue to be imposed. While the overall VTE risk conferred by prolonged seated immobility associated with lockdown measures is likely to be small, this risk can be easily mitigated and possibly prevented by simply staying mobile.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Thrombosis , Venous Thromboembolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
16.
Communication, Culture and Critique ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1908767

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus epidemic (COVID-19) has led to drastic changes in social life. Focusing on a group of essential workers, this study examines how mainland Chinese low-skilled labor migrants discursively manifest their everyday lives via WeChat Moments. From analyzing social media posts and interview data, this study demonstrates that these labor migrants' stay in Macao was a period of unsought and undesired time of waiting, impacted by socio-structural constraints of class, age, gender, and outsider identity. Participants experienced positive (happiness with newfound opportunities) and negative emotions (anxiety and entrapment) during forced immobility due to border closures. This study contributes to understandings of border-crossing as interpreted and experienced via social media discourse.

17.
Acta Facultatis Medicae Naissensis ; 39(1):95-105, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1897087

ABSTRACT

Background/Aim. One of the anti-epidemic measures in the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 in Serbia was the mandatory complete ban on movement for people over 65 years of age. Two main stress factors affecting their health have been identified: intensive media coverage of the new disease and total physical and even social isolation of the elderly. The aim of this study was to assess the immediate impact of these anti-epidemic measures to combat the COVID-19 epidemic in Serbia on the health of people over 65 years old and to recognize protective factors for their health in the conditions of their obligatory isolation. Methods. The cross-sectional study was conducted on a 20% sample of inhabitants over 65 (184 in total) in the urban part of the city of Kruševac, in the central part of Serbia, during April and May 2020. Results. Anti-epidemic measures to combat the COVID-19 epidemic have been associated with deteriorating health in a significantly large proportion of the elderly in the sample (approximately 84%), such as unreasonable fatigue, tension, difficulties performing routine activities due to immobility, concerns, sleeping disorders, and hypertensive episodes. Gender, higher education, and material status were not related to protection and emotional well-being, but some personality factors are related to stress resilience. Conclusion. The protective personality factors for health are the respondents’ inclination toward hope, having a purpose in life, faith, optimism, interest, as well a high appreciation of positive emotions in the respondent’s life (love, joy, enthusiasm, closeness, and belonging) and having a fulfilled emotional life.

18.
Mobilities ; : 17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1868202

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on the 'frictions' felt by international backpackers who have been stuck and locked-down while they were living and working in regional Australian hostels. Backpackers play a central role as both tourists and migrant workers in Australia, where they undertake significant periods of required farm work in order to extend their visas. They are a highly visible and long-standing mobile population in Australia and are relatively under-studied given their significance to tourism cultures and economies. Based on forty semi-structured interviews with backpackers living and working in Bundaberg, Australia, we explore how experiences of immobilities prior to and during the pandemic restrictions manifest as experiences of escalating and alleviating frictions. Friction is understood as an embodied and relational feeling of tension produced by a shortage of space. Friction has always been a feature of hostel living but prolonged lockdowns and inconsistent health messaging escalated frictions into open conflict. We propose that the concept of friction sits between mobilities and immobilities, and that particular mobility contexts exacerbate such frictions. The article contributes to ongoing discussions on pandemic immobilities and the interwoven concerns of tourism, migration, and labour mobilities.

19.
Journal of Ethnic & Migration Studies ; : 1-21, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1860543

ABSTRACT

The number of skilled migrants moving from the Global North to the Global South has been increasing in recent decades. This paper develops and employs a capital-mobility framework to analyze empirical evidence about the new international migration of skilled U.S. migrants to the Pearl River Delta Region of China. Guided by the literature on im/mobility and capital, this paper asks the following questions: What affects skilled U.S. migrants’ mobility to and from China? How do they experience the dynamics of voluntary and involuntary immobility in China? Drawing on 58 semi-structured interviews, we found that the level of capital accumulation and its transferability and convertibility influenced migrants’ mobility and immobility. In addition, the global outbreak of Covid-19 facilitated mobility for some while hindered mobility for others. This study discusses the differences between North-to-South and South-to-North skilled migration and conceptualizes im/mobility as a continuum experienced by skilled migrants during their migratory trajectories. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Ethnic & Migration Studies is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

20.
Rehabilitacia ; 59(1):36-46, 2022.
Article in Slovak | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1857714

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Severe/critical COVID-19 is characterised by bilateral pneumonia with hypoxemia leading to ARDS, and occasionally to MODS. A combination of different factors, including a prolonged stay in the ICU/acute department, can cause several symptoms such as dyspnoea, fatigue, sarcopenia and disability. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pulmonary rehabilitation on selfsufficiency, muscle strength, breathing mechanics and oxygen parameters. Methods: 19 patients (12 women, 7 men) in the post-acute phase of severe/critical COVID-19 pneumonia (10 patients after mechanical ventilation, 9 patients after HFNO) were admitted to inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation. The average age was 66,53 years. We collected clinical characteristics and assessed several measures such as BI, muscle strength (assessed by dynamometry and Janda’s muscle scale), type of breathing and breathing excursion, oxygen parameters (SpO2, breathing frequency) and dyspnoea (using Borg dyspnoea scale) before and after pulmonary rehabilitation. Results: We found a statistically significant improvement in all outcome measures. Conclusion: Our study shows that pulmonary rehabilitation is an effective option in COVID19 patients suffering from permanent impairments. © 2022, LIECREH GUTH. All rights reserved.

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