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1.
Sosyoloji Konferanslari ; 41(1):103-125, 2021.
Article in Turkish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1823848

ABSTRACT

The current study has two significant purposes. The primary aim of the study is to design a valid and reliable scale regarding the behaviors users have for obtaining and verifying health information from digital media during the COVID-19 Pandemic, which became a global health issue in 2020 by affecting the whole world. The secondary aim of the study is to reveal the sources to which new media users frequently refer for obtaining and verifying health information. The research was conducted online using the questionnaire technique with the participation of 551 people. The study demonstrates the “Obtaining and Verifying Health Information from Digital Media Scale to be a valid and reliable measurement tool consisting of 10 items and 3 factors. Another result is that users refer to websites (Web 1.0) more than social media (Web 2.0) when obtaining online health information. In order to verify the health information they have obtained, participants tend to check the online accounts of scientists and doctors. The conclusion section discusses these findings around the concept of infodemic.Alternate : Bu çalışmanın öncelikli amacı tüm dünyayı etkisi altına alan ve 2020 yılı içerisinde küresel bir sağlık sorunu haline gelen Covid-19 Pandemisi döneminde kullanıcıların dijital ortamda sağlık bilgisi edinme ve bilgiyi teyit etme davranışları üzerine geçerli ve güvenilir bir ölçüm aracı tasarlamaktır. Íkincil amacı ise yeni medya kullanıcılarının sağlık bilgisi edinmek ve bu bilgiyi teyit etmek için sıklıkla başvurdukları kaynakları ortaya koymaktır. Araştırma 551 kişinin katılımıyla anket tekniği kullanılarak çevrimiçi olarak gerçekleştirilmiştir. Analizler, “Dijital Ortamda Sağlık Bilgisi Edinme ve Teyit Ölçeği”nin 10 madde ve 3 faktörden oluşan geçerli ve güvenilir bir ölçme aracı olduğunu göstermiştir. Kullanıcıların sağlık bilgisi edinirken sosyal medyaya (web 2.0) kıyasla web sitelerine (web 1.0) daha fazla başvurması elde edilen diğer bir sonuçtur. Edindikleri sağlık bilgilerini teyit etmek için ise bilimsel yayınlar ile bilim insanlarının ve doktorların paylaşımlarına yöneldikleri görülmüştür. Bu bulgular sonuç kısmında Ínfodemi kavramı odağında tartışmaya açılmıştır.

2.
Disease Prevention and Public Health Journal ; 15(2):64-70, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1818745

ABSTRACT

Background: Hoax is still a problem in the era of information disclosure and technological advances currently. News or information containing hoax related to Covid-19 affects the handling effort of the Covid-19 pandemic. This research aimed to describe the behavior of health faculty students in responding to the hoaxes associated with Covid-19 on social media. Method: This research was a descriptive study. The sampling technique used was random sampling. The samples were 384 students who were required to complete the questionnaire. The statistical test used was descriptive statistical analysis. Results: The results obtained in this study were that respondents considered Facebook as the most widely used social media for spreading hoaxes (68%). Respondents thought that cross-checking the accuracy and validity of information is a step that should be performed when receiving hoax news (85%). Respondents stated that they dug up information through official government websites regarding the handling of Covid-19 to check the statement's truth (65%). Some respondents did not cross-check the news or information related to Covid-19 due to the assumption that someone else had done it. Conclusion: Most respondents have cross-checked news or information about Covid-19. Extracting information through official government websites on handling Covid-19 has also been taken to check the accuracy and validity of the statement.

3.
New Zealand Medical Journal ; 134(1547):141-142, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1812752

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy is considered a serious threat to public health, due to worldwide decline in vaccine uptake and resurgence of vaccine preventable diseases. With mass vaccination underway for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), opposition and reluctance could hinder success and therefore must be understood and addressed. This research aimed to understand attitudes towards vaccination and drivers of hesitancy within a New Zealand context from 2018 to today, with particular emphasis on the COVID-19 vaccine. Literature searches were conducted in November 2020 and June 2021, to gather both historical and current research on vaccination attitudes in New Zealand and factors influencing vaccine hesitancy. Key words included coronavirus, vaccine hesitancy, vaccination, anti-vaccination, infodemic, misinformation and social media. Online and unpublished sources were also used, along with the Otago Daily Times (March 2020-February 2021) to provide a local perspective amidst a global pandemic. Drivers of attitudes and vaccination hesitancy are multifactor rial. With social media now so prevalent, misinformation and the 'anti-vax' sentiment can reach more people than ever before. The speed at which the COVID-19 vaccine was developed and approved for use has fuelled hesitancy, with safety appearing the predominant concern. Vaccine hesitancy can be overcome by actively addressing and correcting misinformation with scientifically backed messaging, that is tailored to local communities. Government and regulatory bodies must communicate transparently to the public to avoid confusion and overcome reluctance. Healthcare professionals also play an important role in fostering trust in vaccines within the communities they work in, but they must be well supported by the wider healthcare system. Vaccine hesitancy is a clear threat to a successful vaccination campaign for COVID-19. Misinformation circulating both online and in person can influence decision-making surrounding vaccination. Hesitancy must be actively and publicly addressed in order to increase vaccine uptake.

4.
National Journal of Community Medicine ; 13(3):200-202, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1812229

ABSTRACT

India is one of the world’s worst affected countries due to COVID-19 pandemic. The world is struggling to fight against centuries pandemic. Globally governments have been imposed lockdown and restrictions to control situation and minimize spread of infection. Social media was found the most practical and efficient medium to share information and opinions about pandemic. At time of social distancing, social media helped people to share their feelings and find support. Same time overuse of social media platform created panic and misinformation across countries. People sharing unconfirmed information about covid pandemic and governments were found it difficult to handle. © 2022, MedSci Publications. All rights reserved.

5.
Data ; 7(4):49, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1809756

ABSTRACT

This study examines the phenomenon of disinformation as a threat in the realm of cybersecurity. We have analyzed multiple authoritative cybersecurity standards, manuals, handbooks, and literary works. We present the unanimous meaning and construct of the term cyber threat. Our results reveal that although their definitions are mostly consistent, most of them lack the inclusion of disinformation in their list/glossary of cyber threats. We then proceeded to dissect the phenomenon of disinformation through the lens of cyber threat epistemology;it displays the presence of the necessary elements required (i.e., threat agent, attack vector, target, impact, defense) for its appropriate classification. To conjunct this, we have also included an in-depth comparative analysis of disinformation and its similar nature and characteristics with the prevailing and existing cyber threats. We, therefore, argue for its recommendation as an official and actual cyber threat. The significance of this paper, beyond the taxonomical correction it recommends, rests in the hope that it influences future policies and regulations in combatting disinformation and its propaganda.

6.
14th International Conference on Knowledge and Smart Technology, KST 2022 ; : 1-6, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1794815

ABSTRACT

With the restrictions in our daily life activities under the current situation of the covid-19 pandemic worldwide, billions of people rely on social media platforms to share and obtaining covid-19 related news information. This made social media platforms easily be used as a source of myths and disinformation, which can cause severe public risks. It is thus of vital importance to constraint the spread of misinformation to the public. Although many works have shown promising results on the misinformation detection problem, only a few studies focus on the infodemic detection during the covid-19 pandemic, especially in the low resource language like Thai. Therefore, in this paper, we conduct extensive experiments on the real-world social network datasets to detect misinformation about covid-19 targeting both English and Thai languages. In particular, we perform an exploratory data analysis to get the statistic and characteristics of real and fake content. Also, we evaluate a series of three feature extraction, seven traditional machine learning, and eleven deep learning methods in detecting the fabricated content on social media platforms. The experimental results demonstrate that the transformer-based model significantly outperforms other deep learning and traditional machine learning methods in all metrics, including accuracy and F-measure. © 2022 IEEE.

7.
16th International Conference on Ubiquitous Information Management and Communication, IMCOM 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1788740

ABSTRACT

As the world continues to grapple with the pandemic, how competently people search and process COVID-19-related information online has serious ramifications. In this vein, a demographic segment that is particularly research-worthy includes older people, who are usually slower in technology adoption and use compared with younger people. For these reasons, the objective of this paper is to explore how people aged 65+ search and process online information related to COVID-19. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted in the UK. The older people were found to maintain varied and broad information portfolios. Many found the internet to be an efficient avenue to seek and share information. The participants generally dismissed social media but deemed authoritative information sources (e.g., the WHO website) to be reliable. They were cautious about scams and misinformation online, and were likely to adopt an 'if in doubt, avoid' approach to unfamiliar sites. The study shows that older people in their effort to avoid misinformation may limit their information consumption journeys;nevertheless, this practice keeps them safe. Based on these findings, several implications for theory and practice are discussed. © 2022 IEEE.

8.
Turkish Journal of Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences ; 30(3):908-926, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1786142

ABSTRACT

The massive use of social media causes rapid information dissemination that amplifies harmful messages such as fake news. Fake-news is misleading information presented as factual news that is generally used to manipulate public opinion. In particular, fake news related to COVID-19 is defined as 'infodemic' by World Health Organization. An infodemic is a misleading information that causes confusion which may harm health. There is a high volume of misinformation about COVID-19 that causes panic and high stress. Therefore, the importance of development of COVID-19 related fake news identification model is clear and it is particularly important for Turkish language from COVID-19 fake news identification point of view. In this article, we propose an advanced deep language transformer model to identify the truth of Turkish COVID-19 news from social media. For this aim, we first generated Turkish COVID-19 news from various sources as a benchmark dataset. Then we utilized five conventional machine learning algorithms (i.e. Naive Bayes, Random Forest, K-Nearest Neighbor, Support Vector Machine, Logistic Regression) on top of several language preprocessing tasks. As a next step, we used novel deep learning algorithms such as Long Short-Term Memory, Bi-directional Long-Short-Term-Memory, Convolutional Neural Networks, Gated Recurrent Unit and Bi-directional Gated Recurrent Unit. For further evaluation, we made use of deep learning based language transformers, i.e. Bi-directional Encoder Representations from Transformers and its variations, to improve efficiency of the proposed approach. From the obtained results, we observed that neural transformers, in particular Turkish dedicated transformer BerTURK, is able to identify COVID-19 fake news in 98.5% accuracy. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Turkish Journal of Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences is the property of Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(4): e35786, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785275

ABSTRACT

In the 21st century, the internet and particularly social media have become essential platforms for the spread of health information (including misinformation and disinformation). One of the distinguishing features of communication on these platforms is the widespread use of emojis. Though seemingly trivial emojis are now used by many if not most public health figures and organizations alongside important health updates. Much of that information has had to do with vaccination. Vaccines are a critical public health tool but one surrounded by falsehoods, phobias, and misinformation fueling vaccine hesitancy. Part of that has to do with their lack of positive representation on social media (eg, the syringe emoji is a plain needle, which for many people is an uncomfortable image). We thus argue that vaccination deserves an entirely new emoji to communicate vaccine confidence and discuss a design proposal for a vaccinated emoji that has gained traction in the global public health community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Vaccines , Communication , Humans , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Revista De Comunicacion-Peru ; 21(1):195-213, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1780420

ABSTRACT

The objective of this research was to study the transformations in the way of working and in the journalistic routines in the main digital media in Chile and Colombia. It investigated how journalistic routines were forcibly modified due to the restrictions imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic and what job challenges inherent to the profession journalists from these media had to face. The six most read news portals in each country were chosen according to the Alexa.com ranking. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with editors and directors of digital press media to make a comparative study. The main results show that journalistic routines were adapted to the contingency. Some changed notably, such as access to sources and the relationship with the interviewees, teleworking and the use of technologies to collect and produce news. Others were strengthened, such as the editorial meeting and the editor's relationship with his work team. It is concluded that the media played a fundamental role during the pandemic by informing citizens about health measures and counteracting the fake news disseminated by social networks. In a way, journalism has once again grown in credibility and trust and the classic routines of journalism have been strengthened.

11.
Sustainability ; 14(5):13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1780069

ABSTRACT

The acceptability of appropriate SARS-CoV-2 pandemic measures including vaccinations is currently being hampered due to significant misinformation all over the globe, also known as the "infodemic" within the pandemic. We asked the following two research questions: (1) What is the current extent of the global infodemic preventing populations from receiving adequate healthcare including COVID-vaccinations? (2) Which are appropriate countermeasures to manage the infodemic in order to guarantee adequate healthcare in the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic? Pubmed and Cochrane Library were accessed on 29 October 2021 and searched for reviews and systematic reviews on "COVID-19" and "infodemic". The literature identified was analyzed with methods of qualitative research focusing on (1) mechanism, (2) impact, and (3) countermeasures to confront the infodemic. The world-wide infodemic is being recognized as a multifaceted problem beyond health and human rights, extending into global political spheres such as societal cohesion and security. The mechanism of the COVID-19 infodemic involves specific factors related to the situation, sender, instrument, and recipient. Although freedom of expression and the right to seek, receive, and impart information through any media is a fundamental human right, the infodemic has a substantial impact on health, another fundamental human right, by causing stress, deception, violence, and harm. Mixed-synergistic pre-impact, trans-impact, and post-impact countermeasures can be taken;the most important is building and maintaining trust.

12.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(4): e36022, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779876

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the available evidence on its severity, COVID-19 has often been compared with seasonal flu by some conspirators and even scientists. Various public discussions arose about the noncausal correlation between COVID-19 and the observed deaths during the pandemic period in Italy. OBJECTIVE: This paper aimed to search for endogenous reasons for the mortality increase recorded in Italy during 2020 to test this controversial hypothesis. Furthermore, we provide a framework for epidemiological analyses of time series. METHODS: We analyzed deaths by age, sex, region, and cause of death in Italy from 2011 to 2019. Ordinary least squares (OLS) linear regression analyses and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) were used to predict the best value for 2020. A Grubbs 1-sided test was used to assess the significance of the difference between predicted and observed 2020 deaths/mortality. Finally, a 1-sample t test was used to compare the population of regional excess deaths to a null mean. The relationship between mortality and predictive variables was assessed using OLS multiple regression models. Since there is no uniform opinion on multicomparison adjustment and false negatives imply great epidemiological risk, the less-conservative Siegel approach and more-conservative Holm-Bonferroni approach were employed. By doing so, we provided the reader with the means to carry out an independent analysis. RESULTS: Both ARIMA and OLS linear regression models predicted the number of deaths in Italy during 2020 to be between 640,000 and 660,000 (range of 95% CIs: 620,000-695,000) against the observed value of above 750,000. We found strong evidence supporting that the death increase in all regions (average excess=12.2%) was not due to chance (t21=7.2; adjusted P<.001). Male and female national mortality excesses were 18.4% (P<.001; adjusted P=.006) and 14.1% (P=.005; adjusted P=.12), respectively. However, we found limited significance when comparing male and female mortality residuals' using the Mann-Whitney U test (P=.27; adjusted P=.99). Finally, mortality was strongly and positively correlated with latitude (R=0.82; adjusted P<.001). In this regard, the significance of the mortality increases during 2020 varied greatly from region to region. Lombardy recorded the highest mortality increase (38% for men, adjusted P<.001; 31% for women, P<.001; adjusted P=.006). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the absence of historical endogenous reasons capable of justifying the mortality increase observed in Italy during 2020. Together with the current knowledge on SARS-CoV-2, these results provide decisive evidence on the devastating impact of COVID-19. We suggest that this research be leveraged by government, health, and information authorities to furnish proof against conspiracy hypotheses that minimize COVID-19-related risks. Finally, given the marked concordance between ARIMA and OLS regression, we suggest that these models be exploited for public health surveillance. Specifically, meaningful information can be deduced by comparing predicted and observed epidemiological trends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 28, 2022 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779652

ABSTRACT

Much health communication during the COVID-19 pandemic has been designed to persuade people more than to inform them. For example, messages like "masks save lives" are intended to compel people to wear face masks, not to enable them to make an informed decision about whether to wear a face mask or to understand the justification for a mask mandate. Both persuading people and informing them are reasonable goals for health communication. However, those goals can sometimes be in conflict. In this article, we discuss potential conflicts between seeking to persuade or to inform people, the use of spin to persuade people, the ethics of persuasion, and implications for health communication in the context of the pandemic and generally. Decisions to persuade people rather than enable them to make an informed choice may be justified, but the basis for those decisions should be transparent and the evidence should not be distorted. We suggest nine principles to guide decisions by health authorities about whether to try to persuade people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Communication , Emergencies , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 658, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigates university students' digital health literacy and web-based information-seeking behaviours during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in England. It compares undergraduate and postgraduate students in non-health related subjects with health care students, many of whom were preparing for, or working in, frontline roles. The survey was conducted as part of a wider study by the COVID-HL research consortium. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among n = 691 university students aged ≥18 years from 25 universities across England using an adapted digital survey developed by COVID-HL. Data were collected regarding sociodemographic characteristics and specific measures drawn from the Future Anxiety Scale and the Digital Health Literacy Instrument (DHLI). These had been adapted for use in an English setting and to the specific context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Other data collected included students' anxiety or worries about the future using the Dark Future Scale as well as behaviours in online information-seeking. Data were analysed using correlations to test for relationships between constructs and also between group comparisons to test for differences between students studying health and non-health related subjects. RESULTS: Across digital health literacy dimensions, there was no significant difference between students studying health-related subjects and other students. Health care students did report greater difficulties in relation to how to behave online. They also relied less on public body sources for information about the pandemic. A significant difference was found between the two student populations in relation to their anxiety about the future with health care students reporting fewer fears about the future. CONCLUSIONS: Although digital health literacy is well developed in university students, a significant proportion of students still face difficulties with evaluating online information which may frustrate public health efforts. This could be addressed by ensuring health students' curriculum in particular encompasses digital health literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
15.
Ther Adv Drug Saf ; 13: 20420986221088650, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770144
16.
J Vis Commun Med ; 45(2): 39-47, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764444

ABSTRACT

Navigating for accurate information, especially health- and science-related content, on social media has been challenging during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although infographics are a popular medium for simplifying text-based information into visual components, their usefulness during a global health crisis has not been explored. The study aims to explore the perceptions of infographics in conveying scientific information related to COVID-19 on social media. Following a social media campaign that published COVID-19 related infographics from May to August 2020, a cross-sectional survey was administered to social media users, primarily students from Western University. Several questions asked respondents to make comparisons with written articles when reporting their perceptions of infographics. Seventy-three percent of students from 361 responses belonged to health-related academic backgrounds. Seventy-two percent felt more likely to share infographics than written articles on social media due to the visual appeal. Nearly 90% felt it was easier to navigate through complicated science and that more scientists should use infographics on social media. Educational background did not influence the perceived usefulness of infographics in understanding scientific information. Infographics are perceived favourably in conveying scientific information about COVID-19 on social media. Findings from this study can inform communication strategies during a pandemic and, more broadly, global crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Data Visualization , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Journalism and Media ; 3(1):182, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1760707

ABSTRACT

This study investigates people’s attitudes towards news media’s role as gatekeepers during the coronavirus pandemic. Specifically, this concerns news media’s quality control and the selection of the most important news about the pandemic, as well as the provision of useful information and knowledge about the virus and its implications. Challenging research that has questioned the very idea of journalistic gatekeeping in hybrid media systems, we set out to explore people’s attitudes towards news media’s gatekeeper functions during a crisis, when the need for reliable and relevant information is extraordinarily high and the information environment is flooded with disinformation. In this situation, news media gatekeepers could serve as safekeepers that protect the population. Based on a national survey in Norway (N = 1024), a country characterized by high levels of trust in social institutions, including the national press, the study finds that people were generally supportive of news media’s gatekeeper functions amid the pandemic. However, there were noteworthy demographic differences. Older people, women, and those who were more highly educated showed more positive attitudes towards news media’s gatekeeping. Moreover, we found lower support for news media’s gatekeeping in the group who trusted alternative, right-wing news media.

18.
Technol Health Care ; 30(2): 509-512, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: EpidemiXs is an innovative ecosystem of digital tools centralizing official and validated information on COVID-19 for healthcare workers and the general public in a single hub. OBJECTIVE: The vision of EpidemiXs is to foster collaboration between researchers, institutions and individuals to promote "open data" in order to enrich the scientific community and further accelerate science in the fight against COVID-19. METHODS: Through its set of solutions, EpidemiXs Info, EpidemiXs TV and EpidemiXs Studies, this innovative ecosystem contributes to advancing collaborations, data collection and analysis, and helps find funders. RESULTS: EpidemiXs was launched in March 2020 in Spain with 30 healthcare institutions and rapidly reached close to 1 million users and 2 million views. EpidemiXs gained international recognition when it was awarded the Barcelona Health Hub Awards (BHHAwards) 2020 of the category "Best Startup Initiative to help tackle COVID-19". CONCLUSION: EpidemiXs has proven the efficiency of the rapid deployment of digital tools in times of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Digital Technology , Ecosystem , Humans
19.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e31088, 2022 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although timely and accurate information during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential for containing the disease and reducing mental distress, an infodemic, which refers to an overabundance of information, may trigger unpleasant emotions and reduce compliance. Prior research has shown the negative consequences of an infodemic during the pandemic; however, we know less about which subpopulations are more exposed to the infodemic and are more vulnerable to the adverse psychological and behavioral effects. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine how sociodemographic factors and information-seeking behaviors affect the perceived information overload during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also investigated the effect of perceived information overload on psychological distress and protective behavior and analyzed the socioeconomic differences in the effects. METHODS: The data for this study were obtained from a cross-national survey of residents in 6 jurisdictions in Asia in May 2020. The survey targeted residents aged 18 years or older. A probability-based quota sampling strategy was adopted to ensure that the selected samples matched the population's geographical and demographic characteristics released by the latest available census in each jurisdiction. The final sample included 10,063 respondents. Information overload about COVID-19 was measured by asking the respondents to what extent they feel overwhelmed by news related to COVID-19. The measure of psychological distress was adapted from the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5). Protective behaviors included personal hygienic behavior and compliance with social distancing measures. RESULTS: Younger respondents and women (b=0.20, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.26) were more likely to perceive information overload. Participants self-perceived as upper or upper-middle class (b=0.19, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.30) and those with full-time jobs (b=0.11, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.17) tended to perceive higher information overload. Respondents who more frequently sought COVID-19 information from newspapers (b=0.12, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.14), television (b=0.07, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.09), and family and friends (b=0.11, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.14) were more likely to feel overwhelmed. In contrast, obtaining COVID-19 information from online news outlets and social media was not associated with perceived information overload. There was a positive relationship between perceived information overload and psychological distress (b=2.18, 95% CI 2.09 to 2.26). Such an association was stronger among urban residents, full-time employees, and those living in privately owned housing. The effect of perceived information overload on protective behavior was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings revealed that respondents who were younger, were female, had a higher socioeconomic status (SES), and had vulnerable populations in the household were more likely to feel overwhelmed by COVID-19 information. Perceived information overload tended to increase psychological distress, and people with higher SES were more vulnerable to this adverse psychological consequence. Effective policies and interventions should be promoted to target vulnerable populations who are more susceptible to the occurrence and negative psychological influence of perceived information overload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Journal of Hospital Librarianship ; : 1-14, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1752004

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of social media usage on students’ fear during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a cross-sectional survey approach, a closed-ended questionnaire was administered as a data collection tool among 600 students of 10 public and private sector universities in Pakistan and 438 responses were received. It was found that the respondents’ believed that uploading more information on social media about COVID-19 had spread fear and panic among the students. It was also found males had a high level of psychological fear and physical fears as compared to female respondents. Respondents between the age group of 31 years or more had more psychological fear, followed by respondents between the age group of 24-30 years. However, those whose age was between 18-23 years had fewer psychological fears. The findings of this study could contribute to the body of knowledge on the subject matters. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Hospital Librarianship is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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