Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 124
Filter
1.
Journal of the Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences ; 21(1):33-38, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818979

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate allied health and nursing staff’s online COVID-19 related information-seeking behavior to prevent COVID-19 infection. METHODOLOGY: This study was cross-sectional research performed from February to May 2020 that surveyed allied health and nursing staff working in healthcare settings, whether full or part-time, of Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Two valid questionnaires, such as preventive behaviors and online COVID-19 related information-seeking behaviors, were used. Multiple logistic models were used to explain the correlation between one dependent binary variable and other variables. RESULTS: 291(94.8%) had good preventive behaviors. 239 (77.9%) of the participants, after getting online health information from the Internet, very often search the obtained data in other books and journals;240 (78.2%) very often compare the received data with information on other websites;252 (82.1%) very often consulted with physicians about the obtained information. There was a relationship between online COVID-19 related information-seeking behaviors (Beta = 0.04, 95% CI: 1.02-1.06 and P<0.001) and preventive behaviors. CONCLUSION: Health-care workers use various information-seeking strategies to decrease the chance of finding inaccurate data and misjudging the correct data. This study shows that healthcare workers’ behavior to see credible information related to COVID-19 significantly affects their preventive behaviors.

2.
IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS) ; : 283-289, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1816456

ABSTRACT

The existence of physical and financial barriers in the provision of healthcare leads to an increasing recognition that alternative sources of information are being used to supplement or replace the advice of healthcare professionals. Internet search engines are a common means to obtain health information. However. information, misinformation, and disinformation are all available concurrently, leaving health information seekers to distinguish these categories of information. Following a review of theories directly and indirectly related to health information-seeking behaviour (HISB). we examine how public announcements made by credible sources (e.g.. health professionals and politicians) in varying geographic regions (globally, nationally (Canada). and regionally (New York State) influenced both HISB (represented by Google Searches) and whether this influences human behaviour (represented by Google Mobility Data). Across these analyses, we demonstrate that there are strong correlations between information search behaviour and mobility around the time of public health announcements suggesting that, directly or indirectly, health communication was associated with changes in individual behaviour.

3.
Asian Journal of Social Science ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1814041

ABSTRACT

The rule of social distancing, coupled with the closing down of ethnic enclaves, has led immigrants to become isolated from their ethnic groups. In this study, we investigate the increasing role of ethnic online communities in immigrants’ information-seeking behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic. An analysis of 726 posts in MissyUSA reveals how an ethnic online community helps Korean immigrant women deal with the pandemic, reflecting the essence of a community amid societal lockdown. The findings suggest that these online communities supplement immigrant women's medical knowledge, build non-medical knowledge helpful to disadvantaged immigrants, and offer transnational knowledge regarding medical systems, products, and travel. These results provide evidence of how ethnic online communities promote immigrants’ ongoing incorporation into society through the development of domestically and transnationally engaged medical and non-medical knowledge.

4.
Indian Journal of Dermatology ; 67(1):92, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1810663

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccine-hesitancy is an important obstacle to attain herd-immunity against COVID-19. Undue fears about adverse effects like allergic reactions may be an important reason for vaccine-hesitancy. Objectives: To assess the online information-seeking behavior of Indian internet users regarding 'allergies' and determine its association with COVID-19 vaccine-hesitancy. Methods: We conducted a Google trend analysis to obtain the relative search volume (RSV) for keywords—'skin allergy,' 'drug allergy,' 'food allergy,' 'vaccine allergy,' 'contact dermatitis,' and 'allergy' using a public domain https://trends.google.com/trends. We further obtained state-wise data and statistically analyzed it to assess any association with vaccine-hesitancy. Results: Higher RSV was found for 'vaccine allergy' after the advent of COVID-19 vaccines, showing the steepest peak. 'Skin allergy' showed two peaks. The first peak was after the advent of COVID-19 pandemic and second peak was after introduction of vaccines. RSV of 'contact dermatitis' remained unchanged. Eastern and North-Eastern states showed the highest RSV for 'skin' and 'vaccine' allergies. Literacy rate showed a significant positive correlation with vaccination, whereas vaccine-hesitancy was inversely proportional to RSV for 'allergy.' Conclusion: Increased online information-seeking behavior is demonstrated by Indians regarding various 'allergies,' particularly after the advent of COVID-19 vaccines. Literacy was directly proportional to vaccination status, whereas vaccine-hesitancy was inversely proportional to search-volume for 'allergy.'

5.
Personality and Individual Differences ; 195:111606, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1804956

ABSTRACT

Past research has independently examined the concepts of certainty and future thought. Here we combine these concepts by examining the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of certainty about the future during periods of societal uncertainty. Three studies (N = 1218) examined future certainty, defined as feeling certain about some future event or outcome, during two major societal events of uncertainty—the COVID-19 pandemic and the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election. In Study 1, certainty about positive or negative futures of COVID-19 (e.g., the pandemic will end soon;the pandemic will never end) predicted poorer information seeking—ignorance of medical experts, adherence to conspiratorial thinking, and lower objective knowledgeability about COVID-19. Building on these findings, in Study 2, future certainty predicted antisocial health behaviors, including failing to social distance. Study 3 extended these findings to the political domain—the 2020 Presidential Election. Future certainty that one's preferred candidate would win the election predicted poor information seeking and antisocial behaviors in terms of claiming that the election was rigged, endorsing violence if one's candidate lost, and, among Trump supporters, identifying with Capitol insurrectionists. These findings suggest that future certainty is linked to intellectual blindness and antisocial behaviors during important periods of societal uncertainty.

6.
Data and Information Management ; : 100005, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1796993

ABSTRACT

To better promote information service and fight the infodemic, this paper investigated the difficulties that Chinese college students encountered in information seeking during the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected data in two stages. In the first stage in November 2020, we collected data from the Foundation of Information Science course. 54 college students who took the course completed an assignment to illustrate their information needs and difficulties during the pandemic. In the second stage in March 2021, trough convenience sampling we conducted an online survey by WenJuanXing. The participants were required to answer the same question as the question in the first stage. We collected 204 valid responses. Then, based on the search task difficulty reason scheme proposed by Liu, Kim, and Creel (2015) (denoted LKC15), we used content analysis to code the responses to analyze the difficulties that Chinese students encountered. LKC15’s difficulty reasons were classified from three aspects: user, task, and user-task interaction. The findings indicated that 14 of the 21 difficulty reasons in LKC15 were identified in this study. Moreover, we added 17 new Difficulty reasons to revise the scheme. The difficulty reasons of user-task interaction were mentioned most frequently. In terms of user-task interaction, the difficulty reasons related to document features were mentioned most frequently, followed by the search results. Finally, it provided some suggestions and discussed the directions for future study.

7.
Library Management ; 43(5):353-369, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1788602

ABSTRACT

Purpose>Digital information seeking behavior incorporates the effective information seeking, retrieving and using in maritime studies. Moreover, digital information literacy skills support the employment of digital tools and information databases for decision making and for performing specific tasks online. The main aim of this paper is to explore the relevant research for the information needs and information seeking behaviour of maritime students.Design/methodology/approach>A systematic literature review over scholarly publications in English language over the last decade was performed through PRISMA method.Findings>The systematic literature review resulted to 22 related publications that are consistent with the criteria of the systematic literature review. These publications are analysed and discussed. The need for further research in the area of information seeking behaviour of students of maritime studies as well as of digital information literacy is exposed.Originality/value>This work explores the behavioural patterns surrounding the central role of information for maritime students as well as for decision-making in the maritime sector. Digital information literacy competencies are discussed in order to be included in the curricula of maritime studies.

8.
Library Management ; 43(5):370-398, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1788601

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This research aimed to investigate the information-seeking behaviour (ISB) and information needs of different professional groups within the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector in the Republic of Ireland (i.e. for what purpose information is acquired), the information sources professional groups use (including in-house documentation, regulations, industry guidelines, standards and colleagues) and the factors, which influence professional groups' choice of information sources. Furthermore, the research explored the perceived level of support that exists towards knowledge and information sharing.Design/methodology/approach>A quantitative non-experimental research design, comprising of a self-completion survey questionnaire, was used to examine a number of information-seeking variables: information triggers, information sources and source influencers as well as information sharing enablers. It was related to four professional tasks: process technology/process development, regulatory support and quality/compliance support and engineering.Findings>The research provides new insights into the ISB of pharmaceutical professionals working within a highly regulated and high-performance production environment, including a greater understanding of the context in which professional groups experience information needs. The levels of agreement observed in relation to employees' perception of information-sharing enablers indicated an overall positive level of information sharing.Research limitations/implications>The study points to largely echoed previous findings which suggest that individual work role associated tasks prompt particular information needs. Further to this, work role associated tasks have a bearing on information source selection. Pharmaceutical professionals engaged in positive levels of information and knowledge sharing, relying on procedures, other colleagues and internal documentation as information sources. The participants also indicated a high level of agreement in respect to the value of available subject matter experts as information-sharing enablers.Practical implications>Organisations should aim to create opportunities for adequate time to share information and organisational structures, facilitating an overall organisational culture of sharing. A focus on information sharing through forums, seminars, meetings and working groups could enhance information sharing, through the development of communities of practice.Social implications>Pharmaceutical professionals relied on trustworthiness and quality as professional' top information source-influencing factors. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that working within a high-performance, target-driven and time-constrained production environment brings a particular contextual impact, where frequent urgent information triggers are experienced. These contextual factors warrant further investigation.Originality/value>A paucity of information exists with respect to the ISB of professionals, working within the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector, which is a sector known for its high level of information use and production. This paper offered an original empirical investigation of the ISB of professionals, working within the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector in the Republic of Ireland, focussing on key professional tasks. The research also addressed the level of support available for knowledge and information sharing.

9.
Libraries, Digital Information, and COVID: Practical Applications and Approaches to Challenge and Change ; : 79-90, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787954

ABSTRACT

Learning in Higher Education is changing across the globe, driven by demographic and economic shifts which combine to create an unprecedented increase in demand for access to high-quality, flexible online provision. This trend has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this shifting landscape, libraries also have to adapt. In this chapter, we have drawn on our experience at the University of London of running a digital library for large cohorts of distance learners all over the globe, and have provided detailed, practical information about running such a service, in the hope that this may be useful as a comparator, benchmark, or guide for the interested reader. Creating a successful digital library which meets the learning, teaching, and research needs of an academic institution is not a simple transference of physical library collections and practices to an online version. It calls for a thorough understanding of the distance learners’ individual learning and information needs, the information environment in which they work, and the barriers to accessing and using the library and other information sources. In addition, it requires technically competent librarians, a robust digital infrastructure, carefully selected and licensed digital collections, an integrated information and digital literacy framework, close partnerships with faculty, commercial publishers, and senior management. Although fewer staffing resources and less accommodation are required to run a wholly digital library compared with running a physical library, it is not an inexpensive undertaking. © 2021 David Baker and Lucy Ellis Published by Elsevier Ltd.

10.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(4): e36804, 2022 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775589

ABSTRACT

Shortly after the first case reports in 2019, COVID-19 was declared a pandemic. Early messages from trusted experts, which later proved to be inadequate or incorrect, highlight the need for continual adjustment of messages to the public as scientific knowledge evolves. During this time, social media exploded with greatly sought-after information, some of which was misinformation based on incomplete or incorrect facts or disinformation purposefully spread to advance a specific agenda. Because of the nature of social media, information, whether accurate or not at the time posted, lives on and remains accessible to the public even when its usefulness has been discredited. While the impact of mis/disinformation on COVID-19 risk-reducing behaviors is debatable, it is clear that social media has played a significant role in both extending the reach of COVID-19-related falsehoods and promoting evidence-based content. Over the last decade, social media has become a dominant source of information that consumers turn to for health information. A great deal of misinformation and disinformation has reached large numbers of social media users, which points to a need for the agencies of the US Public Health Service to create communications to convey accurate and current information and appeals that will actually be viewed. This viewpoint highlights the challenges, risks, and potential benefits that social media present in mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 325, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The health impacts of COVID-19 are not evenly distributed in societies. Chronic patients are highly affected and develop dangerous symptoms of COVID-19. Understanding their information seeking about COVID-19 may help to improve the effectiveness of public health strategies in the future, the adoption of safety measures, and minimize the spread of the pandemic. However, there is little evidence on information seeking specifically on COVID-19 in this study setting. Therefore, this study aimed to assess information seeking about COVID-19 and associated factors among chronic patients. METHOD: An institutional-based cross-sectional study supplemented with qualitative data was conducted at Bahir Dar city public hospitals in Northwest Ethiopia from April 8 to June 15, 2021. A total of 423 chronic patients were selected using systematic random sampling techniques with an interval of 5. Bi-variable and multivariable logistic regression analysis was fitted to identify factors associated with information seeking about COVID-19. A p-value < 0.05 was used to declare statistical significance. Qualitative data were analyzed using a thematic approach. Finally, it was triangulated with quantitative findings. RESULT: The proportion of information seeking about COVID-19 among chronic patients was 44.0% (95% CI = 39.0, 49.0). Being living in urban [AOR = 4.4, 95% CI (2.01, 9.58)], having high perceived susceptibility to COVID-19 [AOR = 3.4, 95%CI (1.98, 5.70)], having high perceived severity to COVID-19 [AOR = 1.7, 95%CI (1.04, 2.91)], having high self-efficacy to COVID-19 [AOR = 4.3, 95%CI (2.52, 7.34)], and having adequate health literacy [AOR = 1.8, 95%CI (1.10, 3.03)] were significant factors associated with information-seeking about COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The overall proportion of information seeking about COVID-19 among chronic patients was low. Thus, health promotion programs should emphasize the chronic patients living in a rural area; enhance perceived risk and severity of COVID-19, enhancing self-efficacy and health literacy interventions to improve information seeking.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Seeking Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Hospitals, Public , Humans
12.
Food Science and Technology ; 42:13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1770823

ABSTRACT

The objectives of this research are trifold. The first is to unveil antecedents of food-handling behaviors in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The second is to investigate the consistency of impacts of proposed determinants across different handling behaviors. The third is to confirm whether or not the premise of intention as the sole direct determinant of behavior in the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) holds. As such, TPB served as the guiding theory, and Factor Analysis and Seemingly Unrelated Regression were used for data analysis. The results discuss the discrepancy of impacts between heterogeneous food-handling behaviors. The contribution of habit and information-seeking behavior across behaviors were confirmed, while the influence of income, minor, objective norm, perception of food risks, trust, perceived behavioral control, and intention was statistically significant but inconsistently differed between behaviors. The independent contributions of gender, age, education, subjective norm, and attitude were negligible. This paper's findings offer evidence to highlight the role of volitional predictors to anticipate safe food-handling behaviors to suggest suitable policy interventions to reinforce the last line of heath defense in the household, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

13.
Global Mental Health ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1768726

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused significant psychological consequences among the public, especially for people in the epicenter. This study examined the "bull's eye" model by comparing the level of psychological distress and the effect of different stressors in Wuhan (the original epicenter) with that in the surrounding areas in Hubei Province during the pandemic. Data were obtained from a cross-national survey of 10,478 respondents between the ages of 18 and 80 years in Hubei Province during the peak of the pandemic. Results of the ordinary least squares regression models showed that Wuhan residents experienced more psychological distress than those in the surrounding areas. Social and economic problems caused by the pandemic, risk exposure, perceived discrimination, and information-seeking behaviors were positively associated with distress. Social assistance was negatively associated with distress. Findings were consistent with the bull's eye model by revealing both a higher level of psychological distress and a stronger effect of stressors among the Wuhan residents than with those in low-risk areas. Thus, policymakers and psychological workers should provide adequate psychological services in high-risk areas. Lowering risk exposure, reducing discrimination against people in the epicenter, and improving information quality are essential to alleviate their psychological distress.

14.
Library Hi Tech ; 40(2):323-339, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1764783

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The massive amount of available information and functionality of the Internet makes selective information seeking effortless. This paper aims to understand the selective exposure to information during a health decision-making task.Design/methodology/approach>This study conducted an experiment with a sample of 36 students to examine the influence of prior attitude, perceived threat level and information limit on users’ selective exposure to and recall of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination information. Participants were assigned to two conditions with or without an upper limit of the number of articles to be examined, and this study collected the number of articles read, the number of articles included in the report and recall score of the articles after one day of the experiment.Findings>This study found that (1) participants with a negative attitude were more inclined to view attitude-consistent information and recalled attitude-consistent information more accurately, while participants with a positive attitude viewed more balanced information;(2) participants perceiving higher health threat level recalled attitude-consistent information more accurately;and (3) an upper limit on the number of articles to be viewed does not have any impact on selective exposure.Research limitations/implications>The findings of this paper pinpoint the disparity of influence of positive and negative attitudes on selective exposure to and selective recall of health information, which was not previously recognized.Practical implications>Vaccination campaigns should focus on reaching people with negative attitudes who are more prone to selective exposure to encourage them to seek more balanced information.Originality/value>This is the first paper to explore selective exposure to COVID-19 vaccination information. This study found that people with a negative attitude and a higher level of perceived health threat are more prone to selective exposure, which was not found in previous research.

15.
Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management ; 26(3):401-419, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1764764

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This paper evaluates how the intention to develop webrooming or showrooming behaviour is affected by both the perceived usefulness and the perceived ease-of-use, as well as by the consumer's personal predisposition to exploratory information seeking and acquisition.Design/methodology/approach>The fashion retailing environment is more omni-channel than ever before. The two predominant omni-channel behaviours are webrooming and showrooming. Taking as its basis the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the concept of exploratory consumer behaviour.Findings>The results obtained from a sample of 847 apparel shoppers (462 webroomers and 385 showroomers) show that the higher perception of the usefulness and ease-of-use of omni-channel buying processes, the higher the intention to develop both webrooming and showrooming behaviours. Additionally, the perceived ease-of-use exerts an additional indirect effect on the intention of developing these omni-channel behaviours through perceived usefulness. Finally, exploratory information seeking and acquisition have a relevant influence on webrooming intentions, but not on showrooming.Originality/value>The authors’ research contributes to the literature on consumer behaviour in the fashion sector by testing a model to explain the intentions of individuals to adopt webrooming and showrooming, incorporating different psychographic variables linked to the use of ICT and the development of an exploratory consumer behaviour.

16.
World Medical & Health Policy ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1763305

ABSTRACT

During health crises like the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic, it is crucial that individuals are able and willing to adequately respond to information. Individuals who deliberately seek information have an enhanced capacity to act on it and are capable of informed assessments of risks and self-protective behaviors. In contrast, overexposure to Covid-19 news as well as non-seeking can constitute information-related inequalities and hamper individuals? coping with the health crisis. Having this global health communication challenge in mind, our research aims to understand what characterizes non-, medium, and frequent seekers, considering sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors, health status, affective risk responses, efficacy assessments, trust in information sources, and satisfaction with information. This study is based on data of the second wave of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) Germany. Among 2602 participants, analysis revealed that 23.3% of the respondents did not actively seek information about Covid-19, while 34.3% of them intensively monitored information. Nonseekers, compared to medium and frequent seekers, were characterized by a lower socioeconomic status, lower affective risk responses, lower perceived information-related self-efficacy, and lower trust in information sources. These findings provide indications for strategic health approaches and can guide initiatives to address adequate use of health information.

17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760608

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the concomitant infodemic have emphasized the importance of digital health literacy (DHL) to global public health research and practice. The aim of this study was to examine information-seeking behavior, the ability to find, understand and deal with health information among university college students in Denmark and/in addition we wanted to examine the impact of their close social network on students' ability to find and understand health information. This research was carried out as part of the COVID-HL university student survey by using a uniform questionnaire consisting of elaborated scales. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey conducted at University College South during 4 weeks in April and May 2020. To capture DHL, four subscales of the DHL instrument were adapted to the pandemic context. A total of 59.9% of the students have sufficient DHL-most students find it rather easy to find information and are satisfied with the information they find on the internet. However, some (28.1%) students find it difficult to judge the quality and reliability of the information. Students with a sufficient level of DHL are more likely to seek information through search engines and websites of official institutions, while students with a limited level of DHL more often use social media for health information. Students with sufficient DHL more often share health information and less often ask for support in their network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Universities
18.
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems ; 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1759460

ABSTRACT

During a global pandemic such as COVID-19, laypeople bear a large burden of responsibility for assessing risks associated with COVID-19 and taking action to manage risks in their everyday lives, yet epidemic-related information is characterized by uncertainty and ambiguity. People perceive risks based on partial, changing information. We draw on crisis informatics research to examine the multiple types of risk people perceive in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic, the information sources that inform perceptions of COVID-19 risks, and the challenges that people have in getting the information they need to understand risks, using qualitative interviews with individuals across the United States. Participants describe multiple pandemic-related threats, including illness, secondary health conditions, economic, socio-behavioral, and institutional risks. We further uncover how people draw on multiple information sources from technological infrastructures, people, and spaces to inform the types of their risk perceptions, uncovering deep challenges to acquiring needed risk information.

19.
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction ; 74:102925, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1757394

ABSTRACT

Mobile social media experienced explosive growth during the COVID-19 pandemic. To understand the underlying causes of users' acceptance towards mobile social media, this study draws upon the uses and gratifications theory, media dependency theory, and related literature of individuals' perceived appraisal (perceived trust, perceived benefits, and perceived risk) to explore the determinants that influenced mobile social media acceptance during the public health crisis maintenance stage. Data were obtained from 724 mobile social media users in China through an online paid questionnaire survey platform. The results revealed that perceived trust and perceived benefits positively affected information seeking and information sharing, which jointly influenced an individual's intention to use mobile social media during the public health crisis maintenance stage. Social media dependency also positively affected mobile social media users' usage intentions. However, perceived risk negatively influenced information seeking and information sharing. The results of this study offer valuable theoretical and practical implications for crisis communication researchers, emergency management practitioners, and mobile social media platforms.

20.
17th International Conference on Information for a Better World: Shaping the Global Future, iConference 2022 ; 13193 LNCS:211-227, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1750597

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic ushered in an era of unprecedented hardship worldwide, bringing uncertainty to new levels as people’s routines were disrupted and what was once considered normal was called into question. Citizens initiated online local communities to support information-seeking amidst the pandemic. In this paper, we explore what types of information were sought and how people engaged in uncertainty reduction with others in their area during the initial phase of COVID-19. We conducted content analysis on a pandemic-relief online local community. We found that people leveraged local networks to get updates about timely situations in local areas, clear confusion around local COVID-19 regulations, and seek confirmation on emerging social norms. However, there existed inaccurate information exchange about regulations and conflicting opinions on social norms. We provide design suggestions to increase the potentials of uncertainty management through online local communities. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL