Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 672
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
Korean J Pain ; 35(4): 458-467, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109722

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have investigated unspecified or idiopathic pain associated with COIVD-19. This study aimed to provide the incidence rates of unspecified pain and idiopathic pain in patients with COVID-19 for 90 days after COVID-19 diagnosis. Methods: A propensity score matched cohort was used, including all patients with COVID-19 in South Korea, and analyzed their electronic medical records. The control group consisted of those who had not had tests for COVID-19 at all. Unspecified pain diagnoses consisted of diagnoses related to pain included in the ICD-10 Chapter XVIII. Idiopathic pain disorders included fibromyalgia, temporomandibular joint disorders, headaches, chronic prostatitis, complex regional pain syndrome, atypical facial pain, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis. Results: After matching, the number of participants in each group was 7,911. For most unspecified pain, the incidences were higher in the COVID-19 group (11.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.0-12.5) than in the control group (6.5%; 95% CI, 6.0-7.1). For idiopathic pain, only the headaches had a significantly higher incidence in the COVID-19 group (6.6%; 95% CI, 6.1-7.2) than in the control group (3.7%; 95% CI, 3.3-4.1). However, using a different control group that included only patients who visited a hospital at least once for any reasons, the incidences of most unspecified and idiopathic pain were higher in the control group than in the COVID-19 group. Conclusions: Patients with COVID-19 might be at a higher risk of experiencing unspecified pain in the acute phase or after recovery compared with individuals who had not had tests for COVID-19.

2.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 15: 2031-2042, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109488

ABSTRACT

Background: South Korea has utilized its National Health Insurance (NHI) system to adjust the medical fees payable for healthcare services, to financially support the frontline healthcare providers combating COVID-19. This study evaluated the composition of such adjustments to the medical fees-made to secure resource surge capacity against the pandemic-in South Korea. Methods: Descriptive statistics and schematization were employed to analyze 3,612,640 COVID-19-related NHI claims from January 1, 2020, to June 30, 2021. COVID-19 suspected and confirmed cases were evaluated based on the proportion of fees adjustment, classified into space, staff, or stuff (3S) using diagnosis codes. The proportion of fees adjustment was investigated in terms of the healthcare expenditure, number of patients, and number of healthcare services covered. Findings: First, in terms of cost, medical fee adjustments covered over 96% of the total costs arising from the increased demand for testing (stuff) and isolated spaces among patients suspected of having COVID-19. Second, medical fees were adjusted to cover over 80% of the cost attributable to COVID-19 confirmed cases, in relation to isolated spaces and medical staff support. Third, the adjustment of less than 10% of the various types of medical fees, if selected strategically, can effectively induce a surge in resource capacity. Interpretation: South Korea has improved its existing surge capacity by adjusting the medical fees payable through NHI to healthcare providers. Particularly, through the provider payment system of fee-for-service, the Korean government could prevent the spread of infection and protect the medical staff assigned to respond to COVID-19. However, additional studies on alternative payment systems are needed to control costs while maintaining an effective pandemic response system in the face of the prolonged COVID-19 outbreak.

3.
Telemed J E Health ; 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107322

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a shift in health care delivery and compelled a heavier reliance on telehealth. The objective of this study was to determine if differences in coverage policies by payer type resulted in differential telehealth use during the first 3 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this population-based cohort study of low-income Arkansans, Medicaid beneficiaries enrolled in the traditional Primary Care Case Management (PCCM) program were compared with Medicaid beneficiaries covered through premium assistance in private Qualified Health Plans (QHPs). Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of insurance claims records from June 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020, for synchronous telehealth and mobile health (m-health) visits, as well as other forms of telehealth. To establish the baseline equivalence of enrollees in the two groups, propensity score matching design was used on demographic and geographic characteristics, Charlson Comorbidity Index, broadband availability, and prior service utilization. Results: Compared with enrollees in the PCCM program, Medicaid expansion enrollees in QHPs had higher odds of having had at least one telehealth visit (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.29-1.42) during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Categorizing utilizations by domain, QHP enrollees were more likely to use synchronous telehealth (aOR = 1.31; 95% CI: 1.25-1.37) and m-health (aOR = 5.91; 95% CI: 4.25-8.21). A higher proportion of QHP enrollees also had at least one mental or behavioral health telehealth session (aOR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.07-1.19). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that within low-income populations, payer type was associated with inequitable access to telehealth during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
Journal of Asian Economics ; : 101557, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2104394

ABSTRACT

Using nationally representative income and expenditure data from South Korea, we show that single-person households suffered a much greater decrease in household income and expenditure compared to multi-persons households during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Negative effects on income were largest for the single-person households in ages 50—64, mostly driven by decreases in earned income rather than business income. There was no corresponding decrease in consumption expenditures, however, other than on transportation expenditure for young men. Notably, there were significant decreases in non-consumption expenditures that are related to formal and informal consumption-smoothing mechanisms, such as spending on insurances, pensions, and household transfers. Our findings highlight the disproportionately negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the middle-aged single-person households. With reduced spending on consumption-smoothing mechanisms, this group is likely to be even more vulnerable to negative income shocks in the future.

5.
Pacific Business Review International ; 15(2):115-129, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2102421

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic can be considered as an economic and health crisis of uncertain magnitude and duration. Frequent lockdowns, salary cuts, and losses of jobs and lives have spurred changes in human behaviour. Today customers are experiencing a transformation in their perceptions towards a life insurance product. The common attitude to treat life insurance as an optional investment instrument has been shifted towards a mandatory risk protection instrument. Thus the demand for a life insurance product is increasing by leaps and bounds and undoubtedly competition among insurance providers at the same time. This article seeks to examine the features that should form part of a life insurance product to attract customers in Indiaduring the COVID-19 pandemic. Data for the study were collected for 159 respondents from October 2020 to December 2020 from Delhi and NCR region. The data were analyzed using Principal Component Analysisafter walking through a maze of articles relating to normal times and crisis times. There is testable evidence to show a paradigm shift in the outlook of customers regarding a life insurance product. Thus, the article also paves the path for future research in the direction of customers behaviour for a life insurance product.

6.
Labour Economics ; 79, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2095728

ABSTRACT

Potential workers are classified as unemployed if they seek work but are not working. The unemployed population contains two groups -those with jobs and those without jobs. Those with jobs are on furlough or temporary layoff. This group expanded tremendously in April 2020, at the trough of the pandemic recession. They wait out periods of non-work with the understanding that their jobs still exist and that they will be recalled. We show that the resulting temporary-layoff unemployment mostly dissipated by the end of 2020. Potential workers without jobs constitute what we call jobless unemployment. Shocks that elevate jobless unemployment have much more persistent effects. Historical major adverse shocks, such as the financial crisis in 2008, created mostly jobless unemployment and consequently caused extended periods of elevated unemployment. Jobless unemployment reached its pandemic peak in November 2020, at 4.9%, modest by historical standards, and has declined at a faster-than-historical pace since.

7.
Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control ; : 104562, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2095615

ABSTRACT

We study how the clarity of COVID-19 risk communications affects COVID-19 insurance demand using proprietary prefecture-level insurance data from China. We find that when local disclosures of COVID-19 risk contain case origin information, local purchases of COVID-19 insurance and local Internet searches for COVID-19 information increase, even after controlling for newly confirmed local cases and new deaths. Our results are robust to using the disclosure clarity of a major neighboring city. The findings suggest that providing improved knowledge about risk to individuals lead them to engage in more risk management. Our evidence contributes to the debate over how risk communication affects individuals’ risk-related behaviors.

8.
Journal of Financial Service Professionals ; 76(6):36, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2092992

ABSTRACT

The lens of the 2022 Social Security trustees report provides an important view of the state of our Social Security system. First, up until this point, COVID-19 has not had the negative impact that some thought it might have. Second, this year's report is consistent with prior reports. Third, imminent changes are not expected;however, change must come.

9.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(10): e35860, 2022 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089625

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has been observed to be associated with venous and arterial thrombosis. The inflammatory disease prolongs hospitalization, and preexisting comorbidities can intensity the thrombotic burden in patients with COVID-19. However, venous thromboembolism, arterial thrombosis, and other vascular complications may go unnoticed in critical care settings. Early risk stratification is paramount in the COVID-19 patient population for proactive monitoring of thrombotic complications. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this exploratory research was to characterize thrombotic complication risk factors associated with COVID-19 using information from electronic health record (EHR) and insurance claims databases. The goal is to develop an approach for analysis using real-world data evidence that can be generalized to characterize thrombotic complications and additional conditions in other clinical settings as well, such as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome in COVID-19 patients or in the intensive care unit. METHODS: We extracted deidentified patient data from the insurance claims database IBM MarketScan, and formulated hypotheses on thrombotic complications in patients with COVID-19 with respect to patient demographic and clinical factors using logistic regression. The hypotheses were then verified with analysis of deidentified patient data from the Research Patient Data Registry (RPDR) Mass General Brigham (MGB) patient EHR database. Data were analyzed according to odds ratios, 95% CIs, and P values. RESULTS: The analysis identified significant predictors (P<.001) for thrombotic complications in 184,831 COVID-19 patients out of the millions of records from IBM MarketScan and the MGB RPDR. With respect to age groups, patients 60 years and older had higher odds (4.866 in MarketScan and 6.357 in RPDR) to have thrombotic complications than those under 60 years old. In terms of gender, men were more likely (odds ratio of 1.245 in MarketScan and 1.693 in RPDR) to have thrombotic complications than women. Among the preexisting comorbidities, patients with heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, hypertension, and personal history of thrombosis all had significantly higher odds of developing a thrombotic complication. Cancer and obesity were also associated with odds>1. The results from RPDR validated the IBM MarketScan findings, as they were largely consistent and afford mutual enrichment. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis approach adopted in this study can work across heterogeneous databases from diverse organizations and thus facilitates collaboration. Searching through millions of patient records, the analysis helped to identify factors influencing a phenotype. Use of thrombotic complications in COVID-19 patients represents only a case study; however, the same design can be used across other disease areas by extracting corresponding disease-specific patient data from available databases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Humans , Female , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Risk Factors , Retrospective Studies , Odds Ratio
10.
Environmental and Climate Technologies ; 26(1):871-882, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082439

ABSTRACT

The economic cultural heritages are exposed to several natural and nowadays biological hazards, which, in addition to causing potential structural damage, can lead to severe loss deriving from financial non-incomes. The paper aims to highlight the role of insurance in mitigating financial damages and losses, specifically explaining the key role of insurance in mitigating biological hazards like Covid-19. The paper is part of broader research by the authors and uses the assumptions and results already obtained previously in the context of the case study relating to the asset of Villa Adriana and Villa D'Este.

15.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-346262

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 impact is catastrophic, beyond imagination and its repercussions on the livelihoods of millions of people are going to be devastating. Pandemic intensifies the awareness towards insurance and the financial risks that could lead to loss of income and increased expenses. The world has witnessed a lot of awareness developed during this crisis is overwhelming, as it testifies to the importance of health insurance as well as life insurance across different channels such as social media, television commercials, advertising billboards, etc. The increasing death toll due to the covid pandemic has led to an awareness of various insurance schemes. Primary Data was collected from the respondents of Coimbatore region by using convenience sampling methodology. A total of 120 questionnaires were distributed and gathered from the participants in the study. The Data was collected through questionnaire survey method. Secondary data was obtained from various sources such as journals, websites, publications etc., The Ranking method and Weighted Average method are used to analyze the collected data. Results indicate that people start valuing the importance of insurance policies and their benefits.

16.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(10):7763-7772, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067319

ABSTRACT

Insurance is one of the service sectors which play the vital role in quality based services. This sector consists of all types of financial activities such as banking and trade of securities. Insurance covers many aspects of assurance on life, medical and insurance on general aspects. Health insurance is an instrument that supports monetary requirements at the time of uncertainty faced by the insurer. Over the past few decades, India’s achievement in terms of healthy survival consciousness has been significant but health insurance sectors are still the way behind while comparing with many other similar countries. Covid-19 impact created prerequisite of health insurance. The purpose of the study is to highlight the factors for choosing the health insurance and personality traits on perception of health insurance. The study investigated the survey through the structured questionnaire and applied convenience sampling method. The SPSS statistical tool was employed to draw the results from the 100 respondents. Descriptive statistics, Anova, Correlation, Regression and Factor analysis are applied to infer the results. The study identified three variables like, Assurance, convenience, responsiveness and satisfaction as service quality. This study concluded that convenience and responsiveness has significantly correlated. Challenges and personality traits are perfectly correlated. Finally, the result shows that personality traits have an impact on buying behaviour of health insurance.

17.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12914, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066480

ABSTRACT

This study addresses, for the first time, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the operation of the disability fund in Poland. The study considers the impact of deaths on the number of survivor pensions and funeral allowance paid. We selected benefits which are a direct consequence of the death of the insured person and do not involve a medical assessment or subsequent steps in the insurance procedure, which allowed for a novel result, avoiding the time-gap problem. Data of four years were included in the study: 2018 and 2019 as pre-pandemic years and 2020 and 2021 as pandemic years. The research presented in this article (unexpectedly) indicates that there is no impact of the increased number of deaths on the increase in the number of survivor pensions and therefore there is no negative impact of the COVID-19 implications on the disability fund. The relationship between the total number of deaths and the number of funeral allowances is characterized by a high correlation with a positive direction.

18.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12328, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066396

ABSTRACT

This research suggests a way to sustain a firm’s business by focusing on the economic aspects of relationship marketing by managing the heterogeneity of churn customers. In general, firms have regarded churn customers as a homogeneous segment, for they have not been conscious that churn ego can be various. However, customer churn can be divided into voluntary and involuntary, implying that firms should reform the retention strategy by focusing on egos that seem homogenous but are heterogeneous in terms of churn behavior. Using a multiple regression model, this study analyzed customer data from an insurance company to investigate the heterogeneous impacts of churn customers. It measured the impact based on the period and revenue in the second lifetime, comprehensively representing customer satisfaction. Empirical results show that customer churn heterogeneity significantly affects customers’ second-lifetime behavior. The analysis reveals how the firm effectively performed customer regaining initiatives and successfully maintained persistency. This research also concludes that voluntary and involuntary churn occurred by intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Finally, this research implicates the retention strategy that differs from the heterogeneity to achieve a firm’s high performance and suggests an empirical method of spurious loyalty avoidance by hedging loyal customer selection risk.

19.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):796, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063514

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The SARS-CoV-2 or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disproportionately impacted racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. Although, kidney transplant procedures decreased following onset of the pandemic, the differential impact of the pandemic on racial and ethnic minority groups remains unknown. Method(s): We examined kidney-alone procedures captured in the national Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) analytic files and compared the change in deceased donor kidney transplant (DDKT) and living donor kidney transplant (LDKT) pre- and post- pandemic and the associated factors. Result(s): We found that the counts of LDKT declined more for Black patients in the 12 months following onset of the pandemic, March 2020 to Feb 2021, compared with counts in the same period in the preceding 12 months. LDKT counts among Black patients fell by 42.6% compared with 33.3% in White patients (P=0.02). This pattern of decrease in LDKT counts among Black patients occurred in all geographic areas of the country (based on current UNOS COVID-19 reporting) except for the Northeast and South Midwest (Figure 1). Along with recipient race, other factors associated with a significant decline in LDKT counts included public insurance, Black living donor race, and location of residence. In contrast, DDKT counts for both Black and White candidates declined initially (10% vs. 5.9% lower respectively, P=0.11) during the pandemic and then recovered closer to pre-pandemic levels. Conclusion(s): The COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted Black patients' access to LDKT. While the current rate of DDKT procedures has recovered in 2021, it is unclear whether LDKT rates will recover to parity. As locoregional surge conditions can have differential effects, ongoing attention to transplant disparities resulting from the pandemic, with appropriately targeted interventions, is warranted.

20.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):863-864, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063472

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Despite several policy reforms over the years, disparities in the access to solid organ transplantation continues to exist remains a significant barrier to liver transplant. The MELD Allocation system and subsequently the Share-35 policy (adopted June 2013) were implemented to address the inequitable access to liver transplantation (LT). The implication of these changes on adult and pediatric LT among ethnic groups is uncertain. Therefore the aim of this study, is to explore the factors associated with access to LT across ethnic groups of all age groups. Method(s): The study period (2014 -2019) included the period after Share-35 policy (June 2013) implementation and prior to implantation of Acuity Circle and COVID pandemic (Feb/March 2020). Using the UNOS database, we identified all candidates (Pediatrics and Adults), who received liver Transplant during the study period. Data extracted included type of transplant, liver diagnosis, age, MELD/PELD score, gender and race/ethnicity. Chi square test and anova were used for comparative analysis. Result(s): During the study period, 46,926 candidates received liver transplant of which 96% were Adults, living donor LT (5%) and ethnic distribution (White 69%, Hispanic 15%, Black 9%, Asian 4% and others 3%). In contrast to the Adult recipients in which there is a gender variation with male predominance (65%), among pediatric group there was similar distribution (Male 51% and Female 49%). There was significant ethnic variation in type of insurance payor (Figure 1) and proportion of LT (Figure 2) across age groups. Among pediatric recipients, no significant difference in LT trends across ethnic groups. In contrary, among the adult recipients, though there was no change among White (71% in 2014 and 71% in 2019) and Asian (4% in 2014 and 4% in 2019), there was slight increase among Hispanic ( 13 % in 2014 and 16% in 2019) and a steady decline among Blacks ( 10% in 2014 and 7.3% in 2019). Conclusion(s): Ethnic Variation in Access to Liver Transplantation exists in both Adult and Pediatric Candidates. Future studies to explore the observed difference in Insurance payors, gender gaps among ethnic groups will provide useful insights to the non-medical factors contributing to inequitable LT access irrespective of age. Identification and understanding the key social determinants that impact LT access will be key in developing strategies to reduce and eliminate these barriers across age groups.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL