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1.
BMJ Open ; 13(1):e066348, 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2193795

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The relationship between the care of patients with COVID-19 and mental health among resident physicians in Japan is imperative for ensuring appropriate care of patients with COVID-19 and should be clarified. We herein assessed the relationship between the care of patients with COVID-19 and mental health among postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) and PGY-2 resident physicians and factors associated with mental health. DESIGN: This nationwide cross-sectional study analysed data obtained using the clinical training environment self-reported questionnaire. SETTING: An observational study across Japan among resident physicians (PGY-1 and PGY-2) from 583 teaching hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Examinees who took the general medicine in-training examination of academic year 2020. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The Patient Health Questionnaire and Mini-Z 2.0 were used to assess mental health, and experience of caring for patients with COVID-19 was divided into three groups (none, 1-10 and ≥11). The prevalence of mental conditions in the three groups was compared using the 'modified' Poisson generalised estimating equations by adjusting for prefecture-level, hospital-level and resident-level variables. RESULTS: Of the 5976 participants analysed, 50.9% were PGY-1. The prevalence of burnout was 21.4%. Moreover, 47.0% of all resident physicians had no experience in the care of patients with COVID-19. The well-experienced group accounted for only 7.9% of the total participants. A positive association was found between the number of caring patients with COVID-19 and burnout (prevalence ratio 1.25;95% CI 1.02 to 1.53). Moreover, the shortage of personal protective equipment was identified as a major contributor to burnout (prevalence ratio 1.60;95% CI 1.36 to 1.88). CONCLUSIONS: Resident physicians who experienced more care of patients with COVID-19 had slightly greater burnout prevalence than those who did not. Approximately half of resident physicians did not participate in the care of patients with COVID-19, which posed a challenge from an educational perspective.

2.
Journal of Medical Regulation ; 108(3):8-17, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2205705

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional, retrospective, pre-post repeated measures study aimed to describe Ohio physicians' burnout and mental health experiences as perceived prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. A one-time online survey was completed by 1,613 physicians registered with the State Medical Board of Ohio (SMBO). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to assess differences between physicians' self-reports of burnout and mental health prior to and during the pandemic. Mann-Whitney U tests examined response differences between physicians and residents. Data revealed statistically significant differences between physicians' pre-pandemic and pandemic experiences for all measures of burnout and mental health (p < 0.001) with moderate effect sizes for feeling emotionally drained from work (Z = -16.71, r = 0.43);feeling down, depressed, or hopeless (Z = -18.09, r = 0.46);feeling less accomplished (Z = -11.03, r = 0.29);and caring less about what happens to patients (Z = -12.04, r = 0.31). Small effect sizes were found for thoughts of suicide and concerns about one's substance use. Additionally, resident physicians were more likely than physicians to report many burnout and mental health concerns prior to and during the pandemic, although these effect sizes were small. These findings can inform stakeholders' efforts toward the prevention and reduction of physician burnout and improvement of well-being. Copyright 2022 Federation of State Medical Boards. All Rights Reserved.

3.
Cutis ; 110(5):249-251, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2203735

ABSTRACT

Dermatology residency programs must be prepared to address the unpredictable but seemingly inevitable impacts of natural (eg, hurricanes) and manmade (eg, threats of violence) disasters as well as widespread infectious disease (eg, the COVID-19 pandemic). However, there is a paucity of literature regarding how residency programs should prepare for and respond to these types of disasters. From the equipment trainees utilize in clinic to the didactic education dermatology residents receive, preserving the means of clinical care delivery and mastery of core competencies in the face of unique and disastrous circumstances poses a great challenge to dermatology residency programs. Addressing disaster preparedness early may help to mitigate the short- and long-term impacts of such events, allowing for a more sustainable residency program.

4.
J Grad Med Educ ; 14(6):674-679, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2202256

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of virtual interviews on residency match outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic is unknown. Examining the ophthalmology match may help inform all specialties undergoing virtual interviews. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of allopathic applicant match characteristics in the first year of the virtual residency Match process. METHODS: Using the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology match database, a retrospective review was conducted of all allopathic applicants to ophthalmology residency programs in the United States from the 2016 through the 2021 match cycles. Demographic information, interview numbers, and match outcomes were compared between the 2016-2020 (in-person) and 2021 (virtual) cycles. RESULTS: A total of 3343 allopathic applicants were analyzed. Applicants in the 2021 Match applied to significantly more programs than 2016-2020 applicants did (78.7±23.6 vs 73.1±22.7, P<.001). Among matched and unmatched applicants, there was no significant difference in the number of interviews granted or completed. There was a significant reduction in the match rate between the 2016-2020 and 2021 Match cycles (81.3% vs 76.6%, P=.0009). A subanalysis of applicants who went to medical schools with ophthalmology residency programs (N=2308) found that the home institution match rate was significantly higher for the 2021 Match compared to the aggregate 2016-2020 Matches (26.1% vs 20.6%, respectively, P=.015). CONCLUSIONS: Significantly more applicants to ophthalmology residency programs matched at their home institutions in the 2021 virtual match cycle compared to the previous 5 years without influencing the interview numbers granted and attended.

5.
AEM Educ Train ; 6(6): e10805, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2121481

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Pandemic disruptions to interviews and away rotations led applicants to rely on alternative sources of information about residency programs. We sought to compare program characteristics important to emergency medicine (EM)-bound applicants from before and after the pandemic. We also investigated the sources of information pandemic impacted applicants used during residency recruitment. Methods: This was a multi-institutional, cross-sectional survey of applicants to EM residency programs. We asked applicants about important factors in choosing a program and compared their response to results from 2019 National Residency Match Program. We also asked about alternative information sources used during this time of restricted access to programs of interest. Results: We surveyed 414 applicants from 40 medical schools and attained a response rate of 38.4%. Compared to 2019 applicants, our respondents identified morale of residents and quality of faculty as important factors in choosing a residency. Our subjects cited websites of the program and hospital affiliate, current residents, faculty/mentor advice, Reddit, and Doximity as sources of program information. Conclusions: Compared to 2019, our EM-bound applicants who, because of the pandemic, were unable to visit programs of interest valued resident morale and faculty quality as factors in choosing a residency program. Without in-person visits, our subjects also had to use both virtual resources (e.g., websites) and traditional sources (e.g., mentor advice) to investigate a program's culture, reputation, and diversity and inclusion. Residency programs should monitor their online presence now that this has become an alternative source of information for applicants during curtailment of in-person visits.

6.
Rehabilitacion (Madr) ; 2022 Jun 30.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105840

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected medical residency (MR) programs worldwide. However, few reports have focused on the MR of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R). Therefore, our objective was to describe the perceptions of PM&R residents in Peru about their MR during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study. During June 2021, we sought to address all PM&R residents in Peru, using a virtual, anonymous and voluntary survey of 13 questions elaborated in Google Forms, which addressed their perception of RM. RESULTS: Of 142 PM&R residents in Peru, 60 (42.3%) responded to the survey. Among these, 21.7% considered that their residency training site (RTS) met little or nothing with the minimum requirements to be one, 50% that their RTS cared little or notthing for him/her since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, 35% that the physicians attending their RTS cared little or nothing about academics, and 71.7% that the lack of subspecialist physicians in PM&R greatly affects their training. In addition, 71.7% and 81.7% reported having learned little or nothing about musculoskeletal ultrasound and electrodiagnostic studies, respectively. Finally, 18.3% reported regretting to have chosen the specialty. CONCLUSIONS: We found an important negative perception about MR and a low self-perception of having learned about musculoskeletal ultrasound and electrodiagnostic studies. It is important to delve into the causes and look for alternatives to improve the training of PM&R residents.

7.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 120(5): 354-358, 2022 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056106

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic forced residency programs to adapt their selection processes. Our objective was to describe the experience of virtual interviews conducted to select residents through applicants' perception. POPULATION AND METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to health care residency applicants after their interviews conducted in 2020. RESULTS: Two-hundred and twenty-one questionnaires were collected and the average distance to the facility was 163 km. Also, 67.9% of the applicants used a personal computer, 98.2% felt that they were treated appropriately, 77.8% were able to state their ideas, and 12.2% reported technical difficulties. In addition, 32.6% said that they would prefer virtual interviews for future selection processes and 17.6%, that it would be irrelevant. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual interviews allowed the resident selection process to be completed; one third of applicants would prefer virtual interviews in the future and there were no apparent technological limitations.


Introducción. La pandemia por COVID-19 obligó a los sistemas de residencias a adaptar sus procesos de selección. Nuestro objetivo fue describir la experiencia de virtualización de las entrevistas de selección de residentes a través de la percepción de las personas aspirantes. Población y métodos. Se envió un cuestionario electrónico a las personas aspirantes de residencias para profesionales de la salud luego de las entrevistas en 2020. Resultados. Se obtuvieron 221 respuestas y la distancia promedio a la institución fue 163 km. El 67,9 % de los aspirantes utilizaron computadora personal; el 98,2 % percibió un trato apropiado; el 77,8 % pudo expresar sus ideas, y el 12,2 % manifestó dificultades técnicas. El 32,6 % refirió que, para próximos procesos de selección, preferiría entrevistas virtuales y al 17,6 % le sería indistinto. Conclusiones. Las entrevistas virtuales permitieron completar el proceso de selección de residentes; un tercio preferiría entrevistas virtuales en el futuro y no hubo limitaciones tecnológicas evidentes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
American Journal of Psychiatry ; 179(9):691-691, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2020641

ABSTRACT

The article discusses the use of Modafinil and its potential use in the treatment of long Covid fatigue.

9.
Neurology Today ; 22(16):5-8, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2018185
10.
Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand ; : 79-82, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2011884
11.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 2326-2339, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996961

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The reorganization of the healthcare system prompted by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has posed unique challenges for Residency Training Programs worldwide. To mitigate its potential negative effects, it is crucial to assess how the pandemic influenced the activity and quality of life of residents. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the pandemic on residents' competencies, satisfaction, working load, training patterns and occupational exposure in the clinical, surgical, research and didactic fields and to quantify its effects on quality of life and risk perception. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was distributed between 1 June 2020 and 31 July 2020 to 1645 residents enrolled in all Residency Programs of four Universities in northern Italy. The survey included questions about clinical, surgical, and research competencies, educational activity, and quality of life pre- and post-pandemic, and on policies and workplace interventions to reduce exposure to SARS-CoV-2. The main outcome measure was the variation in self-perceived clinical, surgical and research competencies and in specialistic training. Data were analysed using the statistical package R Core Team 4.0.0, estimating mean and standard deviation or median and interquartile range for continuous variables. Variables were compared using chi-square test, Fisher exact tests or McNemar test, as appropriate.A multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed to test the effect of different factors on the impact of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) on self-perceived clinical and research competencies and on didactic training. RESULTS: A total of 498 residents completed the survey (response rate 30.3%). The mean age of respondents was 28.9 years, 62.9% were women, and 52.4% were enrolled in the first two years of Training Programs. On the first pandemic wave, over 60% of residents reported a negative impact of the pandemic on their specialistic training. In contrast, 40% of residents involved in clinical duties perceived an improvement in their clinical competences, especially those involved in COVID-19 care, and 34.5% perceived an improvement in their research competences, particularly junior residents, while only 3.5% reported an improvement in surgical skills. Most surgical residents (88.5%) reported a decrease in surgical activities, mainly due to reduced hospital bed capacity and reduction of elective surgery. Almost 90% of all residents experienced a reduction in their didactic activities, but 80% stated their Residency Program adopted virtual training methods. A statistically significant reduction in all examined quality of life items post-pandemic vs. pre-pandemic was found. Even though most survey participants reported the availability of personal protective equipment for residents, 44% considered themselves to be at higher risk of exposure compared to senior staff. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic caused a significant disruption in surgical training, but it had a positive impact on clinical competencies among residents involved in COVID-19 and urgent care. The pandemic had a detrimental effect on all quality of life aspects, and most residents considered themselves at higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to other healthcare professionals.Key MessagesCoronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused a significant disruption in surgical training, but it had a positive impact on clinical competencies among residents involved in COVID-19 and urgent care.Most residents experienced a reduction of didactic activities. Although the majority of training programs implemented virtual training methods to counteract the restrictions imposed by the pandemic, only half of the residents were satisfied of them.A vast proportion of residents had a high occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and considered themselves at higher risk of COVID-19 infection compared to senior staff.The survey highlighted a statistically significant reduction in five key quality of life measures (i.e. sleep, mood, familiar relationships and social relationships quality and employment satisfaction) during the first wave, with mood and social relationships being the most affected. Notably, employment satisfaction was significantly higher in medical compared to surgical residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Surg Innov ; : 15533506221120145, 2022 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993292

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has placed demands on General Surgery residents, who are already at high risk of burnout. This study examined the pandemic's impact on burnout and wellness among General Surgery residents at a large training program. METHODS: General Surgery residents at our institution completed a survey focused on self-reported burnout, mental health, perceptions of wellness resources, and changes in activities during the pandemic. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Unsupervised machine learning (k-means clustering) was used to identify profiles of burnout and comparisons between profiles were made. RESULTS: Of 82 eligible residents, 51 completed the survey (62% response rate). During COVID-19, 63% of residents had self-described burnout, 43% had depression, 18% acknowledged binge drinking/drug use, and 8% had anxiety. There were no significant differences from pre-pandemic levels (p all >.05). Few residents perceived available wellness resources as effective (6%). Based on MBI scores, the clustering analysis identified three clusters, characterized as "overextended", "engaged", and "ineffective". Engaged residents had the least concerning MBI scores and were significantly more likely to exercise, retain social contact during the pandemic, and had less self-reported anxiety or depression. Research residents were overrepresented in the ineffective cluster (46%), which had high rates of self-reported burnout (77%) and was characterized by the lowest personal accomplishment scores. Rates of self-reported burnout for overextended and engaged residents were 73% and 48%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Surgical residents have high rates of self-reported burnout and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Clusters of burnout may offer targets for individualized intervention.

13.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 2022 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990624

ABSTRACT

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the dermatology residency application process rapidly transitioned in a number of dimensions. As in-person activities were canceled and USMLE Step 1 has become pass/fail, there have been several proposed changes to enhance the process, including a push for increased transparency. Given than most dermatology applicants use program websites to learn more about potential residency programs, we conducted a cross-sectional study to quantify how transparent dermatology residency program website were, relative to published guidelines. From February 11, 2022, to February 25, 2022, we examined the available websites of all ACGME-accredited dermatology residencies to determine transparency regarding information dissemination, selection criteria, interview process, program priorities, and program requirements and opportunities. 136 out of 143 dermatology programs (95.1%) were included. Overall, programs were most transparent with program requirements and opportunities (87.25%). This included information on hospital locations, subspecialty clinics, and rotation/call/didactic schedules. Programs were least transparent with sharing their selection and/or exclusion criteria (31.13%) and varied in how much information they shared about the interview process (39.34%), as well as program priorities (64.56%). Opportunities remain for dermatology programs to improve website transparency and aid applicants in this difficult-to-navigate process. These results identify real transparency gaps, with several potential foci for improvement. Our main study limitation is its focus on a single time-period; to ensure that this information remains up to date, ongoing efforts to periodically resurvey content changes is warranted. Our findings provide an overview of programs' successes and remaining opportunities to follow published transparency guidelines; overall, these findings may guide individual program directors aiming to improve the transparency of their dermatology residency programs and ultimately benefit our future workforce.

14.
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol ; 61(5): 755-760, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926939

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a dramatic drop in in-person residency training due to the implementation of isolation and triage measurements. Here, we propose a new flipped classroom clinical skill training model utilizing a combination of pre-workshop, web-based learning and hands-on workshop that shortens in-person contact time to maintain residency training during the pandemic. Effectiveness of this training model was evaluated with a pre-test and post-test skills competency assessment, two-way feedback, and a five-point Likert scale structured survey questionnaire. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The workshop was conducted in a flipped classroom fashion by the obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN) department of a single tertiary teaching medical center covering topics from five OBGYN subspecialities. Every topic consisted of a pre-workshop, web-based, mini lecture (PWML) followed by a hands-on workshop (HW). All first to fourth year OBGYN residents were invited to attend the workshop. All the trainees were required to complete the PWML prior to the day of HW. The workshop consisted of rotational station for each topic and was conducted within one afternoon. A 0-100-point scale pre-test and post-test skills competency evaluation were performed for each station and was assessed by the attending doctor or fellow doctor of each subspeciality. Two-way feedback was done after the post-test evaluation. A five-point Likert scale structured survey instrument consisting of participant's perceptions of the workshop design, relevance to clinical practice, and quality of instructors and materials was created during the curriculum development process and sent to each participant one month after the workshop. RESULTS: A total of 19 residents including five first-year, six second-year, three third-year, and five fourth-year residents completed the entire pre-workshop lecture, workshop, pre-test, and post-test. For all residents, the average post-test score of 5 stations was 95 and was significantly higher than the pre-test score of 60 (p < 0.001). For both junior residents and senior residents, the average post-test scores of 5 stations were also significantly higher than pre-test scores (p < 0.001). Survey generated one month after the workshop showed a high overall satisfaction with the workshop instructors on their professional knowledge, communication skills, and interactions between the instructors and trainees. The average satisfaction scores for manipulation of vaginal breech delivery (VBD), semen analysis (SA), cervical conization (CC), obstetrics anal sphincter injury (OASIS), and laparoscopic suture techniques (LST) were 4.84, 4.96, 4.92, 4.88, and 4.92, respectively The average score for practical application of the training materials, class design and teaching method, overall satisfaction of the session, and time scheduling was 4.84, 4.96, 4.96, and 4.48, respectively. The entire HW was completed within 180 min and was carried out within half a day. CONCLUSION: With the implementation of isolation and triage measures in the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a dramatic drop in in-person exposure to all aspects of the residency training, in particular, non-emergent surgeries. Utilization of PWML saved 1/3 of in-person time and the entire workshop was completed within 180 min that could be carried out within half a day. The decrease of person-to-person contact time during the COVID-19 pandemic is necessary while still providing curriculum-based residency training in spite of decreased hands-on experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Internet , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy
15.
Kans J Med ; 15: 215-217, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1912367

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Effective communication during the patient handoff process is critical for ensuring patient safety. At our academic medical center, first-year interns complete hand-off training before starting clinical rotations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a virtual handoff training for residents as an alternative to in-person sessions due to limitations imposed by COVID-19. Methods: Fifty residents were administered pre/post surveys to gauge the helpfulness of the training for clinical practice, familiarity and confidence in providing a hand-off, and whether they would recommend the virtual format for incoming interns. Additionally, faculty rated the virtual form of the hand-off activity, made comparisons to in-person sessions, and assessed the helpfulness of the session for residents in clinical practice. Results: Forty-four residents (88%) and 11 faculty (85%) completed surveys. After the training session, residents who received instruction and feedback reported significant improvements in familiarity with the hand-off tool and confidence in their hand-off abilities (both p < 0.001). Both residents and faculty were satisfied with the virtual format of hand-off training. Most faculty felt the virtual platform was comparable to in-person sessions and would recommend ongoing use of the virtual platform when in-person sessions were not possible. Conclusions: Teaching hospitals mandate resident training to include strategies for a uniform hand-off method to avoid medical errors. Adaptation to a virtual platform can be a successful instruction strategy, allowing for didactic and interactive sessions with direct faculty observation and feedback.

16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 205, 2022 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many residents are exposed to negative attitudes towards primary care during hospital training. Attractive add-on training programs exist, but it is unclear whether these need to be tailored to the location of training (hospital vs. office). We report differences in learner attitudes from a large German add-on training program. METHODS: Between 2017 and 2020, a regional network offered 31 quarterly seminars to primary care residents. The seminars addressed medical content, practice management and mentoring. We elicited participants' satisfaction, perceived topic relevance, preferences for future seminars, work situation and employer support for participation. A proportionate odds model was used to assess predictors of ratings; results were stratified by training location (hospital vs. office). RESULTS: Most respondents were female (380/575 = 70.0%), aged between 26 and 40 (80.8%), and had on average 3.54 ± 1.64 years of residency training. The majority (83.8%) was working in an office and full-time (63.0%). Overall evaluations were positive (very satisfactory 72.1%). Comparing residents in the hospital phase vs. the office phase, overall seminar ratings of the perceived impact on the motivation for primary care did not differ (p = 0.73 vs. 0.18, respectively). Hospital-based residents were less likely to rate the topics as relevant (39.4% vs. 55.7%, p = 0.02) and had different preferences for future seminar topics (top 3: palliative care, emergencies and chronic care vs. billing, disease management and practice finances for hospital and office phase, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Keeping primary care residents motivated may require education tailored to training location. Our findings may be of interest to teachers, administrators and policymakers.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Adult , Attitude , Curriculum , Female , Hospitals , Humans
17.
Acta Medica Philippina ; 56(4):57-69, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1791235

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives. Virtual learning has been utilized in residency programs to continue training amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of faculty members and residents of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of the Philippine General Hospital towards virtual learning. Method. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Respectively, residents and faculty members answered the Online Learning Readiness Scale (OLRS) and Faculty Readiness to Teach Online (FRTO) through Google Forms. Results. Twenty (20) residents and 19 faculty members participated in the study. The majority of the residents preferred asynchronous learning (50%), while faculty members preferred the hybrid mode (74%). Residents’ readiness for online learning was generally high, though problems with easy distractibility (60%) and time management (40%) were revealed. Female residents had higher online communication self-efficacy compared to males (p = 0.0367). Faculty members’ perceived attitude was significantly higher than ability in course design (p = 0.00102), time management (p = 0.00159), and technical competence (p < 0.0001). Males had higher perceived ability in course design (p = 0.0320). Older age groups had lower perceived abilities in course design (p = 0.0301) and technical competence (p = 0.0371). Conclusion. This study revealed the levels of readiness of residents and faculty for virtual learning. Findings indicate the need to address both issues by developing programs to enhance faculty’s online teaching abilities and observing best practices to minimize problems such as distractibility. Large-scale studies with longer time frames are also recommended. © 2022 University of the Philippines Manila. All rights reserved.

18.
Acta Med Port ; 35(6): 450-454, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780387

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In 2020, critical care departments underwent profound changes imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on the intensive care residency program in Portugal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Association of Critical Care Residents (AIMINT) prepared a questionnaire using the Google Forms® tool, which was applied during August 2020 to the Critical Care residents in Portugal. A descriptive analysis was performed with the data collected. RESULTS: Eighty-five residents participated in the questionnaire, yieldinga response rate of 62%. Three-quarters of all participants provided care to COVID-19 patients. More than 80% of the surveyed participants were on rotations, and these were canceled in 59% of cases. Seventy-eight percent reported a workload greater than 40 hours per week. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on the Critical Care Residency program in Portugal. Most residents surveyed provided care to COVID-19 patients and not only saw their rotations suspended but also experienced difficulties in rescheduling them.


Introdução: No ano de 2020, os serviços de medicina intensiva sofreram profundas adaptações e reestruturações impostas pela pandemia de COVID-19. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o impacto desta pandemia na formação especializada do internato médico de medicina intensiva em Portugal.Material e Métodos: A Associação de Internos de Medicina Intensiva elaborou um questionário usando a ferramenta Google Forms®, e que foi aplicado durante o mês de agosto de 2020 aos internos de formação especializada de medicina intensiva, em Portugal. Com base na informação recolhida realizou-se uma análise descritiva.Resultados: Oitenta e cinco médicos internos responderam ao questionário, perfazendo uma taxa de resposta de 62%. Três quartos dos participantes no estudo contactaram com doentes com COVID-19. Oitenta e seis por cento dos médicos internos inquiridos encontravam-se em estágios, tendo os mesmos sido cancelados em 59% dos casos. Setenta e oito por cento referiram uma carga assistencial superior a 40 horas semanais.Conclusão: A pandemia de COVID-19 teve impacto na formação especializada do internato médico de medicina intensiva em Portugal. A maioria dos internos inquiridos contactaram com doentes com COVID-19, com suspensão dos seus estágios e com prejuízo na remarcação dos mesmos.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Portugal/epidemiology , Critical Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Trauma Surg Acute Care Open ; 7(1): e000898, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779413

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic forced postgraduate interview processes to move to a virtual platform. There are no studies on the opinions of faculty and applicants regarding this format. The aim of this study was to assess the opinions of surgical critical care (SCC) applicants and program directors regarding the virtual versus in-person interview process. Methods: An anonymous survey of the SCC Program Director's Society members and applicants to the 2019 (in-person) and 2020 (virtual) interview cycles was done. Demographic data and Likert scale based responses were collected using Research Electronic Data Capture. Results: Fellowship and program director responses rates were 25% (137/550) and 58% (83/143), respectively. Applicants in the 2020 application cycle attended more interviews. The majority of applicants (57%) and program faculty (67%) strongly liked/liked the virtual interview format but felt an in-person format allows better assessment of the curriculum and culture of the program. Both groups felt that an in-person format allows applicants and faculty to establish rapport better. Only 9% and 16% of SCC program directors wanted a purely virtual or purely in-person interview process, respectively. Applicants were nearly evenly split between preferring a purely in-person versus virtual interviews in the future. Discussion: The virtual interview format allows applicants and program directors to screen a larger number of programs and applications. However, the virtual format is less useful than an in-person interview format for describing unique aspects of a training program and for allowing faculty and applicants to establish rapport. Future strategies using both formats may be optimal, but such an approach requires further study. Level of evidence: Epidemiologic level IV.

20.
Ochsner J ; 22(1): 61-70, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772166

ABSTRACT

Background: Videoconferencing platforms are being used for the purposes of interviewing in academic medicine because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. We present considerations applicable to interviewers and interviewees in the virtual space, with a focus on medical school and residency applicants. Methods: We reviewed the literature regarding the virtual interview process for medical school and residency by searching PubMed using the following keywords and terms: "interview," "academic medicine," "medical school application," "residency application," "virtual interviews," and "videoconferencing." Our search identified 701 results, from which we selected 36 articles for review. Results: The garnered information focuses on strategies for optimizing the virtual interview process from the standpoint of both the interviewer and the interviewee. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the virtual interview process and present recommendations. Conclusion: While the future of the interview process for medical school and residency is uncertain, virtual interviewing is a common and growing practice that will continue to be at least part of the medical interview process for years to come. Interviewers and interviewees should prepare to adapt to the evolving changes in the process.

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