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1.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1562-1576, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101488

ABSTRACT

Research suggests that online learning should be more engaging and collaborative to provide a compatible alternative to in-person learning. Many educators have implemented active learning in their in-person classrooms, while only a few assess how effective similar techniques are in virtual environments. The authors hypothesize that virtual learning, including active learning components, can improve student learning in virtual environments. Furthermore, the authors hypothesize that learning in virtual settings would be affected by students' gender, ability, and familiarity with the topic. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental study involving eighty-seven students from two institutions who participated in an online workshop covering fundamental concepts in construction scheduling. They were split into two groups: one group had no prominent active learning component, while the other was exposed to an active learning component. All participants completed pre and post-workshop surveys to assess their learning of the workshop outcomes and explore the effectiveness of virtual workshops and active learning components in online course delivery. The results of this study suggest that virtual workshops are effective in teaching construction scheduling, while active learning in the form of virtual pair-work does not have a significant positive impact on student learning. Furthermore, student performance in virtual workshops significantly differs based on gender, ability, and familiarity with the topic. Therefore, instructors need to be aware of significant student performance challenges, particularly for males and those with some familiarity with the topics covered in virtual workshops. Since this study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, the authors present further challenges and recommendations for educators and institutions under similar emergency circumstances.

2.
Health Evidence Network synthesis report|76 ; BOOK
Article in English | WHOIRIS | ID: covidwho-2101132

ABSTRACT

This report explores how knowledge translation (KT) and cultural contexts are conceptualized and utilized, with a focus on health policy-making theory and practice. KT takes place within cultural contexts that can powerfully frame what policy problems are and what type of research is accepted by policy-makers. This is illustrated with studies from the COVID-19 pandemic regarding the use of face masks across cultures and of the influence of cultural contexts on KT and evidence-informed decision-making arising from the Black Lives Matter movement. Many Indigenous cultures conceptualize physical health in a holistic manner that encompasses both social and ecological aspects, which are often not considered in the biomedical understanding of health. Effective KT within local cultural contexts requires going beyond general categories (such as Indigenous culture) and assumptions about particular types of culture. Some KT models and frameworks include local context as a factor in translation, identifying community-, culture- and language-focused strategies to improve cultural competency for health-care interventions. Policy considerations are suggested that support the adoption of complex understandings of cultures in knowledge production, communication, translation and use.

3.
Frontiers in Education ; JOUR, 7.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2099125

ABSTRACT

One area of research that has important implications for preventing school failure is concerned with “resilient students,” or those children and youth learners who succeed in school despite the presence of adverse circumstances. However, this concept supposes a reductionist vision of the phenomenon of educational resilience by considering the individual as an object of intervention, as well as assuming deficits and limitations to it: its socioeconomic, cultural and linguistic condition. In contrast, we understand resilience as an available resource that transcends the individual and is integrated within a given territory, region or city. The aim of this paper is therefore to propose the incorporation of a new term in the available literature, namely, “community socio-educational resilience (CSER),” inspired in the term “community resilience.” To this end, the new term is defined, characterized and illustrated from an experience carried out during lockdown due to COVID-19. By “CSER” we mean the engagement of different social, cultural and educational agents in the design and implementation of creative and transformative educational practices that challenge such adversity and uncertain circumstances as those deriving from the COVID-19 pandemic (i.e., home confinement, remote teaching). Five fundamental dimensions of the construct are proposed and suggestions for educational practice are discussed. Copyright © 2022 Iglesias, Esteban-Guitart, Puyaltó and Montserrat.

4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 753, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in South Africa compelled medical schools to switch to a purely online curriculum. The innovative changes transformed the standard clinical skills curriculum to increase learning transfer to bridge the theory-practice gap. The efficacy of this intervention remains unknown. This study aims to measure medical students' clinical competency in the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains by assessing clinical skills knowledge retention and transfer from the online platform compared to face-to-face and blended learning. METHODS: A non-random cross-sectional quasi-experimental study assessed third-year medical students' knowledge retention and learning transfer in three domains of clinical skills competence. Data were obtained using a score sheet during a directly observed formative and a trial online summative assessment. One hundred and one third-year medical students volunteered for the formative onsite assessment that tested the psychomotor domain. Two hundred and thirty-nine students were evaluated on the affective and cognitive domains in the summative online trial mini-objective structured clinical examination (tm-OSCE). The OSCE scores were analysed using descriptive statistics. The significance of the findings was evaluated by comparing OSCE scores with the pre-pandemic 2019 third-year medical students. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found between the two cohorts of medical students from both years (p < 0.05). The 2021 blended group's (n = 101) medians were 90%, 95%CI [86, 92], 82%, 95%CI [80, 85], and 87%, 95% CI [84, 90] for the psychomotor, affective, and cognitive skills, respectively. The e-learning group's affective and cognitive skills medians were 78%, 95%CI [73, 79] and 76%, 95%CI [71, 78], respectively. The 2019 face-to-face cohort (n = 249) achieved medians of 70%, 95% CI [69, 72] and 84%, 95%CI [82, 86] for the affective and psychomotor skills, respectively. CONCLUSION: Medical students demonstrated near and far transfer bridging the theory-practice gap in three clinical skills domains. The blended group performed significantly better than the e-learning and face-to-face groups. Medical schools and educators play a vital role in overcoming learning challenges and achieving higher transfer levels by adopting multiple student-centered teaching delivery approaches and arranging immediate application opportunities. This study offers medical educators suggestions that encourage the transfer of online learning to face-to-face practice, decentralising medical education with a revised blended learning strategy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cognition
5.
Jarq-Japan Agricultural Research Quarterly ; JOUR(4):357-374, 56.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2092623

ABSTRACT

Indica and japonica rice are commonly subjected to different market structures, and the international prices for both subspecies display different trends. The global indica and japonica rice markets in the mid and long term under climate change conditions were projected by the Rice Economy Climate Change (RECC) model. Additionally, endogenous agricultural investments were incorporated into the projections. A COVID-19 pandemic scenario was stimulated to observe its impact on the global indica and japonica rice markets. The results indicated that agricultural investments are expected to decrease in many indica rice-producing countries, whereas the investments will increase in many japonica rice -producing countries in the long term. Therefore, the global indica rice production will decrease due to its investment reduction;however, global japonica rice production will increase in the mid and long term. Due to the COVID-19 scenario, the international indica and japonica rice prices would decrease in 2020 due to the unprecedented shrinking economies worldwide, but the prices would increase from 2021 to 2040 compared with the baseline average of the price projections with the RECC model. The scenario simulation results reveal that the japonica rice markets are projected to have less impact than the indica rice markets from the COVID-19 pandemic.

6.
Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience ; CHAP: 107-122,
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087963

ABSTRACT

This chapter discusses the opportunities and challenges for academics engaging with civic engagement initiatives within higher education settings. Situating civic engagement as part of the current academic portfolio and broader demands of the university context, it explores the dynamics involved in these activities by drawing on the case of one rapid response initiative involving students and staff working on the design and delivery of an intergenerational digital mentoring project. In reflecting on four questions that emerged during the initiative, it considers the practicalities of negotiating civic engagement within the context of the university and academic careers more broadly. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(11): e42431, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Until COVID-19, implementation and uptake of video consultations in health care was slow. However, the pandemic created a "burning platform" for scaling up such services. As health care organizations look to expand and maintain the use of video in the "new normal," it is important to understand infrastructural influences and changes that emerged during the pandemic and that may influence sustainability going forward. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to draw lessons from 4 National Health Service (NHS) organizations on how information infrastructures shaped, and were shaped by, the rapid scale-up of video consultations during COVID-19. METHODS: A mixed methods case study of 4 NHS trusts in England was conducted before and during the pandemic. Data comprised 90 interviews with 49 participants (eg, clinicians, managers, administrators, and IT support), ethnographic field notes, and video consultation activity data. We sought examples of infrastructural features and challenges related to the rapid scale-up of video. Analysis was guided by Gkeredakis et al's 3 perspectives on crisis and digital change: as opportunity (for accelerated innovation and removal of barriers to experimentation), disruption (to organizational practices, generating new dependencies and risks), and exposure (of vulnerabilities in both people and infrastructure). RESULTS: Before COVID-19, there was a strong policy push for video consultations as a way of delivering health care efficiently. However, the spread of video was slow, and adopting clinicians described their use as ad hoc rather than business as usual. When the pandemic hit, video was rapidly scaled up. The most rapid increase in use was during the first month of the pandemic (March-April 2020), from an average of 8 video consultations per week to 171 per week at each site. Uptake continued to increase during the pandemic, averaging approximately 800 video consultations per week by March 2021. From an opportunity perspective, participants talked about changes to institutional elements of infrastructure, which had historically restricted the introduction and use of video. This was supported by an "organizing vision" for video, bringing legitimacy and support. Perspectives on disruption centered on changes to social, technical, and material work environments and the emergence of new patterns of action. Retaining positive elements of such change required a judicious balance between managerial (top-down) and emergent (bottom-up) approaches. Perspectives on exposure foregrounded social and technical impediments to video consulting. This highlighted the need to attend to the materiality and dependability of the installed base, as well as the social and cultural context of use. CONCLUSIONS: For sustained adoption at scale, health care organizations need to enable incremental systemic change and flexibility through agile governance and knowledge transfer pathways, support process multiplicity within virtual clinic workflows, attend to the materiality and dependability of the IT infrastructure within and beyond organizational boundaries, and maintain an overall narrative within which the continued use of video can be framed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , State Medicine , Pandemics , Videoconferencing , Telemedicine/methods
8.
JMIR Nurs ; 5(1): e39866, 2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Digital health literacy is the use of information and communication technology to support health and health care. Digital health literacy is becoming increasingly important as individuals continue to seek medical advice from various web-based sources, especially social media, during the pandemics such as COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to assess health professionals' digital health literacy level and associated factors in Southwest Ethiopia in 2021. METHODS: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from January to April 2021 in Ethiopia. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 423 study participants among health professionals. SPSS (version 20) software was used for data entry and analysis. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the required data. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between the digital health literacy skill and associated factors. Significance value was obtained at 95% CI and P<.05. RESULTS: In total, 401 study subjects participated in the study. Overall, 43.6% (n=176) of respondents had high digital health literacy skills. High computer literacy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.43, 95% CI 2.34-5.67; P=.01); master's degree and above (AOR 3.42, 95% CI 2.31-4.90; P=.02); internet use (AOR 4.00, 95% CI 1.78-4.02; P=.03); perceived ease of use (AOR 2.65, 95% CI 1.35-4.65; P=.04); monthly income of >15,000 Ethiopian birr (>US $283.68; AOR 7.55, 95% CI 6.43-9.44; P<.001); good knowledge of eHealth (AOR 2.22, 95% CI 1.32-4.03; P=.04); favorable attitudes (AOR 3.11, 95% CI 2.11-4.32; P=.04); and perceived usefulness (AOR 3.43, 95% CI 2.43-5.44; P=.02) were variables associated with eHealth literacy level. CONCLUSIONS: In general, less than half of the study participants had a high digital health literacy level. High computer literacy, master's degree and above, frequent internet use, perceived ease to use, income of >15,000 Ethiopian birr (>US $283.68), good knowledge of digital health literacy, favorable attitude, and perceived usefulness were the most determinant factors in the study. Having high computer literacy, frequent use of internet, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, favorable attitude, and a high level of education will help to promote a high level of digital health literacy.

9.
Bull Natl Res Cent ; 46(1): 260, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089257

ABSTRACT

Backgrounds: Vaccine acceptance varies across countries, generations, and the perceived personality of individuals. Investigating the knowledge, beliefs, and acceptability of COVID-19 vaccines among individuals is vital to ensuring adequate health system capacity and procedures and promoting the uptake of the vaccines. Results: A cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2021 to January 2022 in Saudi Arabia. The study included 281 residents to estimate their acceptance to receive COVID-19 vaccination. Around 70% of the included participants had a moderate to high COVID-19 vaccine acceptance rate during the data collection period. The risk increases to about two folds among undergraduates [OR 1.846 (1.034-3.296), p value = 0.036)] and increases to four folds among non-employed [OR 3.944 (2.310-6.737), p value = 0.001]. About 78% of participants with high and 44% with low COVID-19 vaccine acceptance (p value = 0.001) believed the vaccines were safe and effective. The belief that COVID-19 disease will be controlled within two years increased the risk for low vaccine acceptance by about two folds [OR 1.730 (1.035-2.891), p value = 0.035]. Good knowledge about COVID-19 vaccination significantly affected the acceptance rate (p value = 0.001). Conclusions: Several factors affect the intention of individuals to receive vaccines. Therefore, building good knowledge and health literacy through educational intervention programs, especially vaccine safety and effectiveness, is important for successful vaccination campaigns among the general population and ensuring control of the COVID-19 pandemic.

10.
Int J Equity Health ; 21(1): 150, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089204

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 constitutes a global health emergency of unprecedented proportions. Preventive measures, however, have run up against certain difficulties in low and middle-income countries. This is the case in socially and geographically marginalized communities, which are excluded from information about preventive measures. This study contains a dual objective, i) to assess knowledge of COVID-19 and the preventive measures associated with it concerning indigents in the villages of Diebougou's district in Burkina Faso. The aim is to understand if determinants of this understanding exist, and ii) to describe how their pathways to healthcare changed from 2019 to 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study was conducted in the Diebougou healthcare district, in the south-west region of Burkina Faso. We relied on a cross-sectional design and used data from the fourth round of a panel survey conducted among a sample of ultra-poor people that had been monitored since 2015. Data were collected in August 2020 and included a total of 259 ultra-poor people. A multivariate logistic regression to determine the factors associated with the respondents' knowledge of COVID-19 was used. RESULTS: Half of indigents in the district said they had heard about COVID-19. Only 29% knew what the symptoms of the disease were. The majority claimed that they protected themselves from the virus by using preventive measures. This level of knowledge of the disease can be observed with no differences between the villages. Half of the indigents who expressed themselves agreed with government measures except for the closure of markets. An increase of over 11% can be seen in indigents without the opportunity for getting healthcare compared with before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This research indicates that COVID-19 is partially known and that prevention measures are not universally understood. The study contributes to reducing the fragmentation of knowledge, in particular on vulnerable and marginalized populations. Results should be useful for future interventions for the control of epidemics that aim to leave no one behind.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Cross-Sectional Studies , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Poverty
11.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 357, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is associated with increased risk for severe COVID-19. Few studies have examined knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) related to pregnancy during the pandemic. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic characteristics and KAP related to COVID-19 among pregnant women in an urban community in Thailand. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was distributed among pregnant women in Bangkok, Thailand from July-August 2021. Binary logistic regression was conducted to test the association between socio-demographic characteristics and KAP related to COVID-19, and a Spearman's analysis tested correlations between KAP scores. RESULTS: A total of 150 pregnancy survey responses were received. Most participants were third trimester (27-40 weeks gestation; 68.0%). Pregnancy had never been risked contracting COVID-19 (84.7%). Most expressed concerns about being infected with COVID-19 during pregnancy and following birth (94.0 and 70.0%, respectively). The results of binary logistic regression analysis found associations between knowledge and marital status (OR = 4.983, 95%CI 1.894-13.107). In addition, having a bachelor's degree or higher was associated with higher attitude scores (OR = 2.733, 95%CI 1.045-7.149), as was being aged 26-30 (OR = 2.413 95%CI 0.882-6.602) and 31-35 years of age (OR = 2.518-2.664, 95%CI 0.841-8.442). Higher practice scores were associated with having a bachelor's degree or higher (OR = 2.285 95%CI 1.110-6.146), and income ≥15,001 bath (OR = 4.747 95%CI 1.588-14.192). Correlation analysis found a weak positive correlation between knowledge and practice scores (r = 0.210, p-value = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Participants overall had high KAP scores. This study can guide public health strategies regarding pregnant women and COVID-19. We recommend that interventions to improve and attitude and practice scores. Knowledge on pregnancy and COVID-19 should focus on reducing fear and improving attitudes toward the care of patients as well as the promotion of preventive practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parturition , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand/epidemiology
12.
Int J Dent Hyg ; 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088218

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare workers involved in procedures that generate aerosol or handling patient specimens are associated with a high possibility of COVID-19 infection. Thus, it is very important for the health workers to understand the knowledge related to transmission, prevention and protocols of COVID-19. METHODS: Cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted on dental hygiene students in Saudi Arabia. An online version of pre-tested and validated questionnaire was used to test the KAP for COVID 19. RESULTS: The mean score for knowledge-related questions was found to be 2.91 ± 1.59, attitude-related questions to be 2.84 ± 1.41 and for practice-related questions to be 4.20 ± 1.36. After converting the scores into percentages, any score <60% was categorized as poor score, 60%-80% as average score and >80% as good score. Students showed poor knowledge and attitude towards COVID-19. But the practice of dental hygiene students towards COVID-19 was found to be good with the score of 83.4%. CONCLUSION: The outcome of this cross-sectional study shows that most of dental hygiene students studying in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are following good practices towards COVID-19 inspite of having poor knowledge and attitude.

13.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2124782, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087650

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid development and implementation of vaccines. However, uncertainty about their safety and effectiveness among some people has led to vaccine hesitancy. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in March 2021 among individuals from the general Israeli population and health-care workers (HCWs) to examine risk perception toward the COVID-19 vaccine, trust in health-care providers and information sources used for making health-related decisions. The study population included 739 respondents: 42.6% HCWs and 57.4% members of the public. Participants' perceived risk toward the vaccine was relatively low in both populations. Higher perceived benefit of the vaccine, higher perceived extent of knowledge that doctors have about the risk associated with the vaccine, higher perceived freedom to choose whether to get vaccinated and higher trust in health-care providers predicted lower perceived risk toward the vaccine. Individuals who showed greater health responsibility, those who usually get vaccinated against influenza and those who had greater objective knowledge on the COVID-19 vaccine demonstrated lower perceived risk. No statistically significant difference in trust level was found between HCWs and members of the public. Both populations regarded information from medical sources as their greatest influence on health-related decisions. The study points to the factors influencing the perceived risk toward the COVID-19 vaccine and emphasizes the unique status of HCWs having their own views and concerns about the vaccine as individual members. Policymakers should consider these factors when planning national vaccination campaigns.

14.
J Theor Biol ; 557: 111332, 2022 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086501

ABSTRACT

In March 2020 mathematics became a key part of the scientific advice to the UK government on the pandemic response to COVID-19. Mathematical and statistical modelling provided critical information on the spread of the virus and the potential impact of different interventions. The unprecedented scale of the challenge led the epidemiological modelling community in the UK to be pushed to its limits. At the same time, mathematical modellers across the country were keen to use their knowledge and skills to support the COVID-19 modelling effort. However, this sudden great interest in epidemiological modelling needed to be coordinated to provide much-needed support, and to limit the burden on epidemiological modellers already very stretched for time. In this paper we describe three initiatives set up in the UK in spring 2020 to coordinate the mathematical sciences research community in supporting mathematical modelling of COVID-19. Each initiative had different primary aims and worked to maximise synergies between the various projects. We reflect on the lessons learnt, highlighting the key roles of pre-existing research collaborations and focal centres of coordination in contributing to the success of these initiatives. We conclude with recommendations about important ways in which the scientific research community could be better prepared for future pandemics. This manuscript was submitted as part of a theme issue on "Modelling COVID-19 and Preparedness for Future Pandemics".

15.
Int Rev Educ ; 68(4): 539-549, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085506

ABSTRACT

What does the analysis of school support practices during lockdown in France tell us about the fabrication of educational inequalities? The question of parental monitoring of schoolwork has long been absent from French sociology of education. Based on French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu's concept of cultural assimilation, the traditional assumption was that family socialisation operates in an "osmotic" way and that studying parents' concrete, voluntary and explicit practices to support their children's schoolwork would not yield much new information. This research note takes the opposite view and demonstrates, on the basis of a survey using a questionnaire (n = 31,764) supplemented by a series of interviews (n = 18) conducted in France during the spring 2020 lockdown, that there are strong differences depending on social background. The early results of this survey suggest in particular that limiting explanations for social inequalities in homeschooling to a digital divide is too simple. The pedagogical dimensions of social inequalities in children's educational achievements must also be taken into account. The author introduces French theories about the "relationship to knowledge" (les théories du rapport au savoir) as a suitable theoretical approach to investigating this dimension.


Les inégalités scolaires en France : Une enquête sur les pratiques parentales lors du première confinement de COVID-19 ­ Qu'est-ce que l'analyse des pratiques de soutien scolaire pendant le confinement en France nous apprend sur la manière dont se constituent les inégalités scolaires ? La question du suivi parental du travail scolaire a longtemps été absente de la sociologie française de l'éducation. S'appuyant sur le concept de capital culturel de Bourdieu, l'hypothèse traditionnelle peut être résumée ainsi : la socialisation familiale fonctionne de manière « osmotique ¼ et, par conséquent, l'étude des pratiques concrètes, volontaires et explicites des parents pour soutenir le travail scolaire de leurs enfants n'est pas d'une grand utilité. Cette note de recherche prend le contre-pied de ce postulat et démontre, sur la base d'une enquête par questionnaire (n = 31.764) complétée par une série d'entretiens (n = 18) menée en France pendant le confinement du printemps 2020, qu'il existe de fortes différences selon le milieu social. Les premiers résultats de cette enquête suggèrent notamment qu'il n'est pas possible de réduire les explications des inégalités sociales en matière de d'école à la maison à l'existence d'une « fracture numérique. La dimension pédagogique des inégalités sociales dans les résultats scolaires des enfants doit également être prise en compte. L'auteur présente les théories françaises du rapport au savoir comme une approche théorique adéquate pour étudier cette dimension.

16.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2083802

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to measure the correlation between knowledge of viral disease and disease risk perception, disease severity perception, and mask wearing during the COVID-19 pandemic by level of education, age, and gender at a community college in Phoenix, Arizona. Participants were recruited by an email sent to all students, faculty, and staff at PVCC using an all-college email distribution list. Disease risk and severity perception were assessed with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire 5, which was modified to include questions measuring participant age, education level, and whether they had ever taken a college biology course. Two additional question sets measured compliance of willingness to wear a face mask. Analysis showed a significant relationship between gender and mask wearing behavior and between knowledge of viral disease in combination with education level and the combined variables of disease risk perception, disease severity perception, and mask wearing behavior. No significant difference from having taken a biology course was found in risk perception, disease severity perception, and mask wearing behavior by age. The results suggest that formal higher education that includes a knowledge of viral disease influences how individuals perceive the severity and risk of COVID-19 and modify their mask wearing behavior accordingly. Gender influences people's willingness to wear a mask, even though it has no effect of risk perception or severity perception. The results can be used to modify existing health education strategies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

17.
2022 17th Iberian Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (Cisti) ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083498

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the research was to establish the influence of the factors in knowledge management in the acceptance of M-learning in university students in times of covid-19. The study consisted of two stages;the first was an exploratory factor analysis, which allowed the instrument to be validated and homologated. The second stage consisted of carrying out a confirmatory analysis by validating a structural model based on variances called modelling of structural equations of partial minimum squares PLS-SEM, whose results determined that the most influential factors in the application of knowledge are perceived ease of use, knowledge sharing, and perceived utility of the model (TAM);not like this, the intention of behavioural use, that does not influence the application of knowledge. This hypothesis would not be tested regarding the level of influence that the application of knowledge would have on the actual use of the system. The research was carried out with 150 students from a private university in Peru.

18.
2021 Ieee 9th International Conference on Healthcare Informatics (Ichi 2021) ; JOUR: 265-269,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082704

ABSTRACT

During the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, subreddits on Reddit, such as r/Coronavirus saw a rapid growth in user's requests for help (support seekers - SSs) including individuals with varying professions and experiences with diverse perspectives on care (support providers - SPs). Currently, knowledgeable human moderators match an SS with a user with relevant experience, i.e, an SP on these subreddits. This unscalable process defers timely care. We present a medical knowledge-infused approach to efficient matching of SS and SPs validated by experts for the users affected by anxiety and depression, in the context of with COVID-19. After matching, each SP to an SS labeled as either supportive, informative, or similar (sharing experiences) using the principles of natural language inference. Evaluation by 21 domain experts indicates the efficacy of incorporated knowledge and shows the efficacy the matching system.

19.
Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal ; JOUR(21):153-164, 7.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082450

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Child hunger commonly occurs in families with household food insecurity when mothers fail to continue breastfeeding due to stress and inability to produce sufficient breastmilk. This study aimed to investigate the association of breastfeeding knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) with food insecurity during the pandemic of COVID-19. Method: An online self-administered questionnaire related to the study was used to obtain data from 444 Malaysian Result: Findings showed that majority of the mothers have moderate to good knowledge, attitude and practices in breastfeeding. However, food insecurity and child hunger still occur. Conclusion: These findings may be helpful for healthcare professionals in developing effective strategies for continuation of breastfeeding during the pandemic.

20.
Elect Stud ; 80: 102548, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082889

ABSTRACT

Given the deep polarization of the American political system in recent decades, was the 2020 presidential election an extension of the pre-existing partisan coalitions or did the Covid-19 pandemic and its economic consequences have a significant impact on the outcome? Using a national probability sample provided by AmeriSpeak and voter verification provided by Catalist, we construct a structural equation model to examine the relative influence of age, race, gender, education, religious fundamentalism, ideological partisanship, affective partisanship, and measures of Covid-19 experiences and understanding to predict the 2020 vote. We re-construct the partisan polarization landscape to examine the role of politically interested non-partisans in the center of the ideological spectrum and examine their ability to select candidates in response of specific issues. The Covid-19 pandemic had a significant marginal impact on the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.

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