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1.
The New England Journal of Medicine ; 387(4):289-292, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1960589

ABSTRACT

The History of Health Law in the United StatesHealth law shapes the landscape of health care delivery in powerful ways. The history of health law can be broken into four eras, each with its own prevailing ethos.

2.
The International and Comparative Law Quarterly ; 71(3):743-760, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1960173

ABSTRACT

Under the International Health Regulations (IHR), States must consider decision-making criteria in applying travel restrictions during a public health emergency of international concern. Interpretation on the legal parameters of such restrictions varies widely. This article considers whether and how the permissibility of travel restrictions under the IHR may have changed given recent developments, including evolving scientific evidence about their efficacy and shifting World Health Organization (WHO) advice. It is argued that such determinations must conform to the principles of necessity and proportionality as articulated by the IHR, and must also be accompanied by the correlative IHR duties of collaboration and assistance rooted substantively in global solidarity.

3.
The International and Comparative Law Quarterly ; 71(3):761-763, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1960172

ABSTRACT

[...]data retention can seriously interfere with privacy and rights of data protection, engaging the delicate balance between rights and freedoms, on the one hand, and security, on the other, which in turn impacts the very foundations of democracy. [...]data retention—and surveillance in general—engages a third ‘actor’ in the rights–security relationship, this being technology. After setting out the domestic legislation implementing the 2006 EU data retention directive in each State, the authors consider whether such national measures had already been the subject of any constitutional or supreme court decisions before the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled the data retention directive invalid in 2014. [...]there is no doubt that this book provides a valuable overview of the evolution of European surveillance law (and related case law) in the first two decades after the 9/11 attacks.

4.
The International and Comparative Law Quarterly ; 71(3):531-562, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1960168

ABSTRACT

Article 16 of the Ireland–Northern Ireland Protocol annexed to the EU–UK Withdrawal Agreement is an escape clause which allows the parties to deviate from their obligations under certain conditions. This article maps out the main features of the safeguards provision in the Protocol in light of international trade law and international relations literature on treaty design. It provides a detailed examination of the safeguards provision in the Protocol and highlights the key design flaws associated with this regime as well as some potential solutions to such flaws.

5.
J Law Med Ethics ; 50(2): 385-389, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1960157

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 Law Lab platform enables quantitative representation of epidemic law and policies in a given country for multiple years, enabling governments and researchers to compare countries, and learn about the impacts and drivers of policy choices. The Law Lab initiative is designed to address the urgent need for quality legal information to support the study of how law and policy can be used to effectively manage this, and future, pandemic(s).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Global Health ; 18(1): 73, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962857

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and the subsequent COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant global impact. However, COVID-19 is just one of several high-impact infectious diseases that emerged from wildlife and are linked to the human relationship with nature. The rate of emergence of new zoonoses (diseases of animal origin) is increasing, driven by human-induced environmental changes that threaten biodiversity on a global scale. This increase is directly linked to environmental drivers including biodiversity loss, climate change and unsustainable resource extraction. Australia is a biodiversity hotspot and is subject to sustained and significant environmental change, increasing the risk of it being a location for pandemic origin. Moreover, the global integration of markets means that consumption trends in Australia contributes to the risk of disease spill-over in our regional neighbours in Asia-Pacific, and beyond. Despite the clear causal link between anthropogenic pressures on the environment and increasing pandemic risks, Australia's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, like most of the world, has centred largely on public health strategies, with a clear focus on reactive management. Yet, the span of expertise and evidence relevant to the governance of pandemic risk management is much wider than public health and epidemiology. It involves animal/wildlife health, biosecurity, conservation sciences, social sciences, behavioural psychology, law, policy and economic analyses to name just a few.The authors are a team of multidisciplinary practitioners and researchers who have worked together to analyse, synthesise, and harmonise the links between pandemic risk management approaches and issues in different disciplines to provide a holistic overview of current practice, and conclude the need for reform in Australia. We discuss the adoption of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary 'One Health' approach to pandemic risk management in Australia. A key goal of the One Health approach is to be proactive in countering threats of emerging infectious diseases and zoonoses through a recognition of the interdependence between human, animal, and environmental health. Developing ways to implement a One Health approach to pandemic prevention would not only reduce the risk of future pandemics emerging in or entering Australia, but also provide a model for prevention strategies around the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Animals , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2 , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/prevention & control
7.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(8):1110-1114, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958495

ABSTRACT

GOVERNMENT PATENT USE One way to facilitate public access to high-cost medications is through government patent use.1 Given sovereign immunity-a legal doctrine immunizing the government from being sued without its consent-the federal government and its agents, such as generic drug manufacturers, have the ability to make or use patented inventions without the permission of the patent holder;in other words, protected by sovereign immunity, the federal government could use inventors' US patents without legal consequence (US patent rights do not apply overseas). [...]nonpatent exclusivities generally prohibit the approval of competing products only if they rely on data generated by another manufacturer. [...]the government or any third party could submit full new drug applications with original data.1,2 This strategy would not be able to circumvent Orphan Drug Act exclusivity for rare disease drugs because that act blocks the FDA from approving the "same drug" for the same disease or condition if it is a generic;however, because full trials would be needed, it might be feasible to pursue approval of a chemically distinct but therapeutically identical drug. [...]many agency actions are judicially reviewable under the Administrative Procedure Act (1946, Pub L No. 79-404)-a statute that waives the federal government's sovereign immunity. Fourth, Congress could amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (1938, Pub L No. 75-717) and the Public Health Service Act (1944, Pub L No. 78-410) to carve out exceptions to existing nonpatent exclusivities for government use.1,8 Although an exception exists for biologics the Public Health Service prepares when the biologic is unavailable from the license holder,9 this kind of authority could be expanded in terms of both to whom and to what it applies as well as under what conditions.

8.
The Judges' Journal ; 61(3):32-36, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958457

ABSTRACT

INNOVATIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR JUDGES The Massachusetts Trial Court's judicial mentoring program is called J2J, for judge-to-judge. Later, when we resumed jury trials, I held Zoom meetings for my new judge mentees to prepare them to manage the heavy caseload and provided a forum for nuanced analysis and discussion of complex jury management issues to compensate for their lack of traditional courtroom experience due to the pandemic. - New judge mentee History of the J2J Program The J2J Program began in 2009 when the Massachusetts Trial Court sought a formal and structured means of professional development for judges identified as struggling in a particular area. Working with an outside consultant5 and the director of judicial education in the Trial Court's Judicial Institute,6 a core group of judges initiated and developed an innovative program of peer mentor-coaching support for judges likely to benefit from focused, collaborative work with a trained colleague.7 While mentor-coach/mentee work proved beneficial to the judges involved in this context, the resource was not widely publicized or sought after, and it was considered remedial and rather stigmatizing in nature.

9.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(8):1100-1103, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958401

ABSTRACT

The salience of the study has grown as the proportion of Americans who use medications to end their pregnancies has increased and as state-level legal barriers to abortion access have proliferated, with outright bans expected within months.3 The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has also increased demand for at-home medication abortion because of concerns about the risk of contracting COVID-19 in a clinic or in transit;this has added to long-standing barriers to access for clinic-based abortion care, including long distances to the nearest clinic, arranging care for dependents, and more.4 Aiken et al. note the effect of abortion restrictions on increasing demand for at-home medication abortion and offer a preview into the future of abortion seeking for the growing number of Americans who will be legally unable to obtain abortion in a clinical setting. Questions remain about the challenging legal issues that will arise with actions that cross borders of states with differing laws.3 Self-managed abortion may place the person having the abortion or people who help them at risk for criminal and civil penalties8;indeed, people who self-managed their abortion and individuals who helped them have been arrested and prosecuted in the United States.9 The laws of some states specifically criminalize self-managed abortion, whereas laws unrelated to abortion (e.g., fetal harm laws, homicide laws) may also be used to prosecute people who self-manage.9 The distinction between self-managed abortion and telemedicine is also pertinent to the study of the safety and effectiveness of telemedicine abortion, which is well-established as on par with clinic-based medication abortion.4,10 Research on self-managed medication abortion has similarly found levels of effectiveness and safety comparable to clinical care.6,11 Because of the ambiguous legality and decentralized nature of self-managed abortion, however, research on this experience faces unique challenges, such as difficulty identifying a representative sample of people who self-manage and difficulty gaining their trust in the face of privacy and legal concerns-challenges that are less likely when researching telemedicine abortion.12 The model that Aiken et al. studied is somewhat of a hybrid, with the recordkeeping end more closely mirroring telemedicine models and the experience of the person seeking abortion more closely mirroring that ofselfmanaged models. Ten states have six-week bans, and two have enacted total abortion bans.13 Viewing the study results of Aiken et al. through the lens of the future abortion landscape in the United States would predict an increase in demand for out-of-clinic abortion, as state law becomes more restrictive with the weakening of federal constitutional protections. [...]the development of causal models for the operation of laws can set the stage for accurately measuring the relationship between policy and demand for and incidence of self-managed abortion among specific populations.15 NEW RESEARCH The study authors appropriately noted the growing evidence of the safety and efficacy of self-managed medication abortion through online telemedicine and highlighted that the primary risk associated with self-managed abortion may be legal risk. Since the study was published, new research has further established the high levels of safety and effectiveness of self-managed medication abortion across a range of out-of-clinic models-ranging from 94% to 100% abortion completion without surgical intervention.11,16 One recent study in particular-the SAFE (Studying Accompaniment model Feasibility and Effectiveness) study- evaluated the safety and effectiveness of self-managed medication abortion with support from accompaniment groups, whereby non-clinically trained counselors provide information and support over the telephone as needed to people self-managing their abortions.11 The SAFE study further established the effectiveness and safety of self-managed medication abortion and, importantly, concluded that effectiveness in the self-managed setting is not inferior to the clinical setting.

10.
Webology ; 19(2):3047-3056, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958311

ABSTRACT

Indonesian traffic laws have been around for a long time. Regulations on how people can carry out their traffic on Indonesian roads. It's a shame that people are still violating these regulations. There are still many community members who do not commit violations such as exceeding the speed limit, exceeding the capacity, and even racing. So here is the importance of the role of the police as law enforcers. The method used in this study is a normative juridical method which takes the applicable law as the main data and other data as supporting data. The results of this study found that the police in fulfilling their role in enforcing the law can take preventive action, namely preventing violations of the law. The police also have the right to take repressive measures, namely actions against lawbreakers in an effort to make them not want to break the law again.

11.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(8):1123-1125, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958265

ABSTRACT

The California Prison Industry Authority (CALPIA), a semiautonomous prison labor agency under the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, runs two optical laboratories operated by people incarcerated at Valley State Prison and California State Prison, Solano,1 and these laboratories supply ophthalmic lenses to eligible Medicaid recipients, such as this young patient. Documents we obtained through a public records request revealed that our state's public health agency, the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS), agreed to pay CALPIA up to $37.9 million for the 2021/22 fiscal year for optical services alone. CALPIA wages in prison-based optical shops range between $0.35 and $1.00 per hour,6 up to 55% of which can be deducted by law for restitution and administrative costs, resulting in an effective pay rate as low as $0.16 per hour.7 Courts have routinely rejected legal challenges to these meager wages by concluding that, because the Thirteen Amendment permits the involuntary servitude of incarcerated people, the federal minimum wage law does not apply to prison labor.8 The result is a strange supply chain that is not always transparent or top of mind: medical devices produced by poorly paid imprisoned people are provided to the poorest members of free society, such as the infant who needed sight-saving glasses. Others have called for public health officials, researchers, and physicians to address the sprawling reach of the prison industrial complex.14 Medical providers could use their position of authority to advocate better pay and conditions for incarcerated workers who produce the very devices that providers prescribe.

12.
Cyprus Review ; 33(1):167-197, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1958076

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 proffered the opportunity to promote intergroup solidarity and enhance coexistence in the dichotomised island of Cyprus. Nevertheless, devices put in place as drastic preventive measures not only incited internal and external reactions, but also resulted in further distancing the two communities. Preventive policies and mecha-nisms implemented during the pandemic were introduced in the form of exceptional orders’ which prioritised the protection of public health;thus, they remained in an external relationship to normative constitutional law. In an attempt to cope with the COVID-19 state, emergency measures that generated ambiguities within the exercising powers, since different parts of the Cypriot Consti-tution delimit the role of each government branch, were determined. Ergo, constitutional-compliance questions emerged as per the laws applied and interpreted in the aftermath of the emergency promulgation, examining whether rights under human rights law remained aligned with the rule of law and whether these means were up-held in the context of the pandemic. © 2021, University of Nicosia. All rights reserved.

13.
Webology ; 19(2):2332-2340, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958044

ABSTRACT

The main problem in this research is the use of discretion in managing the regional government budgets for handling the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. Material and method data related to discretionary budget management for handling the COVID-19 pandemic were obtained from secondary sources, namely laws and regulations, while the primary data were from the field, including the Jakarta Provincial Government. This research used the juridical normative analytical method. The Result of this research indicated during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law Number 30 of 2014 did not accommodate discretionary actions in budget management. The Conclusion of the research is eliminating the requirement of supervisor approval for budget discretion made by regional heads is the right concept for handling the COVID-19 pandemic.

14.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(8):1115-1119, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1957939

ABSTRACT

Sadly, Celina's experience at the US border is not uncommon, although her ultimate admission to the United States is rare indeed. Because ofthe confluence of MPP and the 2020 invocation of 42 US Code 265 (hereafter "Title 42"), an obscure public health policy last updated in 1944, more than a million expulsions of migrants and asylum seekers occurred at the US border in fiscal year 2021 alone, contrary to international law.1 POLICY BACKGROUND The policy known today as Title 42 originated in a 1944 law called the Public Health Service Act, which (among other things) granted the federal government quarantine powers and the power to prevent the introduction of disease at the border. Robert Redfield, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), determined that introduction into congregate settings of persons from Canada or Mexico would increase the already serious danger to the public health of the United States to the point of requiring a temporary suspension of the introduction of covered aliens into the United States.3 The same order also noted the logistical challenges of preventing the transmission ofCOVID-19 at the border: Widespread, compulsory federal quarantines or isolations of such persons pending test results are impracticable due to the numbers of persons involved, logistical challenges, and CDC resource and personnel constraints.3 Although the US government did not have access to vaccines or rapid tests in March 2020, they need not have adopted such an extreme policy to protect the public's health. Given the barriers to effective implementation of PPE [personal protective equipment] and administrative controls to prevent the spread of [COVID-19] in immigration detention centers, an evidence-based public health approach suggests . . . the release of detainees from immigration detention centers, as this strategy will reduce the likelihood of person-to-person infection and enhance the possibility of engaging in meaningful social distancing and hygienic practices as directed by the CDC.4(p112) That the US government invoked Title 42 for those coming through land borders but instituted only temporary travel bans for other international travelers and did not institute interstate travel bans underscores how unnecessary these extreme measures truly were, even in the early days of COVID-19.5 In addition to the challenges posed by the use of Title 42 to prevent the entry of asylum seekers during COVID-19, MPP-often referred to as the Remain in Mexico program- creates additional barriers for migrants seeking to enter the United States.

15.
The Judges' Journal ; 61(3):37-39, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1957919

ABSTRACT

In 2021, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission received over 5.7 million reports of fraud, identity theft, and other consumer protection issues, accounting for $5.9 billion in fraud losses.3 Of people ages 20-29 reporting fraud to the FTC, 41 percent lost money to the schemes perpetrated, compared to only 18 percent of those in the 70-79 age range reporting fraud.4 The most common types of fraud and their median losses vary by age group. The top categories for fraud losses for the 20-29-year-old category are $2,000 for fake check scams, $1,821 for job scams, and $1,000 for government imposter scams.5 For the 80 and over age group, the highest median losses are $7,650 for romance scams;$6,000 for prizes, sweepstakes, and lottery scams;and $4,975 for family and friend imposter scams.6 Scammers Understand Their Potential Targets There is little doubt that scammers target the unsuspecting, but be advised that scammers also target professionals, businesspeople, and other "sophisticated" groups. According to a psychology professor who has studied scams, scammers are amateur psychologists.7 They understand that people respond to social influences and authority figures. Once the therapist provided the fake deputy sheriff with the Visa card numbers and the PINs, the final step of the scam involved his advising the therapist that she should put the cards in an envelope with his name and badge number and deposit the envelope in a special mailbox (which was a regular, public

16.
Webology ; 19(2):8900-8911, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1957854

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the Covid-19 virus, which is spreading very quickly in various parts of the world, has a bad impact on several different sectors that can harm the country if the country does not take quick and right decisions. This encourages governments of countries in the world to create new regulations so that they are able to ensure the safety of their citizens and also sectors affected by the Covid-19 pandemic can recover. Policy issuance is certainly closely related to constitutional law and laws. Constitutional law is a regulation of the required state institutions and their authorities, internal relations between state institutions, and the relationship between state institutions and citizens. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of constitutional law in handling cases of Covid-19 that hit Indonesia and its implementation. The method used in this study is the literature review method or literature review which searches the literature for research purposes. The results of this study indicate that the role of constitutional law in handling Covid-19 cases in Indonesia can be seen through the making of simple laws and regulations rather than having to change the legal status of the national constitution . . The application of constitutional law in handling Covid-19 cases in Indonesia can be observed from existing policies, namely through the issuance of simple laws such as PP, Presidential Decree, and others.

17.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-341517

ABSTRACT

This report covers the development of online legal education in the Macao Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People’s Republic of China in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. It describes the overall features of the higher education institutions before it studies the example of the University of Macau, Macao’s only comprehensive public university. Against the backdrop of the overall macroeconomic impact of the pandemic on the Macao economy, the report shows what steps had been undertaken before the outbreak of the pandemic and how these had helped to provide exclusively online or hybrid classes during the pandemic. Based on these findings it concludes with some general remarks about the impact of online legal education against the overall trend of a changing legal profession in the future.

18.
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology ; 78:S93-S94, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955951

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The empowerment of patients is considered to be one of the cornerstones of modern days rational pharmacotherapy. In Slovakia (SR), the continued, concerted professional and lay activities to this effect started about two decades ago, with strong involvement of the discipline of clinical pharmacology (CP). Objectives: To report on developments and unique experiences gained in fostering patients' empowerment in SR, a country having undergone considerable economic, political, and health care transitions ever since the 1990ies. Methods: Developing a practice-oriented analysis and subsequent synthesis of lessons learned, based upon the insiders' factual and conceptual information and knowledge of the country's developments and their driving, and slowing down forces and factors, as seen in the pertinent international contexts. Results: The developments leading to ever more pronounced and practical empowerment of patients in Slovakia were much enhanced, and even politically supported, after the launching of unprecedented multifaceted transitions following the Velvet Revolution in 1989. Setting up independent patients' organizations, their coming together forming the alliances and, later on, establishing common associations (such as Association for the Protection of Patients' Rights in SR (AOPP;see www.aopp.sk)) aimed at fostering patients' rights (that felt under some pressures from the deep transitional changes occurring within the health care system), were paralleled by growing academic and political interest (e. g., national Patients' Rights Charter approved by the SR Government in 2001), as well as by SR patients' representatives taking part in various international initiatives and organizations (e. g., EPF, ELPA, EUPATI, etc.). Starting from quickly developing informal contacts, consultations, increasingly professional discussions, and help in education (incl. issues of better access to modern pharmacotherapy modalities), SR's CP(-ists) became involved in mutual activities fostering patients' and patients' representatives' education, such as regular annotated courses Patient and Medicaments at the Slovak Medical University in Bratislava, invitations to annual CP conferences and other meetings. In 2015, EUPATI.sk was established. In 2017, a national, multistakeholder project Medicaments with Reason started, led by AOPP, with the Slovak Society of CP being its scientific guarantor. Successful long-term collaboration of AOPP with SR CP(-ists) and other stakeholders, including payers (health insurance companies in SR), Slovak Chamber of Pharmacists, politicians, academia, and some of the leading SR media, brought about more effective patients' representatives' involvement in legislation activities, high-level health policies negotiations, diagnostic and therapeutic standards and guidelines development, and a more adequate media coverage. These aspects, including collaborations with CP(-ists), were further strengthened during the Covid-19 pandemic. A patients' representative became a regular member of the newly established national SR Clinical Trials Ethics Committee (established under EU CTs Reg. No. 536/2014). Conclusion: Empowerment of patients ascertained by fostering longterm collaborations and synergies among decisive stakeholders involved, including important professional contributions of CP(-ists), as shown by decades-long experience in Slovakia, can contribute in a substantial manner to continuous, patient-friendly optimization of the national medicinal drugs policies and development of national pharmacotherapy standards and guidelines.

19.
Pharmaceutical Technology ; 45(11):14-15, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955749
20.
Calisma ve Toplum ; 3(74):1935, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1955670

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 salgınının Türkiye'de görülmesinin ardından hızlıca çeşitli önlemler alınmış ve 16 Mart-31 Mayıs arasında sokağa çıkma yasaklarını da kapsayan kısıtlamalara gidilmiştir. Kısa sürede olumsuz sosyal ve ekonomik etkileri gözlenen kısıtlamalarla birlikte yoksulluk ve işsizlik bağlantılı intihar haberlerinin yoğunluğu Covid-19 sürecindeki sosyal ve ekonomik gelişmelerin intiharlardaki etkisinin araştırılması ihtiyacını ortaya çıkarmıştır. Bu çalışma, hayatın her alanında yoğun kısıtlamaların ve sokağa çıkma yasaklarının uygulandığı 2020 yılının 16 Mart-31 Mayıs tarihleri arasında yerel ve ulusal basına yansıyan intihar haberlerine odaklanmıştır. Çalışma kapsamında, 303 kişiye ilişkin intihar vakaları ilişkisel tarama modeli ile incelenmiştir. Bu doğrultuda, , Covid-19'un iki buçuk ay süren ilk kısıtlama döneminde yaşanan intihar olayları ve bunun ekonomik gelişmeler ve yoksullukla ilişkisi irdelenmiştir. Araştırma sonucunda sebebi bilinmeyen intiharlar ve psikolojik temelli intiharlardan sonra ilk sırayı ekonomik temelli intiharların aldığı, ekonomik temelli intiharlar içinde de en büyük payı işsizliğin aldığı görülmektedir. Diğer taraftan intiharın, yoksulluk ve hak bağlamında bir protesto biçimi olarak ve ayrıca bireyin toplumla bağının kopması sonucunda da ortaya çıkabildiği anlaşılmıştır.Alternate :After the Covid-19 pandemic seen in Turkey, various policy measures including the curfew restrictions were applied strictly taken quickly between the march 16th and May 31st. In a short time, together with the imposed limitations, which had negative social and economic effects, the intensity of poverty and unemployment-related suicide news revealed the need to investigate the effect of social and economic developments in the Covid-19 process on suicides. This study focuses on the suicides reflected in the local and national press between 16 March and 31 May 2020 when intense restrictions and curfews were implemented in all areas of life. Within the scope of this study, suicide cases of 303 people were examined with the relational screening model. In this direction, suicides incidents that took place during the first two and a half month-long restriction of Covid-19 and its relationship with economic developments and poverty were examined. As a result of the research, it is seen that economic-based suicides take the first place after suicides of unknown cause and psychological-based suicides, and unemployment takes the largest share among economically-based suicides. On the other hand, it has been understood that suicide can occur as a form of protest in the context of poverty and rights, and also as a result of the individual's disconnection from society.

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