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1.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-10, 2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244971

ABSTRACT

Drawing upon broaden-and-build theory, this study examined the influence of positive leadership on employee engagement through the mediating role of employees' state positive affect and the moderating effect of individualism-collectivism orientation in a Chinese cultural context. A sample of 215 valid questionnaires was obtained through a two-wave survey of 48 teams working in central China. Hypotheses were tested by a method of hierarchical linear modelling. The results indicate that positive leadership promotes employees' state positive affect and engagement. State positive affect partially mediates the association between positive leadership and employee engagement. Moreover, a multilevel moderation analysis reveals that collectivism weakens the effect of positive leadership on employees' state positive affect. Theoretical and managerial implications and future directions are discussed.

2.
Journal of the Intensive Care Society ; 24(1 Supplement):109, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20245207

ABSTRACT

Submission content Introduction: Intensive care medicine has become an admired, loved, hated, and definitely more interesting Specialty due to a special situation (COVID-19) that exposed the training process to numerous criticisms, positives, and negatives, and this is how I believe we could improve our beloved world. Proposal: 1. Ideal training program from medical school to Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT): * Medical school: In their last year they should do more than 1 week in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) * Stage 1: there should be a core surgical training of at least 6 months * Stage 2: there should be a rotation on Psychiatry of at least 4 weeks with on calls in ICU and 2 weeks in Palliative Care * Stage 3: acting as a consultant for the last six months on ST7 with backup from a formal consultant, and * Surgical training should be included in the possible dual or triple CCT 2. How would we be assessed? I agree with the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine (FICM) staging program assessment, with some modifications: * As ST7 the trainee should act as a consultant with back support at least 50% of the stage and need to be evaluated by a Multi-Source Feedback (MSF). * Clinical Fellows should have a consultant as a Certificate of Eligibility for Specialist Registration (CESR) guide who establishes the equivalent stage of training supporting them and assessing them under the same model. * Changing the way, the General Medical Council (GMC) conducts the CESR application and making it really equivalent to the ICM training with the FFICM curriculum. 3. What do we need to be taught? * Hot topics for ICU (academic), * Overseas talks to share experiences, * Ultrasound (FUSIC), * Wellbeing strategies, * Leadership training * Psychiatric and physiological effects post ICU for patients and staff, * The administrative and political model of the National Health Service (NHS), and * Communication skills to establish excellent relationships with the other specialties. 4. What would our working life look like? * Normal day: 8 am to 3 pm * Midday shift: 1 pm to 8:30 pm * Night shift: 8 pm to 8:30 am * A rolling rota of 12 weeks with 2 weekends during this time 5. How would you produce Intensive Care Medicine (ICM) Consultants of the future who both love their job and their life: * Starting with less intense shifts, * More cordial relationships between the teams, * Supporting ICM trainees and Fellows going through their CESR pathway, * Making the training more attractive to either male-female doctors getting them involved in as many different specialties as ICM can cover, Conclusion(s): Having full-time ICM Consultants should be welcome in all ICUs in the country, which is not at the moment. This will definitely attract a lot of excellent doctors who are 100% focused on ICM.

3.
International Journal of Manpower ; 44(4):702-727, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244988

ABSTRACT

PurposeInnovation for service contributes to service quality and customer satisfaction, and further benefits service-centered organizations to sustain competitive advantages. However, concurrent mediating and moderating mechanisms underlying innovation for service at both the group and individual levels have been scarcely investigated. The purpose of this study is to explore multilevel mediating and moderating mechanisms behind the relationship between dual-level transformational leadership (TFL) and innovation for service at the group and individual levels.Design/methodology/approachData were collected from two countries (i.e. China and Australia). Multilevel structural equation modeling was employed to validate the research model. Bootstrapping with 5,000 replications and latent moderated structural equation modeling were used to respectively examine the mediating and moderating mechanisms.FindingsThe cross-national results showed that task interdependence and creative role identity respectively played as the group-level and individual-level mediating roles between TFL and innovation for service. It was also found that task interdependence played as a cross-level predictor enhancing individual innovation for service. Task interdependence was a moderator on the relationship between individual-level TFL and creative role identity among Australian employees, but not among Chinese employees. The relationship between creative role identity and individual innovation for service was not moderated by task interdependence among both Chinese and Australian employees.Originality/valueThis study contributes to advancing the TFL–innovation research through revealing dual-level TFL as the antecedent of innovation for service at both the group and individual levels. It also extends the understandings of the mediating and moderating mechanisms behind this dual-level relationship between TFL and innovation for service.

4.
Educational Philosophy and Theory ; 53(9):881-893, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244930

ABSTRACT

This study explores how China's education responses to COVID-19 from a perspective of policy analysis. Specifically, it involves building an educational policy system for COVID-19 to examine educational governance framework, school management and teaching, policies for teachers during the epidemic. The education policy during the epidemic has achieved positive results. Those results aim to ensure the physical and mental health of teachers and students, ensure the supply of epidemic prevention materials and educational resources, ensure the quality of students' learning, and enhance the application ability of teachers' teaching technology. The process of policy changes and effects of policy implementation have been examined to analyze how China's education responses to COVID-19. The characteristics and experience of China's education policy in response to the epidemic concentrate on forming a governance system under the centralized and unified leadership of the Communist Party of China, building a pattern in which families and schools cooperate closely to promote the smooth development of education and teaching, transforming from an emergency substitute during the crisis into an important motivation to promote the transformation of education paradigm, and paying great attention to remote and poor areas and disadvantaged student groups.

5.
BMJ Leader ; 7(Suppl 1):A10, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244743

ABSTRACT

ContextInduction of labour (IOL) is a very common medical intervention with current rates variable as 30-35% nationally. The rates are further increasing because of national drivers and maternity units in the UK are under immense pressure with capacity and staffing issues. Delays because of logistical challenges and understaffing have had a severe impact on patient and staff satisfaction. This area is not very well-studied, despite the severe impact the Covid-19 epidemic had on maternity services throughout the country. This QI project was bifold and aimed to explore the experiences of patients as well as staff during their IOL process at Lister Maternity Unit, understand their perspectives and seek improvement and solutions to the current process.Data was collected using paper and online questionnaires for patients and staff. An information leaflet outlining the purpose of the study was provided with the questionnaire. Surveys included both open questions (for example, was there a delay to your induction and if yes, was it explained to you well?) as well as scoring questions (0-10) regarding communication, facilities and overall experience.Surveys identified four main areas to improve: providing information about the process, planning of activity i.e., number of inductions per day, communication issues between clinical areas and managing patient expectations. Importantly, exploring both patient and staff perceptions helped to identify issues and possible solutions at the same time – for example, patients were often unhappy and worried about delays in their procedures and staff raised concerns about patients not being given enough information about the IOL process including the realistic time scale.Overall, analysis of collected information helped us to develop cost-effective solutions: RAG system to help prioritisation of inductions, incorporation of patient-friendly tools, videos and improvement in current IOL information leaflets, a clerking or checklist proforma as a referencing source of discussion and more support from ward matrons and daily morning obstetric consultant ward rounds to aid communication. Information leaflets and videos have been shared with local maternity service networks (LMNS) and maternity voices partnership (MVP) as service user groups. These solutions will be now implemented at Lister Hospital and their efficacy will be continually evaluated and shared within LMNS.

6.
International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research ; 22(4):104-123, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244662

ABSTRACT

Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is necessary in overcoming emergency conditions, including learning difficulties such as experienced during and after the Covid-19 pandemic. Therefore, this research explored the visionary leadership effects of teachers' OCB through quality of work-life (QWL) and organizational commitment, and developed a new empirical model of the mediation mechanism. A quantitative approach with a survey method was used in this research, where Likert-scale questionnaires were distributed to 387 social sciences teachers in Indonesia. Using structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis, it was found that visionary leadership, QWL, and organizational commitment have a significant effect on OCB;visionary leadership significantly influences QWL and organizational commitment;and visionary leadership has a significant effect on OCB through QWL and organizational commitment. This evidence promotes a new model regarding the effect of visionary leadership on teachers' OCB mediated by QWL and organizational commitment. It not only confirms several previous studies as the basis for developing this research hypothesis, but is also an antithesis to previous research with contradictory conclusions. With such conditions, the new model provides theoretical and practical contributions which require in-depth and critical discussion before it is adopted or adapted as a model in improving teacher OCB via visionary leadership supported by QWL and organizational commitment. © Authors This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

7.
Teaching in the Post COVID-19 Era: World Education Dilemmas, Teaching Innovations and Solutions in the Age of Crisis ; : 575-583, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244418

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the recent health threat that affected almost every part of the world, has had a huge impact on education and educators. While many researchers devoted their attention to exploring ways through which teachers and students could be supported at the time of a pandemic, this paper focuses on a different population: educational leaders. Effective educational leadership at the time of crisis is crucial not only because of its big impact and magnitude but also because it sets an example for how similar situations could be handled in the future. In this paper, the researcher first looks at the qualities and capacities needed of leaders at the time of emergency. She also discusses the need for educational contingency planning and crisis preparedness. Attention is then shifted to handling future crises and emergencies by shedding light on leadership essentials that school and district administrators should be equipped to handle. The paper ends by proposing some recommendations for leader preparation programs so that aspiring leaders are ready to deal with similar situations in the future. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021. All rights reserved.

8.
Global Logistics and Supply Chain Strategies for the 2020s: Vital Skills for the Next Generation ; : 119-133, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244406

ABSTRACT

It is difficult to predict what will happen tomorrow, let alone predict the future of 3PLs in the coming decade. After all, in early 2020, who could have foreseen the upheaval the COVID-19 pandemic has brought to supply chains across the globe? Faced with so much uncertainty, one may want to take the approach of many futurists who think about time in a different way. Instead of thinking in linear terms and throwing darts several years into the future, they start with identifying more highly probable events in the short term and work outward (Webb, 2019). So, while we do not own a crystal ball, we are convinced that two currently emerging aspects, you could call them trends, will shape the foreseeable future of third-party logistics providers (3PLs). First, pronounced technological advancements pertaining to hardware and software increasingly impact the future of corporate supply chain management. Second, elements and events within supply chains are getting more difficult to predict. Looking at the next five to ten years, 3PLs will need to proactively address these trends because it directly influences the 3PLs success and because it influences the 3PLs' clients' success and their associated demand for logistics services. While both trends raise challenges, they also offer ample opportunities for 3PLs by enhancing their current services and developing new offerings. For this, 3PLs need to enhance their leadership and management skills. Moreover, 3PL need to emphasize establishing and managing collaborative relationships. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023. All rights reserved.

9.
Perfusion ; 38(1 Supplement):192, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20243997

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a complex life support modality. To appropriately educate ECMO clinicians, a comprehensive program is required. However, there is no universal ECMO education (EE) program exclusively for intensive care unit Registered Nurses (RNs). Moreover, with the recent Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the existing nursing shortage and the ability of ECMO programs to maintain an established EE program worsened. This continuous quality improvement (CQI) aims to reestablish the quality of an EE program at a large academic medical center at one of the past pandemic epicenters. Method(s): A CQI process with the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle and Ishikawa diagram for root cause analysis (RCA), intervention implementation from July 2022 to June 2023 Results: The RCA revealed intrahospital pandemicrelated restrictions for employee gathering, EE instructor unavailability, increased nursing turnover, increased nursing shortage, and incomplete recordkeeping of ECMO educational activity (EEA) RN attendance as dominant factors disrupting the established EE processes. Six interventions were implemented, with one added in later: 1. Schedule 1 Certification Lecture Day/Quarter (Q), 1 Re-Certification Lecture/Q, and 1 Circuit Skills Class/ month, and 1 Simulation Lab/month 2. Reserve an education room for all EE activities, as COVID-19 policies allow 3. Increase the number of EE instructors 4. Increase Nursing Leadership-ECMO Manager collaboration for optimal RN signup 5. Optimize EEA schedule to help balance RN staffing needs 6. Develop a Master ECMO Folder in Google Drive and maintain updated attendance Five interventions showed positive preliminary results, whereas it was too soon for any conclusion for one (Table 1). Conclusion(s): While preliminary, the achieved results justify that restoring the quality of an ECMO education program after the negative impact of the recent pandemic is possible. However, final results are necessary to infer the effectiveness of each intervention. (Figure Presented).

10.
Industrial Marketing Management ; 102:488-502, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20243993

ABSTRACT

The resilience of B2B sales forces is crucial in face of severe wide-ranging challenges during a crisis. This study aims to investigate the role of leader communication of the crisis in promoting salesperson resilience during the COVID-19. The data were gathered from 418 salespersons from 36 manufacturing firms in times of the COVID-19. The data were analyzed using multilevel structural equation modeling. The results demonstrated the positive relationship between leader crisis communication and salesperson resilience, mediated by salespersons' positive stress mindset. Family strain and core beliefs challenge were found to attenuate the positive linkage between leader crisis communication and salespersons' positive stress mindset. Theoretical and practical implications are presented. This study offers insights to help managers in B2B organizations better understand and implement mechanisms that can foster resilience among their B2B sales forces in the COVID-19 outbreak and other crises. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

11.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 84(8-B):No Pagination Specified, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20243474

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to research the impact of mental health wellness on educational leaders. Leaders with 3 or more years of experience in positions of leadership in Southern California, at the school site and district levels, were invited to participate. Interested participants, who met the criteria, were added to a list of potential participants from which 20 were selected at random and notified. The participants were interviewed once and asked the same 10 questions. The interview was designed to elicit examples of how mental health wellness plays a role in an educational leader's life, both professionally and personally. Leaders in this study shared their reasons for becoming an educator, the path that led them to their leadership position, how mental health plays a role in their ability to perform the duties of their job, roles and responsibilities, as well as how COVID-19 has impacted their overall mental health. Through this research, it demonstrated evidence that mental health wellness is negatively impacted by the positions that educational leaders hold and it has been exacerbated by the demands that COVID-19 have placed on our country, especially our educational system. Implications for this study suggest that changes need to be made to the systems and structures within school districts to better support leaders with mental health wellness so that they can be more effective leaders for the communities that they serve. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
Sestrinsko delo / Information for Nursing Staff ; 55(1):12-18, 2023.
Article in Bulgarian | GIM | ID: covidwho-20243326

ABSTRACT

A pandemic is a complex phenomenon that requires multi-directional corrective actions and, above all, preventive measures. Managing crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic has proven to be the biggest challenge facing healthcare organizations. In the process of ensuring a safe hospital environment for patients and staff, various models and adequate approaches to crisis management were applied. In order to explore the opinion of health care managers on the challenges and practices of providing a safe hospital environment in the management of the COVID-19 pandemic, a qualitative survey - a semi-structured interview - was conducted among 35 health care managers. Based on the results of the interviews with head and senior nurses, the main themes related to "challenges" and "practices" during the pandemic related to the practice of health care professionals were identified. Challenges include: developing and implementing measures to manage safe hospital environment during the COVID-19 pandemic;staff shortages and psychological problems. Practices include changes in nurses' work schedules, nurse rotation, staff training, organizational support. Healthcare managers have provided new and safe practices for managing staff and the environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of this study show that healthcare managers perceive management during the COVID-19 pandemic differently than other crises. In their opinion, managing in these difficult conditions is very complex and requires greater flexibility on the part of managers in accordance with constantly changing circumstances.

13.
Understanding individual experiences of COVID-19 to inform policy and practice in higher education: Helping students, staff, and faculty to thrive in times of crisis ; : 87-98, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20243295

ABSTRACT

This chapter explores the barriers and disruption to community and communication resulting from remote working during the COVID-19 pandemic. The University of Utah's decision to abruptly transition to a fully online model resulted in several communication impacts for staff. First, staff participants received little and inconsistent communication from the University. This caused uncertainty within departments, which trickled down to the students staff serve. Second, this led to staff participants feeling disconnected from the institution and increased their concerns around misinforming students. At the same time, the move to online learning and work decreased efficient communication between colleagues. Casual interactions in the office became email threads and extended feedback processes. Third, staff reported that online communications with students became less personal, which created difficulty for building and maintaining rapport. Finally, staff members' overall sense of community consistently dropped as the COVID-19 pandemic raged on and they were forced to continue to work remotely. The discontent and apprehension felt by staff members around the communication provided from University leadership was compounded by the impact of working from home. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

14.
RAND Corporation ; 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243166

ABSTRACT

The United States faces an unprecedented mental health crisis, with youth and young adults at the center. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly 50 percent of college students reported at least one mental health concern. The COVID-19 pandemic notably exacerbated these issues and underscored the urgent need to identify and implement ways to ameliorate the youth mental health crisis. In 2021, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine called on the field of higher education to address growing concerns about student mental health by identifying and elevating emerging and promising approaches that offer a more holistic way to support students' mental health. Serving as the main entry point for more than 40 percent of students seeking a postsecondary degree, community colleges represent a tremendous and untapped opportunity to better address mental health in the United States, particularly for students who have been traditionally underserved (e.g., students of color, first-generation students, and low-income students). However, community colleges have limited evidence and guidance to inform the implementation of multilevel, holistic approaches to support students with varying mental health needs. To address this knowledge gap, this report shares a descriptive study of eight community colleges at the forefront of implementing multilevel approaches (a combination of prevention, early intervention, and treatment services) to support student mental health, as well as key facilitators for and barriers to their success. [For "How Community Colleges Can Support Student Mental Health Needs. Research Brief. RB-A2552-1," see ED627489.]

15.
National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance ; 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243165

ABSTRACT

The United States faces an unprecedented mental health crisis, with youth and young adults at the center. Even before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, nearly 50 percent of college students reported at least one mental health concern. Without adequate mental health support, college students, including those at community colleges, may be at risk for a variety of academic and nonacademic consequences that negatively affect their overall well-being, including lower college completion rates, higher rates of substance use, and lower lifetime earning potential. This research brief describes a study examining eight community colleges from across the United States which found that, although the institutions did offer mental health services, most lacked a clear organizing framework for those efforts, and that financial challenges limited the support offered to students. The research also highlighted the importance of community college leaders explicitly prioritizing student mental health, as well as broad staff buy-in to the effort. [For the full report, "Supporting the Mental Health Needs of Community College Students. Research Report. RR-A2552-1," see ED627480.]

16.
Virtual Management and the New Normal: New Perspectives on HRM and Leadership since the COVID-19 Pandemic ; : 79-98, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20243056

ABSTRACT

Most of the literature on trust is focused on developing and building trust, and less on maintaining trust. Our basic research question is how trust between manager and employee is affected by working remotely during COVID-19 pandemic, and whether it is possible for virtual managers to find ways of communicating in order to maintain trust despite geographic distance. It is a surprising finding that all respondents have answered that cognitive trust has been maintained and not changed significantly during the pandemic. We found that it is a greater challenge to maintain affective compared to cognitive trust. It is more of a fresh and fragile product in line with Glomseth's (Trust - The foundation in management and society. Hamar Arbeiderblad, HA Debatt (h-a.no), 2020) claim of trust. Managers' digital competence is important for maintaining cognitive trust. Another finding is that it requires more from managers in terms of a conscious individual follow-up of the employees in the home office. Our findings confirm Bergum's (Management of teleworkers: Managerial communication at a distance. Turku School of Economics, 2009) findings that employees who are managed remotely need more frequent feedback and recognition than those who are managed co-located. Communication under distance management is often more task-oriented and formal. © The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023.

17.
Ultrasound ; 31(2):NP34, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20243053

ABSTRACT

UK obstetric sonographers adapted their working practices during the COVID-19 pandemic in response to new guidance issued by professional organisations, and requirements for on-going departmental risk assessments. This study aimed to provide an insight into the implementation of this guidance, completion of risk assessments and perception of support within UK obstetric ultrasound departments during the pandemic period. Obstetric sonographers working in the UK (n=138) used the Qualtrics XMTM platform to complete an anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey about their working experiences during the pandemic. Participants responded to closed questions about national guidance, risk assessments and their perception of support whilst providing fetal ultrasound screening services. Respondents provided additional detail about their experiences in these areas via free-text boxes. Over 90% of respondents were aware of, or had read guidance issued by professional organisations, although sonographers rated the overall usefulness of new guidelines at an average of 5.2/10 (where 0 = not useful at all, and 10 = extremely useful). Challenges for the implementation of guidance in departments were also identified, mostly related to the clinical working environment, including limitations of physical space (76.3%), time constraints (67.5%) and ventilation (61.3%). Most sonographers (77.2%) were aware that a departmental risk assessment had been undertaken, with waiting areas, scan rooms and clinically vulnerable staff highlighted as the most concerning factors. Sonographers felt most supported by their ultrasound colleagues (83.5%) and line managers (41.2%). They felt least supported by senior management and leadership personnel (60.8%), other antenatal colleagues (51.5%) and professional organisations (41.2%). Whilst most sonographers were aware of published COVID-19 guidance, challenges for its implementation in clinical departments were identified. Local risk mitigation strategies often did not prioritise the scan room environment, despite it being highlighted as a concern. Support from the wider, senior service team and professional organisations will be essential to facilitate post-pandemic recovery of the workforce.

18.
Multimodal Technologies and Interaction ; 7(5), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20242381

ABSTRACT

The virtuality of organizational teams have gained interest and popularity in recent years, and have become more prevalent amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Organizational productivity and team relationship-building may suffer certain pitfalls in virtual communication and support without the understanding of the dynamics of short-term, project-based virtual teams. The manuscript aimed to expand what is currently known about short-term virtual team dynamics related to types of effective leadership behaviors. The present study employed a mixed method approach to understanding the dynamics of these teams at both the individual and team level. Small teams were formed and instructed to collaborate on a virtual survival task. Team-related outcomes were measured at the individual level, such as team coordination, team support, and team success. Additionally, distinct latent profiles of leadership behaviors were developed and analyzed at the team level. Team support, more so than team coordination, significantly predicted team success at the individual level, with instrumental support having the strongest effect. Distinct leadership behaviors emerged in teams and were classified through a latent profile analysis, but none of the profiles were significantly related to team performance scores. Demonstrating instrumental support in short-term virtual teams may improve team success. It is important to understand that distinct leadership behaviors exist and future research should explore the impact of these leadership behaviors on other team-related outcomes. © 2023 by the authors.

19.
International Journal of Emerging Markets ; 18(6):1378-1396, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20242256

ABSTRACT

PurposeSmart furniture is an essential part of research that has been designed to best complement easy and safe human interaction. The purpose of smart furniture is to save the space of the house and make the products unique, awesome and safe, functional, strong and also make it works better so the people can live better with it. This research aims to explore the key supply chain strategies implemented by the Indian smart furniture industry to reduce the impact of a post-COVID-19 pandemic.Design/methodology/approachThis work utilized a case study and conducted semi-structured interviews with the top leadership of the smart furniture manufacturing industry to explore key supply chain strategies to reduce the influence of the post-COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, key supply chain strategies have been analyzed using a multi-criteria decision-making technique known as grey relational analysis (GRA) to determine their ranking significance in the smart furniture industry.FindingsThe results of this study discovered that "Inventory-Categorization” is essential in ensuring business continuity during the COVID-19 pandemic and helps reduce the amount of stock they have on hand. It enhanced the opportunity for employees to properly focus on their work and an opportunity for better work-life balance. The results of the study can also help supply chain stakeholders in their establishment of critical strategies.Research limitations/implicationsThe implications of this research work help the Indian furniture industry to make supply chain investment decisions that benefit the organization to sustain itself.Originality/valueThis is the first study to explore key supply chain strategies for the post-COVID-19 era. This work will assist managers and practitioners in helping the organization decide which supply chain strategies are more critical to the betterment of the organization.

20.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 84(8-B):No Pagination Specified, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20242224

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has sparked a public health crisis impacting every aspect of the world. Within education, this crisis caused leaders to navigate through unknown territory. Researchers were overwhelmed seeking to identify effective school leadership before the COVID-19 pandemic. The health crisis has unleashed a host of challenges for supporting leaders of all levels of public schools. Burnout could be a factor leading to high school principal turnover during the pandemic, but also leadership styles may affect high school principals' intention to leave their posts. While the value of transformational campus leadership is known, and there are current surveys to gather job burnout and turnover intention, there is a gap between connecting the three constructs. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive relationship leadership style and job burnout have on turnover intention among Texas high school principals during the COVID-19 global pandemic. This study design was a quantitative survey non-experimental correlational approach. Surveys were distributed to principals through the Texas Association of School Administrators, and all responses were anonymous. The data analysis involved logistic regression for the independent variables of burnout and leadership style predicting the dichotomous turnover intention dependent variable. The overall model was not significant based on an alpha of .05, chi2(4) = 3.54, p = .471, suggesting that the leadership styles More Transformational than Norm, More Transactional than Norm, More Passive-Avoidant than Norm, and Job Burnout did not have a significant effect on the odds of observing the Desire to Stay category of Turnover Intention. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

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