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2.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(10): e39157, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089637

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus continues to spread worldwide, causing various health and economic disruptions. One of the most important approaches to controlling the spread of this disease is to use an artificial intelligence (AI)-based technological intervention, such as a chatbot system. Chatbots can aid in the fight against the spread of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: This paper introduces COVID-Bot, an intelligent interactive system that can help screen students and confirm their COVID-19 vaccination status. METHODS: The design and development of COVID-Bot followed the principles of the design science research (DSR) process, which is a research method for creating a new scientific artifact. COVID-Bot was developed and implemented using the SnatchBot chatbot application programming interface (API) and its predefined tools, which are driven by various natural language processing algorithms. RESULTS: An evaluation was carried out through a survey that involved 106 university students in determining the functionality, compatibility, reliability, and usability of COVID-Bot. The findings indicated that 92 (86.8%) of the participants agreed that the chatbot functions well, 85 (80.2%) agreed that it fits well with their mobile devices and their lifestyle, 86 (81.1%) agreed that it has the potential to produce accurate and consistent responses, and 85 (80.2%) agreed that it is easy to use. The average obtained α was .87, indicating satisfactory reliability. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that incorporating chatbot technology into the educational system can combat the spread of COVID-19 among university students. The intelligent system does this by interacting with students to determine their vaccination status.

3.
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine ; 26(10):1152, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066998
4.
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine ; 26(10):1159-1160, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066997
6.
Archives of Iranian Medicine ; 25(7):480-481, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067653
8.
Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics ; 63(1637):177-184, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2057493
9.
Middle East Journal of Digestive Diseases ; 14(3):359-360, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2044378
10.
Revista Mexicana de Oftalmologia ; 96(3):142, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2044336
11.
Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics ; 64(1641), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2040787
12.
Clinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology ; 19(11):670, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1647474

ABSTRACT

To boost or not to boost, that is the question—or rather, one of many questions regarding COVID19 vaccination in the United States. Do we mandate vaccination for everyone who is eligible? Should employers require that their employees be vaccinated? Should wealthy nations provide boosters for their own residents before other nations have been able to administer the primary series to theirs? Have we done all we can to produce vaccines as quickly as possible? Although this editorial cannot possibly answer all the questions related to vaccination, I will address one of particular interest right now—the use of booster shots.

13.
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia ; 28(4):159-160, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033594
14.
Erciyes Medical Journal ; 44(5):533-534, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033489
15.
International Journal of Preventive Medicine ; 13(1):99, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033230
16.
Discourse & Society ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2020880

ABSTRACT

In response to the threat of COVID-19, China initiated a nationwide campaign. Ideological work such as explaining the implemented policies and persuading the public always took a central role in mobilization, and it has been emphasized by Chinese government during Covid-19 as well. The legitimation discourse used in the campaign is the focus of the current study. The investigation takes into consideration the political logic of the relationship between the central and local governments as well as their working mechanism. More specifically, a total of 84 open letters written by the local governments to mobilize residents during the COVID-19 pandemic were analyzed. The study integrated the CDA perspective, legitimation theory, and campaign-style governance and examined what ideological discourses are constructed in the open letters, what type of authority is constructed for legitimation, and what is the main communication style used. In addition, the study paid attention to the patterns among the different local government ranks. The findings revealed that moral appeal and political authority were the key elements of legitimation discourse, but governments with lower ranks exhibited a trend of de-ideologization. Meanwhile, impersonal politeness and direct bold command contradictorily co-existed in open letters of basic level local governments. These finding reveal that despite the top government’s centralized power, realization of ideological work in a national campaign is confined by the divergent and complicated realities of local governments. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Discourse & Society is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Drug Topics ; 165(9):1, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011545
18.
Erciyes Medical Journal ; 43(6):625, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1576873

ABSTRACT

I read “Letter to The Editor” with considerable interest and attention on my article “The Relationship between Blood Groups and COVID-19 Patients”.

19.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 76(6):909, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1576048

ABSTRACT

The article in the Medical Journal of Malaysia, clearly highlights the effects of anxiety on medical students. The COVID-19 has disrupted the physical, mental, and social well-being of the medical students causing stress, anxiety, depression, fear, loneliness, and uncertainty about their futures.

20.
Journal of Cutaneous Immunology and Allergy ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2007094
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