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1.
South African Geographical Journal ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1960678

ABSTRACT

Crime is a complex and multi-layered phenomenon that impacts the lives of every South African. One crime type–and its causes and consequences–that has been relatively under-researched in the country is livestock theft. This crime is becoming of increasingly concern due to its progressively organized nature and its consequential impact on local and national food security. In this study, we use a seminal spatial theory of crime–the routine activities theory–to examine the incidence of livestock theft in the farming community of Swartruggens, a small town in the North West Province of South Africa. Using group conversations with local community members as well as a series of interviews with farmers, we obtain a better theoretical understanding of the causal and contributary factors to the occurrence of livestock thefts in the area. We further motivate for a ‘contestation of crime’ in this community whereby various role players provide different and distinct rationales behind this scourge afflicting this town and its surroundings. A collaborative approach is recommended between community members and farmers to change the narrative depicted by both groups. This will hopefully deescalate existing tensions in the community and reduce the likelihood of further thefts occurring. © 2022 The Society of South African Geographers.

2.
Scientific Papers Series Management, Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development ; 22(2):543-550, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1958247

ABSTRACT

Animal health and diseases have a major impact on human health and behaviour (i.e. zoonosis, schools, communication etc), food production (African Swine Fever), economy (direct and indirect costs) and trade (export, import, intercommunity trade). Even almost all countries have implemented all kind of management measures, humanity still face up today huge problems, for example the most recent experience, being COVID-19, which ceased almost all human activities in the world and changed people behaviour for several years (2019 up today). For this reason, the paper represents a systemic review of recent information on different management indicators developed - epidemiological/economic etc in order to assist managers (politically, authorities, farmers, all the people involved) to prevent, survey and control such diseases, to develop best practices for benchmarking their country health systems/farm management system etc, and finally to led to an effective and efficient management of infectious disease in livestock during crisis. In this regard, the retrospective method was used and the information reviewed was collected from the latest information published between 2019-2022, available on WHO, Economic Impact, CDC websites, where through a tremendous and collaborative effort across different public health organisations, scientists in the world, dashboards and standard indicators publicly available have been developed. The results of this study demonstrate that the managers of livestock during crisis, the competent authorities, the governments have to consider, undertake and include these kind of tools/indicators in their management in order to assist them to develop their emergency preparedness capacity and to manage in an effective way the infectious diseases during crisis respectively prevention, early detection, rapid response, identifying their vulnerabilities etc.

3.
INDIAN JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCES ; 92(6):782-788, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1935181

ABSTRACT

The study assessed the impact of COVID-19 associated lockdowns on animal health services, coping practices, and financial loss to livestock farmers in Karnataka. A cross-sectional survey among 170 livestock farmers and 24 field veterinarians working in the study jurisdiction were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and repeated ANOVA were employed to asses the impact of COVID-19 lockdown. The results revealed a significant difference in the number of cases attended at different periods of lockdowns and among the veterinarians, with a decline in the number of cases attended across the species of pets (54.9%) followed by goats (35.3%), sheep (29.1%), cattle (25.5%) and buffalo (21.6%) during the lockdown. The mode of veterinarian contact through phone calls (80%) and WhatsApp (46.7%) increased significantly and veterinarian visits decreased by 27.3% and farmers' visits to veterinary hospitals decreased by 61.9% during lockdown. The livestock farmers' welfare schemes were ed by lockdown and the vaccine administration against diseases like PPR, ET, and HS per veterinarian declined in sheep and goats. However, targeted vaccination against FMD in cattle was found achieved. The COVID-19 and associated lockdown affected the livestock farmers in multiple dimensions. Hence, to cope with lockdown-like situations, it is recommended to engage trained personnel, practitioners, and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) associated with animal health care services to provide uninterrupted health care services to livestock farmers.

4.
Food Research ; 5:46-55, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939664

ABSTRACT

Over the last two decades, the world has been confronted with several outbreaks of infectious diseases. Ebola, influenza A (H1N1), SARS, MERS, Zika and most recently, COVID-19, have had a serious global impact on economic instability, local and global public resources and above all, people's health. As the effect of COVID-19 is significant to the world market, it has also indirectly impacted the agricultural sector and hence has significantly exposed the strengths and limitations of the farming systems in terms of resiliency, production and food security which offers important lessons for policymakers. Hence, this study was conducted to analyse the impact of COVID-19 pandemics on the agricultural industry especially the smallholders who are more vulnerable during or post-pandemic due to the lack of resilient supply networks, low periphery of market access and limited production. In doing so, a survey was conducted, which began in May 2020, consisting of online questions that contain information about the impact of COVID-19 on the smallholding sector and the challenges faced by smallholders including crops, livestock, fisheries and aquaculture in Malaysia. A total sample of 217 smallholders or farmers from several states in Peninsular Malaysia was obtained within the Movement Control Order (MCO) period and later extended to the Conditional MCO (CMCO). Almost 86% of respondents answered that COVID-19 had heavily affected agriculture-related activities in Malaysia. Using a principal component analysis, our findings reveal four major issues or challenges those farmers faced during the MCO/CMCO namely income, uncertainties of supply and price, logistics and marketing activities.

5.
International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications ; 13(5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1924734

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this paper is to deploy a structural equation modeling approach through the Partial Small Square technique to validate the disruptions factors that affect livestock supply chain performance. The disruption prediction factors were obtained from the analysis of literature studies and data from the Department of Veterinary Services (DSV) and expert evaluation. Factors considered in the study model are Livestock Process, Finance, Breeders, Quality, Facilities, Technology, Demand, Supply, Information Communication, Sales, Transportation, Government Involvement, Disaster and Syariah Compliance. The results of the study found that the factors of Livestock Process, Finance, Breeders, Livestock Quality, Technology, Supply, Sales, Transportation, Government Involvement and Syariah Compliance were accepted as disruptions in the livestock supply chain. The findings of this study will assist farmers and livestock stakeholders to take necessary measures to minimise the disruption and further the government's goal of enlivening small and medium livestock enterprises in Malaysia.

6.
Hemispheres ; 36:9-18, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1919009

ABSTRACT

The existence of pastoralism as it has been organised for hundreds of years is dependent on constant adaptation to ever-changing situations. Such adaptation includes crop agriculture, wage labour, and community conservancies. In northern Kenya, conservancies are epicentres of wildlife, nature tourism, and commercial ventures. This study incorporates methods and perspectives from history, anthropology, and development studies. The study shows that the shift to community conservancies has exposed pastoral communities to a fluctuating international economic system that has collapsed due to COVID-19 pandemic. The instability caused by the pandemic exposed the vulnerability of community conservancy as a livelihood system.

7.
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences ; 92(2):166-173, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1913183

ABSTRACT

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a silent pandemic faced parallel to COVID-19 pandemic, owing to indiscriminate usage of antimicrobial agents by large mass of people as part of self-medication and unsupervised therapy protocols. This similar kind of situation does exist in livestock and poultry farming sector, which has led to AMR issues like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) mastitis. AMR is really an alarming issue which needs to be addressed or else in near future it would be difficult to treat or control infections in both humans and animals. Reduction in indiscriminate antimicrobial usage and AMR issues in animal husbandry sector requires intervention in animal husbandry practices. In order to device such intervention practices, first we need to document the field level antibiotic usage and knowledge level on AMR. But unfortunately, data on AMR issues at field level were deficit and poorly documented in India. Hence this cross-sectional study was carried out to explore the knowledge and usage pattern of antibiotics among livestock and poultry farmers of Telangana state of India through direct interview method. Cent per cent of the farmers responded that antibiotics were used mainly for therapeutic purpose followed by prophylactic (32%), metaphylactic purpose (44.5%) and as growth promoters (8.33%). Farmers (78%) responded that they purchase the antimicrobial agents over-the-counter. Oxytetracyclines and Enrofloxacin were the two major antibiotics used abundantly by the livestock farmers. Large proportions of famers (80%) were neither following full dosage regime of antimicrobial used nor the withdrawal period, while antimicrobial usage on their animals owing to lack of awareness and knowledge regarding the AMR. Significant differences were found amongst the livestock and poultry farmers with respect to their knowledge level on antimicrobial usage and AMR in animals.

8.
Virologie ; 26(2):179-180, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1913013

ABSTRACT

As successive pandemics have shown that antiviral discovery and validation should be done as a continuous process and all viruses should be considered as a potential threat. For this purpose, we have, we have developed a visualization technique called ANCHORTM that allows us to visualize directly in real-time in living cells infection, localization, replication and cell-to-cell spread of any kind of viruses having a dsDNA phase. This technology has been successfully used to image different kinds of viruses, including herpesviruses, adenovirus, poxviruses and retroviruses. Combined with an automatic pipetting robot and high content microscopy, the technology allows the screening of a large number of molecules or conditions very rapidly and efficiently without any fixation, extraction or reagent. Based on our expertise, we have also developed an image-based screening pipeline for RNA viruses such as RSV, influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2. With a collection of around 30 viruses impacting the human, animal and biodefense markets, we propose one of the most integrated antiviral screening pipelines so far, from early discovery to animal testing in A3 conditions. Two antiviral molecules discovered in the lab will be presented, the first one impacting the animal market and the second one funded by a large grant from the French Ministry of Armed Forces.

9.
Agroscope Transfer 2021. (406):11 pp. ; 2021.
Article in German | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1912706

ABSTRACT

On behalf of the Federal Office for Agriculture (FOAG), Agroscope monitors the production and distribution of food for livestock and pets. The main purpose of its activity is to prevent harmful substances and undesirable products from being fed to animals and reaching consumers' plates through foodstuffs of animal origin. Controls also help to protect owners of animals against fraud and to preserve animal health and the environment. Official Food Control enforcement activities for animals have also been disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic and inspections had to be completely suspended. However, it was possible to resume them after a short period, although in a limited way, by applying the necessary hygiene and precautionary measures. In order to protect the inspectors and employees of the companies inspected, controls have been suspended for fifteen days in March, and then were resumed until the end of the year, but by being announced and by favouring the taking of samples. In this way it was possible to minimize contact with people and counter the spread of the virus by respecting the prescribed protection measures. The integration carried out at the end of 2019 of all the data relating to inspections, companies and products in a new laboratory information management system (LIMS) proved to be successful, although many optimizations and improvements had to be made. Due to increased data security and integration into a interdisciplinary system, production companies of animal feed thus benefited from more shipments, inspection report improved and there were more user-friendly presentation of test results in the product control report. Inspection reports were all able to be sent quickly and those of the checks of products were able to be sent following the analyses and necessary repetitions, thus guaranteeing a return of information in a timely manner. As in previous years, we also observed an increase of more than the average of new registrations/approvals companies in the animal feed sector. While 2019 can be considered a calm year in terms of feed safety, Salmonella was detected in eight animal feeds in 2020, representing 4 separate cases. In one sample, an overrun of the maximum value of coccidiostats according to appendix 10 of OLALA was detected. In 4 other samples, the authorizations issued for the addition of coccidiostats according to animal species had expired. GMOs were detected in two food samples for production animals, one of which was authorized but was not been declared. The second case concerns the contamination of undesirable seeds without germination power in linseed. In addition, GMOs exceeding the tolerance threshold have been detected in three bird feed mixtures and in another ambrosia seed mixture. These products were withdrawn from the market immediately. A total of 1,217 feed samples for livestock and for pets were analysed. 814 were compliant or had minor reporting errors. With a compliance rate of 66.9%, there was a slight improvement compared to the previous year (approx. 65%). With regard to nonconformities, it can be seen that minor non-conformities have decreased compared to last year (5.8%, previous year 12.4%). On the other hand, major non-conformities increased, from 2.6% in 2019 to 4.7% in 2020. Average non-compliances remained at the same level as the previous year, at around 23%.

10.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1041(1):012030, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1908704

ABSTRACT

This study assesses the sustainability of indigenous cattle production (Jabres Cattle) during the COVID 19 pandemic in Brebes Regency, Indonesia. The sustainability of Jabres cattle production is considered from the aspects of production, socio-economic, and environmental aspects. The study was conducted on 64 Jabres farmers in 5 sub-districts (Ketanggungan, Bantarkawung, Banjarharjo, Larangan, and Salem). Respondents were taken using a simple random sampling method and data was taken using online questionnaires. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The indigenous cattle farmers in Brebes Regency have a long experience as beef cattle farmers (10.7 years on average) with an average ownership scale of 7 heads. During the pandemic, there was an increase of 54.7 percent of farmers who felt it was difficult to get cattle breeds compared to before the pandemic. The number of farmers who found it difficult to get forage also showed an increase of 36 percent compared to before the pandemic. Likewise, an increase in the number of farmers (75 percent) felt that it was increasingly difficult to sell beef cattle, which resulted in not making it easy for profits. However, the COVID 19 pandemic can encourage all farmers to pay more attention to the cleanliness of cowshed and the cage environment. Most of the indigenous cattle farmers (89 percent) remain committed to continuing their business despite difficulties in obtaining calves, feed, and selling cattle. Farmers still have confidence that the difficult situation will pass, and demand slaughter cattle will recover.

11.
Rangeland Ecology and Management ; 83:31-40, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1907706

ABSTRACT

Construction of small ponds that collect and store rainwater to be used for livestock watering has been one of the most widespread adaptive solutions in Iberian rangelands to cope with water scarcity, a problem that has become particularly relevant in recent decades due to the progressive increase in livestock density on farms. However, watering ponds can also be a source of health problems due to the consumption of low-quality water by livestock. In this study, we analyzed the physico-chemical and microbiological quality of water from a set of watering ponds located in Iberian rangelands and evaluated its suitability for livestock consumption by comparing the analytical results with internationally recognized water standards for livestock. In addition, seasonal and spatial variations in pond water quality and the influence of some physical and managerial factors were assessed by multivariate statistical analysis. Results showed a high seasonality in pond water composition. The quality of pond water was sufficient to be used for livestock during the rainy season, but high bacterial pollution of fecal origin was evidenced at the end of the dry season in many ponds, with consequent risk for animal health. Dilution by rainwater and evapo-concentration processes were the main mechanisms that determined the concentrations of contaminants in pond water, while livestock density did not seem to have a significant influence. We propose some strategies, such as diversification in water supply sources and regular water quality testing, that farmers could adopt to deal with the detected water quality problems.

12.
ILAR J ; 61(1): 3-9, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1908823

ABSTRACT

With the recent upswing of infectious disease outbreaks (coronavirus, influenza, Ebola, etc), there is an ever-increasing need for biocontainment animal use protocols to better address the research of emerging diseases and to increase the health of both animals and humans. It is imperative that we as a research community ensure these protocols are conducted with the utmost scrutiny and regulatory compliance for the welfare of the animals as well as the health and safety concerns of the individual conducting these studies. Both the welfare of the animals and the health and safety of the research staff must be balanced with the integrity of the science being studied. Even prior to reviewing biocontainment protocols, the research stakeholders should have professional and collegial interactions across all levels of the proposed project. These stakeholders should include the attending veterinarian, the principal investigator, the sponsor, and any organic institutional health and safety assets (environmental health and safety, occupational health, biosafety personnel, medical personnel, facilities operations and maintenance, etc). At most institutions, these stakeholders are members of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and may not possess the necessary tools to properly assess an Animal Biosafety Level 3 and 4 animal use protocol. It is the goal of this article to review some basic concepts of biocontainment, discuss critical communications and preapprovals, clinical observations, medical interventions and supportive care, scientific and study endpoints, euthanasia criteria, animal manipulations, documentation, training, emergency response and contingency plans, security, and decontamination and provide a scenario-based and informative thought-provoking process Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee members and veterinary staff may consider during Animal Biosafety Level 3 and 4 protocol review. These topics will enhance the ability of all stakeholders to balance the protection of the people with the integrity of the science and ultimately the welfare of the animal.


Subject(s)
Animal Care Committees , Occupational Health , Animals , Containment of Biohazards , Humans
13.
Malaysian Journal of Veterinary Research ; 12(2):11-16, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904870

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. COVID-19 is contagious and fatal to humans. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, significant concerns on food safety and security are rising due to potential interspecies transmission. As such, surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 on imported meat and animal parts is carried out and reported in this study to safeguard food safety and security. Overall, none of the 225 samples from various livestock (buffaloes, cattle, goat and pig) imported from seven countries were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) from July 2020 to November 2021. This study finding serves as a baseline data for SARS-CoV-2 in imported meat and animal parts. Notably, this study accentuated the importance of active surveillance to prevent zoonosis and to safeguard food safety and security.

14.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):5-6, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904813

ABSTRACT

The American Rescue Funds Program seeks improvements to infrastructure, capacity, and diversification in meat and poultry processing, with clear prioritization of increased competition via small- and medium-sized processing facilities. The need to euthanize animals at a time when retailers were rationing meat sales was one of several examples of market failures during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated the disruptions to agricultural meat, poultry, and egg production at $15 billion based on CFAP and CFAP2 payments. Marani et al. (2021) estimate the probability of a repeat event at 1% to 2% per year, justifying the use of these public funds to add surplus capacity and infrastructure to mitigate disruptions in case of recurrence. Economics of scale are modest beyond slaughter of more than 125 head per hour in beef plants and 2,000 head per day in pork plants (Duewer and Nelson, 1991;Ollinger, MacDonald, and Madison, 2005). Dozens of such "medium-sized" U.S. pork and beef processing plants have survived since 2000, typically relying upon niche market connections. Given historic processing plant construction costs for medium-sized plants (Aherin, 333333 2021) and an assumed 20% USDA grant to incentivize construction, a $100 million expenditure on each of the beef and pork plants creates an opportunity to add as much as 5% additional capacity for each species, easing current capacity as the industries prepare for local and export growth. Whether producer-ownership of capacity can generate stability and additional benefits in the supply chains is of key interest. Models of producer ownership-including cooperatives and carefully structured LLCs-allow livestock producers to capture processing margins and remove some of the price uncertainty around live animal prices to the plant and producer. It follows, too, that producer-ownership can therefore reduce the ability of existing larger plants to poach supply from medium-sized plants during the crucial startup phase and ensure that plants run at optimum capacity. A significant portion of the additional capacity added to the pork industry in the last 15 years exhibited some form of producer ownership. Anecdotally, the pork and beef sectors may be moving away from commodity production and into systems that maintain animal identity from farm to consumer. Producers have an opportunity to capitalize on this shift by collectively investing in medium-sized plants with the ability to preserve identity and be more responsive to evolving consumer preferences. An overarching concern is of the need to maintain capacity into the future and the potential of existing packers to acquire this subsidized capacity should medium sized processing fail.

15.
Epidemiologie et Sante Animale ; 78:1-131, 2020.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904311

ABSTRACT

This special issue contains 14 papers from the AEEMA Meeting focusing on the theme entitled "What changes for the management of animals' health crises". Topics of papers include: the management of animals' health crises and introduction to the meeting;evolution of societies perception and social acceptability of sanitary control measures;evolution of the health governance: to adapt the French health system to the new challenge;new challenges for risk management of animal health;evolution of preparedness for the management of animal disease crisis;feedback from the fipronil crisis;towards bovine tuberculosis eradication in Republic of Ireland, including European badgers' vaccination (a review);management of foot-and-mouth disease in Mauritius and Rodrigues: a vaccine strategy for eradication;health and biodiversity during anthropocene;Covid-19 and wild animals;Covid-19 and companion animals;Covid-19 and farmed animals;Covid-19 and laboratory animals;and Preventing SARS-CoV-2 transmission from animals to human beings.

16.
Rangelands ; 44(3):163-166, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1900109

ABSTRACT

On the Ground•A workshop focusing on invasive annual grass management in sagebrush steppe was held on December 14 and 15, 2020•The workshop was attended by 250 participants with over 30 presenters.•This special issue of Rangelands includes papers authored by the presenters on the topics covered in the workshop.

17.
Asian Journal of Agriculture and Biology ; 10(3):12, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1897345

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a worldwide pandemic that spread over 192 countries and caused more than 3 million people deaths by 2021. It arises a concern on livestock cultivation, their production, and maintaining the supply chain to sustain the existing economy worldwide. The prediction of potential consequences on livestock production and food security is unexpected. Numerous cases among workers in animal farms and product processing plants are evolved during the panic situation, leading to a negative impact on livestock management, and the distribution of products to human doors simultaneously. One of the significant contributions to the drastic decline in livestock operation is the high cost of animal feed. Social distance also slows down all regular activities in livestock farms, resulting in a considerable upset on outcomes. Not only that shutting down transportation flexibility leads to be a burden for farmers in case of high production costs. In the context of consumers, the sublime price of meat, milk, and eggs has addressed the exacerbating risk to worldwide nutrition security. Hence, the world is experiencing an outbreak challenge in resilient, fair, and flexible animal production systems and ensuring food safety globally.

18.
Sustainability ; 14(11):6452, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1892959

ABSTRACT

Demographic, economic, and environmental issues, including climate change events, aging population, growing urban-rural disparity, and the COVID-19 pandemic, contribute to vulnerabilities in agricultural production and food systems. South Korea has designated smart agriculture as a national strategic investment, expanding investment in research and development (R&D) to develop and commercialize convergence technologies, thus extending sustainable smart agriculture and strengthening global competitiveness. Hence, this study probes the status of smart agricultural R&D investment from the perspectives of public funds, research areas, technologies, regions, organizations, and stakeholders. It examines 5646 public R&D projects worth USD 1408.5 million on smart agriculture in 17 regions and eight technology clusters from 2015 to 2021. Further, it proposes a pool of potential collaborative networks via a case study of strawberry, a representative veritable crop inspiring smart agriculture, to demonstrate the study framework’s usefulness in promoting smart agriculture and establishing a sustainable R&D collaboration ecosystem. The proposed framework, accordingly, allows stakeholders to understand and monitor the status of R&D investment from various perspectives. Moreover, given the insight into the tasks belonging to technical areas and regions that require sustainable cooperation in smart agriculture, central and local governments develop policies to reinforce sustainable smart-farming models.

19.
The Australian Journal of Emergency Management ; 36(3):31-32, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1888112

ABSTRACT

Biological disasters can affect living organisms in the form of epidemic or pandemic and human-induced environmental changes are driving the emergence of many infectious diseases throughout the world. In recent years, viruses from wildlife hosts have caused high-impact disease outbreaks such as SARS, Ebola and the recent COVID-19 pandemic.

20.
Cultivos Tropicales ; 42(4), 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1887748

ABSTRACT

An update of the karstic morphogenesis in San Jose de las Lajas polje is carried out, with the objective of making a quantitative evaluation of the of karstic-erosive process advance. It is from a baseline of more than three decades in reference localities, in accordance with the conditions of use and management to which soils have been subjected. It demonstrates the effects of intensive anthropogenesis on the Red Ferrallitic soils, as a result of a multifactorial process, conditioned not only by the intrinsic properties of the soil cover and conditions of use, but also dependent on the geological-geomorphological conditions. The application of the Integrating System of Qualitative and Quantitative Methods allowed characterizing the complex influence of the relief in the evolution of the main morphometric parameters of the dolines with losses between 12.33-15.95 t ha-1 year-1. It converted into length units show reductions in the A+B horizons between 0.98-1.20 mm year-1, which exceed the permissible threshold values in terms of erosion proposed by the USLE and the rates of formation of soils derived from limestone rocks in Cuba. It has a marked tendency to increase, which confirm the need for protection and improvement so that their "immunity" to erosion ceases to be a myth and becomes a priority issue for Food Security in the post Covid-19 development programs in Cuba. These soils represent the maximum potential to satisfy the country's current demand for agricultural and livestock productions.

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