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1.
Pediatr Cardiol ; 2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059797

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular involvement is a major cause of inpatient and intensive care unit morbidity related to Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). The objective of this study was to identify long-term cardiovascular manifestations of MIS-C. We included 80 consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit with MIS-C who were evaluated for a year in our follow-up clinic using an institution protocol. The outcome measures were cardiac biomarkers (troponin and BNP), electrocardiogram changes, echocardiographic findings cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and graded-exercise stress test (GXT) findings. The cohort included patients aged between 6 months and 17 years (median 9 years; 48.8% females). At the peak of the disease 81.3% had abnormal BNP and 58.8% had troponin leak which reduced to 33.8% and 18.8% respectively at discharge with complete normalization by 6 weeks post-discharge. At admission 33.8% had systolic dysfunction, which improved to 11.3% at discharge with complete resolution by 2 weeks. Coronary artery abnormalities were seen in 17.5% during the illness with complete resolution by 2 weeks post discharge except one (1.9%) with persistent giant aneurysm at 1 year-follow up. CMR was performed at 6 months in 23 patient and demonstrated 4 patients with persistent late gadolinium enhancement (17.4%). Normal exercise capacity with no ectopy was seen in the 31 qualifying patients that underwent a GXT. There is significant heterogeneity in the cardiovascular manifestations of MIS-C. Although majority of the cardiovascular manifestations resolve within 6 weeks, diastolic dysfunction, CAA and myocardial scar may persist in a small subset of patients warranting a structured long-term follow-up strategy.

2.
Br J Anaesth ; 129(5): 801-814, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2003898

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are at risk of long-term comorbidities. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and physical and psychological impairments in ARDS survivors from 3 months to 5 yr follow-up after ICU discharge. METHODS: Systematic search of PubMed, AMED, BNI, and CINAHL databases from January 2000 to date. The primary outcome was HRQoL. Secondary outcomes included physical, pulmonary, and cognitive function, mental health, and return to work. A secondary analysis compared classical ARDS with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease-2 (SARS-CoV-2) ARDS. RESULTS: Forty-eight papers met inclusion criteria including 11 693 patients; of those 85% (n=9992) had classical ARDS and 14% (n=1632) had SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical component summary score mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 46 (41-50) at 3 months, 39 (36-41) at 6 months, and 40 (38-43) at 12 months. The SF-36 mental component summary mean score was 53 (48-57) at 3 months, 45 (40-50) at 6 months, and 44 (42-47) at 12 months. SF-36 values were lower than those found in the normal population up to 5 yr. The predictive distance walked in 6 min was 57% (45-69), 63% (56-69), and 66% (62-70) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Classical ARDS and SARS-CoV-2 ARDS showed no difference in HRQoL and physical function; however, patients with classical ARDS had higher incidence of anxiety and depression (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: ARDS survivors can experience reduced HRQoL and physical and mental health impairment. These symptoms might not recover completely up to 5 yr after ICU discharge. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO: CRD42021296506.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , Survivors/psychology
3.
J Surg Res ; 274: 153-159, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991180

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Medical-legal needs are health-harming adverse social conditions with a legal remedy. Medical-legal partnerships in primary care settings have been proposed to address these needs for at-risk patients already seeking medical care. Our hypothesis is that trauma patients represent a unique population that may be more likely to have baseline medical-legal needs. METHODS: A trauma-specific medical-legal needs survey was developed. Adult trauma patients who were able to give consent and were admitted to our urban Level I hospital were surveyed. Medical-legal needs were tabulated from the surveys. Those patients in the top decile of medical-legal needs were categorized as having a High Burden of medical-legal needs. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify those independent risk factors for having a High Burden of medical-legal needs. RESULTS: A total of 566 participants completed the survey (78.2% response rate). The mean number of medical-legal needs for our population was 2.5 (SD = 3.1). 73% of our respondents had at least one medical-legal need. The most common needs were Housing (n = 229, 40%) and Education/Employment (n = 223, 39%). Older age (aOR = 3.01, 95% CI 1.2-8.1, P = 0.02), being separated or divorced (aOR = 4.25, 95% CI 1.2-14.0, P = 0.02), self perceived poor health (aOR = 8.4, 95% CI 2.61-26.86, P < 0.001), penetrating mechanism of injury (aOR = 2.52, 95% CI 1.22-5.2, P = 0.01), and having been admitted to the hospital for a longer period of time (aOR = 5.48, 95% CI 1.55-19.4, P = 0.008) were all independently associated with a High Burden of medical-legal needs. CONCLUSIONS: Trauma patients have a high baseline burden of medical-legal needs. Medical-legal partnerships embedded in trauma teams may offer an innovative strategy to help address long-term health outcomes in a highly vulnerable population that would not otherwise have contact with the healthcare system.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Emergency Medical Services , Adult , Housing , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vulnerable Populations
4.
Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine ; 23(5):14, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1918319

ABSTRACT

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the setting of critically ill patients. Pneumonia, and in particular community-acquired pneumonia, is one of the most common causes of illness and hospital admission worldwide. This article aims to review the association between AF and acute diseases, with specific attention to pneumonia, from the pathophysiology to its clinical significance. Even though the relationship between pneumonia and AF has been known for years, it was once considered a transient bystander. In recent years there has been growing knowledge on the clinical significance of this arrhythmia in acute clinical settings, in which it holds a prognostic role which is not so different as compared to that of the so-called "primary" AF. AF is a distinct entity even in the setting of pneumonia, and acute critical illnesses in general, and it should therefore be managed with a guidelines-oriented approach, including prescription of anticoagulants in patients at thromboembolic risk, always considering patients' individuality. More data on the significance of the arrhythmia in this setting will help clinicians to give patients the best possible care.

5.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 205(10): 1159-1168, 2022 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846610

ABSTRACT

Rationale: The outcomes of survivors of critical illness due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) compared with non-COVID-19 are yet to be established. Objectives: We aimed to investigate new disability at 6 months in mechanically ventilated patients admitted to Australian ICUs with COVID-19 compared with non-COVID-19. Methods: We included critically ill patients with COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 from two prospective observational studies. Patients were eligible if they were adult (age ⩾ 8 yr) and received ⩾24 hours of mechanical ventilation. In addition, patients with COVID-19 were eligible with a positive laboratory PCR test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Measurements and Main Results: Demographic, intervention, and hospital outcome data were obtained from electronic medical records. Survivors were contacted by telephone for functional outcomes with trained outcome assessors using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Between March 6, 2020, and April 21, 2021, 120 critically ill patients with COVID-19, and between August 2017 and January 2019, 199 critically ill patients without COVID-19, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients with COVID-19 were older (median [interquartile range], 62 [55-71] vs. 58 [44-69] yr; P = 0.019) with a lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (17 [13-20] vs. 19 [15-23]; P = 0.011). Although duration of ventilation was longer in patients with COVID-19 than in those without COVID-19 (12 [5-19] vs. 4.8 [2.3-8.8] d; P < 0.001), 180-day mortality was similar between the groups (39/120 [32.5%] vs. 70/199 [35.2%]; P = 0.715). The incidence of death or new disability at 180 days was similar (58/93 [62.4%] vs. 99/150 [66/0%]; P = 0.583). Conclusions: At 6 months, there was no difference in new disability for patients requiring mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure due to COVID-19 compared with non-COVID-19. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04401254).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Australia/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Survivors
6.
Haseki Tip Bulteni-Medical Bulletin of Haseki ; 60(2):152-160, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1798823

ABSTRACT

Aim: Although there are few studies on the predictive value of C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio (CAR) in coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients, to the best of our knowledge, there are no studies specifically conducted in COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study assessed the use of baseline CAR levels to predict death in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with CVD. Methods: This study was designed as a single-center cross-sectional study. Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 who were admitted to the University of Health Sciences Turkey, Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital between April 16 and May 20, 2020 were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those who died and those who survived, considering the follow-up period. The CAR values of the study population, as well as patients with CVD, were calculated, and the association of CAR with in-hospital mortality was evaluated. Results: The in-hospital mortality rate was 11.1% (49/442 pts) in all populations. Deceased patients had significantly more frequent CVD (p<0.001) and the mortality rate was 34.4% (30/96 pts) in those patients. Median CAR values were higher in nonsurvivors than among survivors (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CAR was an independent predictor of mortality in patients with CVD [hazard ratio 1.013 (95% confidence interval: 1.002-1.022), p=0.018]. Conclusion: CAR is an inflammatory risk marker that independently predicts mortality in all COVID-19 hospitalized patients and patients with CVD.

7.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 2022 Mar 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796408

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the influence of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on outcomes of mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 during the first 120 days after hospital discharge. METHODS: Five academic centers conducted a retrospective analysis of mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 admitted during March through May 2020. Survivors had access to a multidisciplinary postintensive care recovery clinic. Physical, psychological, and cognitive deficits were measured using validated instruments and compared based on ECMO status. RESULTS: Two hundred sixty two mechanically ventilated patients were compared with 46 patients cannulated for venovenous ECMO. Patients receiving ECMO were younger and traveled farther but there was no significant difference in gender, race, or body mass index. ECMO patients were mechanically ventilated for longer durations (median, 26 days [interquartile range, 19.5-41 days] vs 13 days [interquartile range, 7-20 days]) and were more likely to receive inhaled pulmonary vasodilators, neuromuscular blockade, investigational COVID-19 therapies, blood transfusions, and inotropes. Patients receiving ECMO experienced greater bleeding and clotting events (P < .01). However, survival at discharge was similar (69.6% vs 70.6%). Of the 217 survivors, 65.0% had documented follow-up within 120 days. Overall, 95.5% were residing at home, 25.7% had returned to work or usual activity, and 23.1% were still using supplemental oxygen; these rates did not differ significantly based on ECMO status. Rates of physical, psychological, and cognitive deficits were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that COVID-19 survivors experience significant physical, psychological, and cognitive deficits following intensive care unit admission. Despite a more complex critical illness course, longer average duration of mechanical ventilation, and longer average length of stay, patients treated with venovenous ECMO had similar survival at discharge and outcomes within 120 days of discharge.

8.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(3): 103437, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773093

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The outcome of performing a tracheostomy in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) seems promising based on the reported 30-day survival rate. However, long-term outcomes are still lacking. Therefore, our aim in this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of tracheostomy performed in critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 27 COVID-19 patients on whom tracheostomy was performed between February 28, 2020, and April 7, 2020, at Tongji Hospital (Wuhan, China). Patients' clinical characteristics, complications, and outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: All patients underwent successful bedside tracheostomy. Thirteen patients (48.1%) were successfully weaned off ventilation within 1 month. The survival rate at one, three, and nine months after tracheostomy were 63.0%, 37.0%, and 29.6%, respectively. At nine months after tracheostomy, 8/27 patients had survived, with five (62.5%) being discharged home while the remaining were dependent on nursing care. CONCLUSION: The survival rate of COVID-19 patients who underwent tracheotomy decreased markedly from 1 to 3 months after tracheotomy, remaining stable between 3 and 9 months. Medical support is much needed for COVID-19 patients over the first 90 days after tracheotomy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tracheostomy , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , Tracheotomy
9.
J Clin Med ; 11(5)2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736965

ABSTRACT

Zika virus (ZIKV) was discovered in Uganda in 1947 and was originally isolated only in Africa and Asia. After a spike of microcephaly cases in Brazil, research has closely focused on different aspects of congenital ZIKV infection. In this review, we evaluated many aspects of the disease in order to build its natural history, with a focus on the long-term clinical and neuro-radiological outcomes in children. The authors have conducted a wide-ranging search spanning the 2012-2021 period from databases PubMed, PubMed Central, Web of Science, Medline, Scopus. Different sections reflect different points of congenital ZIKV infection syndrome: pathogenesis, prenatal diagnosis, clinical signs, neuroimaging and long-term developmental outcomes. It emerged that pathogenesis has not been fully clarified and that the clinical signs are not only limited to microcephaly. Given the current absence of treatments, we proposed schemes to optimize diagnostic protocols in endemic countries. It is essential to know the key aspects of this disease to guarantee early diagnosis, even in less severe cases, and an adequate management of the main chronic problems. Considering the relatively recent discovery of this congenital infectious syndrome, further studies and updated long-term follow-up are needed to further improve management strategies for this disease.

10.
Eur J Pediatr ; 181(4): 1507-1520, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616131

ABSTRACT

The long-term outcomes of newborns exposed to SARS-CoV-2 infection in utero or during the first hours of life are still unknown. We performed a single-center, prospective, observational study of newborns born from mothers with microbiologically confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy or at time of delivery. Infants were offered a multidisciplinary follow-up consisting of nasopharyngeal Polymerase Chain Reaction test at birth and at 48-72 h of life, auxological growth and neurological development, serologic testing, and audiological and ophthalmological assessments. One-hundred ninety-eight mothers and 199 newborns were enrolled. Of the 199 newborns, 171 underwent nasopharyngeal swab, four (2.3%) and two (1.15%) children tested positive at birth and 48-72 h of life, respectively. None had SARS-CoV-2 related symptoms. Auxologic and neurologic development were normal in all children during follow-up. Nine out of 59 infants had SARS-CoV-2 IgG at 3 months of life, which was associated with a positive nasopharyngeal swab at birth (P = 0.04). Twenty seven out of 143 (18.8%) newborns had pathologic transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions at birth, although 14/27 repeated after 1 month were normal. Audiological evaluation was completed with Auditory Brainstem Response between the third and sixth month of life in 34 children, showing in all normal hearing threshold. The ophthalmological evaluation found retinal vascular anomalies in 3/20 (15%) children, immature visual acuity in 5/20 (25%) children, and reduced distance attention in 6/20 cases (30%). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the neonatal and mid-term multidisciplinary outcomes of newborns exposed to SARS-CoV-2 infection in utero or during the first hours of life are mostly positive, with the exception of ophthalmologic findings which, in a preliminary cohort, were abnormal in about 15% of cases. Further prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of children exposed to SARS-CoV-2 in utero and in the early postnatal life. WHAT IS KNOWN: • In utero mother-to-child transmission of SARS-CoV-2 has been documented by several independent studies. • Neonatal COVID-19 is a systemic disease that can be severe, although rarely. WHAT IS NEW: • Newborns exposed in utero to SARS-CoV-2 have mostly a normal auxological, audiological, and neurological development during the first months of life. • Fundus fluorescein angiography revealed that up to 5% of newborns exposed in utero to SARS-CoV2 can show retinal and choroidal abnormalities, including peripheral hypofluorescence of the choroid and increased vascular tortuosity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Rev Neurol (Paris) ; 178(1-2): 137-143, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Long-term outcomes after neurological manifestations due to COVID-19 are poorly known. The aim of our study was to evaluate the functional outcome and identify the risk factors of neurologic sequelae after COVID-19 associated with neurological manifestations (NeuroCOVID). METHODS: We conducted a multi-center observational study six months after the acute neurological symptoms in patients from the French NeuroCOVID hospital-based registry. RESULTS: We obtained data on 60 patients. NeuroCOVID had a negative impact on the quality of life (QoL) of 49% of patients. Age was a predictor of residual QoL impairment (OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.13, p=0.026). At six months, a significant residual disability was found in 51.7% of patients, and impaired cognition in 68.9% of cases. The main persistent neuropsychiatric manifestations were a persistent smell/taste disorder in 45% of patients, memory complaints in 34% of patients, anxiety or depression in 32% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: NeuroCOVID likely carries a high risk of long-term neuropsychiatric disability. Long-term care and special attention should be given to COVID-19 patients, especially if they had neurological manifestations during acute infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 754169, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518554

ABSTRACT

Currently, there is a limited understanding of long-term outcomes of COVID-19, and a need for in-home measurements of patients through the whole course of their disease. We study a novel approach for monitoring the long-term trajectories of respiratory and behavioral symptoms of COVID-19 patients at home. We use a sensor that analyzes the radio signals in the room to infer patients' respiration, sleep and activities in a passive and contactless manner. We report the results of continuous monitoring of three residents of an assisted living facility for 3 months, through the course of their disease and subsequent recovery. In total, we collected 4,358 measurements of gait speed, 294 nights of sleep, and 3,056 h of respiration. The data shows differences in the respiration signals between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Longitudinally, we note sleep and motor abnormalities that persisted for months after becoming COVID negative. Our study represents a novel phenotyping of the respiratory and behavioral trajectories of COVID recovery, and suggests that the two may be integral components of the COVID-19 syndrome. It further provides a proof-of-concept that contactless passive sensors may uniquely facilitate studying detailed longitudinal outcomes of COVID-19, particularly among older adults.

13.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(7): 1423-1435, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454038

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric facial palsy represents a rare multifactorial entity. Facial reanimation restores smiling, thus boosting self-confidence and social integration of the affected children. The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of microsurgical workhorse free functional muscle transfer procedures with emphasis on the long-term functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a literature search of the PubMed database from 1995 to 2019 using the following search strategy: "facial paralysis"[Title/Abstract] OR "facial palsy"[Title]. We used as limits: full text, English language, age younger than 18 years, and humans. Two independent reviewers performed the online screening process using Covidence. Forty articles met the inclusion criteria. The protocol was aligned with the PRISMA statement (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) and was registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO, CRD42019150112) of the National Institute for Health Research. RESULTS: Free functional muscle transfer procedures include mainly segmental gracilis, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis minor muscle transfer. Facial reanimation procedures with the use of the cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) or masseteric nerve result in almost symmetric smiles. The transplanted muscle grows harmoniously along with the craniofacial skeleton. Muscle function and aesthetic outcomes improve over time. All children presented improved self-esteem, oral commissure opening, facial animation, and speech. CONCLUSIONS: A two-stage CFNG plus an FFMT may restore a spontaneous emotive smile in pediatric facial palsy patients. Superior results of children FFMT compared to adults FFMT are probably attributed to greater brain plasticity.


Subject(s)
Facial Paralysis/congenital , Facial Paralysis/surgery , Muscle, Skeletal/innervation , Muscle, Skeletal/transplantation , Nerve Transfer/methods , Smiling , Child , Female , Humans , Meningeal Neoplasms/congenital , Meningeal Neoplasms/surgery , Rhabdomyosarcoma/congenital , Rhabdomyosarcoma/surgery
14.
Lancet Reg Health Eur ; 8: 100186, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study sought to establish the long-term effects of Covid-19 following hospitalisation. METHODS: 327 hospitalised participants, with SARS-CoV-2 infection were recruited into a prospective multicentre cohort study at least 3 months post-discharge. The primary outcome was self-reported recovery at least ninety days after initial Covid-19 symptom onset. Secondary outcomes included new symptoms, disability (Washington group short scale), breathlessness (MRC Dyspnoea scale) and quality of life (EQ5D-5L). FINDINGS: 55% of participants reported not feeling fully recovered. 93% reported persistent symptoms, with fatigue the most common (83%), followed by breathlessness (54%). 47% reported an increase in MRC dyspnoea scale of at least one grade. New or worse disability was reported by 24% of participants. The EQ5D-5L summary index was significantly worse following acute illness (median difference 0.1 points on a scale of 0 to 1, IQR: -0.2 to 0.0). Females under the age of 50 years were five times less likely to report feeling recovered (adjusted OR 5.09, 95% CI 1.64 to 15.74), were more likely to have greater disability (adjusted OR 4.22, 95% CI 1.12 to 15.94), twice as likely to report worse fatigue (adjusted OR 2.06, 95% CI 0.81 to 3.31) and seven times more likely to become more breathless (adjusted OR 7.15, 95% CI 2.24 to 22.83) than men of the same age. INTERPRETATION: Survivors of Covid-19 experienced long-term symptoms, new disability, increased breathlessness, and reduced quality of life. These findings were present in young, previously healthy working age adults, and were most common in younger females. FUNDING: National Institute for Health Research, UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Department for International Development and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

15.
J Infect ; 83(5): 581-588, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356312

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the health status, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life (HRQoL) of COVID-19 associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors, 8 months after diagnosis. METHODS: All eligible patients were interviewed and underwent a physical examination, chest X-ray, and 6 min walk test (6MWT). Scales to evaluate post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and HRQoL were applied. RESULTS: Of 1295 patients, 365 suffered ARDS and 166 survived to hospital discharge. Five died after discharge and 48 were lost to follow-up. Of the 113 remaining patients, 81% had persistent symptoms. More than 50% of patients completed less than 80% of the theoretical distance on the 6MWT, 50% had an abnormal X-ray and 93% of patients developed psychiatric disorders. Mean SF-36 scores were worse than in the general population. After multivariate regression analysis, female sex, non-Caucasian race, and Charlson index>2 were independent risk factors for a worse mental health component summary score on the SF-36, and age was associated with a better prognosis. Female sex and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently associated with a worse physical component summary score. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 associated ARDS survivors have long-term consequences in health status, exercise capacity, and HRQoL. Strategies addressed to prevent these sequelae are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Female , Humans , Quality of Life , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
16.
Lancet Reg Health Eur ; 6: 100121, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: : This study aimed to understand the impact of a critical care admission on long-term outcomes, compared to other hospitalised patients without a critical care encounter. A secondary aim was to examine the interrelationship between emotional, physical, and social problems during recovery. METHODS: : We utilised data from the UK Biobank, an on-going, prospective population-based cohort study. We employed propensity score matching to assess differences in outcomes between patients with a critical care encounter and patients admitted to the hospital (first admission to hospital available) without critical care. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse emotional, physical and social outcomes following critical illness and the relationships between these health domains. FINDINGS: : Data from 1,618 patients were analysed. The median time to follow-up in the critical care cohort was 4427 days (IQR:788-6146) vs 4516 days (IQR: 811-6369) in the non-critical care, hospitalised cohort. Across the two time periods assessed (pre and post 2000), patients exposed to critical care were more likely to experience mental health issues such as depression (p < 0.01) and social isolation (p = 0.01) following discharge from hospital. The critical care cohort were also more likely to have social problems such as the requirement for government funded welfare support (p = 0.02). In the critical care cohort, social and emotional health were closely correlated (p < 0.001, 95% CI:0.33-0.54). The nature of physical problems changed over time; pre-2000 there was a significant difference between the critical and non-critical care in physical outcomes following discharge from hospital, however, there was no difference detected between the two cohorts post-2000. INTERPRETATION: This cohort study has demonstrated that survivors of critical illness have different psycho-social outcomes to matched patients, hospitalised without a critical care encounter. FUNDING: JM is funded by a THIS.Institute (University of Cambridge) Research Fellowship (PD-2019-02-16). AHL is part of the Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, funded by the Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12017/13) and the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office (SPHSU13).

17.
J Crit Care ; 62: 172-175, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988303

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has created an enormous health crisis and this spring New York City had a severe outbreak that pushed health and critical care resources to the limit. A lack of adequate space for mechanically ventilated patients induced our hospital to convert operating rooms into critical care areas (OR-ICU). A large number of COVID-19 will develop acute kidney injury that requires renal replacement therapy (RRT). We included 116 patients with COVID-19 who required mechanical ventilation and were cared for in our OR-ICU. At 90 days and at discharge 35 patients died (30.2%). RRT was required by 45 of the 116 patients (38.8%) and 18 of these 45 patients (40%) compared to 17 with no RRT (23.9%, ns) died during hospitalization and after 90 days. Only two of the 27 patients who required RRT and survived required RRT at discharge and 90 days. When defining renal recovery as a discharge serum creatinine within 150% of baseline, 68 of 78 survivors showed renal recovery (87.2%). Survival was similar to previous reports of patients with severe COVID-19 for patients cared for in provisional ICUs compared to standard ICUs. Most patients with severe COVID-19 and AKI are likely to recover full renal function.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Renal Replacement Therapy , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Recovery of Function , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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