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1.
Neurologia ; 2022 Aug 03.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966964

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with post-COVID-19 syndrome may present cognitive and emotional symptomatology. This study aims to analyse the results of an outpatient neuropsychological intervention program for post-COVID-19 syndrome. METHOD: In June 2020 Institut Guttmann started an outpatient post-COVID-19 neurorehabilitation program, including respiratory therapy, physiotherapy, and neuropsychological rehabilitation. Before and after the program, the cognitive-emotional state of all participants is assessed. Six months after treatment, a follow-up assessment is administered (which includes a collection of information on various aspects of daily life). RESULTS: The sample analysed consisted of 123 patients (mean age: 51 years, SD: 12.41). Seventy-four per cent (n=91) had cognitive impairment and underwent cognitive treatment (experimental group); the remaining 26% (n=32) constituted the control group. After the intervention, the experimental group improved in working memory, verbal memory (learning, recall and recognition), verbal fluency and anxious-depressive symptomatology. The control group showed changes in immediate memory, verbal memory (learning and recognition) and depressive symptomatology, although the effect size in the latter two was smaller than in the experimental group. Six months after treatment, 44.9% of the patients were unable to perform their pre-COVID-19 work activity, and 81.2% reported difficulties in their activities of daily living. CONCLUSIONS: Neuropsychological rehabilitation is an effective tool to treat the cognitive-emotional deficits present in post-COVID-19 syndrome. However, months after the end of treatment, not all patients recover their pre-COVID-19 functional level.

2.
Eat Behav ; 46: 101660, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966501

ABSTRACT

Research suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic is negatively impacting mental health, with rates of eating disorder referrals in particular rising steeply during the pandemic. This study aimed to examine 8-month changes in body image and disordered eating during the COVID-19 pandemic, and explore whether any changes were moderated by gender, age, or eating disorder history. This study used a longitudinal survey design in which 587 adults living in the UK (85 % women; mean age = 32.87 years) completed assessments every two months over five timepoints from May/June 2020 to January/February 2021. Measures included body esteem, disordered eating, and psychological distress. Mixed effect models showed small but significant improvements in body esteem and disordered eating symptoms from May/June 2020 to January/February 2021. These improvements were independent of changes in psychological distress, and did not vary by gender, age or eating disorder history. Whilst poor body image and disordered eating may have been elevated in the early period of the pandemic, this study suggests improvements, rather than worsening, of these outcomes over time. This may reflect adaptation to this changing context.

3.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-10, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966184

ABSTRACT

There is growing evidence that levels of fear and anxiety have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, given regular epidemic prevention and control measures, longitudinal changes and causal factors in the incidence of fear and anxiety need to be measured and explored. College students completed online surveys in two wave studies a year apart. The participants who completed both of the surveys numbered 22,578. The online surveys were completed at the pandemic's normalization/prevention stage (T1, from June 1 to 15, 2020) and during a phase of new local transmission of the disease in Guangdong Province (T2, from June 10 to 18, 2021). Multiple linear regressions were used to examine fear and anxiety predictors from demographic characteristics. Fear related to COVID-19 had significantly decreased at T2 (t = 66.64, p < 0.001), however, anxiety had significantly increased at T2 (t = -5.03, p < 0.001). In particular, not implementing preventive measures (e.g., handwashing) during the COVID-19 pandemic had the greatest impact in predicting the change in fear levels. By contrast, prior poor mental health status contributed the most in predicting the change in degree of anxiety. These results suggest different changes in anxiety levels (deterioration) and degree of fear (mitigation) occurred as the COVID-19 pandemic progressed. These findings have implications for planning mental health crisis provisions and have long-term impact beyond this pandemic.

4.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966157

ABSTRACT

The German government initiated the Network University Medicine (NUM) in early 2020 to improve national research activities on the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. To this end, 36 German Academic Medical Centers started to collaborate on 13 projects, with the largest being the National Pandemic Cohort Network (NAPKON). The NAPKON's goal is creating the most comprehensive Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) cohort in Germany. Within NAPKON, adult and pediatric patients are observed in three complementary cohort platforms (Cross-Sectoral, High-Resolution and Population-Based) from the initial infection until up to three years of follow-up. Study procedures comprise comprehensive clinical and imaging diagnostics, quality-of-life assessment, patient-reported outcomes and biosampling. The three cohort platforms build on four infrastructure core units (Interaction, Biosampling, Epidemiology, and Integration) and collaborations with NUM projects. Key components of the data capture, regulatory, and data privacy are based on the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research. By April 01, 2022, 34 university and 40 non-university hospitals have enrolled 5298 patients with local data quality reviews performed on 4727 (89%). 47% were female, the median age was 52 (IQR 36-62-) and 50 pediatric cases were included. 44% of patients were hospitalized, 15% admitted to an intensive care unit, and 12% of patients deceased while enrolled. 8845 visits with biosampling in 4349 patients were conducted by April 03, 2022. In this overview article, we summarize NAPKON's design, relevant milestones including first study population characteristics, and outline the potential of NAPKON for German and international research activities.Trial registration https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04768998 . https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04747366 . https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04679584.

5.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-162-S-163, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967253

ABSTRACT

Background:Symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 primary vaccination among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are generally similar to the general population,although symptoms after the second dose are more frequent and severe than after the first dose.Postvaccination symptoms after a 3rd mRNA vaccine dose in the predominantly immune-compromised IBD population is unknown.Methods:Adults with IBD participating in the prospective Coronavirus Risk Associations and Longitudinal Evaluation in IBD (CORALE-IBD) vaccine registry who received a 3rd mRNA vaccine dose were asked to complete a detailed symptom survey 1 week after vaccination.Symptoms were assessed across 11 organ systems,and graded as mild,moderate,or severe,or requiring hospitalization.“Severe+” referred to those with severe symptoms or who required hospitalization.We stratified by age (<or> 50 years) given prior distinct symptom profiles after dose 2 (D2).We also evaluated whether severe+ symptoms after D2 predicted severe+ symptoms after dose 3 (D3).Results:We included 524 participants (70% female, mean age 45 years) who received a 3rd mRNA vaccine through October 11, 2021.Most had Crohn's disease (71%), and 89% were on biologic therapies.Most (58%) had received primary vaccination with BNT562b2,and only 3.5% reported prior COVID infection at the time of initial vaccination.Overall, 97% of subjects received a 3rd dose with the same mRNA vaccine as in their initial series with the remainder receiving the other mRNA vaccine type.No participants received a 3rd dose with the Ad26.CoV.2 (J&J) vaccine. Overall, 41% reported symptoms after a 3rd dose,with symptoms generally more frequent and severe among those <55 years (Table).The most frequent postvaccination symptom was injection site pain (39%).Common systemic symptoms included fatigue/malaise (34%),headache (23%),and muscle, bone or joint symptoms (13%).These were all less frequent after D3 than after D2 (Figure).Gastrointestinal symptoms were reported by 8.8%, which was slightly more frequent than after D2 (7.8%).Among those with postvaccination symptoms, the proportion with severe symptoms after D3 was lower than D2 for fatigue/ malaise, headache, dizziness and lightheadedness, fever/chills, and rheumatologic symptoms, but was slightly higher than D2 for gastrointestinal symptoms.Severe+ symptoms were seen in 17% after D2 and in 14% after D3. Of those with severe+ symptoms after D2, 34% had severe+ symptoms after D3.In contrast, about 22% had severe+ symptoms after D3 but did not report severe+ symptoms after D2.Conclusion:The frequency and severity of symptoms after a 3rd mRNA vaccine dose are generally similar or lower than those after a second dose.Furthermore, prior severe+ symptoms after D2 do not necessarily predict severe+ symptoms after D3. Further evaluation of postvaccination gastrointestinal symptoms in this population is warranted. (Figure Presented) (Table Presented)

6.
Sleep Medicine ; 100:S219, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967129

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Sleep problems can actively contribute to the onset, maintenance and worsening of mental disorders. Beyond insomnia, several other sleep pathologies may be associated with adverse mental health outcomes, and having multiple sleep disorders may be an aggravating factor. This study aimed to delineate the current landscape of sleep difficulties and symptoms of sleep disorders linked to poor mental health, investigate associations between the age at onset of sleep problems and subsequent mental health, and assess the perceived impacts of sleep problems. Materials and Methods: A representative sample of 1,200 Canadians (16 to 88 years old, 53% females) completed an online survey on sleep and mental health between 21 and 24 September 2021 (i.e. after the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada). The survey included questions inspired form the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, Sleep Disorders Symptom Checklist-25, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, STOP-Bang, and Insomnia Severity Index. The sample was stratified in two groups based on self-reported current mental disorder diagnosis: mental disorder diagnoses [219 (18.2%)] vs no diagnosis [960 (80.0%)]. Total scores on the General Anxiety Disorder-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire were used to determine anxiety and depression symptoms severity. Results: Of those with mental disorder diagnoses, 80.4% (176/219) endorsed symptoms of at least one sleep disorder, a proportion significantly higher compared to the 42.7% observed in the rest of the sample (p<.001, V=.29). The mental disorder diagnoses group included higher proportions of respondents endorsing symptoms of insomnia disorder, sleep apnea, bruxism, restless legs syndrome, nightmare disorder, hypersomnia and somnambulism. After adjusting for age, sex, income level and total sleep time, having a mental disorder diagnosis was associated with: insomnia (OR=3.52, p<.001), obstructive sleep apnea (OR=1.95, p=.006) and bruxism (OR=2.77, p<.001). Half of those with mental disorders diagnoses endorsed symptoms of multiple sleep disorders, a proportion significantly higher than what was observed in the rest of the sample (p<.001, V=.35). Endorsing symptoms of insomnia, sleep apnea, bruxism, restless legs syndrome, and hypersomnia were associated with more severe anxiety and depression symptoms after adjusting for age, sex, income level, total sleep time, and mental disorders diagnoses (B>.98, p<.012). Younger age at onset of sleep problems was a significant independent predictor for current self-reported diagnosis of mental disorders (OR=.96, p<.001). Compared to the rest of the sample, the mental disorder group reported significantly worse impacts of sleep problems on mental health, family relationships, physical health, cognitive functioning, productivity level, and global daily functioning. Conclusions: These results reinforce the transdiagnostic nature and cumulative impacts of the various profiles of sleep problems associated with mental health issues. These findings also suggest that the relationship between sleep and mental health is not solely driven by short sleep duration or insomnia. There is a need to enhance awareness about the diverse profiles of sleep issues linked to poor mental health and the relevance of early intervention, notably during youth. Should future longitudinal studies based on objective measures confirm these observations, this may inform further development of transdiagnostic sleep interventions for people with mental disorders.

7.
Sleep Medicine ; 100:S185, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967127

ABSTRACT

Introduction:Mental health conditions such as anxiety represent a growing health concern for students in institutions of higher education. Postsecondary students are a vulnerable population that is increasingly recognized to be at risk for both mental health problems and significant sleep problems. While it has been hypothesized that poor sleep quality may be a risk factor for developing anxiety, little is known about the frequency and severity of sleep problems and their association with anxiety within the postsecondary student population. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the best evidence on the association between sleep quality and anxiety in postsecondary students. Materials and Methods: An experienced librarian developed systematic search strategies in four databases: MEDLINE, Embase, APA PsycInfo (through Ovid Technologies Inc.) and CINAHL, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (through EBSCOhost). Databases were searched from inception to September 2020. Random pairs of independent reviewers screened titles and s for eligibility and critically appraised all eligible studies. We assessed the quality of studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria for cohort studies, and the Hoy tool for cross-sectional studies. One author extracted and synthesized the results from all of the low and moderate risk of bias studies. We synthesized our results by study design and population. Results: Once duplicates were removed, a total of 3203 unique citations were screened. Fifty-one articles were eligible and critically appraised. Studies with low and moderate risk of bias were included in our final synthesis of which 24 were cross-sectional studies and four were cohort studies. With the exception of one study, all cross-sectional studies reported a statistically significant association between poor sleep quality and anxiety. All four of the cohort studies found that students who reported poor sleep quality were more likely to develop future anxiety and students with anxiety were more likely to develop future poor sleep quality. Conclusions: Poor sleep quality is associated with anxiety in postsecondary students. Due to the cross-sectional nature of most studies, we cannot determine the direction of this association. Future studies should focus on developing high-quality prospective cohort or longitudinal studies to help understand the impact and direction that this association has in postsecondary populations. This research has the potential to inform the development and design of mental health policies and programs that are created by postsecondary institutions to address the increasing rates of student mental health issues. Acknowledgements: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Operating Grant: Knowledge synthesis: COVID-19 in Mental Health & Substance Use;University of Ontario Institute of Technology;Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

8.
Sleep Medicine ; 100:S97-S98, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967121

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Adolescence is defined as the period of a gradual transition between childhood and adulthood, with conceptually distinct physical changes marking puberty and maturation. Sleep is a critical aspect for overall well-being and healthy development across physical, behavioral, cognitive, academic, and psychosocial domains. This can pave the way to a new frontier for adolescent research, in which the dynamic interplay between sleep and multiple psychosocial aspects of adolescents’ life can explain long-term developmental outcomes. Thus, systematizing and assessing longitudinal research on this topic is required to understand both changes of sleep during adolescence and its complex over time relationship with psychosocial development. Material and methods: The first aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to identify all studies that evaluated longitudinally sleep quality, with standardized objective and/or subjective measures, in adolescence. The second aim is to evaluate the longitudinal interplay between sleep quality and psychosocial development in adolescents (particularly considering the domains of social experiences in multiple ecological contexts;identity processes and well-being outcomes). This work could lead to a better understanding of both changes in sleep quality during adolescence and its bidirectional link to psychosocial development. Pubmed;Psychinfo, PsycArticles, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus;ProQuest Dissertations and Theses;ERIC;GreyNet databases were systematically searched without publication period restriction until 23th of September 2021. Eligible studies had to: include adolescents from the general population aged between 10/11 to 18/19 years old;use a longitudinal design;report sleep quality-related outcomes as measured by objective and/or subjective standardized measures for at least two time-points. The corresponding author worked in pairs with another team member and independently screened at first the titles and s and then the full text against the eligibility criteria. Results: A total of 362 full-texts were screened and a final number of 250 studies were included. The inter-rater agreement between the first and other authors of the team that worked in pairs for the selection process was substantial. Of these studies, 163 evaluated the longitudinally sleep quality of adolescents over time and its connection to physical health;psychological and social wellbeing. 81 studies evaluated longitudinally the interplay between sleep quality and different ecological contexts and identity development of adolescents. Finally, 6 studies evaluated the change over time of sleep quality outcomes and its relationship with wellbeing, context and identity in adolescents before and after the pandemic due to the Covid-19 outbreak. Conclusion: Because of the broad scope of this project, the data can be used to examine a large variety of research questions. From this large selection of literature, different systematic reviews on different specific topics will be obtained. Particularly, our work will focus at first on systematically assessing the development and change over time of the sleep quality during the adolescence period. Furthermore, different works on the longitudinal interplay between sleep quality and physical health, different contexts and identity development will be systematically evaluated and presented. Acknowledgements: This work was conducted within the ERC-Consolidator project IDENTITIES (Grant Agreement n. 101002163).

9.
European Journal of Molecular and Clinical Medicine ; 9(4):227-235, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1965498

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Corona virus Disease is a fatal viral disease that continues to trouble many countries around the world. Immunization is one of the most effective and cost-efficient initiatives ever, saving millions of lives every year. COVID-19 vaccines are considered to be of great importance in preventing and controlling the disease. This study aimed to estimate AEFI, COVID-19 vaccine awareness, preference among people visiting vaccination centre, SIMS, Shimoga. OBJECTIVE: 1. To estimate AEFI among people visiting vaccination centre, SIMS, Shimoga. 2. To estimate COVID-19 vaccine awareness and preference among people visiting vaccination centre, SIMS, Shimoga. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective longitudinal study was conducted for a period of one month – July 2021. People visiting COVID vaccination centre, SIMS, Shimoga were included in the study. Considering AEFI to be 30% after pilot study, sample size calculated was 336. Data was collected from 373 participants. Ethical clearance was obtained by Institutional Ethics Committee. Oral consent was taken from each participant. Each participant is interviewed telephonically, and the relevant information was collected. The collected data was tabulated in Microsoft excel sheet. Analysis is done by using epiInfo software. Descriptive statistics like percentages, mean were used, and the results were tabulated. RESULTS: Incidence of AEFI reported from our study population was 36%. Majority of it was after first dose of vaccination (47%), and the most common complaint was pain (64%) at the site of injection. Covishield was the most preferred vaccine as the availability was good. Awareness regarding vaccine was mostly from the discussion among friends, family members (25%) and from the health care provider (22%). CONCLUSION: Most of the AEFI reported was minor. Acceptability of the vaccine will increase if more vaccine is made available and choices of different vaccine is given to the people. “Conducting awareness camps” regarding vaccination at the work places will increase the vaccine acceptance as discussion among friends and family members has major role in sharing information

10.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(9)2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963356

ABSTRACT

Given widespread use of spike antibody in generating coronavirus disease vaccines, SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid antibodies are increasingly used to indicate previous infection in serologic surveys. However, longitudinal kinetics and seroreversion are poorly defined. We found substantial seroreversion of nucleocapsid total immunoglobulin, underscoring the need to account for seroreversion in seroepidemiologic studies.

11.
International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design ; 12(2):1-14, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1964214

ABSTRACT

Aims from the present study are to analyze the effect of students’ experience, expectation, and campus readiness on students’ e-learning satisfaction during the Covid-19 pandemic. The present studies explore the three variables’ effect on learning satisfaction in two phases, i.e., examining learning satisfaction between a distance learning campus and traditional campuses and comparing learning satisfaction between two conditions with a one-semester time lag. The results show that students enrolled in distance learning campuses have higher learning satisfaction, and students’ experience incorporates systems readiness affecting e-learning satisfaction. Further, the longitudinal study shows that fulfilling the learning mode’s expectations will increase e-learning satisfaction. The study also found that no effect from learning application which was used on e-learning satisfaction. The implication was discussed.

12.
Frontiers in Political Science ; 4, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1963521
13.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(7): ofac270, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961126

ABSTRACT

Symptoms of long coronavirus disease (COVID) were found in 38% of 170 patients followed for a median of 22.6 months. The most prevalent symptoms were fatigue, affected taste and smell, and difficulties remembering and concentrating. Predictors for long COVID were older age and number of symptoms in the acute phase. Long COVID may take many months, maybe years, to resolve.

14.
Saf Sci ; : 105879, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956347

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 had a huge impact on healthcare systems globally. Institutions, care teams and individuals made considerable efforts to adapt their practices. The present longitudinal, mixed-methods study examined a large sample of healthcare institution employees in Switzerland. Organisational resilience processes were assessed by identifying problematic real-world situations and assessing how they were managed during three phases of the pandemic's first year. Results highlighted differences between resilience processes across the different types of problematic situations encountered by healthcare workers. Four configurations of organisational resilience were identified depending on teams' performance and ability to adapt over time: "learning from mistakes", "effective development", "new standards" and "hindered resilience". Resilience trajectories differed depending on professional categories, hierarchical status and the problematic situation's perceived severity. Factors promoting or impairing organisational resilience are discussed. Findings highlighted the importance of individuals', teams' and institutions' meso- and micro-level adaptations and macro-level actors' structural actions.

15.
Sleep Health ; 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956343

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Pregnancy is associated with elevated risk for poor sleep quality, which increases the risk for poor obstetrical outcomes and parent mental health problems. The COVID-19 pandemic has seen increased reports of disturbed sleep worldwide; however, the degree this extends to pregnancy or influences pregnancy mental health outcomes has not been examined. The goal of this study was to examine changes in pregnant individuals' sleep, anxiety, and depression during the pandemic, and to understand how sleep was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression over time. METHODS: The Pregnancy During the COVID-19 Pandemic (PdP) study is a prospective longitudinal cohort of pregnant individuals (at enrollment) with repeated follow-ups during pregnancy and the postpartum period. About 3747 pregnant individuals participated between April and July 2020. The present analysis was restricted to participants who completed at least 2 assessments, yielding a final sample of 1842 pregnant individuals. RESULTS: Depression symptoms were elevated at baseline, compared to prepandemic estimates of prevalence, but declined gradually over time. Shorter sleep duration, higher sleep disturbance, and more sleep-related impairments at baseline predicted a slower decline in depression symptoms over time. More sleep disturbances at baseline also predicted slower decline in anxiety symptoms over time. In contrast, rates of depression and anxiety symptoms at baseline were not predictive of changes in any of the 3 sleep variables over time. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of early intervention for sleep problems in pregnancy, in order to optimize mental health throughout pregnancy and mitigate long-term negative outcomes.

16.
Psychiatry Res ; 316: 114739, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956301

ABSTRACT

Physician wellness was greatly impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Busy clinical services, personal safety concerns, changing guidelines, and compassion fatigue weighed on physicians. Although studies have examined physician wellness, few have studied how it changed over time. A survey about wellness was distributed to 299 physicians at Ascension St. Vincent Hospital-Indianapolis March 2020, July 2020, November 2020, and March 2021. Physicians also free-texted about their well-being during the pandemic. Participation rates over the four time periods averaged 22.23%. Responses were compared among the time periods using Pearson Chi-Square and Fisher's Exact Tests. Six wellness factors (anxiety, worry about becoming ill, worry about infecting family, worry about caring for children, concern about personal finances) were reported as worse after the pandemic began, but statistically significantly improved over the course of the study. In contrast, seven wellness measures (increased issues with depression, frustration, hopelessness, fatigue, dread going to work, worry about missing work, worry about caring for family), that also worsened after the pandemic began, did not statistically improve over time. Physician wellness was impacted by the pandemic; however, not all measures followed the same course over time. Longitudinal assessments of wellness can help inform programs to best support physicians.

17.
Addict Behav ; 135: 107439, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956049

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between alcohol consumption, psychological distress and COVID-19 related circumstances (being in lockdown, working from home, providing home-schooling and being furloughed) over the first eight months of the pandemic in Australia. METHOD: A longitudinal study with six survey waves over eight months with a convenience sample of 770 participants. Participants were aged 18 or over, lived in Australia and consumed alcohol at least monthly. Demographic data was obtained in the first wave. Data on alcohol consumption, psychological distress (Kessler 10), and COVID-19 related circumstances (being in lockdown, working from home, providing home-schooling and being furloughed) were obtained in each survey wave. RESULTS: Results from the fixed-effect bivariate regression analyses show that participants reported greater alcohol consumption when they had high psychological distress compared to when they had low psychological distress. Meanwhile, participants reported greater alcohol consumption when they worked from home compared to when they did not work from home. Participants also reported greater alcohol consumption when they provided home-schooling compared with when they did not provide home-schooling. The fixed-effect panel multivariable regression analyses indicated a longitudinal relationship between higher psychological distress and providing home-schooling on increased alcohol consumption. CONCLUSION: Broader drinking trends during the COVID-19 pandemic typically indicate increases and decreases in drinking among different members of the population. This study demonstrates that in Australia, it was those who experienced psychological distress and specific impacts of COVID-19 restrictions that were more likely to increase their drinking.

18.
Front Psychol ; 13: 876116, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952655

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The present study examined whether and how attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine (i.e., safety, efficacy, and price), mental health statuses (i.e., perceived stress and depression), and interpersonal factors (i.e., online social support, perceived social support) would predict COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Patients and methods: The two-wave longitudinal surveys were conducted in December 2019 and 2020 in Chinese medical college students (N = 194). Well- validated measures were used, including the Perceived Stress Scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Online Social Support Questionnaire, and the Perceived Social Support Scale. Perceived safety, efficacy, price of COVID-19 vaccine, vaccine hesitancy, and actual intake were also measured. Results: Only 2.1% of participants had been vaccinated against COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic; 13.4% intended to get vaccinated in the next 3 months, and 66% intended to have it in the next 12 months upon follow-up. Multiple regression analyses revealed that perceived stress (ßm = -0.15, p < 0.05) and depression (ßm = -0.15, p < 0.05) were risk factors for positive attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine; online social support (ORm = 1.41, p < 0.01) and positive attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine (ORm = 1.83, p < 0.01) were protective factors of intention to get vaccinated in future. Conclusion: Findings suggest that intervention efforts should be made to reduce negative attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine among people with poor mental health and enhance online social support to promote COVID-19 vaccination.

19.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(28): e225, 2022 Jul 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has continued for a couple of years, the long-term effects of the pandemic and the subsequent school curriculum modification on the mental health of children and parents need to be investigated. To clarify the changes that can occur during one school year and to predict the risk factors for vulnerable groups, this study identified parameters relative to children's screen time, their problematic behavior, and parental depression. METHODS: A total of 186 participants were analyzed who were parents of elementary schoolchildren in South Korea. These parents were required to complete a web-based questionnaire twice. The questionnaires were conducted in June 2020 and September 2021. Participants' general demographics including family income, children's screen time, sleep patterns, problematic behavior, and parental depression were assessed via the parental questionnaire that included various measurement tools. RESULTS: Children's body mass index (BMI) increased significantly in 2021 (18.94 ± 3.75 vs. 18.14 ± 3.30, P < 0.001). Smartphone frequency of use per week (5.35 vs. 4.54, P < 0.001) and screen time per day (3.52 vs. 3.16, P < 0.001) significantly increased during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic. The television screen time (2.88 vs. 3.26, P < 0.001), frequency of viewing (3.77 vs. 4.77, P < 0.001), and children's problematic behaviors significantly decreased (9.15 vs. 11.85, P < 0.001). A lower income household was a key predictor of increased smartphone frequency (B = 1.840, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.923-2.757, P < 0.001) and smartphone screen time (B = 1.992, 95% CI, 1.458-2.525, P < 0.001). The results showed that the lower income household (B = 5.624, 95% CI, 2.927-8.320, P < 0.001) and a child's psychiatric treatment history (B = 7.579, 95% CI, 5.666-9.492, P < 0.001) was the most significant predictor of problematic behaviors of children and parental depression (B = 3.476, 95% CI, 1.628-5.325, P < 0.001; B = 3.138, 95% CI, 1.827-4.450, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggested that children's smartphone screen time and BMI increased during COVID-19 because of the school curriculum modification following school closures in South Korea. The increased children's problematic behaviors and parental depression were predicted by lower-income households and the previous psychiatric history of children. These results indicate that multiple social support systems to the vulnerable group are needed during the ongoing pandemic and that a modified school setting is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Smartphone , Surveys and Questionnaires , Television
20.
Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health ; 16(1): 42, 2022 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents have been deeply exposed to negative consequences of social distancing imposed by Covid-19. There is a lack of longitudinal studies regarding the impact on adolescents of this unfavorable condition, and their results are controversial. The aim of the present prospective study is to assess psychopathological symptoms in adolescent students over time and to evaluate what type of impact the Covid-19 pandemic had on adolescents. Moreover, the association between mental health indexes, potential risk and resilience factors is explored. METHODS: Psychopathological symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depression, stress, emotional dysregulation, maladaptive behaviours), and potential risk and resilience factors (i.e., childhood trauma, emotional regulation skills, family function, personality traits) were assessed among a sample of 153 students (72% female; mean age 16.1 ± 0.49), living in a medium-size city in the north of Italy, at two time points: before the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic (November 2019-January 2020) and 1 year later (April-May 2021). RESULTS: After 1 year, we found an increase in mean scores on anxiety, stress for future uncertainty, and higher frequency of maladaptive behaviours. By contrast, the level of stress related to social domains (i.e., school attendance, romantic relationships, peer pressure) decreased. Dysfunctional emotional regulation skills, childhood trauma, low family functioning, and specific personality traits were associated to higher psychopathological symptoms. Cluster analysis detected three groups of youths based on their change over time in psychopathological symptoms: those who worsened (N = 23; 15%), improved (N = 55; 34%), or remained stable (N = 75; 46%). After controlling for baseline mental health status, those adolescents reporting increase in self-harm (OR = 2.61; p < 0.001), binge-drinking (OR = 3.0; p = 0.007), aggressiveness (OR 1.92; p = 0.004), and binge-eating (OR 2.55; p = 0.003) were more likely to present a worsened mental health condition. CONCLUSION: The present results suggest that the Covid-19 pandemic seems to have had a different impact on subgroups of students. Indeed, we found a global worsening of psychological well-being only in a subgroup of adolescents, otherwise other students remained stable or improved. Increased frequency of maladaptive behaviors was found as a predictor of worsened mental health, therefore interventions to strengthen emotional regulation strategies are warranted. Finally, the decrease of stress in social domains could be due to reduction of potential triggering situations, thus indicating only a temporary beneficial effect that requires careful monitoring.

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