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1.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-335652

ABSTRACT

We examine how, why and which consumers infer company mask policies to be politically motivated, impacting their purchase interest. Five studies (N = 3,438) demonstrate that consumers use a company’s mask policy as a proxy for its underlying political ideology but interpret the political intent behind these policies based on their own political ideology: conservatives believe mask policies are political, while liberals interpret their absence as political. We find that mask policies are preferred over no policy, but recommended mask policies are more palatable than mask requirements. However, mask recommendations fail to garner compliance from conservatives. A government mandate to require masks can balance both company and public health goals by moving the blame conservatives assign for the policy from the company to the government, resulting in the most ideal outcome for business and public health.

2.
Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) ; 35(4): 466-467, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774129

ABSTRACT

Understanding of the impact of masking in schools to prevent COVID transmission is limited since much of the data considers factors in addition to masking. We collected data from 30 school districts in Texas, contrasting districts where masks were mandated with those where masks were optional. Results showed that mandatory masking was associated with a reduction in COVID-19 positivity among student populations, but not in staff populations.

3.
Transp Policy (Oxf) ; 119: 32-44, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702657

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the air transport industry, forcing airlines to take measures to ensure the safety of passengers and crewmembers. Among the many protective measures, mask mandate onboard the airplane is an important one, but travelers' mask-wearing intentions during flight remain uninvestigated especially in the US where mask use is a topic of on-going debate. This study focused on the mask use of airline passengers when they fly during COVID-19, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) model to examine the relationship between nine predicting factors and the mask-wearing intention in the aircraft cabin. A survey instrument was developed to collect data from 1124 air travelers on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), and the data was statistically analyzed using structural equation modeling and logistic regression. Results showed that attitude, descriptive norms, risk avoidance, and information seeking significantly influenced the travelers' intention to wear a mask during flight in COVID-19. Group analysis further indicated that the four factors influenced mask-wearing intentions differently on young, middle-aged, and senior travelers. It was also found that demographic and travel characteristics including age, education, income, and travel frequency can be used to predict if the airline passenger was willing to pay a large amount to switch to airlines that adopted different mask policies during COVID-19. The findings of this study fill the research gap of air travelers' intentions to wear a mask when flying during a global pandemic and provide recommendations for mask-wearing policies to help the air transport industry recover from COVID-19.

4.
J Hosp Infect ; 121: 82-90, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1578228

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Influenza infections acquired in hospital show increased mortality, especially in elderly patients with risk factors. Nevertheless, vaccination rates are low among both high-risk patients and healthcare workers (HCWs). AIM: To more effectively prevent influenza infections in the hospital during the influenza season, a strict mouth-nose protection (MNP) requirement was introduced for all staff throughout the shift on the affected wards as an intervention and its effect on nosocomial infection rates was studied. METHODS: The present data were obtained in a retrospective, monocentric analysis over a period of four consecutive influenza seasons from 2015 to 2019. MNP for all staff during the whole shift as an intervention was introduced in 2017 and for the following seasons if at least three influenza patients were in the ward at the same time. Data from hospitalized influenza patients before and after intervention were compared with regard to nosocomial incidences and mortality. FINDINGS: In the years with strict mandatory MNP (2017-2019), the nosocomial influenza incidence fell nearly 50% (odds ratio: 0.40; 95% confidence interval: 0.28-0.56; P < 0.001) accompanied by a significant reduction in nosocomial mortality by 85% (0.15; 0.02-0.70; P = 0.007). The infectious pressure indicated by influenza incidences and patient-days at risk were comparable before and after intervention, as was the low rate of vaccine uptake by nurses. CONCLUSION: Mandatory MNP for HCWs effectively protects patients from nosocomial influenza infections and mortality.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Aged , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital , Policy , Retrospective Studies , Seasons , Vaccination
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(9): 1703-1706, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501055

ABSTRACT

In ecologic analyses of US states, piecewise multivariable models showed lower case-rate slopes after implementation of mask requirements: -1.0% (95% confidence interval, -1.34% to -.57%) and -0.44% (-.86% to -.03%) per 100 000 per day in early- and late-adopter states, respectively, compared with never-adopter states. Our findings support statewide mask requirements to mitigate transmission of coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Humans , Masks , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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