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1.
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice ; 18(2):123-134, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2243187

ABSTRACT

Purpose: During the COVID-19 outbreak, clinical schools across the UK were forced to switch their learning from face-to-face to online platforms. This paper aims to describe the experiences of psychiatry teachers and medical students at Cambridge University of the online psychiatry case-based tutorials during the COVID-19 outbreak and the lessons learned from this implementation. Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted qualitative focus groups with students followed by in-depth individual interviews with students and teachers. Findings: In a data-led systematic text condensation analysis, this study found seven themes: the COVID-19 context, the structure of the course, teachers' educational ethos, beyond the (teaching) script, possibilities for learning or teaching reflective practice, attitudes to online learning and suggestions for future development. The authors then applied the normalisation process theory (NPT) as the theoretical frame of reference. This model has previously been applied to the implementation of telemedicine in psychiatry, to understand how new technology can become embedded in clinical care. Originality/value: This study's results show how the NPT model can be modified to support the delivery of medical education online, including reflective learning and practice as an iterative process at every stage of the implementation and delivery of the teaching. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

2.
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology ; 35(3):126-136, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2242232
3.
Journal of Breast Imaging ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2246129

ABSTRACT

Creating a comprehensive didactic curriculum for breast imaging fellows can be a demanding undertaking, especially considering that most breast practices are understaffed because of the COVID-19 pandemic and amid rising clinical volumes. This leaves little time for didactic education. In this article, we present our approach to creating a collaborative weekly multidisciplinary didactic lecture series involving multiple institutions, using the Society of Breast Imaging's suggested fellowship curriculum as the foundation. We discuss the advantages for both trainees and faculty, including fostering camaraderie, networking, and engagement among breast imaging fellows. Faculty have the opportunity for professional development by leveraging their clinical expertise through selecting didactic topics in their niche. This creates a pathway for speaking faculty to be recognized as regional and national experts.

4.
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ; 1397:v, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246006
5.
Journal of Hypertension ; 41:e156, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2245711

ABSTRACT

The COVID19 pandemic resulted in lock-downs and reduction of social interactions to reduce the risks of disease transmission. Routine medical services were affected and telemedicine was rapidly adopted for the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of many chronic diseases including hypertension. We look at the considerations for the design and set-up of telemedicine for the management of hypertension. Many aspects need attention in order to ensure a safe, reliable, and effective program. Many regulatory agencies developed guidelines, advisories, regulations, and legislation to manage telemedicine. We examine some of these guidelines and their differences in South East Asian countries. Often, the professional clinical service standards in telemedicine are maintained by the state medical boards or councils. Additional training or certification and licensure is needed prior to providing telemedicine services. In-person visits are required when remote consultations cannot meet the professional clinical standards. Because telemedicine can traverse national boundaries, different regulators differ in their approach to the provision of telemedicine services to overseas patients. Nonetheless, the doctor must meet the same standard of care for overseas patients. Also, practice insurance will need to explicitly cover the practice of telemedicine especially for overseas patients. Besides the professional clinical standards, telemedicine differs by technology platforms, communication devices, software, and blood pressure monitoring devices. These varied devices and software require further evaluation of technical standards for safety, reliability, data privacy, storage, transmission, and licensure. Some of the guidelines also cover the need for quality improvements and technology upgrades. Regardless, there have been many studies of telemedicine in hypertension covering many aspects of care. Some can be simpler telemonitoring of blood pressure to highly sophisticated ones with devices linked to personal communicators (usually cellphone) with feedback to healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists) and tagged to clinical interventions to improve the control of hypertension. Reviews of these studies show that hypertension telemedicine programs are effective but the evidence may be available in different practice settings and patient types, thus, complicating the design and recommendations. Therefore, it is important to review the type of practice and patients, determine which aspects are lacking to be targeted, and designing a good program. A good program will lead to better clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, lower cost, reduced manpower for delivery of care, and convenience all round. Clinical practice guidelines and undergraduate and postgraduate medical training need to encompass telemedicine for the future.

6.
Interface (Botucatu, Online) ; 27: e220086, 2023.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2240785

ABSTRACT

Trata-se de estudo qualitativo sobre o papel da supervisão acadêmica do Grupo Especial de Supervisão do Projeto Mais Médicos para o Brasil de Roraima (GES-RR) durante a pandemia de Covid-19. Foi realizada uma cartografia, com entrevistas e uma roda de conversa. Durante a pandemia, a Atenção à Saúde Indígena passou por rearranjos e a supervisão acadêmica do GES-RR exerceu-se remotamente, o que reduziu seu potencial, mas manteve sua relevância. O acolhimento dos médicos pelos supervisores potencializou a capacidade transformadora da assistência e diminuiu a sensação de isolamento e abandono. O GES-RR foi importante para a mediação de conflitos com a gestão, para a qualificação do trabalho médico, para a reflexão sobre as relações e condições de trabalho e como espaço privilegiado de Educação Permanente em Saúde. O estudo mostrou a importância dos papéis exercidos e da retomada presencial em momento oportuno.


We conducted a qualitative study to investigate the academic supervision role of the Special Supervision Group for the More Doctors Project for Brazil in Roraima (GES-RR) during the Covid-19 pandemic. We constructed a map based on interviews and conversation circles. During the pandemic, indigenous health care underwent reshaping and academic supervision was performed by the GES-PR remotely, reducing its potential but maintaining its relevance. The support provided to the doctors by the supervisors enhanced the transformative capacity of care and reduced the sensation of isolation and abandonment. The GES-RR played an important role in mediating conflicts with management, improving the quality of medical work, and stimulating reflection on working relations and conditions, and is uniquely positioned to provide permanent health education. The findings highlight the importance of the roles and of returning to face-to-face working at the appropriate time.


Se trata de un estudio cualitativo sobre el papel de la supervisión académica del Grupo Especial de Supervisión del Proyecto Más Médicos para Brasil de Roraima (GES-RR) durante la pandemia de Covid-19. Se realizó una cartografía, con entrevistas y una ronda de conversaciones. Durante la pandemia, la Atención de la Salud Indígena pasó por reorganizaciones y la supervisión académica del GES-RR se ejerció remotamente, pero mantuvo su relevancia. La acogida a los médicos por parte de los supervisores potencializó la capacidad transformadora de la asistencia y disminuyó la sensación de aislamiento y abandono. El GES-RR fue importante en la mediación de conflictos con la gestión, calificación del trabajo médico, para la reflexión sobre las relaciones y condiciones de trabajo y como espacio privilegiado de Educación Permanente de Salud. El estudio mostró la importancia de los papeles ejercidos y de la retomada presencial en momento oportuno.

7.
Int J Ophthalmol ; 16(2): 280-285, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242883

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the flipped classroom model for teaching horizontal strabismus didactics in an ophthalmology residency program in China as part of a visiting professorship from the United States. METHODS: Residents from an ophthalmology residency program in China were invited to participate in flipped classroom sessions taught by an experienced American ophthalmology faculty in 2018. Residents were instructed to watch a pre-class video lecture prior to the in-class-case-based activity. Content tests (5 Ophthalmic Knowledge Assessment Program style questions) and surveys were administered before and after the classroom sessions (100% response rate). These results were compared to that of an American cohort who were taught the same content. RESULTS: The Chinese cohort of 12 residents preferred the flipped classroom to the traditional classroom at higher rates than the American cohort of 40 residents (92% vs 55%, P=0.04) and felt that all ophthalmology topics would be appropriate for the flipped classroom teaching style (P-values between 0.008 and <0.001). In both Chinese and American cohorts, we found that the exotropia curriculum saw a small but significant improvement in performance following the flipped classroom session (P=0.025 for Chinese residents; P=0.001 for US residents), whereas scores in both groups for the esotropia course did not significantly improve. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to evaluate the flipped classroom model implemented by a visiting ophthalmology professor in a global outreach setting. The flipped classroom sessions are viewed favorably by the Chinese residents relative to the US cohort with a modest impact on knowledge. Decreased in-person interpreter requirement and increased student engagement make this model valuable in cross-cultural visiting professorship settings. Finally, the flipped classroom may lend itself well to a virtual format to prevent the transmission of COVID-19, although such a format requires further study.

8.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 9, 2023 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to explore residents' and teachers' perceptions of the digital format of Metis (a national education network in Sweden) didactic courses for psychiatry residents in Sweden to guide post-pandemic curriculum development. METHODS: An online attitude survey was developed and sent out to 725 residents in psychiatry and 237 course directors/teachers. Data were examined descriptively and group differences were analysed with independent sample t-tests. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 112 residents and 72 course directors/teachers. Perceptions of digital formats were quite similar between the two groups with some significant differences i.e., residents agreed more strongly than directors/teachers with the statement that Metis courses in digital format were of the same quality (or better) than the classroom-based format. Residents perceived the positive effects of using interactive tools more than directors/teachers. More than 40% of the responders in both groups preferred a return to classroom-based course meetings. Responders in both groups suggested that different forms of digital elements (e.g., video-based and sound-recorded lectures, digital-group discussions, virtual patients) could be incorporated into different phases in the courses. CONCLUSIONS: The study represents the current largest survey among residents in psychiatry and a teaching faculty in Sweden, to understand the impact of digitalization on the quality of residents' education during the pandemic. The results point towards applying a mixed format for training and education going forward, incorporating digital aspects into the national curriculum.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Psychiatry , Humans , Sweden , Surveys and Questionnaires , Curriculum , Psychiatry/education
9.
Health Sci Rep ; 6(2): e1110, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241798

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: Little is known about physicians' approaches to continuing medical education (CME) for continuing professional development despite the rapid evolution of CME offerings. We sought to identify the extent to which demographic, career, and experiential CME-activity variables were independently associated with physicians' satisfaction with their ability to stay current on medical information and practice. Methods: Using the 2019 Association of American Medical Colleges' National Sample Survey of Physicians data, we ran multivariable logistic regression models examining demographic, career, and experiential (participation in 11 CME activities in the past year) variables for their associations with physicians' satisfaction (satisfied vs. not satisfied/neutral) with their ability to stay current. Results: Of 5926 respondents, 90% (5341/5926) were satisfied with their ability to stay current. Significant (each two-sided p < 0.05) predictors of respondents who were satisfied included (among others) a surgery specialty (vs. primary care; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-1.88), an academic affiliation (vs. none; AOR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.10-1.66), and participation (vs. no participation) in each of professional meetings (AOR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.07-1.60) and journal-based CME (AOR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.07-1.56). Respondents who self-identified as a race/ethnicity underrepresented in medicine (vs. white; AOR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.48-0.97) and were between ages 40 and 49 years (vs. 50-59; AOR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.58-0.94) were less likely to be satisfied. Gender, board certification status, and medical degree type did not independently predict satisfaction (each p > 0.05). Conclusion: We observed independent associations between physicians' satisfaction with their ability to stay current in medical information and practice and each specialty, academic affiliation, race/ethnicity, age, and CME activity type (for 2 of 11 examined). Findings may be relevant to organizations and institutions designing and implementing CME activities in the current context of COVID-19 pandemic-related in-person activity limitations and can inform targeted interventions addressing differences in the satisfaction we observed to better support physicians' CME.

10.
Cancers (Basel) ; 15(4)2023 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240800

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted conventional medical education for surgical trainees with respect to clinical training, didactics, and research. While the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical trainees were variable, some common themes are identifiable. As hordes of COVID-19 patients entered hospitals, many surgical trainees stepped away from their curricula and were redeployed to other hospital units to care for COVID-19 patients. Moreover, the need for social distancing limited traditional educational activities. Regarding clinical training, some trainees demonstrated reduced case logs and decreased surgical confidence. For residents, fellows, and medical students alike, most didactic education transitioned to virtual platforms, leading to an increase in remote educational resources and an increased emphasis on surgical simulation. Resident research productivity initially declined, although the onset of virtual conferences provided new opportunities for trainees to present their work. Finally, the pandemic was associated with increased anxiety, depression, and substance use for some trainees. Ultimately, we are still growing our understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic has redefined surgical training and how to best implement the lessons we have learned.

11.
Ann Anat ; 246: 152043, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2238982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic caused major shifts in students' learning strategies as well as teaching environments that profoundly affected the delivery of anatomy courses in medical schools. The Department of Anatomy at the University of Zagreb School of Medicine had a unique experience where the anatomy course in 2019/2020 was first taught in-person before transferring to an online course delivery, while the inverse happened in 2020/2021. The core curriculum, course material and examination criteria were the same in both academic years. The aim of the study was to determine whether course delivery affected students' perceptions of the course and whether it impacted students' engagement and success. METHODS: The students' perceptions of the course were assessed via an anonymous course survey (student evaluation of teaching, SET). The questions in the SET assessed the usefulness of teaching modalities rather than students' satisfaction. Most questions were in the form of statements to which students responded with their level of agreement on a five-point Likert scale. Differences between responses in 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. Effect size was estimated using Cliff's delta and association between responses was assessed using Spearman's r coefficient. RESULTS: Students' perceptions were significantly affected by changes in course delivery. Students' success and engagement were higher in 2019/2020 when in-person teaching preceded online teaching. Furthermore, students' views on course organization and the usefulness of continuous assessment were more positive in 2019/2020. Finally, students' perceptions of the usefulness of online materials and activities were more positive in 2019/2020. All comparisons between the two academic years were statistically significant (P ≤ 0.0001 for all comparisons, Mann-Whitney test). CONCLUSIONS: Students' perceptions of the anatomy course were dependent on the teaching environment they were exposed to at the beginning of the course. A transfer from in-person to online course delivery was more successful than vice-versa. This has important implications for structuring hybrid courses in medical education in the future.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Educational Measurement , Educational Status , Curriculum , Anatomy/education
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 102, 2023 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2245057

ABSTRACT

Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda, has established partnerships with several other institutions worldwide, including the University of Brescia and "Magna Græcia" University, which have agreed to collaborate for the primary purpose of student exchange. Our aim is to comment on students' preparation for away rotations based on the authors' own experiences and opinions alongside a review of selected papers on the preparation of students for global health and ethical collaboration. Medical electives represent a unique opportunity for all medical students, not merely for those who will work in resource-limited settings due to increasing globalization. The emergence of ethical international collaborations is of paramount importance to stimulate these projects and ensure that they are implemented safely and with adequate preparation even and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medicine , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Uganda , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health
13.
Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol ; 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2245064

ABSTRACT

We tested for feasibility, acceptance, and "non-inferiority" of small-group teaching applying blended learning (i.e., the integration of face-to-face and online instruction) to problem-based learning (bPbL) compared to conventional PbL (cPbL). In a just pre-pandemic, randomised controlled trial, 317 students attended either bPbL or cPbL groups. The first meeting of the bPbL groups took place online via written internet chat, while cPbL groups met on site. All groups met on site the second time. All students had the opportunity to attend lectures either on site or as videos on demand. We analysed student evaluation data, results in a final summative exam, attendance of lectures on site and use of lecture videos. Furthermore, we performed a qualitative analysis of student statements made in semi-structured group interviews about pros and cons of the bPbL approach. There was no difference between students of either bPbL or cPbL groups with respect to exam results (score: 14.3 ± 2.8 vs. 13.8 ± 2.7) or course evaluation. However, relatively more bPbL than cPbL students reported having used lecture videos, while the proportion of those attending lectures on-site was higher among cPbL students. Interviews revealed that some of the bPbL students' experiences were unexpected and feared disadvantages seemed to be less severe than expected. Participation in a blended PbL format did not worsen course evaluations or exam results, but seemed to influence lecture attendance. The combination of face-to-face and digital elements could be suitable as a hybrid approach to digital instruction in the post-pandemic era.

14.
J Pathol Inform ; : 100162, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243067

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic forced us to adapt our recently developed informatics training serving a variety of students as well as faculty and staff. The successful flipped classroom course series (a hybrid-format with both asynchronous online learning and in-person synchronous components) was shifted to a fully online format with the synchronous portion now held via web-based video conference. We repeated our participant survey at the end of each of the 3 one-credit courses to compare student satisfaction and learning outcomes achievement to the original offering. The responses were overall very positive again and while there were no differences in satisfaction levels for 2 of the courses, overall satisfaction was higher for the new, fully online Python Programming course. Likewise, students reported similar achievement of the learning outcomes across all courses with 1 of the 12 objectives receiving higher competency agreement in the new, fully online version. Overall, the fully online version of the course series was equally successful, if not more so, than the original version with a physical classroom session each week. Given that participants also had strong agreement with a new question that they would prefer online class meetings instead of in a classroom, even if there wasn't a global pandemic (citing a variety of logistical reasons such as "convenience of screen sharing," parking issues, and job-related time constraints), the fully online version of the informatics training will be retained.

15.
Acad Pediatr ; 2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243018

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Training disruptions, such as planned curricular adjustments or unplanned global pandemics, impact residency training in ways that are difficult to quantify. Informatics-based medical education tools can help measure these impacts. We tested the ability of a software platform driven by electronic health record data to quantify anticipated changes in trainee clinical experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We previously developed and validated the Trainee Individualized Learning System (TRAILS) to identify pediatric resident clinical experiences (i.e. shifts, resident provider-patient interactions (rPPIs), and diagnoses). We used TRAILS to perform a year-over-year analysis comparing pediatrics residents at a large academic children's hospital during March 15-June 15 in 2018 (Control #1), 2019 (Control #2), and 2020 (Exposure). RESULTS: Residents in the exposure cohort had fewer shifts than those in both control cohorts (P < .05). rPPIs decreased an average of 43% across all PGY levels, with interns experiencing a 78% decrease in Continuity Clinic. Patient continuity decreased from 23% to 11%. rPPIs with common clinic and emergency department diagnoses decreased substantially during the exposure period. CONCLUSIONS: Informatics tools like TRAILS may help program directors understand the impact of training disruptions on resident clinical experiences and target interventions to learners' needs and development.

16.
Anat Sci Educ ; 2022 Feb 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242524

ABSTRACT

Uncertainty tolerance, individuals' perceptions/responses to uncertain stimuli, is increasingly recognized as critical to effective healthcare practice. While the Covid-19 pandemic generated collective uncertainty, healthcare-related uncertainty is omnipresent. Correspondingly, there is increasing focus on uncertainty tolerance as a health professional graduate "competency," and a concomitant interest in identifying pedagogy fostering learners' uncertainty tolerance. Despite these calls, practical guidelines for educators are lacking. There is some initial evidence that anatomy education can foster medical students' uncertainty tolerance (e.g., anatomical variation and dissection novelty), however, there remains a knowledge gap regarding robust curriculum-wide uncertainty tolerance teaching strategies. Drawing upon humanities, arts and social sciences (HASS) educators' established uncertainty tolerance pedagogies, this study sought to learn from HASS academics' experiences with, and teaching practices related to, uncertainty pedagogy using a qualitative, exploratory study design. Framework analysis was undertaken using an abductive approach, wherein researchers oscillate between inductive and deductive coding (comparing to the uncertainty tolerance conceptual model). During this analysis, the authors analyzed ~386 min of data from purposively sampled HASS academics' (n = 14) discussions to address the following research questions: (1) What teaching practices do HASS academics' perceive as impacting learners' uncertainty tolerance, and (2) How do HASS academics execute these teaching practices? The results extend current understanding of the moderating effects of education on uncertainty tolerance and supports prior findings that the anatomy learning environment is ripe for supporting learner uncertainty tolerance development. This study adds to growing literature on the powerful moderating effect education has on uncertainty tolerance and proposes translation of HASS uncertainty tolerance teaching practices to enhance anatomy education.

17.
J Osteopath Med ; 2022 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242255

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: With the surge of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2 [COVID-19]), the modality of teaching anatomy has shifted from in-person cadaveric dissection to virtual lessons for incoming first-year medical students. As a result, we aim to assess the impact that this curriculum change has on student perspectives. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to understand the relative effect of a virtual anatomy course implemented during the pandemic (2019-2020) on the confidence, skills, and perspectives of first-year medical students compared to medical students who had traditional in-person anatomy at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine (Rowan SOM) in Stratford, New Jersey. METHODS: The authors developed a 14-question survey to target gross anatomy students of the Classes of 2023 and 2024 at Rowan SOM. The Class of 2024 had a virtual anatomy lab compared to the Class of 2023, who had an in-person anatomy lab in their first year of medical school. The responses were analyzed to understand the difference between a hands-on cadaver lab and a virtual anatomy lab utilizing SPSS. RESULTS: The survey was administered to approximately 400 people, from which we received 149 responses (37.3%). Among all responses, 36.2% (n=54) belonged to the Class of 2023 who encountered hands-on cadaver experience, whereas 63.8% (n=95) belonged to the Class of 2024 who gained virtual anatomy lab experience. An independent t-test statistical analysis was utilized. Under the confidence domain, when students were asked about the understanding of trauma after their respective anatomy labs, 64.0% of the Class of 2023 (n=50) showed significantly higher confidence with p<0.001, compared to 15.4% for the Class of 2024 (n=78). Under the skills domain, the Class of 2023 (n=50) felt more comfortable with ultrasound (64.0%), identifying all of the pertinent anatomical structures and their respective locations on imaging (72.0%), and identifying the pathology (90.0%) with respective p values of <0.001, <0.001, and 0.004. Only 36.9% of Class of 2024 respondents shared similar comfort with ultrasound (n=84), 30.9% identifying pertinent anatomical structures (n=84) and 65.4% in identifying pathology (n=84). Under the attitude domain, the Class of 2023 (n=50) had more respect toward the human body with their hands-on cadaver experience (88.0%) than the Class of 2024 (n=89, 33.3%). CONCLUSIONS: Based on current results, it can be established that medical students who had in-person cadaveric dissection had a favorable attitude toward their anatomy course compared to students who had virtual anatomy during the COVID-19 pandemic.

18.
Anat Sci Educ ; 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240015

ABSTRACT

Prior to the challenges imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic, anatomy practical sessions at Trinity College Dublin involved eight to 10 students per donor station, rotating between digital learning, anatomical models/osteology, and dissection activities for three hours weekly. To maintain cadaveric participation in the anatomy laboratory while adhering to distancing guidelines, a transition to dyad pedagogy was implemented. This mode of delivery allowed two students per donor station to spend one hour per week in the anatomy laboratory with all digital learning elements transferred to the virtual learning platform Blackboard as pre- and post-practical session learning activities. Dyad pedagogy has been explored in clinical settings and simulation procedural-based training but is yet to be fully verified in anatomy education. To determine the effectiveness of hybrid practical sessions and reduced donor to student ratios, the opinions of first year medical students were examined using an online questionnaire with a 51% response rate. Although students recognized the merits of more time in the anatomy laboratory, including opportunities for self-directed study and exposure to anatomical variation, they felt that having two students per station enabled sufficient hands-on time with the donor body and fostered learning opportunities that would not be possible with larger groups. Strong preferences for quality time with the donor body supported by online resources suggests this modality should be a key consideration in course design for anatomy curricula and emphasizes the importance of gauging students' preferences to optimize satisfaction and learning output when pivoting to blended learning strategies in anatomy education.

19.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; : 8465371221117282, 2022 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239510

ABSTRACT

Burnout is a healthcare concern affecting physicians around the world. Physicians experiencing burnout tend to display signs of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Ongoing burnout trends have posed numerous challenges to Canadian physicians, notwithstanding the added complexity of the COVID-19 pandemic's impact in recent years. In particular, Canadian radiologists frequently reported experiencing high rates of burnout. This review aims to examine prominent factors affecting burnout in Canadian radiologists and summarize the impact of recent trends. In doing so, the overall wellbeing of Canadian radiologists can be assessed, and strategies for improvement can be discussed as the Canadian healthcare system prepares for new challenges of increasing demand and pressures.

20.
Rev Med Interne ; 2022 Nov 09.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239086

ABSTRACT

Uncertainty in inherent to every aspects of medical practice. As the concept of uncertainty in healthcare is still to explore, deciphering the determinants and the roots of this uncertainty would benefit from the insights of various disciplines, such as epistemology, sociology, mathematics, or philosophy. The urgent need to improve physician's ability to cope with uncertainty, has been recently highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Besides, the concept of uncertainty tolerance has been proposed, and could serve as a relevant basis for approaching uncertainty, in medical education. Thus, we propose at first to discuss the uncertainty tolerance framework from Hillen et al. Then, from an educational perspective, we outline some avenues regarding how uncertainty tolerance could be thought, in a competence-based approach, and discuss several educational activities, which have proven efficient in promoting uncertainty tolerance among medical practitioners abroad.

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