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1.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 76(6):909, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1576048

ABSTRACT

The article in the Medical Journal of Malaysia, clearly highlights the effects of anxiety on medical students. The COVID-19 has disrupted the physical, mental, and social well-being of the medical students causing stress, anxiety, depression, fear, loneliness, and uncertainty about their futures.

2.
Psychiatry Investigation ; 19(8):676-686, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010596

ABSTRACT

Objective Several previous studies have reported the negative psychological impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic on medical students worldwide. This study investigated the sociodemographic and psychosocial factors associated with COVID-19–re-lated post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) risk among medical students in Daegu, a region that experienced a high concentration of infections. Methods A total of 270 students completed the self-reported questionnaires including COVID-19 exposure, psychological measure-ment, and sociodemographic factors. We evaluated the COVID-19–related PTSD risk group using the Korean version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the odds ratio for the COVID-19–related PTSD risk group in sociodemographic and psychosocial factors. Results The prevalence of the COVID-19–related PTSD risk group was 10.4% in medical students. Among sociodemographic factors, lower grades (specially, first-year medical students) and current smokers were associated with the COVID-19–related PTSD risk. Indi-rect exposure to COVID-19 was also associated with this risk. Meanwhile, having higher resilience, self-esteem, and social support were less likely to be associated with COVID-19–related PTSD risk. Conclusion This study suggested that it is necessary to develop a system for the screening and managing of COVID-19–related PTSD risk group among medical students, especially high-risk groups during the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
BMC palliative care ; 21(1):154, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009386

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Palliative care (PC) is a strongly emerging discipline worldwide. Despite efforts to integrate this important topic in the medical curriculum in Belgium, still little time is spent on PC and its implementation during theoretical and practical training. MATERIALS & METHODS: We had two cohorts of second master's year MD students at the University of Antwerp complete a survey compromising a custom-built PC knowledge test and a self-confidence assessment of communicative skills used in end-of-life conversations. We evaluated students' self-confidence regarding end-of-life-conversations before and after a PC training program. We also explored whether the PC classes enabled the students to adequately reflect on factors that might influence end-of-life conversations with an open-end question about the potential implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on advance care planning (ACP) conversations. Finally, we compared the results of the respondents having enjoyed face-to-face training (cohort 1) with those having received online training only (cohort 2, COVID-19 pandemic). RESULTS: Although the respondents in both cohorts indicated that the overall curriculum did not pay enough attention to PC training, their average scores on the theoretical questions were good. Feeling confident about their communicative skills in general, they indicated to be less confident when it came to communications concerning PC and ACP in particular. The COVID-19 pandemic was initially equally deemed to impede and facilitate ACP and end-of-life conversations, but after the ACP training class more respondents saw the pandemic as an opportunity to broach end-of-life issues. Finally, we found no differences in scores between online and regular classroom teaching. CONCLUSION: Students experience a lack of confidence in communication skills used in end-of-life conversations and ACP. To help improve skills and competencies in conducting end-of-life conversations, it is recommended to have medical students assess PC/ACP training programs regularly and to modify the curriculum and course content based on these outcomes and current developments.

5.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:1873, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009098

ABSTRACT

Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) prognosis is determined by a wide range of factors, such as the severity of the disease manifestations, the psychosocial aspects of patients, the proper management of comorbidities, adoption of a healthy lifestyle and adherence to treatment. Studies on chronic diseases highlight the value of patient education to foster treatment adherence and improve prognosis. Objectives: To promote health education to SLE patients and their families providing accessible and comprehensive Scientific information, in order to improve adherence to treatment and the patient's prognosis. Methods: The Waiting Room Project is linked to the Extension Health Care Program for SLE patients and their families of Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil, since 2011. A total of 700 patients under SLE treatment at the Rheumatology Unit of the University Hospital are involved. Medical students and rheumatology fellows, altogether, developed high-quality informative texts, with clear content and layman language appropriate for the patient, under the supervision of the rheumatology professors. The texts are illustrated by the team of the Communication Department of the Medical School and medical students, and are printed in a leafet format. The material is handed out to the patients, while they wait for their medical appointment, by the students and the care team. The content of the leafets is discussed, making sure that all the concerns and doubts are properly addressed Results: The Waiting Room Project has produced 17 leafets, addressing different aspects of SLE, comorbidities, and treatment. The texts approach the traditional cardiovascular risk factors (Smoking, Arterial Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity, Physical Activity), and some medical conditions related to general health and SLE treatment (Sun Protection, Healthy Food, Oral Care, Vaccination, Pregnancy, Osteoporosis). In 2020 and 2021, two leafets about Covid-19 were produced in order to clarify important aspects of this disease, its impact on lupus patients and to solve questions about SLE medications: one regarding the association between Lupus and Covid-19 and another about the treatment of lupus and Covid-19. Other four leafets were produced concerning SLE treatment, including Adherence to Treatment, the use of Antimalarials, Corticos-teroids, and Immunosuppressants. Information about the drugs, general importance on lupus treatment, recommendations and possible adverse events were described. Futhermore, additional content is currently in production with themes such as Intravenous Corticosteroid and Cyclophosphamide, Human Papilloma-virus Infection, Malignant Neoplasm, and specifc cancers frequently affecting women, such as Colorectal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, and Breast Cancer. The leafets are also available online on the Medical School website in Portuguese and in English (medicina.ufmg.br/alo/material-didatico/), on the Minas Gerais Rheumatology Society website (reumatologia.org.br/orientacoes-ao-paciente/), and on the Instagram page @lupusufmg Conclusion: The leafets have been an important source of information and health education for SLE patients and their families, improving student/physician-patient communication. Despite the adversities caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the Waiting Room Project has kept its purpose to make each patient with SLE an agent of their healthcare. Improving the patients' access to evidence-based information must be a goal of healthcare professionals that treat patients with SLE.

6.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 77:41, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006783

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hybrid teaching method has been executed in majority of medical schools during Covid19 pandemic. With this integrated method being employed, a check and balance mechanism is required. We aim to determine the student's satisfaction and experience of hybrid undergraduate teaching in obstetrics and gynaecology posting. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical students undergoing hybrid teaching during obstetrics and gynaecology posting in the year of 2020 and 2021. A total of 112 fourth and fifth year medical students whom were affected by the pandemic participated in this study. Online questionnaires consist of socio-demographic, experience and satisfaction domains were distributed through Google Forms to all eligible students. Results: The response rate was 75%. Up to 92% of participants own a personal computer or laptop with 61.6% own a smartphone and use them to access the online class. Majority (90.2%) of the respondents were satisfied with the hybrid teaching. Only ethnicity showed a significant association with the satisfaction of the students. Conclusion: Our study found that the majority of students were satisfied with hybrid teaching. Hence its practice can be continued as it can be utilized at any time as compared to traditional teaching.

7.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(7):252-254, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006747

ABSTRACT

Background: The general atmosphere of the medical college is frequently seen as being extremely stressful;as a result, medical students' academic results suffer, as well as their physical and psychological health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate medical students' levels of anxiety about their future careers. Objectives: To exploring the level of anxiety among medical students during COVID-19 Pandemic Methods: It was a descriptive quantitative cross-sectional research. After receiving verbal approval from each student at the Fatima Jinnah Medical University in Lahore, the participants enrolled. The data was gathered using a pre-designed questionnaire. A VAS score was employed to assess anxiety levels. SPSS 23 was used to analyze data. To get the desired findings, a statistical test like the chi-square test was used, with a p-value of 0.05 being considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that the mean age student was 20.33± 1.49 years with range from 19-27 years of 165 female medical students were enrolled. Maximum strength of 3rd professional year as 70(42.42%), students were asked to respond to their own self-perceived level of anxiety by using VAS scale of 0 to 100 (mild, moderate and severe) and 84(50.91%) students' shows severe level of anxiety. The factor contributing anxiety during COVID-19 explored and faced fear about future career 127(76.97%). Students observed that it took great effort to understand online lectures 108(65.45%) and faced the problem of recalling the memorized online 112(67.88%) as insignificant p-value. Conclusion: The COVID-19 epidemic did not seem to enhance the general degree of anxiety among medical students, but instead, they were more concerned about their studies, exams, and especially their future career.

8.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(8):BC09-BC13, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006505

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has emerged as a major health crisis throughout the world. In order to control the spread of disease in India, the Central Government imposed a nationwide lockdown. The ongoing spread of the pandemic, strict lockdown measures and delay in the opening of educational institutions in the country are expected to affect the mental health of medical college students too. In order to help and guide the students, we should first be aware of the magnitude of the problem faced by medical students due to the pandemic. For this purpose, this study was conducted online. Aim: To assess the effect of the pandemic on the psychological status of the students and their perception towards medical profession. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted by the Department of Biochemistry of Kalpana Chawla Government Medical College, Haryana, India from 22nd May 2020 to 5th June 2020, among 538 first year Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) students from several Government and Government aided medical schools in the state of Haryana after obtaining ethical clearance. The detailed questionnaire, a study consisting of sections on the current status in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic, perception towards medical profession and psychological status. It was posted online on social media platforms and the responses were collected within 15 days of posting. The psychological status was assessed based on a 21 item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test, using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 software. Results: Out of 538 student’s responses, it shows that 19.1% (n=103) of students experienced moderate stress, probably because of the COVID-19 outbreak and the effect it had on the social and academic aspects of their lives. About 11.5% (n=62) of students had a moderate level of anxiety, and 16.9% (n=91) had experienced moderate depression during the ongoing pandemic. Conclusion: The study demonstrates various factors, like interruptions in regular studies, social distancing, fear of infection, fear of losing a loved one, and worry about the completion of the syllabus and examinations, all cause stress and anxiety in students.

9.
EJVES Vascular Forum ; 54:e38, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2004042

ABSTRACT

Aims: Delays in turnaround time (TAT) have significant financial implications for the National Health Service, estimated to be as much as £347 327 per year. Considering this, we aimed to reduce the TAT by 25% in a vascular surgical theatre, via a Quality Improvement Project (QIP), as part of an MBBS component. We hypothesised that improvements in TAT would also lead to beneficial secondary effects, such as improved theatre utilisation, reduced on the day cancellations, and fewer minutes overrun. Methods: TAT was defined as the time between the last patient going to recovery (“wheels out”) to the next one entering the theatre (“wheels in”). Using the electronic theatre record system “Galaxy”, we established a baseline average TAT using data from October 2019 to January 2020. To identify the common issues underlying TAT delays, a group of three medical students undertook a four week research period, involving ad hoc staff interviews and review of postoperative debrief forms. From this, we constructed our interventions and implemented them over a six week period. Results: Our research period suggested ward-based preparation was a common reason for delay. To address this, we created interventions that focused on giving the ward staff more time, to promote “patient readiness”. An advanced warning system when sending for the patient (30 minutes prior to the end of surgery;previously, the ward was only notified when the patient was being closed) and a newly designed ward based checklist (shown in Fig. 1;the checklist allowing systematic review of tasks needed to be completed) were utilised. Baseline average TAT was 51.7 minutes and the pre-intervention theatre utilisation percentage was 86%. After a PDSA cycle using the interventions described above, we reduced the average TAT to 42.1 minutes, an 18.4% decrease. Figure 2 shows a run chart visualising these results. While the reduction did not meet our 25% target, it remains a significant one. Unfortunately, reduced TAT did not translate into significant improvement in theatre utilisation, on the day cancellations, or minutes overrun, all of which remained at the median of the pre-intervention period. However, improvements in these metrics were impeded by factors out of our control (e.g., surgical complications causing delays). These “unpreventable” delays had particularly significant impacts on our results when they occurred due to the intervention period being conducted over only one PDSA cycle (owing to the COVID-19 pandemic halting elective procedures). Conclusion: Our ward based interventions have shown they can reduce turnaround times in vascular surgery. Less idle theatre time and improved theatre utilisation will be imperative in reducing the backlog of surgeries the COVID pandemic has created. While this QIP was unable to translate reduced TAT to beneficial secondary effects, such as improved theatre utilisation, we hypothesise that with a larger sample size, reduced turnaround times will improve these long term, as there will be more opportunity for the interventions to have their effect without being obstructed by unpreventable delays. Therefore, we believe these interventions should be considered for further exploration on a larger scale to ascertain their true value. This will begin with the resumption of our second PDSA cycle, once surgeries resume [Formula presented] [Formula presented]

10.
Academic Radiology ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2003783

ABSTRACT

Rationale and Objectives : The COVID-19 pandemic prompted the virtualization of historically in-person radiology rotations for medical students. As students return to in-person clinical education, there is an opportunity to reevaluate teaching strategies and incorporate best practices from the pandemic. We describe our experience with the conversion of a four-week radiology clerkship from an in-person (IP) to remote learning (RL) to hybrid model (HM) and its impact on student performance and satisfaction. Materials and Methods : Stratified by curriculum (Group 1 IP, Group 2 RL, Group 3 HM), student standardized final examination scores, final grades, lecture evaluation scores, and satisfaction scores were compared. Additional analysis was performed for Group 3 clinical divisions in which IP or RL models predominated. Results : A significant decrease in mean final exam score was noted in Group 2 (p<0.0001). Average lecture rating decreased in Group 3 compared to Group 1 (p<0.001). Group 3 students reported improved faculty (Group 1: 59, Group 2: 61, Group 3: 82;p<0.001) and resident (Group 1: 76.5, Group 2: 68, Group 3: 90;p<0.001) teaching effectiveness. Student-reported quantity and quality of formative feedback were also highest for Group 3 (Quantity;Group 1: 60.6, Group 2: 74, Group 3: 93;p<0.001) (Quality;Group 1: 59.1, Group 2: 77, Group 3: 97;p<0.001). Group 3 subanalysis demonstrated increased student-perceived usefulness of activities within IP divisions (p<0.01) and a decrease for RL divisions (p<0.05). Conclusion : A hybrid curriculum resulted in improved student satisfaction and preserved student performance after an emergent conversion to remote learning.

11.
JACCP Journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy ; 5(7):747-748, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003616

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Interprofessional education (IPE) is an imperative to prepare pharmacy students for contemporary practice. There has been a significant move by health professions educators to engage students of various professions with one another. Of the four IPE competency domains, there is sparse literature in values/ethics domain. Research Question or Hypothesis: Does guided questions/discussion around COVID-19 case followed by debrief enhance pharmacy and medical students' confidence in knowledge about interprofessional roles/responsibilities and ethical decision making ability? Study Design: Retrospective pre-post survey assessing students' confidence in knowledge about roles/responsibilities and proficiency in making ethical decisions. Methods: Interprofessional teams of first year pharmacy and medical students participated in a COVID-19 vaccine case discussion. In small groups, learners developed a vaccine distribution priority list. Groups presented their recommendations during faculty facilitated large group debrief. Students also engaged in small group discussion in answering guided questions about each profession's roles/responsibilities. Large group debrief provided clarification of roles/responsibilities. Quantitative data was assessed on a Likert scale: Not confident at all(1) to very confident(5). A Fisher's Exact Test assessed the proportional differences. Qualitative comments were collated and thematic analysis was performed using the constant comparison method. Results: 303 students (156 pharmacy, 147 medicine) participated. Self-rating of confidence in roles/responsibilities knowledge improved: -not confident at all/not confident- decreased from 90 to 18 (p<0.001) and -confident/very confident- increased from 83 to 191 (p<0.001). Similarly, confidence in ethical decision making ability improved: 'not confident at all/not confident' decreased from 55 to 9 (p<0.001) and 'confident/very confident - increased from 119 to 204 (p<0.001). Three themes of learning emerged from 266 qualitative comments: knowledge about roles/responsibilities, insights into communication and teamwork, and managing ethical dilemmas. Conclusion: This learning engagement had a positive impact on students' self-perception of confidence in knowledge of roles/ responsibilities and ethical decision making ability. Future studies directly assessing learning in these areas could further validate these findings.

12.
Journal of Pakistan Association of Dermatologists ; 32(3):472-477, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003522

ABSTRACT

Objective To determine the frequency of skin manifestations associated with prolonged mask wearing during the course of ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Jinnah Sindh Medical University (JSMU), Karachi. A total of 138 medical students, who gave history of wearing masks were enrolled. The demographic data including age, gender, and their year of education was collected. A total of 20 questions were asked related to the type of mask, duration of wearing mask, associated and underlying skin disorders, etc. All information was carefully recorded on Google forms. Results This study included 138 participants, 124 (89.9%) females and 14 (10.1%) males. The type of masks used by the medical students varied, however 84.8% used surgical masks. The average duration of mask wear was 4 hours for 72.4% of the participants. There was no significant relation between skin changes and the type and duration of mask wear. The common skin manifestations reported in this study were itching (24.6 %), redness (27.5%), rash (10.1%), burning sensation (12.3%), acne (24.6%), pimples (37.7%), pigmentation (8.7), cracked skin (1.4%), scaling of skin (2.9%), and 29.7% reported no changes. The most frequently affected locations were cheeks (41.3%), followed by chin (13.8%), nasal bridge (10.1%) and perioral area (8%). Participants with history of atopic dermatitis were affected slightly more by itching, redness, rash, burning sensation, acne than those without a history of atopic dermatitis however these manifestations had no significant relation (p>0.05). Pressure bruises were reported in 23.9% of the participants and there was no significant relation with the skin manifestations. About 33% of the females who use makeup under the mask found it inconvenient due to pimples and itching. (p<0.05). Relationship between different skin types and use of cleansers for maintaining skin hygiene generally (p=0.006) and after taking mask off is significant (p=0.034). Significant relation exists between people experiencing pimples after taking off masks and using oral/systemic drugs (p=0.003), and other products (ice cubes, day cream, steroids, skincare regime) for management (p=0.012). Significant relation exists between acne after taking off mask and use of topical drugs (p=0.034). Conclusion The increase in skin manifestations is associated with the increased use of face masks during the COVID 19 pandemic among medical students. As mask wearing can't be compromised due to the nature of the working environment, certain guidelines need to be established to prevent or reduce the occurrence of such manifestations.

13.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003415

ABSTRACT

Background: Patient safety adverse events are a significant concern in pediatric healthcare in the US. Learning how to identify and report identified errors and near misses enables mitigation of current and future harm. An interactive in-person simulation activity at our institution has been successful in enhancing medical students and trainees' ability to identify and report patient safety hazards. Infection prevention precautions during the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the rapid development of a virtual simulation training in 2020-2021. Our objectives were to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a virtual simulation training to enhance medical students and trainees' awareness of and confidence in identifying and reporting patient safety hazards. Methods: Learners were 102 second year medical students starting clinical clerkships. Brief orientation videos reviewed learning objectives, instructions on navigating the 360-video virtual interface, and the simulated case - a 5 y/o boy in the emergency department with an acute asthma exacerbation. Learners then explored a 360 video in a virtual simulation environment to identify hazards that fell into the broad themes of falls, allergies, protected health information, personal protective equipment, hand hygiene, choking, medication administration, privacy, electronic health records, and infections. Learners then viewed brief instructional videos on these hazards, the importance of situational awareness, and how to report near misses and errors using our hospital incident reporting system. Effectiveness and learners experience was assessed through pre and post simulation questionnaires and learner interviews. Results: Key outcomes were frequency of safety issues identified and confidence in identifying and reporting hazards, errors and near misses. Scores of learner confidence in identifying and reporting patient safety hazards significantly increased (see Figure). Learners rated their overall satisfaction on a 0-10 scale (0= Not at all Satisfied, 10= Very Satisfied). Median learner satisfaction scores were 7. Learners reported that the virtual simulation was a good alternative to in-person training. Specific positive aspects identified were the short instructional videos with a variety of speakers, the concise nature of the activity, and learning to how to file incident reports. The increase in confidence in identifying and reporting patient safety hazards were lower in the virtual simulation compared to the in-person version. However, learners identified several strategies to enhance the experience in future years. Specific areas for improvement were zooming in capabilities on mobile devices and variation in experience depending on internet speed and device used. Conclusion: This brief interactive simulation activity was successful in enhancing learners' awareness of and confidence in identifying and reporting patient safety hazards. Our next steps include improving the immersive nature of the simulation experience, integrating more authentic components, replicating a team approach, and identifying platforms that are suited to a variety of mobile devices and internet speeds.

14.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003360

ABSTRACT

Background: During the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, medical students at The George Washington University School of Medicine •Health Sciences (GWU SMHS) sought to address the rapid dissemination of misinformation by creating DC COVID Connect (DCC), a reliable web-based resource specific to the Washington, D.C Metropolitan area. With the emphasis on clinical public health in the GW SMHS M.D. Program curriculum, these students were well-equipped to consolidate a comprehensive body of information to help members of all ages in the local community navigate all aspects of their lives during the pandemic. Methods: The online resource was originally a 130-page html document. Sections of the document include but are not limited to: age-group specific health information about COVID-19, local news updates in the DMV pertaining to COVID19, information for at-risk populations: individuals experiencing homelessness, incarceration, and disability, peer-reviewed research, services (housing, legal services, etc). To better disseminate these resources, our team transformed the document into a website, available in 12 different languages.The DCC team is now in the process of launching a mobile application with a database connected to the website for a more user-friendly interface for the pediatric population. The app prioritized: certain age-appropriate sections relating to emerging vaccine guidelines for younger populations, educational resources, and sexual and reproductive health topics. Results: The DCC team began with 60 fourth-year medical students and grew to include over 100 medical students with guidance from physician/resident mentors. DCC has been recognized as a trusted resource by the community and has been utilized by D.C. Medicaid, the Black Coalition Against COVID, “El Tiempo Latino”, and providers at local hospitals and clinics including Children's National Medical Center (CNMC). In the past several months, we have collaborated with the providers at CNMC and plan to launch the app in August 2021. QR code badges will be used to facilitate distribution among patients and families. Our Google Analytics report showed that DCC had a total of 13,332 users since the launch in July 2020. With additional data regarding user demographics from QR code tracking and surveys, we hope to utilize this information to increase accessibility of our resource. Conclusion: The framework of the DCC app provides the much needed infrastructure that is lacking in the DC community by keeping pace with the breadth of information and resources that are being made available to our pediatric population. The impact of the pandemic will linger for years to come and our resource will continue to evolve and repurpose the work that we do to reflect such changes.

15.
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research ; 14(8):458-465, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003229

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccination for COVID-19 is the most effective measure for controlling the pandemic. Knowledge, attitude & behaviour study among medical students towards COVID-19 vaccination presented a unique opportunity to study and to address barriers to vaccination and their associations. Objective: To study knowledge, attitude and behaviour of MBBS 2nd& 3rd year students towards COVID-19 vaccination. Methods: This was a cross sectional study involving MBBS students from the 2nd and 3rd professional years. A semi-structured questionnaire was designed and disseminated among the students. The questionnaire consisted of items related to knowledge, attitude, and behaviour towards COVID-19 vaccination. Responses obtained were analysed. Results: It was found that 100% of the participants were vaccinated and majority of the participants were well informed regarding COVID-19 vaccine and its schedule, ADRs. Majority were of the opinion that taking COVID-19 vaccine was a social responsibility and they were motivated to take booster dose if offered. Most of the participants admitted to motivating their family and friends to get vaccinated and follow social distancing protocols. Conclusion: We found that the knowledge, attitude and behaviour of medical students towards COVID-19 vaccination was favourable. The positive result of this study highlighted the measures taken by the government and health care workers towards educating people about COVID-19 and its vaccination.

16.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2002998

ABSTRACT

Background: The Mentorship Educational Directive (MED) Program is a medical student-run initiative connecting Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) high school students interested in healthcare with BIPOC medical student mentors. Early health career pipeline programs contribute to achieving health equity by working to assure an adequate and culturally representative health workforce, which is shown to improve access to, and quality of health services for underserved populations. The Health Education Resource Opportunity (HERO) program is a community program focused on increasing the number of underrepresented high school students in STEM fields. The MED program partnered with HERO to add a medical student mentorship component with first- and second- year medical students. Methods: Medical student leaders used a structured virtual platform for mentor/mentee engagement. The HERO program recruited mentees, and student leaders recruited mentors who completed extensive training and were paired via a speed-matching system. Student leaders conducted group sessions on Zoom using breakout rooms and videos as learning tools for demonstrations before students practiced techniques and concepts with their mentors. Mentors and mentees also participated in individual meetings. Following the program, mentors completed reflection questionnaires. We used descriptive and in vivo coding to analyze themes from the questionnaires. Results: Mentors valued the program's structure, created cultural connections, became comfortable having difficult conversations, and felt empowered to mentor students. One of the most common themes was about mentorship;mentors stated they would seek additional opportunities to be mentors and that early mentorship is essential. Shared racial and cultural identities created a deeper connection between mentors and mentees. Mentors found comfort in discussing sensitive topics with their mentees and peers. Conclusion: The MED Program facilitated engagement between medical student mentors and high school mentees using a virtual platform. Three themes emerged from the reflection questionnaires, including cultural connections and shared identities, empowerment of mentors, and comfort with conversations about sensitive topics. These are important findings since studies have shown that sustained relationships and community partnerships enhance students' abilities in higher education. Our findings are a positive step in that direction since mentors expressed satisfaction in their mentoring relationships and felt like they made a positive impact on the students' life and education. The HERO program is currently working with a new set of MED medical student leaders, planning for the coming year and addressing areas for improvement. Overall, we concluded that a virtual BIPOC student mentorship program was a rewarding and meaningful experience for medical students. Areas for further study include analysis of high school student responses and expansion to additional communities. We anticipate that similar programs could potentially expand the network of BIPOC physicians and healthcare leaders, in turn inspiring upcoming generations of potential healthcare providers.

17.
Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association ; 72(8):1471-1473, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1998209
18.
Atencion Familiar ; 29(3):167-173, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1998140

ABSTRACT

Objective:to identify the knowledge,prevention behaviors and perceived risk of covid-19 in medical students.Methods: descriptive, cross-setionalstudy. Students from a medical school participated from September to December 2020. The inclusion criteria were: to be enrolled in the first to tenth semester of the Medical Surgeon Bachelor's Degree, no matter age or gender, who agreed to participate in the research giving informed consent by answering an online survey consisting of 26 questions including fifteen items on knowledge of covid-19, nine on prevention behaviors, and two on covid-19 risk perception. Descriptive analysis was performed. Results: 912 surveys were included, 62.2% were female (n=567), 82% said they had received information related to covid-19 from reliable information sources(n=748), 96.5% talked to their family and friends about prevention measures (n=880), 63.8% were unaware of N95 mask use during intubation, suctioning,bronchoscopy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures (n=582) and 43.3% indicated that they were afraid of becoming infected (n=395). Conclusion: most of the participants reported having received adequate information to learn about aspects related to covid-19, but were unaware of essential aspects such as the use of N95 masks.It is necessary to educate and informthe medical school student populationin order to decrease the perception of risk and increase prevention behaviors.

19.
Atencion Familiar ; 29(3):160-166, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1998139

ABSTRACT

Objective: to identify the knowledge, prevention behaviors and perceived risk of covid-19 in medical students. Methods: descriptive, cross-sectional study. Students from a medical school participated from September to December 2020. The inclusion criteria were: to be enrolled in the first to tenth semester of the Medical Surgeon Bachelor's Degree, no matter age or gender, who agreed to participate in the research giving informed consent by answering an online survey consisting of 26 questions including fifteen items on knowledge of covid-19, nine on prevention behaviors, and two on covid-19 risk perception. Descriptive analysis was performed. Results:912 surveys were included, 62.2% were female (n=567), 82% said they had received information related to covid-19 from reliable information sources (n=748), 96.5% talked to their family and friends about prevention measures (n=880), 63.8% were unaware of N95 mask use during intubation, suctioning, bronchoscopy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures (n=582) and 43.3% indicated that they were afraid of becoming infected (n=395).Conclusion: most of the participants reported having received adequate information to learn about aspects related to covid-19, but were unaware of essential aspects such as the use of N95 masks. It is necessary to educate and inform the medical school student population in order to decrease the perceptionof risk and increase prevention behaviors.

20.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(10):855-860, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1998072

ABSTRACT

Background:The present coronavirus-related epidemic of respiratory and upper respiratory infections (SARS CoV-19) has worldwide mortality and morbidity. This study evaluated the awareness and attitudes of undergraduate medical students concerning the 2019-novel Corona virus. Materials & Methods:235 participants were taken into account subsequent to receiving informed written consent. The questionnaire consisted of Demographic profile, Information Regarding Source of Knowledge, awareness questions and attitude-based questions. Results: Out of 235 subjects, males were 110 and females were 125. Correct response in reference to questionnaire were you diagnosed with covid-19,if yes then specify the method of diagnosis was given by 78%, how does COVID-19 transmit by 85%, how satisfied are you with the amount of health information available about COVID-19 by 86%, how do you mainly obtain health information by 90%, can COVID-19 be cured with antibiotics by 94%, what is the main test to be done for covid 19 by 88%, which organ mainly gets effected in covid-19 by 94%, how confident are you in your own hospital to diagnose or recognize COVID-19 by 90%, please rate your likelihood of contracting COVID-19 during the current outbreak by 91%, please rate your likelihood of surviving COVID-19 if infected by 78%, please rate your concerns about other family members getting COVID-19 by 82%, which type of mask did you buy during the pandemic by 86%, do you think country's health department is doing enough to prevent the outbreak from spreading by 88%, do you think your country's health department is doing enough to cure those infected by 90%, do you cover your mouth while coughing and sneezing by 85% and do you avoid sharing utensils by 89%. Conclusion: Undergraduate medical students possessed adequate awareness and attitude towards 2019-novel Corona virus.

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