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1.
Infancy ; 28(2):435-453, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2242930

ABSTRACT

Attaining self-regulation is a major developmental task in infancy, in which many children show transient difficulties. Persistent, clinically relevant difficulties in self-regulation include excessive crying or sleeping disorders. Many families with affected children are burdened with multiple psychosocial risk. This suggests that regulatory problems are best conceptualized as the maladaptive interplay of overly burdened parents and a dysfunctional parent–child interaction. The current study examines whether social isolation and bonding difficulties function as mediating mechanisms linking maternal psychopathology to (1) children's excessive crying and (2) sleeping problems. The sample comprised N = 6598 mothers (M = 31.51 years) of children between zero to three years of age (M = 14.08 months, 50.1% girls). In addition to socio demographic data, the written questionnaire included information on maternal depression/anxiety, isolation, bonding, and children's regulatory problems. Hypotheses were tested with a mediation model controlling for psychosocial risk and child characteristics. As expected, maternal symptoms of depression/anxiety were linked to infants‘ excessive crying and sleeping problems. Social isolation and bonding difficulties mediated this association for excessive crying as well as for sleeping problems, but social isolation was a single mediator for sleeping problems only. The findings provide important insights in the mediating pathways linking maternal psychopathology to children's regulatory problems.

2.
Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health ; 78(2):61-70, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2242621

ABSTRACT

This study examined work-family enrichment, protective resources and psychological implications among working Israeli parents during COVID-19. In this cross-sectional study, 409 working parents were recruited during Israel's third lockdown. Levels of FWC/WFC and resilience were moderate, psychological distress and fear of COVID-19 were low, and perceived social support was high. All the study variables showed significant associations with each other. A multivariate regression analysis explained 30% of the WFC and FWC variance. We found differences in FWC/WFC based upon children's age but not on parents' gender. FWC/WFC mediated the effect of perceived social support and resilience on fear of COVID-19 and psychological distress. The findings explain the importance of personal resources during the pandemic in buffering the negative effects of parents' work- and family-related burdens and have important implications for helping families with young children cope during challenging times. © 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

3.
Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology ; 30(1):e79-e91, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2242298

ABSTRACT

Background: Dentists and dental auxiliaries are considered at high risk for the spread of COVID-19 due to their direct contact with the patient's oral cavity. The stress of being infected with the virus was high during the pandemic. This research aims to estimate the psychological impact of COVID-19 on dental assistants in Saudi Arabia during this pandemic. Methodology: This questionnaire-based cross-sectional study used a pre-validated Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale with 21 Items (DASS-21) to assess the psychological impact on the mental health of dental assistants during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire was sent to the participants through the mail using Google Forms. One reminder email was sent after a week to fill out and submit the form. Data were entered using Microsoft Excel and later analyzed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results: The response rate was 75% (210 out of 280). Most participants were 20–40 years old and only 10 were above 50. Most participants were females (180) and were of non-Saudi origin. The results of a comparison of DASS scores between males and females were statistically significant (p = 0.001), with a higher mean total DASS score noted in males (20.03) compared to females (13.68). Conclusion: Healthcare workers in direct contact with patients, such as dental assistants, have a higher risk of contracting the infection, which increases their psychological stress and anxiety.

4.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2241639

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This observational cross-sectional study examined changes in substance use during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Mexican population and evaluated whether depression or anxiety was associated with these new consumption patterns. Methods: An online survey was distributed to the general population. Participants were questioned about their demographics, situation during the COVID-19 pandemic, and substance consumption patterns. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression and the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale were used. Results: A total of 866 individuals completed the survey. The mean scores for the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Coronavirus Anxiety Scale were 8.89 ± 6.20 and 3.48 ± 3.22, respectively. The preferred substances were alcohol (19%), tobacco (16.5%), and marijuana (5.6%). Consumption of alcohol (p = 0.042) significantly increased during the pandemic and it was higher in women than in men (p = 0.040). Conclusions: Substance use patterns were affected by the pandemic, with an increase in the number of users and consumption rate, as well as the reported psychiatric symptoms. © 2022 by the authors.

5.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 80(1):13-21, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2241486

ABSTRACT

Importance: Anxiety disorders are common, highly distressing, and impairing conditions. Effective treatments exist, but many patients do not access or respond to them. Mindfulness-based interventions, such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) are popular and can decrease anxiety, but it is unknown how they compare to standard first-line treatments. Objective: To determine whether MBSR is noninferior to escitalopram, a commonly used first-line psychopharmacological treatment for anxiety disorders. Design, Setting, and Participants: This randomized clinical trial (Treatments for Anxiety: Meditation and Escitalopram [TAME]) included a noninferiority design with a prespecified noninferiority margin. Patients were recruited between June 2018 and February 2020. The outcome assessments were performed by blinded clinical interviewer at baseline, week 8 end point, and follow-up visits at 12 and 24 weeks. Of 430 individuals assessed for inclusion, 276 adults with a diagnosed anxiety disorder from 3 urban academic medical centers in the US were recruited for the trial, and 208 completed the trial. Interventions: Participants were 1:1 randomized to 8 weeks of the weekly MBSR course or the antidepressant escitalopram, flexibly dosed from 10 to 20 mg. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome measure was anxiety levels as assessed with the Clinical Global Impression of Severity scale (CGI-S), with a predetermined noninferiority margin of -0.495 points. Results: The primary noninferiority sample consisted of 208 patients (102 in MBSR and 106 in escitalopram), with a mean (SD) age of 33 (13) years;156 participants (75%) were female;32 participants (15%) were African American, 41 (20%) were Asian, 18 (9%) were Hispanic/Latino, 122 (59%) were White, and 13 (6%) were of another race or ethnicity (including Native American or Alaska Native, more than one race, or other, consolidated owing to low numbers). Baseline mean (SD) CGI-S score was 4.44 (0.79) for the MBSR group and 4.51 (0.78) for the escitalopram group in the per-protocol sample and 4.49 (0.77) vs 4.54 (0.83), respectively, in the randomized sample. At end point, the mean (SD) CGI-S score was reduced by 1.35 (1.06) for MBSR and 1.43 (1.17) for escitalopram. The difference between groups was -0.07 (0.16;95% CI, -0.38 to 0.23;P =.65), where the lower bound of the interval fell within the predefined noninferiority margin of -0.495, indicating noninferiority of MBSR compared with escitalopram. Secondary intent-to-treat analyses using imputed data also showed the noninferiority of MBSR compared with escitalopram based on the improvement in CGI-S score. Of patients who started treatment, 10 (8%) dropped out of the escitalopram group and none from the MBSR group due to adverse events. At least 1 study-related adverse event occurred for 110 participants randomized to escitalopram (78.6%) and 21 participants randomized to MBSR (15.4%). Conclusions and Relevance: The results from this randomized clinical trial comparing a standardized evidence-based mindfulness-based intervention with pharmacotherapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders found that MBSR was noninferior to escitalopram. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03522844. © 2023 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

6.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2241377

ABSTRACT

Background: Low back pain as a symptom affects many individuals around the globe regardless of their economic status or sociodemographic characteristics. During the 2019 COVID-19 pandemic, students found themselves obligated to sit down for long periods of time. The aim of this current study is to investigate the impact of these prolonged periods of sitting down in front of computers on developing a new episode of low back pain. Methods and Materials: This research adopted an observational cross-section study design. Students who are currently enrolled or had experienced distance learning classes in the last 6 months were eligible to participate. An online-based questionnaire was developed by the investigators through reviewing the literature with relevant objectives. McNemar's test was used to compare certain variables between two periods before and during online distance learning. We used paired t-tests to compare pain intensity before, during, and after online learning, while a chi-square test was used to investigate correlations between factors influencing low back pain. Results: A total of 84 students participated in the study—46 (54.8%) females and 38 (45.2%) males. Before online distance learning, only 42.9% of participants reported low back pain, while only 20% had a back injury. The mean pain scores before, during, and after online distance learning were (2.85 ± 2.16, 4.79 ± 2.6, and 4.76 ± 2.7), respectively. The pain scores before online learning were significantly lower than pain scores during and after online distance learning (p < 0.05), respectively. Conclusion: The study findings suggested that low back pain prevalence increased among students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future research should study participants' behavior during the online learning and assess the long-run impact of distance learning among high-school and undergraduate students. © 2022 by the authors.

7.
Frontiers in Psychiatry ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2240436

ABSTRACT

Background: Health sciences students experience high levels of psychopathology conditioned by psychosocial, financial, and academic factors. However, COVID-19 pandemic might even have worsened their mental health. Thus, this article aims to evaluate how the exposure to COVID-19 pandemic has affected these students' mental health and to determine the effect of purpose in life and character strengths on this psychopathology. Methods: A cross-sectional study of unpaired samples was carried out in Spain during the first and third waves of the pandemic in 70 medical and 52 nursing students. Results: The risk factor that most determined the appearance of anxiety was the exposure of family and friends to COVID-19 (OR = 4.01;p < 0.001), while the most protective factors were honesty (OR = –1.14;p = 0.025) and purpose in life (OR = –0.18;p < 0.001). Purpose in life also protected against the onset of depression and total psychopathology. In addition, we observed studying medicine was a protective factor against total psychopathology while being a nursing student was associated with high levels of acute stress. Conclusion: Exposure of the students' family and friends to SARS-CoV-2 favored the appearance of symptoms of anxiety. Honesty had a preventing role in the onset of anxiety and a high purpose in life was protective against the appearance of anxiety, depression, and total psychopathology.

8.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2239745

ABSTRACT

When the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) began to ravage the world in 2019, the World Health Organization became concerned. The epidemic has a high mortality and contagion rate, with severe health and psychological impacts on frontline emergency medical service system practitioners. There are many hospital staff surveys, but few have covered the stress among emergency medical technicians. DASS-21, PSQI, and AUDIT questionnaires were used to evaluate the sources of psychological stress factors of firefighters in Taiwan. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the questionnaire content. We conducted questionnaire surveys from May 2022 to July 2022. Our sample comprised 688 participants. The odds ratios of increased depression, anxiety, and stress levels due to reduced family or peer understanding and support were 2.72 (95% CI: 1.50–4.92), p = 0.001;2.03 (95% CI: 1.11–3.68), p = 0.021;and 3.27 (95% CI: 1.83–5.86), p < 0.001, respectively. The odds ratios of poor sleep quality due to depression, anxiety, and increased stress levels were 5.04 (3.18–7.99), p < 0.001;2.44 (95% CI: 1.57–3.81), p < 0.001;and 4.34 (95% CI: 2.76–6.82), p-value < 0.001, respectively. During the COVID-19 pandemic, poor sleep quality and a lack of understanding and support from the Taiwan firefighting agency staff, family, or peers resulted in increased depression, anxiety, and stress levels. © 2022 by the authors.

9.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2239464

ABSTRACT

There is evidence that parental psychological disorders in stressful situations increase the risk of disturbance in child development. This has been investigated in disasters but not in pandemics, which are sensibly different from other types of traumatic events. We investigated the relationship between mothers' anxiety and their children's (self-reported) stress and the boundary conditions of this association during the first full COVID-19 lockdown in Italy. During the COVID-19 pandemic, mothers might have increased their protective attitudes to secure and support their children;we tested whether the relationship between mothers' anxiety and children's stress was weaker (buffer effect) or stronger (over-protection effect) when perceived parental support was high. We measured mothers' anxiety, children's perceived parental support, and children's stress in a sample of 414 8- to 11-year-old primary school children (229 females, Mage = 9.44) and 395 mothers (Mage = 42.84). Results supported the over-protection scenario and provided the first evidence for the "helicopter-parent effect” during the COVID-19 pandemic: mothers' anxiety was positively associated with children's stress only when perceived support was high. Our finding highlights the importance of educating parents (for example, via emotional training) to prevent the worst consequences of adverse events in children and promote their mental health. © 2022 by the authors.

10.
Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health and Behavior ; 11(1):35-54, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2239052

ABSTRACT

Background: The development of depression and anxiety symptoms during long COVID may partly result from the biopsychosocial effects of COVID-19 that impact mental health, rather than from the infection alone. Aim: The present study examined the association of anxiety, depression, stress, and psychological distress levels with sociodemographic factors and symptom severity during and three months after the acute phase of COVID-19. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 119 participants with a positive SARS-CoV-2 qPCR test. Three months after the acute phase of infection, participants completed an online survey to collect clinical information and sociodemographic data, followed by completion of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress scales. Results: During and after infection, fatigue was the most frequently reported symptom. After the acute phase of COVID-19, substantial numbers of participants presented moderate to severe psychological distress (28.5%), severe to extremely severe depression (26.05%), and severe to extremely severe stress (31.09%). Female patients presented higher stress scores than males, while individuals who reported having lost a loved one presented high psychological distress, anxiety, and depression. The presence of physical symptoms after COVID-19 and other factors such as being a woman, being married, having children, or living with someone who suffers from a disease increased vulnerability to depression, stress, and anxiety. Conclusions: There are psychological consequences for survivors of COVID-19 associated with sociodemographic factors. Clinical strategies are needed to provide mental health care for individuals with long COVID symptoms. © 2022 IACFS/ME.

11.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246530

ABSTRACT

Depressive symptoms, a prevalent mood illness, significantly harm college students' physical and mental health. Individuals have experienced some degree of psychological harm as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Taking this into account, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity (PA) and depressive symptoms among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the mediating roles of perceived stress and academic procrastination. A total of 586 college students were subjected to the Physical Activity Scale (PARS-3), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the Procrastination Assessment Scale-Students (PASS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Findings from this research demonstrated that there was a significant positive correlation between perceived stress, academic procrastination, and depressive symptoms, while PA was significantly negatively correlated with perceived stress, academic procrastination, and depressive symptoms. The results of the chain mediation analysis showed that PA had a significant direct effect on depressive symptoms. Perceived stress, academic procrastination, and perceived stress-academic procrastination had significant mediating and chain mediating effects on the relationship between PA and depressive symptoms. In conclusion, PA among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic affects their depressive symptoms directly and indirectly through the independent mediating effect of perceived stress and academic procrastination, as well as the chain mediating effect of perceived stress and academic procrastination. © 2022 by the authors.

12.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246437

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: During the past 3 years, the COVID-19 pandemic has severely affected the normal school schedule of college students, jeopardizing their mental health, sleep quality, and interpersonal relationships. However, previous studies have focused on the dimension of social support received, and few studies have measured in depth the association of support received from family on adolescents' physical and mental health. Therefore, this study explored the associations between family support received by Chinese college students during COVID-19 pandemic online classes, stress and sleep quality, and the mediating role of stress. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted at Chongqing Medical University recruited 712 college students through a university-wide incidental random sample using the Questionnaire Star platform. Statistical description and correlation analysis was conducted using SPSS 25.0, and structural equation modeling was constructed using AMOS 22.0 to test for mediating effects;(3) Results: The family support score of college students during the COVID-19 pandemic online course was 19.41 ± 4.62. Correlation analysis showed that sleep quality was negatively correlated with family support (r = −0.224, p < 0.01), positively correlated with stress (r = 0.324, p < 0.01), and family support was negatively correlated with stress (r = −0.159, p < 0.01). The results of structural equation modeling showed that stress partially mediated the relationship between family support and sleep quality among college students (indirect effect = −0.150, p < 0.01, SE = 0.013,95% CI = [−0.208, −0.064]). The model R2 was 36.4%. (4) Conclusions: Schools should consider implementing sleep education, and stress relief curriculum measures to improve the quality of students' sleep, and should focus on the role that family plays during online classes. This will help students overcome the negative emotional effects of stress in the COVID-19 pandemic and improve their learning efficiency and physical and mental health. © 2022 by the authors.

13.
Pediatric Drugs ; 25(1):115-126, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246020

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Current irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) treatments have limited efficacy and probiotics like Bacillus clausii (B. clausii) were found to be effective in the management of several gastrointestinal disorders. This phase III trial assessed the efficacy and safety of adding B. clausii (four strains: O/C, N/R, SIN, T), versus placebo, to conventional treatment of pediatric IBS in Mexico. Methods: Patients aged 6–17 years 11 months with IBS (Rome IV) for at least 2 months were randomized to receive either B. clausii (oral suspension, total dose 4 billion spores/day) or placebo once daily for 8 weeks. All patients also received conventional treatment. The primary endpoint was the difference in the proportion of patients with clinical improvements at Week 8 (Global Assessment Questions [GAQ]). Secondary endpoints included responders by Subject's Global Assessment of Relief for Children with IBS (SGARC);number/consistency of stools;abdominal distention/bloating;abdominal pain/intensity;and IBS behavior. Results: 73.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 67.3–80.0;B. clausii n = 129) and 78.5% (95% CI 72.5–84.4;placebo n = 130) of patients had symptom improvement (p = 0.8182). For Week 8 SGARC, 19.2% (B. clausii) and 20.9% (placebo) reported complete symptom relief. Stool evaluations, bloating, abdominal pain/intensity, and IBS behavior were similar between groups. Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion: No significant differences in efficacy between B. clausii and placebo were demonstrated in addition to conventional treatment. The sample size calculation was based on an expected placebo/conventional treatment response of 30–40%. However, the actual treatment response observed was 80% and, thus, a study with larger population would be warranted. In addition, this study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, when such controlled social conditions may have resulted in better diet, greater family stability, less psychological stress, and lower risk of infections exacerbating IBS, thereby improving symptoms in both groups. EudraCT number: 2018-004519-31. © 2022, The Author(s).

14.
Journal of Dental Education ; 87(1):43-49, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245802

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed panic and fear among people in the community, and has endangered the mental health of people, including students. The purpose of this study was to determine the psychological effects of COVID-19 outbreak on dental students of our university in 2020. Methods and materials: The present cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 133 dental students from the fifth and 11th semesters in our University. Data collection tools included the Demographic Information Questionnaire, the 28-item Goldberg General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) to measure the psychological aspects, the BarOn Emotional Quotient-Inventory (BarOn EQ-i) to determine emotional intelligence, and the COVID-19 Anxiety Scale (CAS) of students during the epidemic. The reliability and validity of the questionnaires had already been reviewed and confirmed. The correlation of the scores of the questionnaires was evaluated by Pearson correlation coefficient and the effects of different variables in predicting the scores of the questionnaires by regression model. Results: Among the tested students, the mean GHQ-28 score was 35.73%, the mean BarOn EQ-i score was 59.94%, and the mean CAS score was 25.27%. There was a significant and direct correlation between GHQ-28 and BarOn EQ-i scores and also a significant and negative correlation between GHQ-28 and CAS scores and between BarOn EQ-i and CAS scores. Conclusion: Despite limited CAS scores and high BarOn EQ-i scores, psychological disorders were observed in a significant number of students during the COVID-19 pandemic period;there is a need for therapeutic and counseling interventions to mitigate the effects of these disorders. © 2022 American Dental Education Association.

15.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245680

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has impacted all levels of daily life for people everywhere, with particularly serious implications for pregnant women. This paper examines the COVID-19-related childbirth anxiety (CCA) of Israeli women in the first two waves of the pandemic. We first present two psychotherapeutic case studies with pregnant women in the two waves. This is followed by an empirical study that compared the contribution of background variables, psychological distress, economic concerns, and personal resources to CCA in two samples, Wave 1, March–April 2020 (n = 403) and Wave 2, September–October 2020 (n = 1401), and two subpopulations, Jewish and Arab women. Findings reveal that CCA was significantly lower in Wave 2 than in Wave 1. Furthermore, poorer health, higher education, being an Arab, later gestational week, at-risk pregnancy, wave, higher psychological distress, greater economic concerns, and lower self-compassion contributed to higher childbirth anxiety. Wave moderated the association between optimism and anxiety. The findings of the empirical study, together with insights from the case studies, provide evidence of a decrease in CCA later in the crisis, and indicate the significance of resources for coping with the psychological implications of the pandemic. Moreover, they suggest the importance of empowering self-reliance techniques, such as self-compassion, which was significantly associated with lower anxiety, above and beyond the background and psychological variables. Clinical Impact Statement: Using both psychotherapeutic cases and empirical findings, this study points to the risk and resilience factors that contributed to pregnant women's COVID-19-related childbirth anxiety (CCA) in the first two waves of the pandemic. The study suggests that CCA was higher in the first wave, as well as among women from a minority group. At the same time, the research shows that resilience resources of optimism and self-compassion contributed to the reduction of anxiety. These findings may guide interventions for the vulnerable group of pregnant women in times of crisis. © 2022 by the authors.

16.
Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology ; 57(2):178-184, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245642

ABSTRACT

Background and Goals: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted daily life, particularly in those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to determine the impact of the pandemic on the pregnancy planning and mental health of women with IBD. Methods: Women with IBD (age 18 to 45 y) were asked to complete anonymous surveys on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnancy planning and mental health symptoms such as stress (Perceived Stress Scale), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7). Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify risk factors associated with stress, depression, and anxiety during the pandemic. Results: Seventy-three women with IBD were included (mean age: 32.1). Of 39 patients who were preconception, 20 (51.3%) reported a significant impact of the pandemic on pregnancy planning, with common reasons for not planning conception being fear of transmission of the virus to the fetus, lack of social supports, and no desire to be in hospital during pregnancy. Over half of all women reported an increase in stress and depression symptoms during the pandemic, with over half also reporting symptoms of anxiety. On multivariable linear regression analyses, increased anxiety levels were a significant predictor of increased stress and depression symptoms during the pandemic. Urban residence and younger age were significant predictors of increased anxiety symptoms during the pandemic. Conclusion: A significant proportion of women with IBD experienced an impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnancy planning and mental health illnesses such as stress, depression, and anxiety. © 2023 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved.

17.
Annals of Surgery ; 277(1):50-56, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245637

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the degree of psychological impact among surgical providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Summary of Background Data: The COVID-19 pandemic has extensively impacted global healthcare systems. We hypothesized that the degree of psychological impact would be higher for surgical providers deployed for COVID-19 work, certain surgical specialties, and for those who knew of someone diagnosed with, or who died, of COVID-19. Methods: We conducted a global web-based survey to investigate the psychological impact of COVID-19. The primary outcomes were the depression anxiety stress scale-21 and Impact of Event Scale-Revised scores. Results: A total of 4283 participants from 101 countries responded. 32.8%, 30.8%, 25.9%, and 24.0% screened positive for depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD respectively. Respondents who knew someone who died of COVID-19 were more likely to screen positive for depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD (OR 1.3, 1.6, 1.4, 1.7 respectively, all P < 0.05). Respondents who knew of someone diagnosed with COVID-19 were more likely to screen positive for depression, stress, and PTSD (OR 1.2, 1.2, and 1.3 respectively, all P < 0.05). Surgical specialties that operated in the head and neck region had higher psychological distress among its surgeons. Deployment for COVID- 19-related work was not associated with increased psychological distress. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic may have a mental health legacy outlasting its course. The long-term impact of this ongoing traumatic event underscores the importance of longitudinal mental health care for healthcare personnel, with particular attention to those who know of someone diagnosed with, or who died of COVID-19. © 2023 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved.

18.
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology ; 21(1):41944.0, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245407
19.
Healthcare Technology Letters ; 9(45050):77-90, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2244406

ABSTRACT

This study applied the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines to redesign the Portable Health Clinic (PHC), as a Remote Healthcare System (RHS), for the spread of COVID-19 containment. Additionally, the proposed drone-based system not only collects people data but also classifies the case according to the main symptoms of coronavirus using the COVID-19 triage process (CT-process) based on the analysis of measurement readings taken from patients, where drones are used in a swarm as a PHC platform and are equipped with the required sensors and essential COVID-19 medications for testing and treating people at their doorstep autonomously when a full curfew is imposed. This paper describes a complete framework and proposes currently in production hardware to build the suggested system, considering the effect of the extra payload weight on drone's durability. In addition, part of the proposed application was simulated using OPNET simulation tool. This work highlights the main aspects that should be considered when designing drone swarm-based system and distributing the roles on system nodes with the main focus on the controlling messages for inter-swarm and intra-swarm communication and coordination.

20.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2244132

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in heightened stress for many individuals, with women reporting more stress than men. Although a large body of evidence has demonstrated that stress, in general, can impact the menstrual cycle, it is not yet clear if COVID-specific stress would impact women's menstrual health. The current study explored the relationship between COVID-related stress and distress and menstrual variables (menstrual pain, number and severity of menstrual symptoms, and menstrual pain interference) in a sample of reproductive-age adult women. Seven-hundred fifteen women completed the initial survey and were re-contacted to complete the same survey three months later. Of those recontacted, 223 completed the follow-up survey. Results indicated that COVID-related stress and distress was associated with higher levels of menstrual pain, more frequent and more severe menstrual symptoms, and greater menstrual pain interference, even after accounting for age, hormonal use, bodily pain, and pain catastrophizing. Our findings suggest that women experience unique vulnerabilities that directly impact their health and functioning, and both research and clinical care should address these symptoms through careful assessment and treatment of menstrual pain and symptoms, particularly during and after periods of high stress and distress. © 2022 by the authors.

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