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1.
Embase; 2022.
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-335102

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the relationship between young adults’ labor force participation and depression in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, Participants: Data come from the nationally-representative EPICOV cohort study set up in France, and were collected in 2020 and 2021 (3 waves of online or telephone interviews) among 2217 participants aged 18-30 years. Participants with prior mental health disorder (n=50) were excluded from the statistical analyses. Results: Using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models controlled for participants’ socio-demographic and health characteristics and weighted to be nationally-representative, we found that compared to young adults who were employed, those who were studying or unemployed were significantly more likely to experience depression assessed using the PHQ-9 (multivariate ORs respectively: OR: 1.29, 95% CI 1.05-1.60 and OR: 1.50, 1.13-1.99). Stratifying the analyses by age, we observed than unemployment was more strongly associated with depression among participants 25-30 years than among those who were 18-24 years (multivariate ORs respectively 1.78, 95% CI 1.17-2.71 and 1.41, 95% CI 0.96-2.09). Being out of the labor force was, to the contrary, more significantly associated with depression among participants 18-24 years (multivariate OR: 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.82, vs. 1.00, 95% CI 0.53-1.87 among participants 25-30 years). Stratifying the analyses by sex, we found no significant differences in the relationships between labor market characteristics and depression (compared to participants who were employed, multivariate ORs associated with being a student: men: 1.33, 95% CI 1.01-1.76;women: 1.19, 95% CI 0.85-1.67, multivariate ORs associated with being unemployed: men: 1.60, 95% CI 1.04-2.45;women: 1.47, 95% CI 1.01-2.15). Conclusions and relevance: Our study shows that in addition to students, young adults who are unemployed also experience elevated levels of depression in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. These two groups should be the focus of specific attention in terms of prevention and mental health treatment. Supporting employment could also be a propitious way of reducing the burden of the Covid-19 pandemic on the mental health of young adults.

2.
Infektoloski Glasnik ; 41(3):87-92, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822781

ABSTRACT

Summary Originating with unexplained symptoms from Wuhan, city of China, COVID-19 being a global pandemic causing tremendous morbidity and mortality, has proved to be the biggest challenge of the 20th century. This study aimed to explore the functional impacts of COVID-19 upon those patients who were diagnosed with this disease and were admitted in hospitals. This cross-sectional survey included 183 COVID-19 diagnosed patients from COVID-19 isolation wards of public and private hospitals of Islamabad and Rawalpindi. After getting ethical permission from Institutional Review Board of Shifa International Hospital (Ref # 070-21), this survey was conducted for the time period of 6 months from December 2020 to May 2021. Through convenient sampling, 183 patients with the age range of 25 to 55 years with no already diagnosed psychological complaints were assessed for eligibility briefed regarding the study purpose and then were asked for their voluntary participation. The Functional Status Scale for the Intensive Care Unit (FSS-ICU) was used to assess the functional status impacted due to COVID-19 during hospitalization. Frequencies and percentages were calculated through SPSS-21. On FSS-ICU, out of 183 COVID-19, 11 (6%) patients reported that they were dependent, 18 (9.8%) required maximum assistance, 32 (17.5%) required moderate assistance, 27 (14.8%) required minimal, 24 (13.1%) required supervision to complete their tasks, 28 (15.3%) required assistive devices, whereas 43 (23.5%) were totally independent. Results indicated a temporal impact of COVID-19 upon functional status of hospitalized patients in intensive care units, therefore highlighting the need of physiotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic interventions.

3.
Osteopathic Family Physician ; 13(4):24-28, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822744

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 continues to be a major societal disruptor that threatens the wellness and health of millions of people worldwide. We rightfully celebrate the over 20 million survivors in the United States, yet, what constitutes actual recovery, as many face continuing repercussions of their illness? This paper reviews COVID-19, focusing on its sequela of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the accompanying intensive care unit stay, treatment options and its increased morbidity. Outlined is the importance of long-term, comprehensive care for post-infection patients, as well as the numerous barriers to adequate care. We suggest looking to doctors of osteopathic medicine to bridge the gaps in multifactorial care, including psychological and physical dysfunction. Osteopathic medicine is discussed as a potential benefit during this pandemic by reviewing its effectiveness in a previous pandemic. However, additional work must be conducted to improve awareness of needed care and delivery of that care.

4.
Revista de la Facultad de Medicina Humana ; 22(2):495-501, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822700

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pregnancy is a stage of physiological, psychological, personal, and social changes for women. The role of the emotional and psychological aspect covers the entire period because as fetal development progresses, the mother-baby relationship is strengthened, making the mother vulnerable. Objectives: Collect, describe and analyze relevant information on mental health in pregnant women, both at different stages of pregnancy and before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A literature search was carried out through PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scielo using terminology compiled from MeSH and DeCs. Results: Pregnancy due to hormonal changes causes the presence of anxiety and feelings of depression that worsen as the stages of fetal development progress. These psychological disorders have greatly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic due to various reasons such as the relationship with a partner, uncertainty, fear, anguish, and growing phobia of contagion. Conclusion: Pregnant women are a vulnerable population whose mental health has always been affected and more than ever due to the pandemic, so they need better care in the health sector, such as providing reliable information on preventive measures to alleviate the burden of stressors, as they bear the burden of their health distress and that of the fetus.

5.
Revista Medica Herediana ; 33(1):15-23, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822664

ABSTRACT

In Peru, one of the first interventions to flattened the epidemiologic curve of the pandemic was quarantine that changed eating behavior, physical activity and mental health of the population. Objective: to determine modifications in eating behavior, physical activity and mental health in young adults before and after the quarantine. Methods: cohort study involving 384 adults from 18 to 24 years of age that were subjected to a virtual interview and application of an international questionnaire to evaluate changings in eating behavior, physical activity and mental health contrasted by Chi square. Results: an increase in the distribution of daily foods [breakfast (p<0.001), morning snack (p<0.05), lunch (p<0.001), afternoon snack (p<0.001), dinner (p<0.05)] and an increase in ingestion of fruits (p=0.005) and reduction in the ingestion of fast food (p<0.05) and candies (p=0.03). Physical activity decreases specially in males vs females (28.4% vs. 25.3%) and there was a reduction in the total number of sleep hours, mental health was severely affected. Conclusions: quarantine induced variations in eating behavior, reduction in physical activity and increase in mental health disorders. These modifications put the population at risk for weight gain or obesity and eventually to non-transmissible diseases.

7.
Revista de Neuro-Psiquiatria ; 85(1):72-82, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818928

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the prevalence of the main mental disorders in health workers and the general population, in the context of the coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Material and Methods: The article follows the norms of the PRISM Guide for systematic revisions. A bibliographical search was made in Pub Med /MEDLINE from March 2020 until the 24 of March of 2021, the search strategies being duly evaluated by means of the Cochrane Manual of systematic reviews;similarly, the Mendeley program was used to qualify bibliographical references and eliminate duplicated articles. Results: Twenty-two studies were included in the analysis with a total average of 24 593 participants. In the general population, anxiety had a prevalence of 36.4%;depression, 26.6%;stress, 44.2% and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 5.9%. Women presented more frequently symptoms of anxiety and depression, whereas the majority of men manifested symptoms of stress. Among the health professionals, stress and sleep disturbances were the main problems, both with a prevalence of 43%. Conclusion: The mental health of frontline health professionals and workers, as well as the general population’s is seriously compromised in the COVID-19 pandemic, with anxiety, depression, stress, insomnia and PTSD as the most prevalent conditions.

8.
Journal of Clinical Medicine ; 11(9), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818160

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 forced healthcare workers to work in unprecedented and critical circumstances, exacerbating already-problematic and stressful working conditions. The “Healthcare workers’ wellbeing (Benessere Operatori)” project aimed at identifying psychological and personal factors, influencing individuals’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: 291 healthcare workers took part in the project by answering an online questionnaire twice (after the first wave of COVID-19 and during the second wave) and completing questions on socio-demographic and work-related information, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and the Brief Cope. Results: Higher levels of worry, worse working conditions, a previous history of psychiatric illness, being a nurse, older age, and avoidant and emotion-focused coping strategies seem to be risk factors for healthcare workers’ mental health. High levels of perceived social support, the attendance of emergency training, and problem-focused coping strategies play a protective role. Conclusions: An innovative, and more flexible, data mining statistical approach (i.e., a regression trees approach for repeated measures data) allowed us to identify risk factors and derive classification rules that could be helpful to implement targeted interventions for healthcare workers.

9.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818143

ABSTRACT

Studies provide evidence that distress, (health) anxiety, and depressive symptoms were high during the first weeks of COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, decreasing over time (possibly due to individuals’ protective psychological factors). Relations between different lockdown restrictions, mental health issues, and protective factors need to be explored, since even small lockdown effects might increase the risk of future mental health issues. We merged objective lockdown stringency data with individual data (N = 1001) to examine differences in lockdown effects in strict lockdown (Romania) and mild lockdown (Hungary) conditions between March and May 2020 on stressors and mental health symptoms, taking protective factors into account. The stricter lockdown in Romania revealed higher levels of perceived risk of infection, distress intolerance, and COVID-19 health anxiety. Protective psychological factors were not affected by the lockdown measures. Surpassing psychological flexibility and resilient coping, self-control proved to be the most promising protective factor. It is recommended that future research merge objective data with study data to investigate the effects of different COVID-19 lockdown measures on mental health and protective factors. Policy decisions should consider lockdown-dependent consequences of mental health issues. Intervention programs are suggested to mitigate mental health issues and to strengthen peoples’ protective psychological factors.

10.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818129

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted perinatal mental health globally. We determined the maternal factors and pandemic-related experiences associated with clinically significant perinatal (pregnant and post-partum) depressive symptoms in Australian women. Participants (n = 2638;pregnant n = 1219, postnatal n = 1419) completed an online survey (August 2020 through February 2021) and self-reported on depression, social support, and COVID-19 related experiences. We found elevated depressive symptoms amongst 26.5% (pregnant) and 19% (postnatal) women. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed higher likelihood of elevated depression associated with residence in Victoria, lower education, past/current mental health problems, greater non-pandemic prenatal stress, age ≥ 35 years (pregnant women) and existing physical health issues or disability in self or others (postnatal women). Greater family stress/discord and lower social support (friends) was associated with higher odds of elevated perinatal depression, while lower social support (family) was significantly associated with elevated depressive symptoms in pregnant women. Greater depression was associated with social distancing, pandemic-related news exposure and changes to prenatal care (pregnant women). Single postnatal women showed lower odds of elevated depression than partnered women. Our findings underscore the importance of universal screening for depression and targeted support during a pandemic for perinatal women displaying vulnerability factors.

11.
Frontiers in Psychiatry ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818021

ABSTRACT

Background: The long-term mental health effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children are rarely reported. We aimed to investigate the progression of depressive and anxiety symptoms among a cohort of children in the initial epicenter of COVID-19 in China. Methods: Two waves of surveys were conducted in the same two primary schools in Wuhan and Huangshi, Hubei province: Wave 1 from 28 February to 5 March, 2020 (children had been confined to home for 30–40 days) and Wave 2 from 27 November to 9 December, 2020 (schools had reopened for nearly 3 months). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were estimated using the Children's Depression Inventory – Short Form (CDI-S) and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), respectively. ΔCDI-S and ΔSCARED scores between Wave 2 and Wave 1 were calculated and further categorized into tertiles. Multivariable linear regression and multinomial logistic regression models were then applied. Results: A total of 1,224 children completed both surveys. The prevalence of mental health outcomes at Wave 2 increased significantly compared to Wave 1, specifically depressive symptoms (age-standardized prevalence rates: 37.5 vs. 21.8%) and anxiety symptoms (age-standardized prevalence rates: 24.0 vs. 19.6%). Higher ΔSCARED scores were observed in females and children in Wuhan, and children with experience of neglect had higher ΔCDI-S (β = 1.12;95% CI = 0.67–1.58) and ΔSCARED (β = 6.46;95% CI = 4.73–8.19) scores compared with those without experience of neglect. When the Δ scores were further categorized into tertiles, similar results were found. Conclusions: The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms after schools resumed was increased compared with that during the home quarantine period, even though the COVID-19 pandemic was under control. Females and children in Wuhan, and also children with experience of neglect were at increased risk of mental health disorders.

12.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816930

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer survivors often experience financial hardship due to high costs associated with cancer treatment. Our objective was to (1) identify determinants of financial hardship, and to (2) evaluate the impact of financial hardship on mental health symptoms among cancer survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We used nationally representative data from the COVID-19 Household Impact Survey collected at three-time points: April 20-26, May 4-10, and May 30th -June 8 th of 2020. Our primary exposure was cancer survivor status, based on participant's self-report of a cancer diagnosis (n=854, 7.1%). We defined financial hardship using the following question: “Suppose you have an unexpected expense that costs $400. Based on your current financial situation, how would you pay for this expense?” Respondents were categorized as experiencing financial hardship if they chose the following options: I wouldn't be able to pay for it right now;sell something;use a payday loan, deposit advance, or overdraft;borrow from a friend or family member. Chi-square (χ2 ) tests were used to compare reported financial hardship among cancer survivors to other U.S. adults. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to identify determinants of financial hardship among cancer survivors. We used multinomial logistic regression to evaluate associations of financial hardship on mental health symptoms of cancer survivors. Results: Eighteen percent of cancer survivors reported experiencing financial hardship. Cancer survivors aged 30-44 (44.8%) and 45-59 years (25.9%) more frequently reported financial hardship compared to adults without cancer (23.4%, 16.7%, respectively, χ2p<0.05). Compared to cancer survivors aged 60+ years, those aged 18-29 (aPR: 2.54, 95% CI;1.51-4.28), 30-44 (aPR:3.41, 95% CI:2.26-5.16), and 45-59 years (aPR:3.66, 95% CI:2.26-5.16) were more likely to experience financial hardship. Cancer survivors on Medicaid (aPR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.16-2.66) were more likely to experience financial hardship compared to their counterparts. Compared to those without a high school degree, cancer survivors with some college education (aPR: 0.30, 95% CI: 0.18-0.47) and with a ≥Baccalaureate degree (aPR:0.05, 95% CI: 0.02- 0.14) were less likely to experience financial hardship. Rural cancer survivors had 61% higher prevalence of financial hardship compared to urban residents (aPR: 1.61, 95% CI:1.00-2.58), however, suburban residents were less likely to experience financial hardship compared to cancer survivors living in urban areas (aPR: 0.65, 95% CI:0.44-0.98). Cancer survivors who experienced financial hardship were more likely to report feeling depressed (aOR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.39-5.56), lonely (aOR: 3.06, 95% CI: 1.39-6.72), and hopeless (aOR: 3.16, 95% CI: 1.36-7.37) 3-7 days during the last 7 days. Conclusion: Lower SES measures and younger age were determinants of experiencing financial hardship among cancer survivors. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a high burden of mental health symptoms among cancer survivors experiencing financial hardship.

13.
Respirology ; 27(SUPPL 1):185, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816637

ABSTRACT

Introduction: PCD is a rare, progressive disease resulting in upper and lower respiratory tract manifestations that increase the risk of sleep disordered breathing. This study is the first to characterize sleep quality in Australian children with PCD and examine it is relationship to mood and health-related quality of life (HrQOL). Methods: Clinically stable children with PCD (1-18 years of age) were recruited. Subjective sleep quality was assessed with the SDSC, PDSS and OSA-18 questionnaires. HrQOL and depressive symptoms were assessed via age-appropriate QOL-PCD and CDI questionnaires. Demographic data including passive smoke exposure was recorded. Pulmonary function testing and ENT assessments were performed. Children underwent overnight polysomnography including transcutaneous CO2 and video monitoring (50% studies complete due to Covid restrictions). Results: Twenty-two participants (10 female) aged 8.1 ± 5.1 (mean ± SD) years were recruited. Mean(±SD) FEV1 was 78.2 ± 21.2%. Ninety-two percent of children assessed were diagnosed with chronic rhinosinusitis and 35% exposed to regular passive cigarette smoke. Polysomnography identified sleep fragmentation in 90% of studies and one case of mild obstructive sleep apnoea. Subjective sleep questionnaires revealed 76% of parents and 50% of children reported clinically significant scores indicating sleep disturbance and excessive daytime somnolence respectively. Twenty-seven percent of parents reported a moderate-severe impact of sleep disturbance on QOL. Forty-six percent of children had elevated depression scores. HrQOL and mood scores were correlated with poor subjective sleep quality. Children exposed to passive cigarette smoke had poorer subjective sleep quality and lower HrQOL and mood. Conclusion: Even in periods of clinical stability, children with PCD exhibit poor sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness and this is associated with lower mood and HrQOL. Based on these findings, we recommend routine screening for mental health and symptoms of sleep disturbance in children and adolescents with PCD. The continued education of children and families regarding the effects of cigarette smoke is advised.

14.
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy ; 36(1):1-3, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815736
15.
The Lancet Psychiatry ; 9(5):349, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1815335
16.
Clinical Neurosurgery ; 68(SUPPL 1):72, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1813118

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic forced the implementation of social distancing guidelines to minimize spread of the coronavirus. However, it is not yet understood what effects these precautions had on the rates of penetrating neurotrauma. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed neurotrauma data from our institutional trauma registry from distinct periods defined as pre-COVID-19 (March 2019-September 2019) and COVID-19 (March 2020-September 2020). Demographics, injury characteristics, mechanisms of trauma, and past medical history (including psychiatric diagnosis) were collected. Data were analyzed for between-group differences and presented as odds ratios. RESULTS: We observed a significant rise in the number of neurotrauma cases in 2020 (558 vs. 630, OR 1.129 [1.0071, 1.2657]). There was a decrease in the proportion of male victims (71.3% vs. 68.6%, p = 0.03). There were significant differences noted in the mechanism of injury between groups. Patients in 2020 were less likely to present with falls (42.3% vs. 34.3%, OR 0.7119 [0.5627, 0.9005]) and more likely to present with GSW (4.48% vs. 7.78%, OR 1.7981 [1.0951, 2.9523]). Of the patients with penetrating cranial injuries, the most common motive was assault (56.7% vs. 60.0%), followed by self-inflicted (13.3% vs. 20.0%) and accidental (20.0% vs. 18.3%) with a significant difference between years (p = 0.0043). The presence of comorbid psychiatric illness or substance abuse did not confer an increased odds of presenting with penetrating injuries. No significant differences were noted in mean arrival or discharge GCS or injury severity as measured by ISS. However we did observe significant increases in patients presenting with bilaterally reactive pupils (48.3% vs 59.3%, p = 0.0025), patients discharged home (27.6% vs 37.3%, p = 0.0002), and survival at 6 months (41.4% vs. 54.2%, p = 0.0188). CONCLUSION: We observed a higher rate of penetrating neurotrauma while social distancing measures were in place. It is unclear if the psychosocial effects of quarantine and social distancing had a causative relationship with the increased rates of assault and self-inflicted penetrating injuries.

17.
Neuroepidemiology ; 56(SUPPL 1):35, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1812738

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has boosted telemedicine (TLM) for acute and chronic neurological disorders and it has demonstrated its cost/efficiency benefits. Before the Covid-19 pandemic, TLM was used mainly for the acute stroke management to deliver thrombolysis and select mechanical thrombectomy in rural and underserved areas. To the opposite, experiences for chronic neurological disorders were limited before the Covid-19 pandemic. Covid-19 pandemic suggests to re-think neurological practices. Therefore, it was observed that neurological diseases are compatible with tele-consultation, teleassistance and tele-expertise, because clinical symptoms are accessible to simple questionnaires, functional scales and expert visual observation. The new use of TLM has demonstrated its efficiency for stroke but also for chronic neurological diseases as Multiple Sclerosis, Epilepsy, Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases, Atrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Myasthenia gravis, neuromuscular diseases, post-traumatic lesions and psychiatric disorders. Moreover, TLM is safe, it allows treatments changes, it protects patient confidentially, it safeguards the privacy of participants. TLM improves quality of life, allowing to the patients to hold the tele-visit in familiar environment in a multidisciplinary approach, with a strong correlation compared with the equivalent face-to-face visit. This new medical practice provides multiple consequences: TLM training is necessary, and governments, health care systems and payers should be encouraged to continue to develop its generalization. Conclusion: TLM for acute and chronic neurological disorders presents 4 advantages: better access to care, greater convenience, enhanced patient comfort, better confidentiality. TLM must become a new normality rather than exception, while standard operating procedures and legal framework are essential.

18.
Prog. Brain Res. ; 270:xix-xx, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1799652
19.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(SUPPL 2):56, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1798731

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The wide spread of novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) carries not only physical but also psychological effects especially among the medical students. The COVID-19 pandemic made examination and curricular restructuring. With the accessible evidence suggesting that medical students mental health status is very poorer than that of general population. Academic stress being a chief predictor have significant effect on student's mental wellbeing. Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the psychological distress of COVID-19 on medical students and to find the personal risk factors. Materials and Methods: The present study was an observational study conducted at Saveetha Medical College, the total participants was 282 medical students. An online survey was conducted and distributed to medical students via Google forms containing the questionnarie sessions. The questionnaire consists of demographic details, psychometric tools for assessment of depression, stress and anxiety scales. Results: The total number of participants were 282 medical students. Participants with clinically significant depression was 75.2%, anxiety was 56.4% and stress was 52.9%. Those who showed PTSD was 54.3%. This analysis revealed that it is associated with gender. This study also revealed that depression and anxiety was significantly associated with personal history of psychiatric illness. Conclusion: Medical students were highly depressed, anxious and stressed during COVID-19 pandemic. The psychological impact of COVID-19 on medical students is also associated with previous psychiatric illness and gender.

20.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(SUPPL 2):35, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1798730

ABSTRACT

Introduction: There is growing evidence of neuropsychiatric presentations in patients of COVID-19, but literature is scarce on laboratory biomarkers for its objectivity as diagnostic or prognostic purpose and how they are impacted in clinical course of systemic outcome in COVID-19 infection. Materials and methods: Authors screened 430 ICU patients admitted to our tertiary care hospitals, out of whom 67 were diagnosed positively with definitive neuropsychiatric sequalae and receive psychotropic interventions during their hospital stay. Authors compared their D-dimer levels, C-reactive proteins, serum ferritin levels, serum procalcitonin and Vitamin D levels and further analyzed CORADS severity score with psychiatric severity and outcome. Results: Among the clinical laboratory biomarkers only D-dimer levels were found to be significantly impacting the variability among various psychiatric diagnosis (F=2.479, p <0.033). while serum ferritin levels were just marginally close to significance (F= 2.221, p=0.053). We observed that serum CRP, vitamin D levels and serum procalcitonin levels were not significantly variable between seven domains of psychiatric disorders. These laboratory biomarkers were considered to be useful not only for early suspicion of neuropsychiatric disorders and identifying high risk cohorts but also rationalizing therapies, predicting outcome and framing ICU admissions. Conclusions: The present study has found significant association of elevated levels of D-dimer variability but not the other laboratory biomarkers among various neuropsychiatric comorbid sequalae in ICU admitted COVID-19 patients. This particular observation might have potential for serum D-dimer levels to be possibly used as an early biomarker to screen or suspect for comorbid neuropsychiatric presentations and their prognosis.

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