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1.
Value Health ; 2022 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore the 1-year temporal change in prevalence, variety, and potential risk factors of long COVID symptoms, and to further predict the prognostic trends of long COVID. METHODS: We searched electronic databases for related studies published from January 2020 to February 2022, and conducted one group meta-analysis and locally weighted regression explore the monthly temporal change in the prevalence of each long COVID symptom in 1-year follow-up period. RESULTS: A total of 137 studies were included in meta-analysis, including 134,093 participants. The temporal change of any long COVID symptom showed a steep decrease initially (from 92% at acute phase to 55% at 1-month follow-up), followed by stabilization at approximately 50% during 1-year follow-up. Six months or more after the acute phase, the odds ratio (OR) of population characteristic factors increased, such as female gender (from 1.62 to 1.82), while the OR value of acute phase-related factors (severe/critical and hospitalization) decreased. As for specific symptoms, about two-thirds of the symptoms did not significantly reduce during the 1-year follow-up, and the neuropsychiatric symptoms showed a higher long-term prevalence (approximately 25%) and longer persistence than physical-symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The temporal changes in the prevalence and characteristics speculate that long COVID may persist longer than expected. In particular, we should pay more attention to neuropsychiatric symptoms and other symptoms for which there is no significant downward trend in prevalence. The influence of acute phase-related factors for long COVID gradually decreases over time, while the influence of population characteristic-related gradually increases.

3.
Chinese Journal of Nursing Education ; 20(5):614-619, 2023.
Article in Chinese | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-20245482
4.
Gut ; 72(Suppl 1):A178-A181, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244904

ABSTRACT

IDDF2023-ABS-0032 Figure 1 IDDF2023-ABS-0032 Figure 2 IDDF2023-ABS-0032 Figure 3 IDDF2023-ABS-0032 Figure 4COVID-19 outcomes in moderate-severe vs mild or quiescent IBD[Figure omitted. See PDF]ConclusionsPatients with IBD, particularly UC had an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19. Active IBD is associated with adverse COVID-19 outcomes, and the risk is increased with the disease activity of IBD.

5.
Health Sciences Review ; 7 (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20242907

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Loop diuretics are the first-line treatment for volume overload in acute decompensation of congestive heart failure (AHF). Loop diuretic resistance is common due to pharmacologic tachyphylaxis. Therefore, thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics are often used as add-on therapy to combine two different pharmacologic mechanisms. This systemic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize the current evidence on the efficacy and safety of metolazone and other thiazide-like diuretics in AHF. Method(s): PRISMA guidelines were followed in conducting this systematic review. PubMed, Scopus, PubMed Central, and Embase databases were searched using relevant keywords for studies published before 5 Jan 2022. and title screening was performed, followed by full-text screening using the Covidence software. Data were extracted, and analysis was done using Cochrane Review Manager (RevMan v5.1). The results were reported in odds ratio and mean difference with 95% confidence intervals. Result(s): Out of 2999 studies identified by database search, eight studies met the inclusion criteria (2 RCTs and 6 cohort studies). Pooled analysis using a random-effects model showed no difference in mean difference among the metolazone group and control group for 24 hours total urine output (MD 69.32, 95% CI -638.29 to 776.94;n = 551;I2 = 84%), change in urine output in 24 hours (MD -284.09, 95% CI -583.99 to 15.81;n = 345;I2 = 0%), 48 hours total urine output (MD -465.62, 95% CI -1302.22 to 370.99;n = 242;I2 = 0%) and urine output at 72 hours (MD -13.24, 95% CI -90.88 to 64.40;n = 205;I2 = 0%). However, studies with furosemide only in the comparator arm, 24 hours of total urine outcome favored metolazone (MD 692.70, 95% CI 386.59 to 998.82;n = 334;I2 = 0%). There was no difference between the two groups in the rate of adverse events, loss of weight, mortality, or readmission rates. Conclusion(s): Metolazone therapy in diuretic resistant AHF may improves urine output and facilitates achieving a net negative balance. Thus, metolazone and thiazide-like diuretics can be used as add-on therapy in acute decompensation of heart failure, especially in diuretic resistance.Copyright © 2023 The Author(s)

6.
European Journal of Human Genetics ; 31(Supplement 1):708, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20242552

ABSTRACT

Background/Objectives: The disease course upon SARS-CoV-2 infection is highly variable and comprises a range from asymptomatic infection to severe (and even lethal) COVID-19. Genetic factors substantially contribute to this variability, as evidenced by epidemiological studies and recent results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as well as sequencing-based approaches. The host genetics group of the German COVID-19 OMICs Initiative (DeCOI) has been founded with the aim to identify additional genetic variants that influence COVID-19 severity through whole genome sequencing (WGS) analyses. Method(s): Until January 2022, WGS has been performed on approximately 1200 individuals affected by COVID-19. Result(s): The most recent data freeze comprised 952 individuals. In this dataset, no carrier of a deleterious protein-altering variant has been detected in TLR7, which is the only conclusive risk gene for severe COVID-19. Applying a gene-based association test of rare variants to the subcohort of European individuals (n = 752, mean age: 56 years, females: 44%), including 199 severely affected individuals, we did not observe any significant association after correction for multiple testing. Exome-wide association analysis of common variants in this subcohort replicated the GWAS-locus on chromosome 3. Conclusion(s): With this ongoing work, we are contributing to international efforts to elucidate the host genetics of COVID-19, also by sharing our summary statistics for meta-analyses. Currently, we are sequencing additional severely affected individuals and we are refining analytical strategies, which will also include the joint analysis of common and rare variants at genomewide scale.

7.
Value in Health ; 26(6 Supplement):S399, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20241115

ABSTRACT

Objectives: A LSR is a systematic review that is continually updated, incorporating new evidence as it becomes available. They are conducted in research areas where new evidence is constantly emerging on diagnostic methods, treatments, and outcomes. The objective of this study was to understand the current application of LSRs across research areas. Method(s): Embase, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched to identify LSRs. Only the most recent update of a LSR was included. Data regarding the indication, intervention, methods, frequency of updates, and funding were extracted. Result(s): Of the 1,243 records identified, 126 LSRs were included for analysis. The first LSR was published in 2015, with a significant increase in the number of LSRs published starting in 2020, coinciding with the COVID-19 pandemic. The most common indication represented by LSRs was COVID-19 (72%), followed by oncology (10%). Other indications with LSRs included chronic pain, traumatic brain injury, and skin disorders, among others. While most oncology LSRs identified interventional randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) (85%), only 54% of COVID-19 LSRs were restricted to interventional studies, including a combination of RCTS and real-world observational studies. Oncology LSRs included common cancers such as prostate, renal, or multiple myeloma. Of the reviews that reported update frequency, 28% planned monthly, 12% yearly, and 12% weekly updates. Only 46% of LSRs were registered. The majority of LSRs were funded by government or research organizations. Objectives of LSRs varied, with most stating the need to maintain up-to-date databases;however, several studies used LSRs to facilitate network meta-analysis or mixed treatment comparisons. Conclusion(s): While LSRs were introduced over five years ago, their frequency increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Apart from COVID-19, LSRs are commonly used in oncology settings. LSRs provide high-level, relevant, and up-to-date evidence, making them a useful tool for clinical and real-world research.Copyright © 2023

8.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 82(Suppl 1):1310, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20240934

ABSTRACT

BackgroundInfections constitute an important and frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic inflammatory and systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), this increased risk has been related to the immune system alterations inherent to the disease, the drugs used to control it (corticosteroids, DMARDs and immunosuppressants) and associated comorbidities. Most studies focus on the search for factors associated with the development of infections but do not explore the worst outcome: patient failure.ObjectivesTo identify factors that help to predict an unfavorable outcome (exitus) after a severe infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.MethodsThis study was a retrospective case-control study at a single institution over a 10-year period. Patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with hospital admission for infection from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2019 (pre-pandemic SARS-COV-2) were selected. The main variable was exitus due to the infectious episode. We collected: age, sex, time of evolution of RA, previous treatment and at the time of admission, number of admissions for infection, location of the infection, comorbidities, and other associated serious diseases. The statistics included a descriptive analysis of the different variables (expressed as median and interquartile range -IR- for quantitative variables and percentages for qualitative variables), and the association study using the χ2 test or Fisher's exact test for qualitative variables, and t-student or Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis for quantitative variables.ResultsWe obtained 152 patients (71.7% female, 28.3% male), with a total of 214 episodes of admission for infection (115 patients with 1 episode (75.7%), 25 (16.4%) with 2 episodes, 6 being the maximum number of episodes recorded). The median age at admission was 77 years, and the median time of RA evolution was 8 years (IR 4-16). The location of the infection responsible for admission was mainly respiratory and urinary. Forty-eight patients died in the episode (31.6% of the sample, 15 males and 33 females, median age 81.5 years (IR 69.5-86.5)). Comparing the patients with unfavorable outcomes (exitus) with the rest, we only found a statistically significant difference in the number of previous admissions (p=0.011), and in the coexistence of some other serious disease (exitus 85.4%, rest 61.5% p=0.003). There were no differences by sex, age, time of RA evolution, drugs, location of the infection, or comorbidities.ConclusionA history of hospital admission due to infection, and having another serious disease, are factors associated with an unfavorable outcome (exitus) in patients with RA admitted for an infectious process.References[1] Listing J, Gerhold K, Zink A. The risk of infections associated with rheumatoid arthritis, with its comorbidity and treatment. Rheumatology 2013;52(1):53-61.[2] George MD, Baker JF, Winthrop K, Hsu JY, Wu Q, Chen L, et al. Risk for serious infection with low-dose glucocorticoids in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A cohort study. Ann Intern Med. 2020;173(11):870-8.[3] Singh JA, Cameron C, Noorbaloochi S, Cullis T, Tucker M, Christensen R, et al. Risk of serious infection in biological treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Lancet. 2015;386(9990):258-65.Acknowledgements:NIL.Disclosure of InterestsNone Declared.

9.
Health Sciences Review ; 7 (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20239538

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To systematically review longitudinal studies to determine the prevalence and time-course of fatigue after stroke (post-stroke fatigue, PSF). Material(s) and Method(s): A study protocol was registered on PROSPERO. Five databases (PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCHINFO and CINAHL) were searched (10th to 13th June 2022). Citations were imported into Covidence software, s screened by one author, full texts of potentially eligible studies retrieved, and one author applied inclusion criteria (longitudinal cohort studies of patients with acute stroke). Quality assessment of included studies was performed using the Joanna Briggs institute tool for observational studies. A meta-analysis was performed for the prevalence of PSF at different time-points after stroke onset, and changes over time. Subgroup analyses were performed by type of stroke and study location. Result(s): A total of 13,991 records were returned from the searches. Nine studies were eligible and were included. Five studies were of strong and four of moderate quality. Of the studies suitable for meta-analysis, the prevalence of PSF was 42% (95% CI - 39-44%) at six months after ischaemic stroke;and 34% (95% CI - 28-40%) at one year in stroke survivors excluding subarachnoid haemorrhage. Subgroups analyses found no differences in PSF prevalence between Asian countries and others. Of those with PSF at first assessment, 66% (95% CI - 61-71%) remained fatigued at follow-up;of those without PSF initially, 15% (95% CI - 11-20%) developed PSF at follow-up. Conclusion(s): PSF is common and around two-thirds with fatigue remain fatigued. This justifies the development of new interventions for PSF treatment.Copyright © 2023 The Author(s)

10.
Journal of Health and Social Sciences ; 8(1):33-44, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20239463

ABSTRACT

Introduction: As the major mechanism for coronavirus disease 2019, cytokine storm-mediated organ harm continues to dominate current understanding. Despite the first hyper-inflammatory phase, emerging data show that virus-induced poor host immunity may be the true cause of mortality in many individuals. Interleukin 7 (IL-7) is an interleukin that participates in the COVID-19 cytokine storm and regulates the immune system. Its role in COVID-19 cytokine storms is thought to be related to its ability to stimulate the formation and activation of immune cells such as T cells and B cells. This meta-analysis aims to determine the relationship, if any, between interleukin-7 and COVID-19 severity. Methods: This study was planned as a systematic review and meta-analysis and followed the PRISMA guidelines. Four main electronic databases (Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched from January 1st, 2020 to September 2nd, 2022, to find papers investigating the prognostic significance of interleukin-7 in COVID-19-hospitalized adults. Google Scholar was used in addition to the online database search. A random effects model was used to calculate mean differences and 95% confidence interval (CIs) as well as the I2 statistics for heterogeneity analysis. Results: Seven papers were chosen for meta-analysis findings synthesis. All six trials reported interleukin-7 levels among severe and non-severe COVID-19 patients. Pooled analysis showed that IL-7 levels in the severe group were 62.79±81.03 pg/mL, compared to 33.39±56.54 pg/mL for the non-severe group (SMD =-0.17;95%CI:-0.93 to 0.60;p=0.67). Discussion: Available evidence suggests that elevated levels of IL-7 were not associated with the disease severity of COVID-19. While IL-7 levels alone may not have a substantial impact on COVID-19 severity, the interaction between IL-7 and other cytokines, immune cells, and variables such as viral load and genetics should be investigated further. Take-home message: This meta-analysis found that there was no strong link between levels of interleukin-7 and the severity of COVID-19. However, further research is needed to explore the interaction between IL-7 and other factors such as cytokines, immune cells, viral load, and genetics in order to better understand the role of IL-7 in COVID-19 pathogenesis. © 2023 by the authors.

11.
European Journal of Human Genetics ; 31(Supplement 1):343-344, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20239389

ABSTRACT

Background/Objectives: One of the most remarkable features of SARS-CoV-2 infection is that a large proportion of individuals are asymptomatic while others experience progressive, even lifethreatening acute respiratory distress syndrome, and some suffer from prolonged symptoms (long COVID). The contribution of host genetics to susceptibility and severity of infectious disease is well-documented, and include rare monogenic inborn errors of immunity as well as common genetic variation. Studies on genetic risk factors for long COVID have not yet been published. Method(s): We compared long COVID (1534) to COVID-19 patients (96,692) and population controls (800,353) using both questionnaire and EHR- based studies. First meta-analysis of 11 GWAS studies from 8 countries did not show genome-wide significant associations. Result(s): Testing 24 variants earlier associated to COVID-19 susceptibility or severity by COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative showed genetic variation in rs505922, an intronic variant in ABO blood group gene, to be associated with long COVID compared to population controls (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.27, p = 0.033). (Within-COVID analysis gave similar OR, but was not significant after conservative Bonferroni correction (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.06-1.30, p = 092)). Conclusion(s): The first data freeze of the Long COVID Host Genetics Initiative suggests that the O blood group is associated with a 14% reduced risk for long COVID. The following data freezes with growing sample sizes will possibly elucidate long COVID pathophysiology and pave the way for possible treatments for long lasting COVID symptoms.

12.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 82(Suppl 1):1436-1437, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20238342

ABSTRACT

BackgroundJanus kinase inhibitors (JAKinibs) have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA), although their safety profile continues to be analysed due to the possible increase in adverse events (AEs) in relation to anti-TNFs (mild and severe infections, haematological alterations, thromboembolism, increase in neoplasms).ObjectivesTo evaluate in real clinical practice the AEs of JAKinibs in a cohort of patients with RA and SpA. In addition, adherence and reasons for discontinuation (1st or 2nd failure, AE) are analysed.MethodsObservational study of 116 patients diagnosed with RA or SpA who received treatment with JAKinibis (tofacitinib, baricitinib, upadacitinib) after failure of treatment with different classical synthetic (FAMEsc) or biological (FAMEb) disease-modifying drugs. The following data were analysed: demographic characteristics of the patients, years of disease progression, 1st or 2nd failures and AE.ResultsMean age was 52 years, with Baricitinib being older (60 years -SD 13.6), higher prevalence of females in all groups, and a disease progression time of about 10 years. Mean number of FAMEsc was 1.6 and mean number of FAMEb was 2,3 to Tofacitinib(Tofa), 2,76 to Baricitinib(Bari) and 4,4 to Upadacitinib(Upa). 71 (63%) patients had active corticosteroid therapy. The median treatment time with Tofa was 8.8 months, Bari 9.5 and Upa 2.4 months.Most frequent AEs with Tofa were urinary tract infections(UTI) (11.9%, 7 cases) and headaches (8.47%, 5 cases). There were 3 cases of herpes zoster (5.1%), one of which was recurrent, and 2 cases respectively of tachycardia and gastrointestinal intolerance (3.4%). With Baricitnib, 2(5%) cases of UTI and 2(5%) of influenza A were reported. Most frequent AEs related to Upadacitinb are gastrointestinal intolerance, labialis and facial herpes, anterior uveitis and recurrent UTI, with 1 case for each adverse event. There were 4 success with Baricitinib treatment: 2 due to severe COVID, 1 influenza A and 1 due to stroke. 17 patients had 1st failure to Tofa(28.81%), 8 to Bari20.0%) and 3 to Upa(18.75%);7(11.86%) and 2(5%) patients had 2nd failure to Tofa and Bari respectively, no with Upa.Mean CRP to Tofa-SD 18.9-was 17.19, 20-SD 22.7- to Bari and 24.2-SD 27.40- to Upa. Mean ESR-SD 15.3- was 25.4, -SD 26.4 and 44.3 -SD 32-, respectively. At 6 months, 36(62%) were continuing on Tofa, 22(56%) on Bari and 4(27%) on Upa. At 12 months, 27(46.6%) were still on Tofa and 12 on Bari(30.8%) and no patients were on upa.Table 1.TofaBariUpaMean age496047Male19%18%20%Female81%82%80%Time course of disease(years)81111Permanence 6 months62%56%27%Permanence 12 months46,6%31%0%Patients with corticotherapy62%64%60%Previous biological drugs2,3 SD 22,8 SD 2,34,4 SD 2,9Patients who discontinued the drug62%59%33%Mean CRP at the end of treatment172024Mean end-of-treatment ESR252644Repeated AEsUTI(7) Headache(5) Shingles(3) Nephritic colic(2) Gastrointestinal intolerance(2) Tachycardia(2)UTI(4) Headache(2)Serious AEsShingles (3)Varicella encephalopathy(1) Stroke(1) Shingles (1)1st failure28,8%20%18,7%2nd failure11,9%5%0%SuccessSARS-Cov2(2) Influenza(1) Stroke(1)Figure 1. Months stay pharmacoConclusionMost frequent adverse events with JAKinibs are mild infections, except gastrointestinal complaints with upadacitinib. Serious adverse events, including 3 deaths from viral infections, were observed, mostly in patients over 65 years. Most frequent cause of discontinuation was treatment failure. We believe that further observational studies are needed to stratify and profile the risk of infection with JAKinibs.References[1]Atzeni F, Popa CD, et al. Safety of JAK inhibitors: focus on cardiovascular and thromboembolic events. Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2022 Mar;18(3):233-244. Doi: 10.1080/1744666X.2022.2039630 Epub 2022 Feb 17.PMID: 35129033[2]Alves C, Penedones A,et al. The Risk of Infections Associated With JAK Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis. J Clin Rheumatol. 2022 Mar 1;28(2):e407-e414 PMID:33902098Ackn wledgements:NIL.Disclosure of InterestsNone Declared.

13.
Cancer Research Conference: American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, ACCR ; 83(7 Supplement), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20237743

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 vaccination substantially reduces morbidity and mortality associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and severe illness. However, despite effective COVID-19 vaccines many questions remain about the efficacy of vaccines and the durability and robustness of immune responses, especially in immunocompromised persons. The NCI-funded Serological Sciences Network (SeroNet) is a coordinated effort including 11 sites to advance research on the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccination among diverse and vulnerable populations. The goals of the Pooling Project are: (1) to conduct real-world data (RWD) analyses using electronic medical records (EMR) data from four health care systems (Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Northwell Health, Veterans Affairs-Case Western, and Cedars-Sinai) to determine vaccine effectiveness in (a) cancer patients;(b) autoimmune diseases and (c) solid organ transplant recipients (SOTR);(2) to conduct meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies from eight SeroNet institutions (Cedars-Sinai, Johns Hopkins, Northwell Health, Emory University, University of Minnesota, Mount Sinai, Yale University) to determine post-vaccine immune responses in (a) lung cancer patients;(b) hematologic cancers/hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients;(c) SOTR;(d) lupus. Method(s): For our RWD analyses, data is extracted from EMR using standardized algorithms using ICD-10 codes to identify immunocompromised persons (hematologic and solid organ malignancy;SOTR;autoimmune disease, including inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and SLE). We use common case definitions to extract data on demographic, laboratory values, clinical co morbidity, COVID-19 vaccination, SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe COVID-19, and diseasespecific variables. In addition, we pool individual-level data from prospective cohorts enrolling patients with cancer and other immunosuppressed conditions from across network. Surveys and biospecimens from serology and immune profiling are collected at pre-specified timepoints across longitudinal cohorts. Result(s): Currently, we have EMR data extracted from 4 health systems including >715,000 cancer patients, >9,500 SOTR and >180,000 with autoimmune conditions. Prospective cohorts across the network have longitudinal data on >450 patients with lung cancer, >1,200 patients with hematologic malignancies, >400 SOTR and >400 patients with lupus. We will report results examining vaccine effectiveness for prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection, severe COVID-19 and post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PAS-C or long COVID) in cancer patients compared to other immunocompromised conditions. Conclusion(s): Our goal is to inform public health guidelines on COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe illness in immunocompromised populations.

14.
Current Psychiatry Research and Reviews ; 19(3):241-261, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20237582

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the constant transformation of the SARS-COV-2 virus form, exposure to substantial psychosocial stress, environmental change, and isolation have led to the inference that the overall population's mental health could be affected, resulting in an increase in cases of psychosis. Objective(s): We initiated a systematic review to determine the impact of the SARS-COV-2 virus and its long-term effects-in both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases-on people with or without psychosis. We envisioned that this would give us an insight into effective clinical intervention methods for patients with psychosis during and after the pandemic. Method(s): We selected fifteen papers that met our inclusion criteria, i.e., those that considered participants with or without psychiatric illness and exposed to SARS-COV-2 infection, for this review and were retrieved via Google, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PubMed, and PsychINFO Database. Key Gap: There is a dearth of research in understanding how COVID-19 affects people with or without a prior personal history of psychosis. Result(s): The systematic review summary provides insight into the state of knowledge. Insights from the systematic review have also been reviewed from the salutogenesis model's perspec-tive. There is moderate evidence of new-onset psychosis during the COVID-19 pandemic in which some antipsychotics treated the psychotic symptoms of patients while treating for COVID-19. Suggestions and recommendations are made for preventive and promotive public health strategies. Conclusion(s): The Salutogenesis model and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPI) provide another preventive and promotive public health management approach.Copyright © 2023 Bentham Science Publishers.

15.
Cancer Research Conference: American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, ACCR ; 83(7 Supplement), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20236510

ABSTRACT

Cancer remains one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States and a leading cause of death. Large prospective studies have found significant correlations between dietary intake and cancer. Chronic inflammation promotes pro-cancer inflammatory environments and nutrition can influence inflammation, with the intake of certain food items increasing inflammatory biomarkers. The objective of this research was to explore the relationship between inflammatory diet score measured by the Dietary Inflammatory index and all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality, and cancer recurrence among cancer survivors. Web of Science, Medline, CINHAL, and PsycINFO databases were searched to collect potentially eligible sources that focus on dietary inflammation and cancer outcomes. All sources were uploaded to Covidence software and screened by two independent blinded reviewers. The quality of the sources was assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa scale and relevant data was extracted and transferred to the Comprehensive Meta Analysis software and a random effects model was used to perform meta-analysis. Of the 1444 studies imported into the Covidence software, 13 passed all the screening stages and were included in the final analysis. Eight studies reported on pre-diagnosis diet while five others reported on postdiagnosis diet. Five studies reported on colorectal cancer, four on breast cancer, two on ovarian cancer, one on endometrial cancer and one on prostate cancer. Meta-analysis of the studies found that being in the highest postdiagnosis DII score indicating pro-inflammatory diet significantly increased the risk of all-cause death among cancer survivors by 33.5% (HR = 1.335, 95% CI = 1.049, 1.698, n = 6). Analysis did not show a statistically significant association between DII score and cancer mortality or recurrence (HR = 1.097, 95% CI = 0.939, 1.281, n = 6). Analysis by cancer subtype found a significant correlation between postdiagnosis DII score and all-cause mortality among the breast cancer survivors (HR = 1.335, 95% CI = 1.041, 1.711, n = 3) though there were no significant associations between DII and the outcomes of interest from the other cancer types. The meta-analysis concludes that being in the highest postdiagnosis DII score group significantly increased the risk of all-cause death among cancer survivors. This suggests that risk of all-cause mortality could be reduced for cancer survivors by consuming more anti-inflammatory food components and reducing consumption of pro-inflammatory foods. These findings also warrant more research in this field to clarify the relationship between dietary inflammation as measured by the DII and cancer outcomes, particularly cancer-specific mortality.

16.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 35(7):2437-2464, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20236369

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis research aims to use meta-analytical structural equation modeling to look into how hospitality employees use technology at work. It further investigates if the relationship between the constructs of the technology acceptance model (TAM) is moderated by job level (supervisory versus non-supervisory) and different cultures (eastern versus western).Design/methodology/approachIn total, 140 relationships from 30 empirical studies (N = 6,728) were used in this study's data analysis in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis.FindingsThe findings demonstrated that perceived usefulness had a greater influence on "user attitudes” and "acceptance intention” than perceived ease of use. This study also identified that the effect sizes of relationships among TAM constructs appeared to be greater for supervisory employees or in eastern cultures than for those in non-supervisory roles or western cultures.Practical implicationsThe findings provide valuable information for practitioners to increase the adoption of employee technology. Practitioners need to focus on the identification of hospitality employee attitudes, social norms and perceived ease of use. Moreover, hospitality practitioners should be cautious when promoting the adoption of new technologies to employees, as those at different levels may respond differently.Originality/valueThis is the very first empirical investigation to meta-analyze the predictive power of the TAM in the context of hospitality staff technology adoption at the workplace. The findings also demonstrated differences in the predictive power of TAM constructs according to job level and cultural differences.

17.
European Journal of Human Genetics ; 31(Supplement 1):696-697, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20236332

ABSTRACT

Background/Objectives: Genetic factors influence COVID-19 susceptibility and outcomes, including the development of pulmonary fibrosis (i.e. lung scarring). Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive lung disease and the most common cause of pulmonary fibrosis in the general population. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of COVID-19 and IPF revealed genes associated with both diseases, suggesting these share genetic risk factors. Here we performed a genetic overlap study between COVID-19 and IPF. Method(s): Summary statistics from an IPF 5-way meta-GWAS and from the COVID-19 Host Genetics initiative GWAS metaanalysis (v6) were used. We performed genetic correlation analyses and assessed individual genetic signals to identify those variants shared between both traits. We conducted colocalisation analyses to determine whether the same causal variant was driving both traits. Finally, the association of overlapping variants with gene expression was assessed and a phenome-wide association study was performed. Result(s): There was a positive genetic correlation between severe COVID-19 and IPF. We found four genetic loci with likely shared causal variants between both traits, including one novel risk locus at 7q22.1 that colocalised with decreased ZKSCAN1 and TRIM4 expression in blood. The other three loci colocalised with MUC5B, ATP11A and DPP9 expression. The locus associated with increased ATP11A expression was also associated with higher Hb1AC levels, a biomarker used in diabetes. Conclusion(s): Results suggest there are shared biological processes driving IPF and severe COVID-19 phenotypes.

18.
Neuromodulation ; 26(4 Supplement):S61, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20236266

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common neuropathic syndrome seen in patients with diabetes. Roughly 30% of the diabetes patient population1 experience painful DPN symptoms including bilateral stabbing or burning pain in addition to numbness in the feet and lower legs. Traditionally painful DPN symptoms have been treated with conventional medical management (CMM) including glycemic control, general risk factor management, as well as pharmaceutical agents. These treatment approaches are often unsuccessful in the long-term1. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been demonstrated as an effective treatment for painful DPN of the lower extremities with multiple publications dating back to 1996 showing benefits of SCS for pain relief and improved Quality of Life (QoL) in DPN patients (Figure 1)2-18. Method(s): A systematic literature review of the robust body of evidence for SCS in the treatment of painful DPN was conducted. Publications were selected for inclusion by two independent reviewers using defined selection criteria. Additional relevant publications from outside the search dates were included. Result(s): SCS was first documented as an effective treatment for DPN in three single-arm studies published between 1996 and 20122,4,5, one of which was followed-up to thirty-six months18, and another to seven-years3. These studies paved the way for two RCTs published in 20146,7, one of which was followed-up to five-years in two publications8,10, and another7 was followed-up with analyses on QoL9 and an evaluation of the effects of burst SCS17. Two meta-analyses were published in 2020 and 202111,12. A post-hoc analysis of a multi-center single-arm study on high frequency (10kHz) SCS to treat DPN was published in 202013 and followed by an RCT published in 202114 with additional 1-year follow-up15,16. Collectively these studies demonstrate that SCS is an effective therapy for patients with painful DPN by reducing pain and increasing QoL for DPN patients (Figure 1). Conclusion(s): This review of a large body of evidence shows a decades-long history of the effectiveness of SCS for symptom relief in patients suffering from painful DPN. Future research on the effectiveness of new waveforms and novel methods of energy delivery to the spinal cord are needed. The study of outcomes in addition to pain relief is also needed, which may better illustrate the breadth of effects of SCS therapy on the underlying disease factors. Increasing awareness of the current evidence is essential to increasing therapy adoption by expanding payer support and influencing referring health care provider behavior. Disclosure: Eric Grigsby, MD: AE Mann Foundation: Consulting Fee: Self, Bioness Inc.: Consulting Fee: Self, Medallion Therapeutics: Consulting Fee: Self, Medtronic: Consulting Fee: Self, SPR Therapeutics: Consultant: Self, Tenex Health: Consultant: Self, Voyager Therapeutics: Consultant: Self, Xalud: Consulting Fee: Self, AE Mann Foundation: Consulting Fee: Self, Medallion Therapeutics: Consulting Fee: Self, Bioness Inc.: N/A: Self, Medallion Therapeutics: N/A: Self, SPR Therapeutics: N/A: Self, Abbott / St. Jude Medical: N/A: Self, Tenex: N/A: Self, Vertos: N/A: Self, Xalud: N/A: Self, AE Mann Foundation: Consulting Fee: Self, Bioness Inc.: Consulting Fee: Self, Medtronic, Inc.: N/A: Self, Collegium Pharmaceutical, Inc.: Trustee: Self, Flowonix Medical: Served on speakers' bureau: Self, Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Served on speakers' bureau: Self, Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Trustee: Self, Spinal Restoration, Inc.: Trustee: Self, Jazz Pharmaceuticals: N/A: Self, Alfred Mann Foundation: N/A: Self, Boston Scientific: N/A: Self, CNS Therapeutics: N/A: Self, Collegium Pharmaceutical, Inc.: N/A: Self, Flowonix Medical: N/A: Self, Jazz Pharmaceuticals: N/A: Self, Medtronic, Inc.: N/A: Self, Myoscience: N/A: Self, NeurAxon Inc.: N/A: Self, Spinal Restoration, Inc.: N/A: Self, St. Jude Medical, Inc.: N/A: Self, Abbott Laboratories: Consultant: Self, Alfred Mann Foundation: Consulting Fee: Self, Cervel Neurotech, Inc.: Consultant: Self, CNS Therapeutics: Consultant: Self, Covidien: Consultant: Self, Cumberland Pharmaceuticals, Inc.: Consultant: Self, Flowonix Medical: Consultant: Self, Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Consultant: Self, Mainstay Medical: Consultant: Self, Medtronic, Inc.: Consultant: Self, Myoscience: Consultant: Self, NeuroPhage Pharmaceuticals: Consultant: Self, Nevro Corp: Consultant: Self, Palyon: Consultant: Self, Spinal Modulation: Consultant: Self, SPR Therapeutics: Consultant: Self, St. Jude Medical, Inc.: Consultant: Self, Tenex Health, Inc.: Consultant: Self, VertiFlex Inc.: Consultant: Self, Vertos Medical, Inc.: Consultant: Self, Xalud Therapeutics, Inc.: Contracted Research: Self, Medtronic, Inc.: Served on speakers' bureau: Self, Flowonix Medical: Served on advisory board: Self, Medtronic, Inc.: N/A: Self, Jazz Pharmaceuticals: N/A: Self, Medtronic, Inc.: Ownership Interest: Own Stock, Stock Options, Future Stock Options: Self, Nevro Corp: Ownership Interest: Own Stock, Stock Options, Future Stock Options: Self, Rachel Slangen, PhD: None, Lisa Johanek, PhD: Medtronic: Salary/Employee: Self, Maddie LaRue, PHD: Medtronic: Employee:, Cecile de Vos, PhD: None, Melissa Murphy: Medtronic: Consulting Fee:, Relievant: Consulting Fee:Copyright © 2023

19.
Prescriber ; 34(4):23-26, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20236237

ABSTRACT

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection remains a major public health problem, especially in younger children and the elderly. But several monoclonal antibodies, antivirals and vaccines, either recently launched or in development, offer new hope for RSV prevention and treatment.Copyright © 2023 Wiley Interface Ltd.

20.
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research ; 16(5):13-18, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20236199

ABSTRACT

We conducted a review and evaluated the already documents reports for the relationship among diabetes and COVID-19. The review outcome shows that the COVID-19 severity seems to be greater among patients with diabetes as comorbidity. So, strict glycemic control is imperative in patients infected with COVID-19. Thus, world-wide diabetes burden and COVID-19 pandemic must be deliberated as diabetes increases the COVID-19 severity. Established on this, it is precise significant to follow specific treatment protocols and clinical management in COVID-19 patients affected with diabetes to prevent morbidity and mortality.Copyright © 2023 The Authors.

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