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1.
Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies ; 21(1):15-27, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246631

ABSTRACT

Based on 25 in-depth interviews collected during the COVID pandemic from Chinese academic immigrants in the U.S., we find that COVID immediately halted their transnational travels. Furthermore, catalyzed by changes in the Sino-U.S. geopolitical relationship, the soaring Anti-Asian hate in the U.S., and the raging storm of patriotism and nationalism in China, COVID impacts academic migrants' perceptions of opportunities, pursuits of transnational movements, and ethnic and diasporic identities. The disrupted transnational migration of people and knowledge due to the intersection of the pandemic, social contexts, and geopolitics may have long-term detrimental effects at the individual, institutional, national, and global levels. © 2023 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

2.
Global Networks ; 23(1):59-74, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2245300

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically disrupted and reconfigured the cross-border movements of people. Based on an anthropological study of the experiences of transnational migrants during the pandemic (May 2020–May 2021), this article explores stories of how cross-border immobility impacts transnational life and sense of belonging. The stories reveal the emotional toll of prolonged family separation across geographical distances when loved ones are no longer ‘just one flight away' and give voice to experiences of being ‘trapped', ‘stuck' or ‘stranded' in a state of transnational limbo. Running through the stories are intensified experiences of foreignness, non-belonging, precariousness and discrimination. Some also felt abandoned by their country of origin as border closures left them ‘locked out' and ‘blowing in the wind', fostering an experience akin to exile. © 2021 Global Networks Partnership & John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

3.
Professional Geographer ; 75(1):164-174, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2238334

ABSTRACT

How do we unpack and make sense of anti-African/Black sentiments in the pandemic control and mitigation practices in China? This article responds to the question by drawing a parallel between the experiences of Africans in China during the Ebola virus disease and COVID-19 outbreaks. Focusing specifically on Nigerians as a subsection of the African community in Guangzhou City, China, it explores how the COVID-19-inspired discrimination against Africans reflects much of the experiences of Africans in China during the Ebola crisis of 2014. The article combines sixteen "Ebola experience” data points, obtained from Nigerians in Guangzhou in 2017, with four COVID-19 experience virtual interviews, media reports, and social media archive and netnographic analysis covering April to June 2020. The experiences of Africans in Guangzhou in the early months of the COVID-19 outbreak reflect a patterned response to Africans and Blackness in the context of pandemic in China. The article contributes to the literature by examining the question of racial discrimination and the construction of African immigrant community in China as dangerous within the new geography of Afro-mobilities in East Asia. © 2022 by American Association of Geographers.

4.
J Cancer Policy ; 35: 100377, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241960

ABSTRACT

Refugees and displaced groups have been shown to face increased risk of developing advanced cancer stages. This has been shown to be evident in Lebanon, whereby refugees are detected at later stages when compared to the Lebanese population. Lebanon is one of the biggest host (per capita) of refugees worldwide, and suffers from difficult political situation, compounded by an economic crisis, the COVID-19 pandemic and a blast which hit the capital Beirut in 2020. The main determinants of poor health outcomes among migrant populations in Lebanon include a fragmented and inequitable healthcare system and legal constraints to healthcare accessibility. The health care system is largely privatised with multiple health systems operating simultaneously for different nationalities. The current multi-crisis situation has exacerbated the fragility of the health system and its ability to cope with increasing needs. On the other hand, legal constraints for refugees to obtain residency in Lebanon has also contributed to insufficient access to health care and poor health outcomes among this population. Health system reforms, improved emergency preparedness and response measures, and an ease on legal and political restrictions for the refugee populations in Lebanon are considered key policy recommendations to ensure refugees right to health in Lebanon.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Refugees , Humans , Female , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lebanon/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240851

ABSTRACT

Background Migrants' access to healthcare services is limited. This study aimed to identify health system barriers to vaccination, specifically HPV/MMR vaccination among children in Ukrainian economic migrants (UMs). Methods Between December 2021-March 2022, a qualitative study of UMs living in Poland was conducted. Six focus groups were held with 53 UMs aged 15-45; in-depth interviews with 12 healthcare workers (HCWs) were also performed. A thematic analysis was conducted based on the six WHO health system building blocks. Results HCWs described gaps in integrating migrant status in accessible healthcare data which impeded active management of vaccination procedures. UMs reported that the digitization of healthcare services, intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic, reduced their access to primary care. Inadequate health information systems caused problems with the provision of credible vaccine information in translated forms, and language difficulties, experienced by both UMs and HCWs; this was enhanced by a lack of professional interpreting services. Although most UMs reported vaccinating children according to the Polish schedule, the variations in schedules across countries caused concern among UMs and increased HCWs' uncertainty about how to interpret vaccination cards, particularly in the context of possible false certificates. UMs were affected by discrimination through HCWs. HPV was deprioritized by UMs due to misconceptions about non-mandatory vaccinations; the cost was also a barrier. Conclusions The study findings have implications for migrant vaccination delivery targeting children in Poland, and other UMs receiving countries. A concerted effort is required to improve UM's awareness of the significance of vaccinations. Barriers to healthcare access must be recognized by policymakers. Importantly, removing the cost barrier may increase the uptake of the HPV vaccine among Ukrainian migrant adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Transients and Migrants , Adolescent , Humans , Child , Poland , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Vaccination/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Language , Health Personnel
6.
J Migr Health ; 7: 100169, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240803

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aimed to review the progress and challenges of COVID-19 vaccine roll-out for migrants in Japan and discuss the approaches to address the challenges and better prepare for future waves of COVID-19 and other pandemics. Methods: We conducted a literature review using an assessment framework which we developed building upon existing frameworks and tools on access to health services and COVID-19 vaccination among migrants. Results: COVID-19 vaccination coverage among foreigners might be lower than that of nationals although the data on foreigners were not widely available. A gap appeared to exist between the government's efforts to disseminate vaccine-related information through multi-lingual websites and migrant communities as recipients. A series of barriers for migrants were identified at different stages of the vaccination process. While efforts were made by different units of local governments, NGOs, migrant communities, and international exchange associations, linkages across sectors and scaling-up appeared to be an issue. No foreigners were explicitly excluded from the entitlements of COVID-19 vaccination. The national level guidance, however, allowed sub-national levels to make a decision on whether or not undocumented foreigners should be reported to the immigration office or law enforcement when providing the services. In consequence, units in charge of public health and vaccination of some municipalities did not offer vaccination to those in need. Conclusion: Migrants, especially those unregistered face various barriers in accessing COVID-19 vaccination. It is critical to assess and address challenges concerning channels of information dissemination, pathways to access services, obstacles for vulnerable migrants, and data for evidence-based actions.

7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1023900, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239703

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine uptake among foreign migrants in China and to explore the determinants of their vaccine uptake behavior. Methods: From June to October 2021, we used convenience and snowball sampling to recruit a sample of 764 participants from five cities in which the overwhelming majority of foreign migrants in China live. The chi-square (χ2) tests were used to examine vaccination distribution according to demographic characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression models visualized by forest plot were used to investigate the associations between significant determinants and vaccine uptake. Results: Overall, the prevalence of vaccination rate was 72.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 69.9-76.0%]. Migrants whose social participation was very active [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.95, 95% CI: 1.36-6.50, P = 0.007] or had perceived COVID-19 progression prevention by the vaccine (AOR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.01-3.02, P = 0.012) had higher odds of vaccination compared to those whose social participation was inactive or who did not have this perception. Migrants who perceived the vaccine uptake process as complex (AOR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.27-0.80, P = 0.016) or were unsure of their physical suitability for the vaccine (AOR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.24-0.68, P < 0.001) had lower odds of vaccination compared to those who did not have these perceptions. Furthermore, migrants from emerging and developing Asian countries (AOR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.07-5.21, P = 0.04) and the Middle East and Central Asia (AOR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.07-4.50, P = 0.03) had higher odds of vaccination than those from major advanced economies (G7) countries, while migrants from other advanced economic countries (OR: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.11-0.63, P = 0.003) had lower odds of vaccination than those from G7 countries. Conclusion: It may be beneficial to promote vaccine uptake among migrants by ensuring effective community engagement, simplifying the appointment and uptake process, and advocating the benefits and target populations of the COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(3)2023 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239247

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has further deepened socioeconomic and health inequities worldwide, especially among populations experiencing social vulnerability, such as international migrants. Sustained lockdowns and social distancing have raised challenges to conducting public health research with hard-to-reach populations. This study aims at exploring strategies to recruit "hard-to-reach" international migrants for qualitative public health research during the pandemic in Chile, based on the authors' experience. A retrospective qualitative evaluation process was carried out on the recruitment processes of three qualitative research projects focused on international migrants in Chile. All projects were implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic, demanding complementary and flexible strategies: (i) social media; (ii) snowball sampling; (iii) referrals from social workers and pro-migrant and migrant-led organizations; (iv) vaccination centers and healthcare centers; and (v) community-based recruitment. The strategies are qualitatively evaluated around seven emerging qualitative categories: (i) feasibility during lockdown periods; (ii) speed of recruitment; (iii) geographical coverage; (iv) sample diversity; (v) proportion of successful interviews; (vi) ethical considerations; and (vii) cost. Engaging hard-to-reach international migrants in public health research during the pandemic required constantly adapting recruitment strategies. Furthermore, relying on strategies that were not only Internet-based promoted the participation of populations with limited access to the Internet and low-digital literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Public Health , Chile/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Qualitative Research
9.
J Int Migr Integr ; : 1-31, 2023 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243227

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has had a major impact on migrants and ethnic minorities (MEMs). Socio-economic factors and legal, administrative and language barriers are among the reasons for this increased susceptibility. The aim of the study is to investigate the impact of Covid-19 on MEMs compared to the general population in terms of serious outcomes. We conducted a systematic review collecting studies on the impact of Covid-19 on MEMs compared to the general population in the WHO European Region regarding hospitalisation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality, published between 01/01/2020 and 19/03/2021. Nine researchers were involved in selection, study quality assessment and data extraction. Of the 82 studies included, 15 of the 16 regarding hospitalisation for Covid-19 reported an increased risk for MEMs compared to the white and/or native population and 22 out of the 28 studies focusing on the ICU admission rates found an increased risk for MEMs. Among the 65 studies on mortality, 43 report a higher risk for MEMs. An increased risk of adverse outcomes was reported for MEMs. Social determinants of health are among the main factors involved in the genesis of health inequalities: a disadvantaged socio-economic status, a framework of structural racism and asymmetric access to healthcare are linked to increased susceptibility to the consequences of Covid-19. These findings underline the need for policymakers to consider the socio-economic barriers when designing prevention plans. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12134-023-01007-x.

10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1060861, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242628

ABSTRACT

Aim: In Mexico, as in other societies, migrants are seen as over-users of health services. However, the extent, distribution, and trends of use over time are unknown. Evidence is needed to inform health policies and improve health services for foreign patients. The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with the distribution and trends of Mexican and foreign resident hospitalizations in Mexican public hospitals from 2010 to 2020. Methods: A graphical and statistical analysis (descriptive and correlational) of discharge trends in public hospitals was carried out. Hospitalization trends were analyzed by country of habitual residence (Mexico, US, Central and South America, and Other Continents), age, sex, primary discharge category, and region of service delivery. Adjusted Poisson modeling was used to examine the factors associated with annual hospitalizations of Mexican and foreign residents. Results: Between 2010 and 2020, there were 26,780,808 hospitalizations in Mexican public hospitals. Of these, 0.05% were of foreign residents. Hospitalizations for Mexican residents remained stable from 2010 to 2019, while those for foreign residents trended upward over the same period. In 2020, hospitalizations of Mexican residents fell by 36.6%, while foreign resident hospitalizations fell by 348.8%. The distribution of hospitalizations by sex was higher among females for all categories of habitual residence, except among US residents. Obstetric discharges were the most common reason for hospitalization among Mexican residents (42.45%), Central and South American residents (42.24%), and residents from Other Continents (13.73%). The average hospital stay was 2 days. Poisson regression confirmed these results, showing that hospitalizations was higher among women (except among foreign residents) and in the ≤ 17 age group. Poisson modeling also showed that trauma injury was the leading cause of discharge for foreign residents after obstetric causes. Discussion: It is unlikely the upward trend in hospitalizations among foreign residents in Mexico from 2010 to 2019 affected the Mexican public health system, given the small proportion (0.05%) of hospitalizations and the brief length of hospital stay. The increased number of hospitalizations during the study period may be explained by local and national measures to facilitate foreign residents' access to hospital services, while the decrease in hospital utilization in 2020 is likely associated with COVID-19. Geographic location and the most frequent primary discharge categories of hospitalizations within each population could provide evidence for modifications to public health policy in Mexico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Mexico/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Length of Stay
11.
Glob Netw (Oxf) ; 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242086

ABSTRACT

This article deals with the recent COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected mobilities in Northern Ireland. Drawing on the findings of in-depth interviews with migrant women and elements of autoethnographic research, the author discusses how migrant women reshape their mobilities in the context of global pandemic. The article looks into how COVID-19 has reinforced the existing mobility regimes and how waiting has become an important part of migrant women strategies. To this end, it examines waiting as both passive and active condition. It then explores politics of mobility and transgressive powers involved in migrant women trajectories.

12.
Glob Netw (Oxf) ; 2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239599

ABSTRACT

We explore how the Chinese diaspora state during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 managed to transform a severe health crisis into a geo-political opportunity for transnational nation-building through diaspora governance based on extensive use of social media technologies. By adopting a multi-scalar perspective, we analyse the intertwined nature of top-down and bottom-up processes of the Chinese Party-state's diaspora mobilization. Based on discourse and ethnographic analysis, we argue that China's diaspora governance exposed a new and strong capacity for extra-territorial governance. We explore how discursive hegemony, social control and diaspora mobilization were achieved by widely employing the Chinese social media application, WeChat. We also contend that this was facilitated by the Italian government's and media's pro-China attitudes to emphasize the importance of considering transnational embeddedness when studying the implementation and impact of interactive online technology for diaspora governance in an illiberal political context.

13.
Administrative Theory & Praxis ; 44(4):277-297, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2237297

ABSTRACT

This article describes the social mechanisms that condition the negative policy feedback effects among powerless social groups. It uses the policy feedback theory to explain the role of the administrative burden as the intermediate negative policy feedback that can lead to end negative policy feedback effects. The article elaborates upon the unequal treatment of low-income migrants in cities during pre-pandemic times and how that has led to alienation and civil disobedience during the COVID-19 pandemic in India. It highlights the essential role of democratic mechanisms like media and the judiciary in mitigating the inequality exacerbating effects of public service encounters. The article makes a case for promoting an understanding of the concept of the administrative burden that converges its experience-distant and experience-near meanings.

14.
Asian Development Review ; 39(2):147-174, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2237197

ABSTRACT

Remittance inflows are now the largest source of external financing to developing countries, but little research has yet firmly established the effect of remittances on household welfare. We investigate the case of Tajikistan, one of the most heavily remittance-dependent countries in the world. We use a panel dataset collected nationwide and employ an instrumental variable estimation to confirm a positive relationship between receiving remittances and household welfare after correcting for endogeneity. Moreover, we find that the effect of remittances on household spending is more pronounced in households whose head is male, older, and/or less educated. Then, we combine our estimated coefficients with the projected decline of remittance inflows as a result of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak and show the pandemic's adverse effect on household spending per capita. © 2022 Asian Development Bank.

15.
Psikhologicheskii Zhurnal ; 43(5):121-124, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2232039

ABSTRACT

On March 25–26, 2022, the Sixth International Scientific and Practical Conference "Socio-Psycho-logical Adaptation of Migrants in the Modern World” was held. Penza State University became the organizer of the conference. The conference was held online on Zoom. Participants discussed topical ethno-psycholog-ical problems of migrant adaptation, problems of socio-psychological adaptation of migrants and refugees in Russia and other countries, methodological problems of socio-psychological adaptation of the individual in new conditions of life, problems of psychological and pedagogical assistance to migrants and refugees, adaptation of the individual to extreme conditions life activities, as well as the most acute psychological, anthropo-logical and philosophical challenges in science and society. A separate topic for analysis and discussion was the problem of the impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic on global migration processes. © 2022, Russian Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

16.
Canadian Journal of Communication ; 47(3):409-414, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2230968

ABSTRACT

The current conjuncture is marked by a multitude of global crises that include the COVID-19 pandemic;global warming;conflicts in Ukraine, Afghanistan, and Palestine;growing global poverty and food scarcity;the exponential increase of forcibly displaced people;the escalating use of incarceration to manage migrants, including children;land conflicts with Indigenous peoples;and the persecution and genocide of religious, ethnic, and sexual minorities around the globe, from the Rohingya to the Uyghurs. In Canada, we nessed the of hundreds of unmarked graves of Indigenous children forced to attend residential schools;court rulings in favour of pipelines that violated the constitutional rights of Indigenous peoples;the global mobilization of Black Lives Matters;the escalation of anti-Asian racism;the heightened Islamophobia that resulted in the killing of members of the Afzaal Salman family;attacks on mosques and synagogues;and the ongoing criminalization, incarceration, and violent police murders of Black, Indigenous, and people of colour across the country. The recent occupation of Ottawa and other cities and towns highlights the rise of right-wing extremism that, along with the failure of the state to act swiftly to protect the rule of law, brings up the intersection of misogyny, racism, colonialism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, and populism (Karim, 2000;Mirrlees, 2021;Neville & Langlois, 2021). Drawing on their experiences working with the Community Media Advocacy Centre (CMAC) as scholar-activists, King and Odartey-Wellington argue that the canon of Canadian communications scholarship must be expanded to include Canada's history of colonialism and discrimination against ra- cialized people.

17.
J Nurs Scholarsh ; 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2234377

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes is increasing globally and particularly affects vulnerable groups in society, such as migrants. Research shows that type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for severe illness when infected with COVID-19. Diabetes-related complications can be prevented with good glycaemic control. In addition, good glycaemic control has been shown to be an important cornerstone for preventing severe illness in individuals infected with COVID-19. In order to maintain good glycaemic control, self-care is needed. The purpose of this article is to describe self-care maintenance and possible changes in self-care maintenance and to explore factors related to unchanged self-care maintenance in migrant patients with type 2 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The second aim is to describe well-being, social support, and the need for support from healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic in migrant patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN/METHOD: A triangulation design with cross-sectional data collection was used. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and interpreted together in a triangulation design. Patients were selected by a diabetes nurse from a computer system at a health center in south-eastern Sweden and invited to participate in the study. A questionnaire was translated into the languages most commonly used at the clinic and sent out to 332 migrant patients who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and treated in primary care. This questionnaire assessed self-care maintenance for diabetes (questions inspired by the Self-Care of Diabetes Inventory), with questions added to every item to assess changes during the pandemic. When changes occurred, we asked the participants to elaborate. Open-ended questions asked the participants how they would like to receive information when there are changes in their healthcare. Descriptive statistical analyses were used for the quantitative data and qualitative data was analyzed using a directed approach to content analysis. RESULTS: In total, 79 participants answered the questionnaire (mean age 69 ± 11, 51% male, 47% born in the Middle East). Of these, 76% stated a change in self-care. More than half (58%) stated changes in maintaining an active lifestyle, 40% had changed their physical exercise, and 38% had changed their behavior to avoid getting sick. Participants said that this change was due to staying at home or canceling social activities because they feared meeting people during the pandemic. Others were more physically active than before on a regular basis during the pandemic due to taking walks to get fit, as a precaution related to COVID-19, and having greater awareness about how to avoid getting sick. Approximately one-quarter of the participants experienced a change in contact with healthcare due to poorer access to care, with fewer doctors' appointments and care being postponed during the pandemic. More than half (58%) would like to receive information about healthcare changes by a letter in the regular mail. Social support had changed for 35% of the participants, with less support from family and friends due to the risk of being infected with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to societal restrictions that changed the way of life for many individuals. Migrant patients with type 2 diabetes, who are already a vulnerable group regarding self-care, had difficulties in maintaining good living habits during the pandemic. During crises such as COVID-19, support with self-care, such as closer contact with healthcare providers, is vital. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Knowledge about how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected migrants with type 2 diabetes can be used to support healthcare providers in identifying individuals who are at high risk of suffering from the consequences of their diabetes associated with the pandemic.

18.
Ethn Health ; : 1-24, 2022 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230254

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated health inequalities worldwide, having a disproportionately harsh impact on unprivileged populations such as migrants and refugees. These populations are often more exposed to the virus, but less protected, while at the same time being at higher risk of suffering from poor living and working conditions, limited access to healthcare, and discrimination by the host society, all of which is challenging to their mental health. Empirical evidence on how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting migrants and refugees is required to design effective actions aimed at ensuring health equity. Therefore, this paper aims to analyse how the pandemic has impacted the psychological well-being of migrants and refugees living in Spain. DESIGN: This study was carried out within the framework of the ApartTogether study sponsored by the World Health Organization. Data collection was carried out during March-November 2020, through an online survey completed by 241 participants (age: M = 37 years; 129 women). RESULTS: The results indicate that 78.7% of participants had suffered a decrease in their psychological well-being since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, with number of difficulties and worries experienced being the best individual predictors of this outcome. Enjoying social connections and perceiving positive treatment from the host society were positively associated with psychological well-being at a relational and community level, respectively. CONCLUSION: Based on these findings, we outline priority areas of psychosocial interventions aimed at guaranteeing the mental health of migrants and refugees in the face of the pandemic in Spain.

19.
International Journal of Human Rights in Health Care ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2227113

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis study investigate urban migrant dwellers' gender and age differences in response to the specific phobia of COVID-19 and hesitancy toward vaccines in the slum settlements. Design/methodology/approachThe study anchored on the two-factor model proposed by Mowrer (1939) and used a quantitative design approach with a convenience sampling method for data gathering among 362 urban migrants residing and working in the cities of Ghana. The study used the Mann-Whitney U test and the regression analysis for the analysis. FindingsThe result showed that there is a significant difference between males and females in their understanding of economic phobia, thoughts on social phobia and perception level of vaccine hesitancy. Additionally, there is a significant difference between age groups in their level of thoughts of psychological phobia, economic phobia and thoughts of vaccine hesitancy. Finally, the specific of phobias of COVID-19 are significant predictors of vaccine hesitancy. Research limitations/implicationsThis research is slum-specific, which implies that the outcome cannot be generalized to other geographical settings. Practical implicationsThe study demonstrates how a pandemic manifests itself to dwellers in slums. The outcome of the study sheds light on how policymakers appreciate the dynamics of the pandemic in a developing country, which may guide future responses to pandemics. Originality/valueThe outcome of the study sheds light on how policymakers appreciate the dynamics of the pandemic in a developing country, which may guide future responses to pandemics.

20.
Studies in Social Justice ; 16(3):612-627, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2226617
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