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1.
J Cancer Policy ; 33: 100340, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882163

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early reports suggested that COVID-19 patients with cancer were at higher risk of COVID-19-related death. We conducted a systematic review with risk of bias assessment and synthesis of the early evidence on the risk of COVID-19-related death for COVID-19 patients with and without cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched Medline/Embase/BioRxiv/MedRxiv/SSRN databases to 1 July 2020. We included cohort or case-control studies published in English that reported on the risk of dying after developing COVID-19 for people with a pre-existing diagnosis of any cancer, lung cancer, or haematological cancers. We assessed risk of bias using tools adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We used the generic inverse-variance random-effects method for meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated separately. Of 96 included studies, 54 had sufficient non-overlapping data to be included in meta-analyses (>500,000 people with COVID-19, >8000 with cancer; 52 studies of any cancer, three of lung and six of haematological cancers). All studies had high risk of bias. Accounting for at least age consistently led to lower estimated ORs and HRs for COVID-19-related death in cancer patients (e.g. any cancer versus no cancer; six studies, unadjusted OR=3.30,95%CI:2.59-4.20, adjusted OR=1.37,95%CI:1.16-1.61). Adjusted effect estimates were not reported for people with lung or haematological cancers. Of 18 studies that adjusted for at least age, 17 reported positive associations between pre-existing cancer diagnosis and COVID-19-related death (e.g. any cancer versus no cancer; nine studies, adjusted OR=1.66,95%CI:1.33-2.08; five studies, adjusted HR=1.19,95%CI:1.02-1.38). CONCLUSIONS: The initial evidence (published to 1 July 2020) on COVID-19-related death in people with cancer is characterised by multiple sources of bias and substantial overlap between data included in different studies. Pooled analyses of non-overlapping early data with adjustment for at least age indicated a significantly increased risk of COVID-19-related death for those with a pre-existing cancer diagnosis.

2.
Revista Medica De Chile ; 149(11):1606-1613, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880667

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on the management of chronic diseases such as cancer. Comprehensive care, from preventive strategies to palliative care for cancer patients, has been strongly affected by multiple factors associated with the pandemic. The hampering of early detection, timely diagnosis, as well as recommended treatment and follow-up are side effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection worldwide that will undoubtedly produce changes in the prognosis and survival of oncologic patients. Through this narrative review, we report global and local figures of these effects, as a first approach to tackle the challenge of updating cancer care.

3.
J Cancer Policy ; 33: 100338, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The early COVID-19 literature suggested that people with cancer may be more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 or develop COVID-19 than people without cancer, due to increased health services contact and/or immunocompromise. While some studies were criticised due to small patient numbers and methodological limitations, they created or reinforced concerns of clinicians and people with cancer. These risks are also important in COVID-19 vaccine prioritisation decisions. We performed a systematic review to critically assess and summarise the early literature. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic search of Medline/Embase/BioRxiv/MedRxiv/SSRN databases including peer-reviewed journal articles, letters/commentaries, and non-peer-reviewed pre-print articles for 1 January-1 July 2020. The primary endpoints were diagnosis of COVID-19 and positive SARS-CoV-2 test. We assessed risk of bias using a tool adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Twelve studies were included in the quantitative synthesis. All four studies of COVID-19 incidence (including 24,181,727 individuals, 125,649 with pre-existing cancer) reported that people with cancer had higher COVID-19 incidence rates. Eight studies reported SARS-CoV-2 test positivity for > 472,000 individuals, 48,370 with pre-existing cancer. Seven of these studies comparing people with any and without cancer, were pooled using random effects [pooled odds ratio 0.91, 95 %CI: 0.57-1.47; unadjusted for age, sex, or comorbidities]. Two studies suggested people with active or haematological cancer had lower risk of a positive test. All 12 studies had high risk of bias; none included universal or random COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2 testing. CONCLUSIONS: The early literature on susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 for people with cancer is characterised by pervasive biases and limited data. To provide high-quality evidence to inform decision-making, studies of risk of SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 for people with cancer should control for other potential modifiers of infection risk, including age, sex, comorbidities, exposure to the virus, protective measures taken, and vaccination, in addition to stratifying analyses by cancer type, stage at diagnosis, and treatment received.

4.
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care ; 11(5):1683-1701, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1875946

ABSTRACT

Yoga is recognized and practiced for different levels of prevention since antiquity. The current scoping review aimed to identify and document the evidence reporting the effect of yoga interventions on immunity against COVID-19 infection. Three databases--PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar, were searched to identify eligible studies. Articles published in English after 2010 and assessing the impact of any form of yoga (such as yogasanas, meditations, or pranayamas) on immunological markers were included in the review. The studies without information of the intervention on immunity markers, and experience sharing reviews were excluded. The search yielded 45 eligible articles with majority of the studies being published from the USA and India. Most of the studies were randomized controlled trials, enrolling the adult population with a specific focus on diseases like HIV, cancer, and heart failure. It was observed that a variety of yoga interventions along with meditation and pranayama, in different combinations were used by the authors. However, all these studies unanimously reported improvement in immunological profile (indicated by improved biochemical markers) of an individual (irrespective of disease state and type) with yoga. Moreover, the beneficial effects of these traditional Indian interventions were also found to have a positive impact on overall physical and physiological wellbeing and quality of life. Findings from the existing literature indicate that the practice of yoga has the potential to strengthen cell-mediated immunity and hence could be used as an effective preventive measure against COVID-19 where immunity plays a critical role.

5.
OECD Health Working Papers ; 141(45), 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1875226

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted primary and secondary prevention efforts as well as routine care related to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The number of cancer-related procedures declined across countries, as much as 40% in some of the reporting countries. Many of the OECD countries also faced challenges in maintaining and further improving cancer care quality and outcomes during the pandemic. This paper compiles initial findings as well as emerging evidence from a subset of OECD countries covering the period from March 2020 to August 2021. It illustrates how several of these countries attempted to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on cancer care systems. There have been examples of adapting treatment guidelines, changing clinical practices and reducing backlogs to minimise negative impacts of the pandemic on cancer patients. Several of the countries also undertook more frequent monitoring and in-depth analysis of cancer care performance to help develop more targeted risk-based approaches in providing cancer screening and care. The analyses also confirm that strong health information infrastructure is crucial for developing resilient health systems that provide effective, timely and people-centred cancer care.

6.
Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) ; 2022 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875844

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D has received considerable optimistic attention as a potentially important factor in many pathological states over the past few decades. However, the proportion of the active form of vitamin D metabolites responsible for biological activity is highly questionable in disease states due to flexible alterations in the enzymes responsible for their metabolism. For instance, CYP3A4 plays a crucial role in the biotransformation of vitamin D and other drug substances. Food-drug and/or drug-drug interactions, the disease state, genetic polymorphism, age, sex, diet, and environmental factors all influence CYP3A4 activity. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP450-encoding genes have received considerable attention in the past few decades due to their extensive impact on the pharmacokinetic and dynamic properties of drugs and endogenous substances. In this review, we focused on CYP3A4 polymorphisms and their interplay with vitamin D metabolism and summarized the role of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis, bone diseases, diabetes, cancer, other diseases, and drug substances. We also reviewed clinical observations pertaining to CYP3A4 polymorphisms among the aforementioned disease conditions. In addition, we highlighted the future perspectives of studying the pharmacogenetics of CYP3A4, which may have potential clinical significance for developing novel diagnostic genetic markers that will ascertain disease risk and progression.

7.
Clinics ; 76: e2507, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1870057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), all health services worldwide underwent profound changes, leading to the suspension of many elective surgeries. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of elective colorectal surgery during the pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, single-center study. Patients who underwent elective colorectal surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic between March 10 and September 9, 2020, were included. Patient data on sex, age, diagnosis, types of procedures, hospital stay, mortality, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) preoperative screening tests were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 103 colorectal surgical procedures were planned, and 99 were performed. Four surgeries were postponed due to positive preoperative screening for SARS-CoV-2. Surgical procedures were performed for colorectal cancer (n=90) and inflammatory bowel disease (n=9). Laparoscopy was the approach of choice for 43 patients (43.4%), 53 (53.5%) procedures were open, and 3 (3%) procedures were robotic. Five patients developed COVID-19 in the postoperative period, and three of them died in the intensive care unit (n=3/5, 60% mortality). Two other patients died due to surgical complications unrelated to COVID-19 (n=2/94, 2.1% mortality) (p<0.01). Hospital stay was longer in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection than in those without (38.4 versushttps://doi.org/10.3 days, respectively, p<0.01). Of the 99 patients who received surgical care during the pandemic, 94 were safely discharged (95%). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that elective colorectal surgical procedures may be safely performed during the pandemic; however, preoperative testing should be performed to reduce in-hospital infection rates, since the mortality rate due to SARS-CoV-2 in this setting is particularly high.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Surgery , Coronavirus Infections , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus
8.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 120(2): 118-121, abril 2022. tab
Article in English, Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1870010

ABSTRACT

Se realizó un estudio observacional y prospectivo en el Hospital Garrahan, cuyos objetivos fueron conocer la portación asintomática del coronavirus de tipo 2 del síndrome respiratorio agudo grave (SARS-CoV-2, por su sigla en inglés) en niños oncológicos y/o en sus cuidadores al hospitalizarse para realizar quimioterapia, y describir el impacto en la continuación del tratamiento en aquellos con prueba positiva para SARS-CoV-2 o con síntomas compatibles con la infección por el virus durante la internación. Se incluyeron los pacientes con enfermedad oncohematológica y sus cuidadores, a quienes se les realizó una prueba de detección de SARS-CoV-2 por reacción en cadena de la polimerasa con transcripción inversa. Se analizaron 733 hospitalizaciones. La tasa de positividad para SARS-CoV-2 fue del 2,2 % (IC95%: 1,35-3,52). Todos los pacientes con prueba detectable completaron la quimioterapia. El 7,7 % de los pacientes presentó síntomas compatibles de caso sospechoso con prueba no detectable y el 77 % de ellos pudo continuar su tratamiento.


An observational, prospective study was carried out at Hospital Garrahan. Its objectives were to establishtherateofasymptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among children with cancer and/or their caregivers during hospitalization for chemotherapy, and describe the impact of ongoing treatment among those positive for SARS-CoV-2 or with symptoms compatible with infection during hospitalization. Patients with onco-hematological disease and their caregivers were included. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for SARS-CoV-2 was done. A total of 733 hospitalizations were analyzed. The SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate was 2.2% (95% confidence interval: 1.35-3.52). All patients with a detectable test result completed chemotherapy. Also, 7.7% of patients developed symptoms compatible with a suspected case although they had an undetectable test result, and 77% of them were able to continue treatment.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , COVID-19 , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Prospective Studies , Early Detection of Cancer , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitalization
9.
Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1868092

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented impact of the Sars-CoV-2 pandemic (COVID-19) has strained the healthcare system worldwide. The impact is even more profound on diseases requiring timely complex multidisciplinary care such as pancreatic cancer. Multidisciplinary care teams have been affected significantly in multiple ways as healthcare teams collectively acclimate to significant space limitations and shortages of personnel and supplies. As a result, many patients are now receiving suboptimal remote imaging for diagnosis, staging, and surgical planning for pancreatic cancer. In addition, the lack of face-to-face interactions between the physician and patient and between multidisciplinary teams has challenged patient safety, research investigations, and house staff education. In this study, we discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic has transformed our high-volume pancreatic multidisciplinary clinic, the unique challenges faced, as well as the potential benefits that have arisen out of this situation. We also reflect on its implications for the future during and beyond the pandemic as we anticipate a hybrid model that includes a component of virtual multidisciplinary clinics as a means to provide accessible world-class healthcare for patients who require complex oncologic management.

10.
Journal of Global Health Reports ; 5(e2021060), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1865730

ABSTRACT

Background: Treatment seeking for people with alcohol use disorders (AUD), injecting drug use and viral hepatitis is low, and has worsened during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Deferring clinical care and increasing drug and alcohol use exacerbate the risks of progression for individuals with chronic liver disease from viral hepatitis and/or alcohol-related liver disease (ALD). We explored the impact COVID-19 epidemic may have on patients with chronic liver disease and suggested mechanisms to protect this at-risk population during and after the pandemic.

11.
Inserto BEN Bollettino Epidemiologico Nazionale ; 2(4):39-45, 2021.
Article in Italian | GIM | ID: covidwho-1864119

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Obesity is a complex condition, now recognized as a pathology, as well as being a risk factor for other noninfectious diseases (diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, tumours etc.) The data from the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrate that obesity can also be an important factor for the development of complications in infectious diseases. International studies have shown that the prevalence of obesity has increased in many countries from about 1975, especially among youngsters, which threatens a new emergency for public health. With the encouragement of the WHO and the National Program Guardagnare Salute, the surveillance system OKkio alla SALUTE was launched in Italy in 2007, and since then, has collected data to estimate the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity and its associated risk factors. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2019 data were collected on children aged 8-9 years, on six occasions using samples that were representative at regional level (and sometimes at local health service level) using personnel who were trained using methods and instruments that were validated and the same throughout the country. Other information on possible associated variables was collected using four questionnaires which were completed by the children, their parents, their teachers and the head-teachers of the selected classes. Participation in the Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative of the WHO European Region makes international comparisons possible. On the basis of the results obtained so far, a series of initiatives for communication and activities for prevention have been developed at national and local level.

12.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(7): 5801-5810, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864396

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We assessed breast cancer clinicians' perspectives on how the COVID-19 pandemic and increased use of telehealth affected their clinical communication about sexual heath. METHODS: Breast cancer clinicians participating in a sexual health communication intervention study (N = 29; 76% female; 66% oncologists; 34% advanced practice clinicians) completed an online survey. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. RESULTS: All clinicians were using telehealth, with most (66%) using it for up to half of their clinic appointments. Although only 14% of clinicians reported having shorter clinic visits, 28% reported having less time to discuss sexual health; 69% reported no change; and 3% said they had more time. Forty-one percent reported sexual health was less of a priority; 55% reported no change; and 3% said it was more of a priority. Thirty-five percent reported telehealth was less conducive to discussing sexual health; 59% reported no change; and 7% reported more conducive. Qualitative analysis revealed key issues underlying the perceived impact of the pandemic on discussions of sexual health including heightened clinician discomfort discussing such issues via telehealth, the less personal nature and privacy issues in telehealth visits, increased concerns about risk of COVID-19 infection and other health concerns (e.g., missing recurrence, mental health) taking priority, and clinician-perceived patient factors (e.g., discomfort, decreased priority) in discussing sexual concerns. CONCLUSION: Pandemic-related changes in breast cancer clinicians' practice could be exacerbating challenges to discussing sexual health. Methods for integrating sexual health into cancer care are needed, regardless of the mode of delivery.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Health Communication , Sexual Health , Telemedicine , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics
13.
J Med Screen ; : 9691413221101807, 2022 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861920

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has caused an indefinite delay to cancer screening programs worldwide. This study aims to explore the impact on breast cancer screening outcomes such as mammography and diagnosis rates. METHODS: We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, medRxiv and bioRxiv between January 2020 to October 2021 to identify studies that reported on the rates of screening mammography and breast cancer diagnosis before and during the pandemic. The effects of 'lockdown' measures, age and ethnicity on outcomes were also examined. All studies were assessed for risk of bias using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Rate ratios were calculated for all outcomes and pooled using standard inverse-variance random effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: We identified 994 articles, of which 7 registry-based and 24 non-registry-based retrospective cohort studies, including data on 4,860,786 and 629,823 patients respectively across 18 different countries, were identified. Overall, breast cancer screening and diagnosis rates dropped by an estimated 41-53% and 18-29% respectively between 2019 and 2020. No differences in mammogram screening rates depending on patient age or ethnicity were observed. However, countries that implemented lockdown measures were associated with a significantly greater reduction in mammogram and diagnosis rates between 2019 and 2020 in comparison to those that did not. CONCLUSION: The pandemic has caused a substantial reduction in the screening and diagnosis of breast cancer, with reductions more pronounced in countries under lockdown restrictions. It is early yet to know if delayed screening during the pandemic translates into higher breast cancer mortality.

14.
Clinical and Experimental Vaccine Research ; 10(2):191-195, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1857509

ABSTRACT

Given the systemic immunogenic effects of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy in patients with bladder cancer and its non-specific immunogenic effects in viral respiratory diseases, we aimed to study severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in bladder cancer patients with a history of BCG therapy. In the present study, all bladder cancer survivors with a history of BCG therapy were identified and included in the study according to the data recovered from the UORC (Uro-Oncology Research Center) registry database. These patients were followed up in terms of acquiring coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Among the studied patients, 102 eligible bladder cancer patients with a history of BCG therapy entered the study. The males constituted the majority of the patients (86.3%), and more than half of the study population (55.9%) were above 65 years old. Among the understudy patients, 12.7% were confirmed for COVID-19. The study results did not show a statistically significant association between the time and number of BCG therapy courses and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although no statistically significant association was observed between receiving BCG therapy and developing COVID-19, the infection rate in patients who had recently received BCG therapy was lower than those who had received therapy more than a year ago.

15.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 860238, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855336

ABSTRACT

Background: Data on the efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccines in patients with malignancy are immature. In this paper, we assessed the literature involving the use of COVID-19 vaccines in cancer patients and reported the seroconversion rates as the main outcome and severity of COVID-19 infection and side effects following COVID-19 vaccination as the secondary outcomes. Methods: A systematic review with meta-analysis was performed. Searches were conducted in electronic websites, databases, and journals, including Scopus, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science from January 01, 2019, to November 30, 2021. Studies reporting data on the safety and efficacy of COVID vaccine in cancer patients using any human samples were included. The risk of bias was assessed using the NEWCASTLE-OTTAWA scale in the included studies. Results: A total of 724 articles were identified from databases, out of which 201 articles were duplicates and were discarded. Subsequently, 454 articles were excluded through initial screening of the titles and abstracts. Moreover, 41 studies did not report the precise seroconversion rate either based on the type of cancer or after injection of a second dose of COVID vaccine. Finally, 28 articles met all the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. The overall seroconversion rates after receiving a second dose of COVID-19 vaccine, based on type of cancer were 88% (95% CI, 81%-92%) and 70% (95% CI, 60%-79%) in patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, respectively. Conclusion: Overall, we conclude that vaccination against COVID-19 in patients with active malignancies using activated and inactivated vaccines is a safe and tolerable procedure that is also accompanied by a high efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroconversion/drug effects , Vaccination/adverse effects
17.
J Palliat Med ; 2022 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852874

ABSTRACT

Background: Adults with advanced lung cancer experience reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and psychological symptoms at diagnosis. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate whether the COVID-19 pandemic worsened HRQOL among patients recently diagnosed with cancer. Design: We analyzed baseline data from two randomized controlled trials of early palliative care to compare HRQOL and depression symptoms among those enrolled during the pandemic (January 2020 to January 2021) versus prepandemic (March 2018 to January 2019). Setting/Subjects: This cohort included patients recently diagnosed with advanced lung cancer in two multisite studies. Measurements: We used analysis of covariance to calculate adjusted mean differences between groups with the timeframe as an independent variable and HRQOL (using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General) and depression symptoms (using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9) as dependent variables, adjusting for age, gender, relationship status, performance status, symptoms, and time since diagnosis. We tested for an interaction between the COVID-19 timeframe and relationship status. Results: Neither HRQOL (adjusted mean difference -1.78; p = 0.137) nor depression symptoms (0.06; p = 0.889) differed between patients enrolled pre-COVID-19 (n = 665) relative to those enrolled during COVID-19 (n = 191) in adjusted analyses. Relationship status moderated the effect of the COVID-19 timeframe on HRQOL; unmarried patients experienced worse HRQOL during COVID-19 (adjusted mean difference: -5.25; p = 0.011). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic did not further reduce HRQOL or increase depression symptoms among patients recently diagnosed with lung cancer, but did worsen HRQOL for unmarried patients in moderation analysis. Psychosocial evaluation and supportive care are important for all patients, particularly those with limited social support. Clinical trial registration numbers: NCT03337399 and NCT03375489.

18.
Journal of Clinical Hepatology ; 38(2):322-327, 2022.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1848709

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the value of urinary al - microglobulin (al - MC) and N - acetyl - - D -glucosaminidase/urinary creatinine (NAG/UCr) in monitoring renal injury in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) - related liver diseases.

19.
EPMA Journal ; 12(3):243-401, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1848234

ABSTRACT

This special issue contains 7 articles on the principles of predictive, preventive and personalised (3P) medicine. Topics covered include: endothelin-1 and its potential as the diagnostic, prognostic and treatment target in the framework of 3P medicine;potential health risks associated specifically with the low body weight;management of COVID-19;wrist actigraphic approach;diagnosing hospital bacteraemia;and omics biomarkers in pituitary neuroendocrine tumors.

20.
Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi ; 25(5): 295-302, 2022 May 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847419

ABSTRACT

Though the coronavirus disease is still raging in 2021, clinical research on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) did not stop. However, benefiting from advances in lung cancer treatment modality, NSCLC patients have experienced significant improvements in overall survival and quality of life. Currently, research advances on targeted therapy and immunotherapy have together transformed the status of postoperative adjuvant therapy and established a new standard treatment modality for resectable NSCLC. There are equally important research advances in locally advanced and advanced NSCLC, including new treatment modalities, new therapeutic agents, etc., all of which bringing more options for clinical treatment. These therapies will bring changes to NSCLC and will gradually lead to the chronicity of lung cancer in the foreseeable future. Therefore, this paper reviews important studies that will change clinical practice in NSCLC treatment and noteworthy research advances in 2021.
.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Combined Modality Therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Quality of Life
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