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1.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(10):5714-5721, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067302

ABSTRACT

The aim of this research was to predict the anxiety of Corona based on personality traits and positive psychology components in nurses in karaj. The research sample consisted of 100 nurses who were selected from the statistical population using available sampling method. The research tools included Alipour et al.'s Corona Anxiety Questionnaire (2020), Eysenck's Personality Characteristics Questionnaire (EPQ) and Rashid's Positive Psychology Components Questionnaire (2008). The research design was correlational. Pearson's correlation coefficient and regression methods were used for data analysis. The obtained results showed that there is a negative and significant relationship between Corona anxiety and the components of positive psychology (pleasant life, committed life and meaningful life). Also, among the personality traits, there is only a positive and meaningful relationship between Corona anxiety and neuroticism. Also, personality traits and positive psychology components are able to predict 4% of corona anxiety in nurses.

2.
Antibiotiki i Khimioterapiya ; 67(3-4):42-45, 2022.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010616

ABSTRACT

A study which included 97 children who had COVID-19 during the period from September 2021 to January 2022 was conducted. This article discusses the symptoms occurring after COVID-19 infection. The analysis of the results showed that the largest proportion among sick children was in patients with reduced cognitive functions, an increased level of neuroticism, depressed state and emotional instability. The most common comorbidities were the diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory and cardiovascular systems.

3.
Journal of Behavioral Addictions ; 11:182, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009738

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The current study aimed to assess the pattern of digital media use and screen time among students during lockdown. It also aimed to explore possible correlates of problematic digital media use and screen-time among students. Methodology: It was a prospective observational study. Students pursuing undergraduate courses in Public and Private State Universities constituted the study universe. The study used a survey approach for data collection. Besides the screen time, the mental well being of the study participants was assessed by the WHO Well-being Index and the personality was assessed using the Big Five Inventory (BFI)-10. Results: A total of 731 responses were included in the analysis. Around 93% self-reported an increase in daily screen time during COVID-19. A small but significant negative correlation between increased screen time and QoL (rs = -0.154, p < .001) was found. Increased screen time due to the use of social media for non-communication purposes was associated with poorer QoL (U = 32947.50;p = .02) and greater COVID stress (U = 32381.50;p = .01). Out of total of 202 students who shared the screenshot of the phone ST function, 145 (71.8%) underestimated their daily smartphone ST, whereas 56 (27.7%) overestimated ST. In the regression analysis the predicted odds of poor mental well-being were 1.430 times greater for subjects with higher neuroticism scores for the overall sample.

4.
Russian Open Medical Journal ; 11(2), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1988615

ABSTRACT

Rationale - The goal of the study was to investigate gender characteristics of functional somatic disorders in adolescents of the indigenous population of Khakassia (using the case study of the Abakan city). Material and methods - The object of the study was 215 (46.8%) boys and 244 (53.2%) girls of four secondary schools in Abakan. Their average age was 14.5±1.3 years. Data collection was conducted by means of an original screening questionnaire developed by Professor S.Yu. Tereshchenko. Results - The incidence of recurrent pain in the total sample of the surveyed youths was 184 (40.1%) for cephalalgia, 225 (49.0%) for abdominal pain, and 269 (58.7%) for back pain. The prevalence and structure of functional somatic disorders in Khakas adolescents depended on their gender. Asthenic syndrome was more common among girls - 42 (17.2%) vs. 14 (6.5%) in boys. In girls, the percentage of frequent headaches was higher than in boys: 22 (9.0%) vs. 8 (3.7%), respectively. Similar trend was observed in case of rare headaches: 100 (41.0%) vs. 54 (25.1%). Also, girls, compared with boys, were characterized by a higher incidence of both frequent and rare abdominal pains: 38 (15.6%) vs. 9 (4.2%) and 106 (43.4%) vs. 72 (33.5%), correspondingly. Conclusion - The case study of surveyed ethnic sample of Abakan school students revealed a high prevalence of recurrent pain syndromes in the indigenous youths of Khakassia. We have also established that incidence, structure and severity of recurrent pain, as well as its negative impact on well-being and daily activities, were associated with gender.

5.
Sleep ; 45(SUPPL 1):A21-A22, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1927380

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic safety restrictions led to changes in social interactions and information seeking about the virus. For some, these led to increased negative emotions, feelings of social isolation, and increased COVID-related media consumption. We examined the relationship of these variables to subjective sleep quality from participant daily diaries kept early in the pandemic. Methods: From April 20th-May 12th, 2020, college (students, faculty/ staff, alumni, parents) and local (churches, community centers, libraries) community members (N=94, 72 women, ages 18-77) completed a 30-minute survey for before and during social distancing (measuring: mental health, personality, social distancing, and demographics) for possible prizes. Participants then completed daily evening and morning diaries for 5-14 days describing daily affect, social isolation, emotion regulation, COVID media consumption, and subjective sleep quality. Results: Emotions: During the pandemic, poor sleep quality was predicted by less positive mood (r(91)=.486, p<.001) and more negative mood (r(91)=-.433, p<.001). Participants with poorer sleep quality reported less success regulating their emotions that day (r(90)=.292, p=.005) and greater suppression of emotions (rather than cognitive reappraisals to regulate them) (r(91)=-.260, p=.012). Social Isolation: Subjective sleep quality was not predicted by social distancing behaviors (r(88)=.069, p>.05);however, poorer sleep quality was significantly predicted by greater daily feelings of social isolation (r(91)=-.264, p=.005) and lower feelings of social life satisfaction (r(91)=.338, p<.001). COVID-related media: Sleep quality was not significantly related to COVID-media consumption for all participants;however, moderation analyses showed that participants with low avoidance coping, low neuroticism, and high emotional well-being did experience poorer sleep quality associated with greater COVID media consumption (all p's<.05). Conclusion: That mood and social isolation are associated with sleep quality replicates previous findings. The pandemic, however, provided a unique opportunity to observe these relationships in individuals not normally socially isolated because of confounding variables (e.g., health issues, depression, anxiety) with known relationships to sleep quality. That COVID-related media was only related to sleep quality for more well-adjusted participants (low avoidance coping, low neuroticism, high emotional well-being) was surprising, suggesting some may find COVID-19 information anxiety-relieving rather than anxiety-provoking.

6.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; 64(SUPPL 3):S543, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1913237

ABSTRACT

Background: A bidirectional relationship was seen between COVID 19 survivors and psychological issues. Global research shows 1 - 7% of patients infected with COVID had aggressive behaviour in acute as well as post illness stage. In general population, people with higher extroversion scores were associated with lesser social distancing, thereby high chances of infection. No clear data exists from India to comment on personality profile or aggressive intent among COVID survivors. Aim: The current study aimed to assess the personality profile and aggression intent among COVID-19 survivors in patients from Telangana. Methodology: This study is conducted in hospital out-patient or in-patient setting of KIMS, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Telangana in patients of COVID-19. A total of 157 COVID-19 patients were recruited based on convenient sampling. The data from patients was collected using standardized objective semi-structured proforma which contains clinical and sociodemographic profile, Big Five Inventory, Assessment of Aggressive Intent (which includes six components). Results: Among the study population, 18.5% of them had positive scores in one or more of the six components of aggression. On personality assessment, patients with aggression had significantly lower mean scores on agreeableness (p value 0.003) and significantly higher mean scores on neuroticism (p value 0.049). Conclusion: COVID survivors, along with medical complications, have a risk of having psychological disturbances like aggression. Clinicians should be aware and screen for these psychological issues when the patient comes for follow-up. Early intervention and management of aggression can help in improving the patient's quality of life.

7.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; 64(SUPPL 3):S695-S696, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1912844

ABSTRACT

Background: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by excessive fear of embarrassment, humiliation, or rejection when exposed to possible negative evaluation by others when engaged in a public performance or social interactions. Often, the diagnosis of SAD is missed due to lack of awareness and sometimes misclassified into other psychopathological domains. Case report: A 30-year-old male presented with c/c of fearfulness and suspiciousness in the form that whenever he sees any two individuals talking, he thinks that they are talking about him which were followed by panic like episodes and social avoidance. He consulted a psychiatrist and was prescribed Tab. Amisulpride 400mg/day, Tab. Aripiprazole 20mg/day, Tab. Olanzapine 10mg/day, Tab. Clozapine 100mg/day, Tab. Trifluoperazine 10mg/day+ Tab. Trihexyphenidyl 4mg/day, Tab. Alprazolam 1.5mg/day, Tab. Lorazepam 2mg/day, Tab. Clonazepam 0.5 mg/day and Tab. Propranolol 40mg/day. He didn't improve on these medications but took them for 5-6 years because he was able to sleep throughout the day and avoid social interactions. He visited us and detailed evaluation was done. During history taking, it was noted that his symptoms were actually fear of going in public as he used to think that people are talking that he is inferior to them and that people might misjudge or underestimate him. On detailed Mental Status Examination, it was noted that he suffered from social anxiety with avoidant behavior. Conclusion: It is important to categorize the symptoms into clinically relevant domain by detail history taking and MSE. © IBM Results 152 participants 49.3% Males and 50.7% Females Mean age-29.6 years (SD 4.5) 35.5% reported significant stress Average Stress score on DASS-12.9 (SD 11.1) Mean Professional fulfilment (PF) score-2.0 (SD 1.0) Mean Burnout score-1.3 (SD 0.9) 20.4% residents felt professionally fulfilled 41.4% residents had burnout Stress negatively correlated with Agreeableness Stress positively correlated with Neuroticism Stress positively correlated with Burnout (ñ 0.67;p 0.00) Stress negatively correlated with Professional fulfillment (ñ-0.41;p 0.00) Only Conscientiousness moderated the effect of stress on Burnout and Professional fulfillment Conclusion COVID pandemic generated significant stress among resident doctors Stress is associated with Burnout and Professional fulfilment Higher Conscientiousness reduced burnout due to stress Residents with higher Conscientiousness would experience more negative effect of stress on their professional fulfillment.

8.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9):5715, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1837293

ABSTRACT

Healthcare professionals, especially women, have shown increases in anxious-depressive symptoms as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of a Unified Protocol (UP) prevention program to provide emotional regulation skills to cope with stressful situations. The sample consisted of 27 nursing professionals (100% women;mean age: 45.67;SD = 7.71) working in a Spanish public hospital during COVID-19, who were randomized to an immediate treatment group (ITG, n = 13) or to a delayed treatment group (DTG, n = 14, which served as the waiting list control group and received the program 5 weeks after the ITG had received it). The program consisted of five-weekly, two-hour, UP-based group sessions. Variables related to emotional symptomatology, emotional regulation, personality, burnout, and perceived quality of life were evaluated at the following time points: pre- and post-intervention and at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-ups. Statistically significant between-group differences showed lower emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment in favor of the ITG after the intervention. Regarding the effect over time for all participants who received the UP (n = 27), statistically significant reductions were observed in neuroticism, personal accomplishment, and subjective distress caused by traumatic events (−0.23 ≤ d ≤ −0.73). A statistically significant interaction “Time*Condition” was found in anxiety, with increases in the DTG. Participants showed high satisfaction with the UP. These findings show good acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of the UP to reduce the emotional impact of the pandemic in female nursing workers.

9.
Cultural Studies ; 35(2/3):585-597, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1721875

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 global pandemic, Taiwan has been universally praised for its policy actions in preventing its initial outbreak there from Wuhan and for its strict measures in containing its communal spread locally. Memory of the SARS crisis played a major role, but people in Taiwan forget that SARS was initially considered a problem confined mostly to Hong Kong. Taiwanese did not seem urgently aware, until infections multiplied locally. Taiwan's health authorities eventually adopted a draconian quarantine policy, but mainly as a political tactic to contain the widespread panic, as though the dam had suddenly burst. In retrospect, the extremity and internal contradictions of the policy are remarkable, but they are instructive. The initial reaction of unprepared governments, most notably in the US, during COVID-19 mirrors this same ineptitude. Enabling hysteria and resorting to scapegoating were in turn diversions to cover up their inability to prevent a crisis. In the US, racism emerged, China and the WHO were blamed, people were even urged not to wear masks to avoid a run on short supplies. This is the tip of the political iceberg, if one adds tightened immigration and economic effects on the U.S. elections.

10.
European Neuropsychopharmacology ; 53:S455, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1593457

ABSTRACT

Background. Problematic internet use is a growing social issue which is being debated worldwide. During COVID-19-related quarantines, the use of internet has excessively increased [1]. Moreover, internet addiction is considered to be among severe public health issues in the post-pandemic world [2]. Current literature has underlined that both personal and interpersonal variables can lead to a higher risk of internet-dependent behavior among young adults [3, 4]. Students may be particularly vulnerable to internet addiction, as they have unsupervised access to the internet and are responsible for their own time management [2]. A growing body of research has suggested internet addiction to be associated with academic procrastination and lower academic performance, as well as with cognitive and emotional disturbances [5]. Objective. This study was aimed at identifying internet addiction prevalence and factors associated with internet addiction among young adult university students. Method. The total sample included 674 university students (450 men (66.8%), 224 women (33.2%)) aged 18 - 25 years. Internet Addiction Test (IAT), Five-Factor Model (Big Five) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS - 21) questionnaires were employed. Data analysis was performed with t - test. Results. Based on IAT results, 138 university students (21%) showed high rates of internet - dependent behavior. Subsequent intergroup comparison (internet - dependent, n = 138 (98 men (71%), 40 women (29%)) versus ordinary internet users, n = 536) revealed significant between-group differences in personality traits according to Big Five questionnaire and emotional states evaluated with DASS - 21. Particularly, we found that internet-dependent university students have lower rates of extraversion, benevolence, consciousness and openness to experience compared to ordinary internet users (all ps < 0.001). Contrary, internet - dependent university students showed higher rates of neuroticism compared to their ordinary internet-using peers (p < 0.001). In addition, internet - dependent university students have higher rates of depression, anxiety, and stress evaluated with DASS - 21 (all ps < 0.001). Conclusion. Our results showed 21% internet addiction prevalence rate in young adult university students. Certain levels of Five - Factor personality traits that might predispose young adults to internet addiction development were also found. In addition, higher rates of depression, anxiety, and stress which were observed in internet - dependent university students can be both causes and consequences of internet - dependent behavior. We underline that depression, anxiety, and stress associations with internet addiction should be investigated further as both comorbid and premorbid mental health issue. To conclude, it is important to consider high neuroticism, low extraversion, and other traits of young adults at risk for internet - dependent behavior when developing and conducting internet addiction prevention. Conflict of interest Disclosure statement The work reported was financially supported by Ministry of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation, project No. 0721-2020-0040

11.
European Neuropsychopharmacology ; 53:S597, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1596915

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of COVID-19 and the physical isolation measures taken by the governments to reduce its propagation might have negative psychological consequences on the population [1, 2]. In this study, we aimed to explore, for the first time, how mental health status fluctuated along the weeks of the emergency state in Portugal, and to identify which factors may shape these changes in mental health outcomes. Methods: A longitudinal survey study using a convenience sample was conducted, evaluating demographic, clinical, lifestyle and mental health variables in the Portuguese population at three different time-points. Mental health was assessed by means of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21), and with quality of life (QoL) self-evaluation, satisfaction, and quality of sleep questions. Google Forms was used for the online survey, and social media and national newspapers were used to advertise and recruit possible volunteers. The first time-point took place between the 23rd of March and the 5th of April 2020, and the second and third time-points were 4 weeks and 8 weeks later, respectively. 748 participants (mean age = 39.52, % females = 79.95) provided data at all time-points. Repeated-measures analyses were performed to explore whether mental health significantly varied across time. Next, multiple regression models were used in order to identify the sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle factors significantly associated with each dependent variable's change (DASS-21 subscales and QoL measures). The following predictors were tested in the multiple regression models: age, sex, employment status, house balcony and/or terrace, living with children/teenagers/elderly, having a diagnosis of a psychiatric/physical disorder, consumption of substances several times a week, daily amount of time dedicated to sport/looking for COVID-19 related news, and the NEO-FFI subscales. Results We observed that depression (χ2F(2)=23.19, p<.001, Kendall's W=0.793), anxiety (χ2F(2)=97.04, p<.001, Kendall's W=0.745) and stress (χ2F(2)=35.11, p<.001, Kendall's W=0.788) symptoms seemed to improve as the weeks passed during the state of emergency, while the perception of quality of life (self-evaluation: χ2F(2)=140.4, p<.001, Kendall's W=0.749;satisfaction: χ2F(2)=82.02, p<.001, Kendall's W=0.765) and sleep (χ2F(2)=23.5, p<.001, Kendall's W=0.796) got worse. All multiple regression models were statistically significant (DASS-21 Depression: F(17,730)=6.53;p<.001, R2=0.132;DASS-21 Anxiety: F(17,730)=5.12;p<.001, R2=0.106;DASS-21 Stress: F(17,730)=7.16;p<.001, R2=0.143;QoL self-evaluation: F(17,730)=5.8;p<.001, R2=0.119;QoL satisfaction: F(17,730)=6.9;p<.001, R2=0.138;Quality of sleep: F(17,730)=1.98;p=.01, R2=0.044). Regarding the significant predictors, in summary, being female, younger, actively working, and extroverted appear to be protective factors of mental health adaptability during this particular period. On the contrary, having a psychiatric diagnosis or physical illness, and higher neuroticism seem to be risk factors for mental health worsening. Conclusions: Our results provide relevant and novel insights about the course of mental health changes and its predictors during the outbreak of COVID-19, which may help identify potential vulnerability groups. Importantly, the lack of a more diverse sample could limit the generalizability of our results, and other factors that were not considered in our analysis might also have a significant impact on mental health. No conflict of interest

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