Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 184
Filter
1.
Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2213048

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aims to understand the impact that the experience environment has on the nightlife experience, as well as to identify the factors from the nightlifescape that most influence the tourists' experience in Belgrade. Additionally, this study seeks to discover whether these factors changed after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach: To achieve the study's objectives, 679 tourist reviews were collected from one of the most popular travel platforms, TripAdvisor, and analyzed using RapidMiner, the popular software for data/text mining. Findings: The perception of the physical aspects of the experience environment, the presence of other tourists and the feeling of acceptance are identified as the key factors that influence tourists' nightlife experience. This study also found that certain factors from the social and sensory environment, such as staff, the presence of other people, the atmosphere and music, had a positive impact on the tourist experience and their intention to recommend the nightlife experience in Belgrade. Moreover, it was discovered that the COVID-19 pandemic did not provoke changes in the main factors influencing tourists' nightlife experience. Originality/value: The perception of tourists about Belgrade during the night contributes to the growing body of tourism literature on destination image. Focusing solely on the perception of tourists about Belgrade during the night, this study adds a temporal determinant to the destination image, which can be considered as a valuable add on to the current knowledge in the field. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

2.
Menopause ; 29(12):1478-1479, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2190885

ABSTRACT

Objective: Menopausal hot flashes contribute to poor sleep and negatively impact quality of life. The Embr Wave is a noninvasive wearable thermal device that applies personalized cooling and warming to thermoreceptors on the inside of the wrist. New modes with cooling and warming sessions specifically for sleep and hot flashes were introduced on the Embr Wave. This study evaluated the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of nighttime use of the Embr Wave for managing hot flashes and sleep during menopause. Design(s): Self-described peri/postmenopausal women experiencing sleepdisrupting hot flashes and insomnia were enrolled. The study consisted of a 1-week baseline and 2-week intervention in which participants were provided the Embr and instructed to use it as needed. Primary outcomes were device use (recorded by the device) and subjective reports of sleep and hot flashes. Sleep was measured with the PROMIS Sleep Disturbance (PROMIS SD, range 0-100) and Sleep Related Impairment (PROMIS SRI, range 0-100) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, range 0-28). Hot flashes were assessed with the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS, range 0-10), daily hot flash number and severity, and control over nighttime hot flashes (range 0-10). Additionally, participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, range 0-40). Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare outcome measures for baseline and intervention week 2. Spearman's rank order correlations were used to evaluate associations between device use and outcomes. Study was conducted remotely due to COVID. Result(s): 31 participants (age: median 53, range 46-61 years) completed the study between November 2020 to March 2021 in the US;26 had retrievable use data. Baseline data indicated mild sleep disturbance and impairment, subthreshold insomnia, and moderate stress (Table). Mean+/-SD baseline frequency of daytime and nighttime hot flashes was 15.5+/-15.0 and 14.8+/-9.0 per week. Mean+/-SD (median) device use per 24 hours was 5.2+/-4.7 (4.7) sessions and 2.3+/-2.5 (1.5) hours. PROMIS SD, PROMIS SRI, and ISI improved during the intervention compared to baseline (all p<0.01, Table). The intervention also resulted in reduced frequency of nighttime hot flashes, frequency of severe nighttime hot flashes, and increased control over nighttime hot flashes (all p<0.05, Table). In participants with greater baseline hot flash interference (HFRDIS score >=3, n=15), larger improvements in PROMIS SD and SRI, and hot flash control were observed (p<0.05) as well as a reduction in PSS (baseline mean+/-SD 21.7+/-3.2 vs intervention 17.4+/-5.7, p<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the number of subjective hot flashes and number of sessions logged by the device (rs=0.502, p<0.01). No adverse events were reported. Conclusion(s): Results support the feasibility of the Embr Wave for management of sleep-disrupting hot flashes and night sweats in menopausal women. The intervention was associated with improvements in subjective measures of sleep, hot flashes, and perceived stress. The correlation between number of device sessions and number of hot flashes support use of the device for management of hot flashes. Larger longer studies to evaluate the impact of daytime and nighttime use of the Embr Wave on hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms are planned.

3.
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity ; 106(Supplement):1, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2176730

ABSTRACT

Methods: In an ongoing study, we recruited 46 individuals who complete three sessions: sleep loss (2 nights of 4h in bed), normal sleep (2 nights of 9h in bed) (within-subjects), and a low-grade inflammation condition (COVID-19 vaccination) preceded by either sleep loss or normal sleep (between subjects). Blood samples were taken (not analyzed), sickness symptoms were assessed (SicknessQ with 10-point scale), and model-based and model-free control was quantified (a sequential decision task). Result(s): Sickness symptoms were highest after vaccination with sleep loss (M = 34.6), followed by vaccination with normal sleep (M = 24.3) and sleep loss (M = 23.8), and normal sleep only (M = 15.3). Model-free control increased in the vaccine as compared to the non-vaccine condition (b = 0.23, 95% CI 0.10, 0.37, p <.001), most clearly in the normal sleep condition. Model-based control decreased after sleep loss versus normal sleep (reward + common: b = -0.47, 95% CI -0.67, -0.28, p <.001, non-reward + rare: b = -0.43, 95% CI -0.63, -0.18, p <.001), which was not modulated by vaccination. Conclusion(s): These results suggest that low-grade inflammation and sleep loss independently attenuate behavioral control towards a cognitively less expensive but inflexible decision style. The potential role of sleep-immune pathways in model-based and model-free control will be discussed. Copyright © 2022

4.
Annals of Emergency Medicine ; 80(4 Supplement):S10-S11, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2176212

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The critical shortage of health care providers has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic into a staffing crisis. In this setting, it became infeasible for our large tertiary academic hospital to consistently staff our emergency department observation unit with on-site providers. Telemedicine has been utilized and studied as a solution to this shortage in part because it enhances access to a larger staffing pool and allows for increased flexibility without geographic constraints. While telemedicine is well vetted across the continuum of health care, there is a paucity of data regarding the use of telemedicine in the observation medicine setting. This study aimed to primarily evaluate the safety and quality of care and secondarily the satisfaction of staff and patients when using a virtual provider in an emergency department observation unit. Design/Methods: This prospective observational quality improvement study occurred over a three month period where a virtual provider was piloted in an emergency department observation unit on dedicated night shifts at a tertiary care, academic hospital. Utilizing structured survey instruments and post shift interviews, nursing and provider perceptions of care were assessed across multiple domains of both health care quality, safety, and workflow efficiency. Secondary objectives evaluated include: patient and staff satisfaction, overall observation unit census and number of patients upgraded to a higher level of care. Patient satisfaction was assessed through surveys with questions based on Emergency Department Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (ED-CAHPS) questionnaires. These were compared to the unit's ED- CAHPS results in the three month time frame prior to the pilot. Results/Findings: 89% of nurses rated the virtual provider as equal, or better than an in-person provider when addressing clinical concerns. 96% of nurses similarly reported that the virtual provider was more or equally accessible. Moreover, 89% highlighted that the telemedicine workflow resulted in minimal or no increase to their work burden. Of the 16 virtual providers, 14 reported that they were "extremely" or "very" able to deliver appropriate care and engage with patients;the other 2 providers reported they were "somewhat able." 97% of patients reported satisfaction regarding their telemedicine experience. 3% of patients reported a neutral experience and none endorsed being dissatisfied. For ED-CAHP scores in the following categories: "treated with courtesy and respect," "listened carefully," "explained in a way you understand," virtual providers scored "always," the highest mark possible, greater than 93% of the time. Comparatively, in-person providers scored, "always", 63-73% of the time in the above categories during the three month period prior to this pilot. There was only one patient upgraded to a higher level of care, which compared favorably to baseline. Conclusion(s): After implementation of a virtual provider in an emergency department observation unit, clinical staff and patients perceived virtual care to be either similar or improved as compared to an in-person provider. A virtual provider may be an efficient and safe staffing solution in an emergency department observation unit. This may be particularly relevant in the context of an ongoing nationwide staffing crisis. No, authors do not have interests to disclose Copyright © 2022

6.
Quality of Life Research ; 31(Supplement 2):S58, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2175113

ABSTRACT

Aims: The COVID-19 pandemic caused significant disruption to clinical research, reducing the ability of patients to visit clinical sites for face-to-face visits. This has accelerated the trend of initiating decentralised research, where patients complete some, or all, of the study procedures at home. These studies have potential upsides of greater convenience for the patient and possibly lower costs for sponsors. Conversely de-centralised trials bring the challenge of ensuring rigour and high levels of completion when administering PROs via an electronic PRO (ePRO) solution. The methodology and compliance levels of an de-centralised observational validation study are presented. Method(s): A 10-week de-centralised, observation study was completed in US, UK and Germany to assess the psychometric properties of the Asthma Daytime and Night-time Symptoms Diaries (ADSD/ANSD). Following IRB review and approval, multiple PROs were administered via a Bring your Own Device ePRO solution, including the ADSD/ANSD, SGRQ, EQ-5D, PROMIS Sleep Disturbance 8a. Fair-market value honoraria were phased over the period of the study. PRO compliance was monitored throughout the study, with pre-programmed scheduled reminders and escalating triggered alerts implemented to facilitate compliance. Result(s): 235 moderateto-severe asthma patients have been recruited. An interim assessment of the compliance indicates that over 90% of patients completed at least 4 days of daily data each week. The end of study overall compliance will be analysed and stratified by days completed per week. The frequency and distribution pattern of reminders will be assessed. Compliance patterns by country, demographics and baseline characteristics will be reported. Lessons learned will be discussed in detail to inform best practice. Conclusion(s): Decentralised trials are increasing in popularity. PROs are progressively being viewed as fundamental to Patient Focused Drug Development. The interim results from this ongoing study demonstrate that high levels of PRO completion are possible in a decentralised, BYOD study, with numerous and variable PRO administration frequency. This highlights the importance of well designed, patient friendly research protocols, in ensuring high levels of patient compliance in remote settings. On completion of study, compliance and compliance reminder metrics will be presented, stratified by baseline and demographic characteristics.

7.
Journal of Pharmaceutical Negative Results ; 13:2603-2606, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2164819

ABSTRACT

Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a widely known, prolonged, multifactorial limb movement disorder wherein patients have an insatiable desire to move their legs. This is frequently associated with abnormal, non-painful sensations that begin at rest and improve with activity and pain may be the distressing symptom in a few. Ropinirole, a dopamine agonist, is a proven drug for this disease. Method(s): In this study of thirty-two post covid restless leg syndrome, selected by well-established criteria, a course of ropinirole 2 mg in the night was given for three weeks. The drug compliance was maintained more than 95% by telephonic interview. The pain scores (VAS 0- 10), Likert scores of satisfactions, were observed after three weeks and three months. Result(s): The scores significantly decreased after three weeks which maintained the same and an insignificant decrease after three months. The median score decreased from 7 to 3 (three weeks) to 2 in three months. The Likert satisfaction scores improved to 1.81 from three (p value= 0.00). There was improvement in scores from three weeks to three months. There were no side effects. Conclusion(s): In this single centre, quasi experimental study on the efficacy of ropinirole on post covid restless syndrome, we found the drug dosage of 2 mg in the night for three weeks is effective in the control of symptoms. The drug gives better satisfaction which prolonged to three months even if the drug is stopped in three weeks. There were no clinically significant side effects. Copyright © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

8.
European Psychiatry ; 65(Supplement 1):S541-S542, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2154108

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID pandemic brought an overwhelming impact on hospital systems and personnel in the world. Objective(s): Our study aimed to examine the impact of the COVID pandemic on the attitude and mental health of healthcare professionals working in COVID departments. Method(s): We included 23 healthcare professionals working in the COVID departments of the Hospitals of Sfax. Sociodemographic data, medical history and COVID related details were collected from the participants. Their mental health was assessed by the Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Result(s): In our sample, 26.1% were men and 73.9% were women, they were aged from 26 to 52. They worked for 57 hours per week, including 27.38 hours of direct contact with COVID positive patients and 5.43 nightshifts per month. A rate of 52.2% of the participants claimed having enough protection tools and 13% confirmed having enough equipment for patient management. 30.4% feared the lack of equipment and 39.1% considered themselves trained enough to manage COVID patients. As for the protective measures, 95.7% reduced contact with family members, 30.4% stopped visiting their parents, 8.7% left the family house and 4.3% didn't take any particular measure. The mean HADS depression score was 9.61, and 60.86% had a Depression score equal or greater than 8, indicating depression. As for the HADS Anxiety score, its mean was 10.61 and 69.56% had a score equal or greater than 8, indicating anxiety. Conclusion(s): The pandemic had a big impact on healthcare professionals working in COVID departments, as shows the relatively high depression and anxiety rate.

9.
Curr Obes Rep ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2129422

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Night eating syndrome (NES) is an eating disorder that has historically been under-studied. The current review aims to summarize the most up-to-date research on NES to support better awareness. RECENT FINDINGS: Since NES was recently included as a formal diagnosis, research on the prevalence of NES is ever evolving. Current studies underscore the high comorbidity between NES and other eating disorders, with additional complexities for patient with comorbid eating disorders. Recent findings also support the association between NES and sleep correlates, a relationship that has remained during the COVID-19 pandemic. Emerging research confirms correlates of distress in NES across cultures. There remain mixed findings between NES and BMI. There is also debate around whether age is a risk factor. Bariatric surgery research has focused on the re-emergence of NES post-operatively. Our understanding of the correlates of NES is increasing. However, research on the treatment for NES remains particularly under-studied and requires further attention.

10.
Journal of Sleep Research Conference: 26th Conference of the European Sleep Research Society Athens Greece ; 31(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2137097

ABSTRACT

Introduction: It is well known that university students are at high risk for developing sleep problems due to the unique challenges of early adulthood. The COVID-19 pandemic and accompanying infection control measures, including university closures and home schooling, imposed additional challenges to healthy sleep of university students around the world. The aim of our study was to evaluate the characteristics of Slovenian students' sleep habits during the first and second wave of the COVID-19 epidemic in Slovenia. We also aimed to investigate the possible role of sleep hygiene in predicting the sleep quality of students during the epidemic. Method(s): This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted during the first wave of the epidemic in Slovenia (spring 2020) and one year later, when the epidemic was declared for the second time (spring 2021). Slovenian university students responded to sleeprelated, change-specific questions in an online survey. Result(s): 541 participants (80% women) responded to the survey in the first wave and 719 (81% women) in the second wave. Our preliminary results show that most students slept within the recommended time frame of at least 7 h per night during both the first (73.2%) and second wave (63.8%), and most students reported sleeping more or the same amount of time during the epidemic compared to the preepidemic period. On the other hand, sleep quality worsened for a large proportion of participants during the first (37.2%) and second wave (41%), and many experienced less consistent sleep-wake cycles during both the first (48.6%) and second wave (52.1%) compared with the pre-epidemic period. Multiple regression analyses revealed that sleep hygiene predicted overall sleep quality during the epidemic in both waves, even after controlling for relevant variables that might affect sleep (demographic variables, presence or absence of physical illness or mental disorders, stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms). Conclusion(s): Our data confirm evidence of sleep changes previously observed in other studies during the pandemic and demonstrate the vulnerability of university students to decreased sleep quality and regularity during the COVID-19 epidemic. Our preliminary results also suggest the potential role of sleep hygiene in predicting sleep quality across the pandemic waves.

11.
Chronobiol Int ; : 1-9, 2022 Nov 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2122989

ABSTRACT

The present study had two main aims. First, to investigate whether shift/night workers had a higher prevalence and severity of COVID-19 compared with day workers. Second, to investigate whether people regularly working in face-to-face settings during the pandemic exhibited a higher prevalence and severity of COVID-19 compared with those having no need to be in close contact with others at work. Data consisted of 7141 workers from 15 countries and four continents who participated in the International COVID Sleep Study-II (ICOSS-II) between May and December 2021. The associations between work status and a positive COVID-19 test and several indications of disease severity were tested with chi-square tests and logistic regressions adjusted for relevant confounders. In addition, statistical analyses were conducted for the associations between face-to-face work and COVID-19 status. Results showed that shift/night work was not associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 compared to day work. Still, shift/night workers reported higher odds for moderate to life-threatening COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.71, 95%-confidence interval = 1.23-5.95) and need for hospital care (aOR = 5.66, 1.89-16.95). Face-to-face work was associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 (aOR = 1.55, 1.12-2.14) but not with higher disease severity. In conclusion, shift/night work was not associated with an increased risk of COVID-19, but when infected, shift/night workers reported more severe disease. Impaired sleep and circadian disruption commonly seen among shift/night workers may be mediating factors. Working face-to-face increased the risk of COVID-19, likely due to increased exposure to the virus. However, face-to-face work was not associated with increased disease severity.

12.
Journal of Sleep Research Conference: 26th Conference of the European Sleep Research Society Athens Greece ; 31(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2114329

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 infection rapidly became a worldwide pandemic and a public health emergency that seriously burdened healthcare systems. Health care professionals (HCPs) were faced with a new difficult and demanding challenge which frequently meant working long h shifts with low staffing members under high pressure environments. This may have had an important impact on sleep quality of HCPs. Aim(s): To evaluate the quality of sleep of HCPs after 3 waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. Method(s): A sleep questionnaire developed by the authors was sent to all HCPs of a tertiary hospital after the first 3 waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. Result(s): We had a total of 651 participants, mostly female (81.3%). Most participants were nurses (38.1%) and doctors (19.1%), with ages between 30 and 50 years. Other HCPs included were technicians, assistants, pharmaceuticals, among others. The majority dealt directly with COVID-19 patients (73.7%). Concerning quality of sleep, a significant proportion of HCPs referred a bad or very bad quality of sleep (41.5%) and only 16.1% stated a good or very good quality of sleep, of the last, 57% did not work night shifts. The majority suffered from night awakenings (88.6%), with 38.2% referring more than 2 awakenings per night;of these, 65% stated difficulty falling back to sleep. Furthermore, 46.2% HCPs referred initial insomnia and 59.9% referred terminal insomnia. Regarding quantity of sleep 16.9% slept less than 5 h, 47.3% slept approximately 6 h and only 7% slept 8 or more hours. Approximately 33% of HCPs resorted to sleeping medication, most frequently anxiolytics. In reference to daily symptoms, 71.3% of HCPs stated daytime sleepiness, most frequently after lunch (50.5%). Nonetheless, a significant proportion mentioned sleepiness during work (24%), and while driving (14.3%). Finally, 50.4% of the HCPs considered that the 3 waves of the COVID-19 pandemic worsened their sleep quality. Conclusion(s): This analysis demonstrates concerning results regarding the quality of sleep of HCPs after the first 3 waves of the COVID-19 pandemic with important daytime repercussions. This may reflect a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, as half of the HCPs considered that that the pandemic worsened their sleep quality.

13.
Journal of Sleep Research Conference: 26th Conference of the European Sleep Research Society Athens Greece ; 31(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2114244

ABSTRACT

Introduction: High non-adherence rates to CPAP remain a major obstacle to good outcomes in OSA. In trials, 29%-83% of patients do not adhere to CPAP. CPAP adherence in clinical practice, and the effect of clinical pathways and interventions, remain unknown because of incomplete datasets and use of non-clinically relevant criteria for adherence in previous studies. Patients are reported to become adherent or non-adherent to CPAP from treatment onset, forming the basis of current clinical practice, but the studies have been small. We addressed these evidence gaps using a large, UK multicentre clinical dataset, using changes to sleep centres' treatment pathways during the COVID-19 pandemic as a natural experiment. Method(s): Five sleep centres that telemonitored patient data in 2019 and 2020 were recruited. Using a 18% difference in CPAP adherence between years (Philips Respironics data), 80% power, alpha < 0.05, n = 92 was required. Objective CPAP-usage data over the first three months of treatment was collected from 100 patients who started CPAP prepandemic (April 2019) and 100 patients post-start of pandemic (September 2020), per centre. CPAP adherence criteria: Mean CPAP use >=4 h/night for >=70% of nights (for Night 1-3 period, median CPAP use used, as data non-normally distributed). Growth mixture modelling (GMM) and logistic regression were performed using all centres' data (1000 patients). Result(s): Three months after treatment started, only 34% of patients were treatment-adherent in 2019 and 42% in 2020 (p = 0.24). GMM identified six distinct, CPAP-usage behaviours over the first month, each with a different likelihood of CPAP non-adherence at three months. Four behaviours consisted of changing (increasing or decreasing) CPAP use (54% of patients), two behaviours consisted of consistent good or no use (remaining 46%). Treatment pathway determined prevalence of behaviours and CPAP adherence at three months;OSA severity was a weaker determinant of CPAP adherence at three months. Conclusion(s): CPAP use at treatment onset does not predict long-term adherence in most patients. This can explain why current practice is ineffective, and may even be detrimental, as the changing users are inappropriately managed as consistent users . Our data supports precision medicine tailored to specific behaviour from Week 2 of treatment.

14.
Journal of Sleep Research Conference: 26th Conference of the European Sleep Research Society Athens Greece ; 31(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2114031

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Objectives: Evidence suggests that night work, short sleep duration and sleep problems are associated with poor long-term health outcomes, including increased risk of infections. In this symposium, epidemiological data from recent studies among (a) patients in general practice in Norway and (b) day and shift/night workers participating in a large international study (ICOSS-2) on COVID-19 and longcovid, will be presented. Method(s): The study in general practice included a total of 1848 unselective patients visiting their general practitioner. The patients completed a one-page questionnaire while waiting for the consultation. The international study included a total of 7182 day and shift workers from 15 different countries around the world. These participants completed an online survey covering several aspects of sleep. Result(s): The study from general practice showed that patients reporting a sleep duration of less than 6 h had significantly higher risk of infection (any type) compared to patients reporting 7-8 h of sleep (Relative Risk (RR) 1.27, confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.46). Furthermore, the risk of infection was significantly higher in patients with chronic insomnia compared to patients without insomnia (RR 1.15, CI 1.05-1.27). Preliminary data from the ICOSS-2 show that the prevalence of COVID-19 was significantly higher among participants involved in irregular day work (20.7%) and shift/night work (25.3%) compared with participants involved in regular day work (18.9%). Furthermore, the prevalence of long-covid (according to WHO criteria) was significantly higher among irregular day workers (11.4%) and shift/night workers (13.6%) compared with regular day workers (8.4%). Conclusion(s): These data indicate that shift/night work, short sleep duration and sleep problems are associated with an increased risk of infections, including COVID-19. Furthermore, preliminary data suggest that shift/night work also is associated with increased risk of developing long-covid. The possible mechanisms involved will be discussed.

15.
Journal of Sleep Research Conference: 26th Conference of the European Sleep Research Society Athens Greece ; 31(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2113994

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Impaired subjective sleep quality is associated with lower cognitive performance and poor mental health. Mind-wandering (MW) or daydreaming is a state of the human mind when the focus of attention shifts from the ongoing task and the external environment toward internally generated cognitive and emotional processes. Cross-sectional research has shown that poor sleep and negative mood are associated with increased MW, however, it is unknown whether these relations are uni- or bidirectional. Method(s): We investigated the day-to-day dynamics between subjective sleep quality, mind-wandering, and mood across three experience sampling studies in university student samples. The first study included healthy individuals (N = 73,2758 observations) with medium or high trait schizotypy, the second sample included students with high dream recall frequency (N = 55,2078 observations), and the third contained a general student sample (N = 61,1119 observations) who were surveyed during the second and third waves of the Covid pandemic. Data were analyzed with mixed-effect modeling where we separated within and between-person effects. Result(s): Poor sleep quality predicted more MW during the day across all studies, and this relationship was more pronounced within than across individuals. However, if we included mood as a predictor (daytime or right after awakening) sleep quality was no longer significant. On the other hand, more MW significantly predicted lower sleep quality during the night, but the size of the effect was negligible. Elevated trait depression scores were significant predictors of worse sleep quality and more MW but again, if mood was included in the models, then higher trait depression was no longer significant. Conclusion(s): Our findings suggest a unidirectional association of poor sleep with lower mental health and mind-wandering. MW seems more affected by within-person fluctuations in sleep quality. These findings strengthen the evidence that striving for better sleep hygiene is key to functioning and being well during the day, even among healthy young adults.

16.
Journal of Sleep Research Conference: 26th Conference of the European Sleep Research Society Athens Greece ; 31(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2113957

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Behavioural control arises from a balance between model-based and model-free behaviour. Model-based behaviour is cognitively costly but enables adaptation to changes in the environment. In contrast, model-free control is fast, cognitively inexpensive, but inflexible. Overreliance on model-free control and/or reduced model-based control is found across various mental health conditions, suggesting that these modes of control may be influenced by common trans diagnostic processes. Since insufficient sleep and low-grade inflammation are highly common in mental ill-health, we assessed how they by themselves and in combination influence behavioural control Methods: In an ongoing study, we recruited 46 individuals who completed three sessions: Sleep loss (2 nights of 4 h in bed), normal sleep (2 nights of 9 h in bed) (within-subjects), and a low-grade inflammation condition (COVID-19 vaccination) preceded by either sleep loss or normal sleep (between subjects). Blood samples were taken (not analysed), sickness symptoms were assessed using the SicknessQ, and model-based and model-free control was quantified (using a sequential decision task). Result(s): Sickness symptoms were highest after vaccination with sleep loss (M = 34.6), followed by vaccination with normal sleep (M = 24.3) and sleep loss (M = 23.8), and normal sleep only (M = 15.3). Modelfree behaviour increased in the vaccine as compared to the nonvaccine condition (b = 0.23, 95% CI 0.10, 0.37, p < 0.001). Modelbased control decreased after sleep loss versus normal sleep (reward + common: B = -0.47, 95% CI -0.67, -0.28, p < 0.001, nonreward + rare: B = -0.43, 95% CI -0.63, -0.18, p < 0.001), which was not modulated by vaccination. Conclusion(s): These results suggest that sleep loss and low-grade inflammation independently attenuate behavioural control towards a cognitively less expensive but inflexible decision style.

17.
Omega (Westport) ; : 302228221135276, 2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089043

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted with the aim of determining the effect of fear of COVID-19 in patients and clinical nurses on night nursing care. This was a cross-sectional study. The research sample consisted of 604 patients and 270 clinical nurses selected by the convenience sampling method. Data were collected between August 2021 and July 2022 using a Patients' Information form, a Nurse's Information form, the Fear of COVID-19 scale, and the Night Nursing Care instrument. No significant difference was found between the total mean scores of the patients and the nurses on the Fear of COVID-19 scale or the Night Nursing Care instrument (rho = -0.017, p = .702; rho = -0.020, p = .741). It was found that patients' and nurses' fears of COVID-19 did not affect their perceptions of night nursing care.

18.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(8):632-642, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067286

ABSTRACT

This study has systematically investigated the types of drug delivery in the treatment and prevention of oral and dental and cardiorespiratory diseases in patients and animals involved in the disease. Early recognition of risk factors and primary prevention significantly reduces complications and mortality in chronic heart diseases. Lifestyle modification with diet, exercise and smoking cessation is very important to reduce cardiovascular risk factors. In the first days of the disease, when the patient has mild symptoms and has not yet developed respiratory symptoms, you can start treatment with painkillers for headache, sore throat and body pain, along with taking antitussive medicine and vitamin D and C although scientifically the effect of vitamin C. It is not proven, but considering that we still do not have extensive studies on this disease, it seems that taking vitamins may help the patient. Sometimes, some patients themselves start treatment with azithromycin, while this antibiotic has an effect on antibacterial infections and has no effect on the disease of Covid-19. Favipiravir treatment should be started in high-risk outpatients with corona. Of course, along with treatment with favipiravir and similar antiviral effects, it can be effective in the treatment of corona. Famotidine and melatonin, which help improve sleep and are said to have antiviral effects. Of course, melatonin medicine should be taken at around 11 to 12 at night. Because it affects the sleep and wake cycle. Montelukast along with fexofenadine, can have antiviral effects for covid-19 patients. Since the beginning of the Corona pandemic, the world has emphasized on the monthly consumption of vitamin D, but if you do not have a monthly intake, use 1000 milligrams daily or up to 50 thousand units every week and after some time continue to consume vitamin D on a monthly basis. It is also recommended to take vitamin C and magnesium, and it is better for patients to eat foods rich in protein, potassium, and dairy products.

19.
Clinical Toxicology ; 60(Supplement 2):51-52, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2062732

ABSTRACT

Background: Vertatrum viride (false hellebore) is a perennial commonly found in eastern North America. The most common cause of exposure is misidentification when foraging for wild onion, or skunk cabbage. One regional poison center saw an increase in foraging-related poisonings during initial COVID-19 restrictions. The case report highlights severe delayed cardiac effects after ingestion of Veratrum viride in an otherwise healthy, young, female athlete. Case report: A 24-year-old female presented to an emergency room alongside family with complaints of nausea and vomiting that started 30 min after a meal consisting of foraged wild onion (Allium triccocum). Five others ate the same meal and noted similar symptoms. Vitals upon arrival (3 h post ingestion) are as described: HR 51, BP 88/52, Temp 36.7, RR 18 and O2 sat 100% on room air. The patient had no previous cardiac history and was athletic. Management included D5LR with K replacement, and dopamine infusion at 10mcg/kg/min. Dopamine was tapered slowly, down to 6 mcg/kg/min at 16.5 h. Vitals continued to be stable at 17.5 h post ingestion and dopamine was discontinued. The patient developed severe bradydysrhythmia 15 min later, consisting of complete heart block leading to prolonged sinus pause. She responded to 10 s of CPR with return of spontaneous circulation with a junctional escape rhythm which reverted back to sinus bradycardia. A repeat EKG was unremarkable. The dopamine infusion was reinstituted at 4 mcg/kg/min and continued until 26.5 h post ingestion. She was monitored an additional 9.5 h, and remained in sinus rhythm with mild complaints of dizziness that resolved before discharge. Discussion(s): Veratrum spp. toxicity is due to alkaloids found throughout the plant which cause sodium channel opening when bound to type 2 sodium channels. By increasing sodium ion influx during the resting potential and delaying inactivation to create a late sodium current, these alkaloids increase automaticity in conductive cells. This mechanism, paired with the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, is likely responsible for increased vagal tone leading to bradycardia, hypotension, sinus arrhythmia, and junctional escape rhythm. It is noteworthy that even 18 h post ingestion in a relatively stable patient with no significant cardiac history, cardiac arrest occurred just after treatment tapering. Clinicians should consider prolonged observation time in the setting of discontinuation of vasopressors. Conclusion(s): Both clinicians and amateur foragers should be aware of the risks associated with ingestion of Veratrum viride, especially during early spring when it more closely resembles wild onion. While uncommon, significant delayed cardiac effects are possible. Mistaking the plant for edible wild onions can be the difference between a delectable dinner, and a night in the ICU.

20.
Chest ; 162(4):A2226, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060914

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: TB and TB-Involved Case Posters SESSION TYPE: Case Report Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/17/2022 12:15 pm - 01:15 pm INTRODUCTION: Patients who are HIV positive have a high risk of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB). Screening tests for HIV identify antibodies that are present during the seroconversion, or window phase. Here we present a case of reactivation TB during the seroconversion phase of HIV with an initially negative QuantiFERON test. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 24-year-old female presented with a productive cough. She was found to have leukopenia and apical consolidation on chest CT and was treated for community-acquired pneumonia with mild improvement of symptoms. Her QuantiFERON, COVID-19, and HIV antibody screen were negative;however, her reflex HIV antigen was positive. She re-presented a month later with a worsening cough, drenching night sweats, weight loss, vomiting, and dysphonia. Her chest CT noted a right apical cavitary lesion and bilateral upper lobe micronodules with endobronchial spreading. Her QuantiFERON and HIV antibody were now both positive. She was started on rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol (RIPE) therapy and on raltegravir and emtricitabine/tenofovir. DISCUSSION: Above we describe a case of reactivation TB during the seroconversion phase of HIV with a negative QuantiFERON. Primary TB presents in the middle lobes without signs of structural damage whereas secondary TB typically involves the apices and presents with cavitation. Secondary TB is typically due to reactivation or reinfection in immunosuppressed patients. Although we believe this case is due to reactivation due to radiographic findings, her initial QuantiFERON was negative. However, studies have shown that QuantiFERON may have uncertain results in latent TB infections in patients with underlying HIV (1). Reliable testing for latent TB in HIV-positive individuals is necessary as HIV increases the risk of developing active TB and TB increases the risk of transitioning from HIV to AIDS (2). CONCLUSIONS: TB is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide and HIV is a common coinfection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report of reactivation TB during the seroconversion phase of HIV with an initially negative QuantiFERON. Overall, more research must be done to identify the risk of infections during the seroconversion phase and physicians must be able to identify radiographic findings concerning for TB in patients with underlying HIV. Reference #1: Elisa Petruccioli, Teresa Chiacchio, Elisa Petruccioli, et al. Effect of HIV-infection on QuantiFERON-plus accuracy in patients with active tuberculosis and latent infection, Journal of Infection, 2020;80(5): 536-546. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2020.02.009. Reference #2: Bruchfeld, Judith et al. "Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection.” Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine vol. 5,7 a017871. 26 Feb. 2015, doi:10.1101/cshperspect.a017871 Reference #3: Johnson JL, Okwera A, Hom DL, et al. Duration of efficacy of treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected adults. AIDS. 2001;15(16):2137-2147. doi:10.1097/00002030-200111090-00009 World Health Organization. Tuberculosis [Internet]. 2021 [cited 2022 Mar. 15];Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/tuberculosis DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Loor Alshawa No relevant relationships by Angela Binkowski No relevant relationships by Sara Qutubuddin

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL