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1.
Arch Public Health ; 80(1): 139, 2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846869

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Europe, data on population health is fragmented, difficult to access, project-based and prone to health information inequalities in terms of availability, accessibility and especially in quality between and within countries. This situation is further exacerbated and exposed by the recent COVID-19 pandemic. The Joint Action on Health Information (InfAct) that builds on previous works of the BRIDGE Health project, carried out collaborative action to set up a sustainable infrastructure for health information in the European Union (EU). The aim of this paper is to present InfAct's proposal for a sustainable research infrastructure, the Distributed Infrastructure on Population Health (DIPoH), which includes the setup of a Health Information Portal on population health to be maintained beyond InfAct's time span. METHODS: The strategy for the proposal was based on three components: scientific initiatives and proposals to improve Health Information Systems (HIS), exploration of technical acceptability and feasibility, and finally obtaining high-level political support.. The technical exploration (Technical Dialogues-TD) was assumed by technical experts proposed by the countries, and political guidance was provided by the Assembly of Members (AoM), which gathered representatives from Ministries of Health and Science of EU/EEA countries. The results from the AoM and the TD were integrated in the sustainability plan compiling all the major outputs of InfAct. RESULTS: The InfAct sustainability plan was organized in three main sections: a proposal of a new research infrastructure on population health (the DIPoH), new health information tools and innovative proposals for HIS, and a comprehensive capacity building programme. These activities were carried out in InfAct and are being further developed in the Population Health Information Research Infrastructure (PHIRI). PHIRI is a practical rollout of DIPoH facilitating and generating the best available evidence for research on health and wellbeing of populations as impacted by COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The sustainability plan received wide support from Member States and was recognized to have an added value at EU level. Nevertheless, there were several aspects which still need to be considered for the near future such as: (i) a commitment of stable financial and political support by Member States (MSs), (ii) the availability of resources at regional, national and European level to deal with innovations, and (iii) a more direct involvement from EU and international institutions such as the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development OECD for providing support and sustainable contributions.

2.
Settimana Veterinaria ; : 35-36, 2021.
Article in Italian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837569
3.
Public Health Rev ; 43: 1604121, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834676

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has claimed more than 5 million lives worldwide by November 2021. Implementation of lockdown measures, reallocation of medical resources, compounded by the reluctance to seek help, makes it exceptionally challenging for people with non-communicable diseases (NCD) to manage their diseases. This review evaluates the spill-over impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with NCDs including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease, dementia, mental health disorders, and musculoskeletal disorders. Methods: Literature published in English was identified from PubMed and medRxiv from January 1, 2019 to November 30, 2020. A total of 119 articles were selected from 6,546 publications found. Results: The reduction of in-person care, screening procedures, delays in diagnosis, treatment, and social distancing policies have unanimously led to undesirable impacts on both physical and psychological health of NCD patients. This is projected to contribute to more excess deaths in the future. Conclusion: The spill-over impact of COVID-19 on patients with NCD is just beginning to unravel, extra efforts must be taken for planning the resumption of NCD healthcare services post-pandemic.

4.
Nepal J Epidemiol ; 12(1): 1139-1155, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798959

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown measures to confine it has disrupted the routine of the public. The impact of such long-term confinements on the lifestyle and diet of students are not known and hence this study was designed to assess the impact of lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic on the lifestyle and diet of university students. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey among 622 university students across various educational institutes of east India using a pre-designed questionnaire about lifestyle-diet before and during the lockdown. Results were tabulated and statistical tests like Paired t-test, Wilcoxon Rank sign test, and Mc-Nemar tests were applied and overall significance was attributed to P<0.05. Results: During the lockdown a total of 2.4% (95% CI: 1.4-3.8%) decrease in prevalence of tobacco use, 8.7% (95% CI: 6.6-11%) decrease in physical activity and a 0.8 hour (95% CI: 0.6-0.9 hour) increase in the mean sleep duration was observed. There was a significant increase in use of fresh fruits consumption [Median(IQR)-before:2(1-5);during:3(1-5) days] and a decrease in meat-poultry[Median(IQR)-before: 2(0-3);during: 1(0-3)days] and junk food[Median(IQR)-before:1(0-2);during:0(0-2)days] consumption during the lockdown. Conclusion: A significant proportion of changes in lifestyle and frequency of consumption of certain food items in the dietary pattern during the lockdown.

5.
NAVC Clinician's Brief ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1790652
7.
Infez Med ; 30(1): 30-40, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772287

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disproportionately impacted global human health, economy, and security. Because of weaker health-care systems, existing comorbidities burden (HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, and non-communicable conditions), and poor socioeconomic determinants, initial predictive models had forecast a disastrous impact of COVID-19 in Africa in terms of transmission, severity, and deaths. Nonetheless, current epidemiological data seem not to have matched expectations, showing lower SARS-CoV-2 infection and fatality rates compared to Europe, the Americas and Asia. However, only few studies were conducted in low- and middle-income African settings where high poverty and limited access to health services worsen underlying health conditions, including endemic chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis. Furthermore, limited, and heterogeneous research was conducted to evaluate the indirect impact of the pandemic on general health services and on major diseases across African countries. International mitigation measures, such as resource reallocation, lockdowns, social restrictions, and fear from the population have had multi-sectoral impacts on various aspects of everyday life, that shaped the general health response. Despite the vast heterogeneity of data across African countries, available evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted the control and prevention programs, the diagnosis capacity and the adherence to treatment of major infectious diseases (HIV, TB, and Malaria) - including neglected diseases - and non-communicable diseases. Future research and efforts are essential to deeply assess the medium- and long-term impact of the pandemic, and to implement tailored interventions to mitigate the standstill on decades of improvement on public health programs.

8.
Tier..rztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere ; 49(3):229-235, 2021.
Article in German | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1744014

ABSTRACT

These proceedings contain 25 papers from the 64th Annual Meeting of the Pathology Section of the German Veterinary Medical Association. Topics include tumour infiltrating lymphocytes in mammary carcinomas in domestic rabbits;what decides good or bad? - global gene expression analysis of the adenoma of the hepatoid perianal glands and adenocarcinoma the canine apocrine anal sac glands;the canine cutaneous histiocytoma - boring or perspective in immuno-oncology?;impact of antibiotic pretreatment on ventilator-induced lung injury: contradiction between histology and transcriptome analysis?;characterization of murine satellite glial cells of the dorsal root ganglia - a unique cell population with potential regenerative capacities;impact of antibiotic pretreatment on ventilator-induced lung injury: contradiction between histology and transcriptome analysis?;primary diffuse leptomeningeals oligodendrogliomatosis in a cat;pathomorphological studies of fibroadnexal dysplasia in dogs;pyogranulomatous inflammation in multiple Organs of a dog with evidence of Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum;ovary tumors in cats - overview of the examination material from 2009-2020 and case report of a recurrent dysgerminoma;atherosclerosis in the dog;spinal neuroenteric cyst in one Saint Bernard;MENX - an endogenous model for pseudohypoxic pheochromocytomas;molecular Level Evolution II: similarities of CLCA2 in sauropsids and mammals;in vivo detection of double-stranded Ribonucleic acid (RNA) as an early detection marker unclear viral infections using the example of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS CoV-2) in experimental infected hamsters;the role of different mast cell subtypes in the context of intestinal carcinogenesis - a species-comparative approach;an underestimated treasure in paraffin - establishment of a global transcriptome analysis canine tumors from FFPE material based on QuantSeq 3' technology;well researched? - an approximation of the role of CLCA1 in joints through usage molecular databases;integration of digitized historical and cytopathology into an open source DICOM database and viewer system;3R 3D: skin model for the study of viral infections;CARD9 signaling promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and cytokine balance in a mouse model of virus-induced encephalitis;neuropathological changes after intranasal infection with Rift Valley fever virus - a murine model for human encephalitis;a T-cell a day keeps Theiler away - the influence non-reactive T-cells on the course of a Theiler virus infection in mice with C57BL/6 background;digitization in pathology - new opportunities and their obstacles;and specific features of satellite glial cells of dog and pig.

9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742472

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are showing an increasing trend worldwide, and the COVID-19 pandemic may interrupt or delay NCD care, the leading cause of mortality in Thailand, which is hosting 2-3 million migrant workers. The transition of epidemiological risk factors, limited access to health-promoting activities, and pandemic containment measures may adversely impact NCD risks. Therefore, hypertension and associated risk factors were determined among registered Myanmar migrant workers in Thailand. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey with structured questionnaires was conducted in Thailand in 2017. Having hypertension was analyzed as a dependent variable, and the associated risk factors were explored by binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 414 participants with a mean age of 29.45 ± 9.03 years were included, and 27.8 percent of the study participants were hypertensive, which was a rate higher than that in their host country (24.7%) and country of origin (26.4%). An older age, being male, current alcohol drinking, and being overweight and obese with reference to the body mass index (BMI) were significantly associated with hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reaffirmed the idea that NCDs are important public health concerns, and a simple BMI measurement would be a valuable tool with which to determine hypertension risks. Targeted surveillance and an appropriate health policy are necessary for such a vulnerable population in Thailand.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Transients and Migrants , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Myanmar/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Thailand/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
Public Health ; 205: 139-149, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734902

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Alarming rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been observed in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where most refugees reside. There is concern Syrian refugees may experience significant NCD-related health needs, which have significant health implications, including in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and which must be addressed by health systems in neighbouring host countries. Although primary studies on this topic exist, there has been no comprehensive synthesis of the existing evidence base. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to synthesise evidence on the prevalence of NCDs among Syrian refugees residing in neighbouring host countries. STUDY DESIGN: This was a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The review was carried out in line with PRISMA guidelines (PROSPERO CRD420201970430). MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and PubMed databases were searched from 1 January 2011 to 1 November 2021. Peer-reviewed studies reporting prevalence data on the five most common NCDs among adult Syrian refugees living in Turkey, Lebanon or Jordan were included. Methodological quality was assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal checklist for prevalence studies. Meta-analysis was carried out to estimate the pooled prevalence of these NCDs in community and primary care settings. RESULTS: A total of 466 citations were identified, 18 of which were included, representing 237,723 Syrian refugees. In community settings, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus type II, cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases and arthritis was 24% (95% confidence interval: 17-32), 12% (8-15), 5% (3-7), 4% (3-5) and 11% (7-14), respectively. The prevalence of hypertension 35% (33-36) and diabetes mellitus type II 48% (24-72) were significantly higher in primary care settings. CONCLUSION: The findings demonstrate a high prevalence of NCDs among Syrian refugees. Evidence-based preventive and management interventions for NCDs are needed in this context to address acute health needs during the COVID-19 pandemic and the longer-term health burden of NCDs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Noncommunicable Diseases , Refugees , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Syria/epidemiology
11.
Romanian Journal of Veterinary Medicine & Pharmacology ; 5(31):212-217, 2021.
Article in Romanian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1717496

ABSTRACT

Paracetamol is an analgesic and antipyretic with less anti-inflammatory properties than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, indicated in the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate pain and the symptomatic treatment of fever. It is found in a variety of over-the-counter analgesic combinations (tablets, suppositories, children's syrups). Poisoning is due to use by pet (dogs, kats) owners without veterinary advice. The risk is high at present due to movement restrictions on people imposed by the Covid pandemic. Cats are the most susceptible. Poisoning is manifested by methaemoglobinaemia, haemolytic anaemia or toxic hepatosis.

12.
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Investigations ; 13(1):1-6, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1706251

ABSTRACT

Background: The corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread around the world and mutating rapidly. It is absolutely essential to evaluate the potential risk factor influencing disease progression and better understanding of high risk co-morbidities among COVID-19 patients. Objectives: To evaluate the association of serious events in COVID-19 patients according to the number and type of co-morbidities also the association of co-morbidities with the adverse events and the risk of early outcomes with any co-morbidity. Methods: This was a prospective observational study among 1,583 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases admitted during the study period from Apr 2020 to March 2021. Odds ratio (OR) and risk ratio (RR) with respective confidence intervals have been calculated to evaluate the presence and strength of association of case severity with the presence and number of co morbidities. Results: There was 302 study subjects with one or more than one co-morbidities having the mean (SD) age of 54(15) year and 206(68.2%) male cases compared to female. The leading comorbidities were diabetes (146, 9.2%), hypertension (142, 9%) with respiratory disease (50, 3.2%), CAD (16, 1%). Any co-morbid patient has 6 times odds of getting admitted in ICU in comparison to non-co-morbid patient while the risk ratio signifies that five times higher chance of getting admitted in ICU than any non-co-morbid patient. The chances of death in them are always higher than non-co-morbid specially diabetes and hypertensive with CAD. Conclusions: Among patients with COVID-19 disease any co-morbidity resulted to poorer clinical outcomes and more the number of co-morbidities, poorer the clinical outcomes. [ FROM AUTHOR];Copyright of Journal of Clinical & Experimental Investigations is the property of Modestum Publications and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 263, 2022 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704620

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the ability of healthcare systems to ensure the continuity of health services for patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The issue of remote consultations has emerged. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, remote consultations were not routinely provided or covered by public health funding in Latvia. This study aimed to describe the dynamics of consultations and the volume of remote consultations provided for patients with particular NCD and explore clinicians' experiences of providing remote consultations during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Latvia. METHODS: A mixed-method study focusing on the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Latvia in Spring 2020 was conducted. Quantitative data from the National Health Services were analysed to assess the dynamics of consultations for patients with selected NCDs. Qualitative data were collected through 34 semi-structured interviews with general practitioners (GPs) and specialists and were analysed using an inductive thematic analysis. Purposive maximum variation sampling was used for participant selection. RESULTS: During the period with the strongest restrictions of scheduled on-site consultations, a decrease in the total number of consultations was observed for a variety of NCDs. A significant proportion of consultations in this period were provided remotely. GPs provided approximately one-third of cancer-related consultations and almost half of consultations for the other selected conditions remotely. Among specialists, endocrinologists had the highest proportion of remote consultations (up to 72.0%), while urologists had the lowest (16.4%). Thematic analysis of the semi-structured interviews revealed five themes: 1) Adjusting in a time of confusion and fear, 2) Remote consultations: safety versus availability, 3) Sacrifice and loss of privacy, 4) Advantages and disadvantages of communication technologies, and 5) Different form of communication and a health literacy challenge. CONCLUSIONS: During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Latvia, disruptions to health care services decreased the total number of consultations for patients with NCDs provided by both GPs and specialists. In this period, remote consultations proved to be an important instrument for ensuring the continuity of health care for patients with NCDs, and the necessity to develop a well-designed system for telemedicine in Latvia was highlighted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Remote Consultation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services , Humans , Latvia/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Search-Journal of Media and Communication Research ; 13(3):141-156, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1695960

ABSTRACT

Childhood obesity and its associated risks in Malaysia remains a major health concern where at least one in five of children are affected. Media engagement with the public on the outbreak of Covid-19 had since overshadowed these health issues. Measures for social distancing and containment through the Movement Control Order (MCO) presented challenges for parents in making healthy food choices and dealing with unforeseen sedentary lifestyles. The study examined perceptions of parents towards health communication, how parents ensure their children abide by healthy eating habits, and how they seek information on childhood obesity intervention during this period. The positive deviance (PD) approach argues that champions of innovative ideas on maintaining good health are found within the communities rather than a change agency's prescription. The study obtained input from parents in the Klang Valley through semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis findings show that parents from M40 and B40 communities have insufficient information on nutrition for childhood development and prioritize convenience over long-term effects due to their hectic routines and household income. Positive deviant (PD) T20 groups are found to be more efficient in managing and applying knowledge due to their higher health literacy and communication within their social groups. This outlines the gap on effective communication strategies to improve health literacy of the public.

15.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(2): 255-260, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spread of COVID-19 depends on a lot of social and economic factors. THE AIM: to study the influence of country's gross domestic product, population prevalence of overweight/ obesity, NCD mortality, and vaccination on COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with two phases: correlation-regression interrelations in 1) all world countries; 2) all world non-island countries. The study includes the following data from 218 world countries: COVID-19 morbidity/mortality rates, GDP per capita, the prevalence of overweight/ obesity, NCD mortality among adults (both sexes), people fully vaccinated against COVID-19. RESULTS: An average percentage of the prevalence of overweight among adults in world countries by 2019 was 47.31 ± 15.99%, obesity 18.34 ± 9.64%, while the prevalence by 2016 were 39% and 13%, respectively. Overweight and obesity among adults during three years grew by 21.2% and 40.8%, respectively. Data from the world countries provide significant correlations (p < 0.0001) between COVID-19 morbidity, and: GDP (r = 0.517), overweight (r = 0.54), obesity (r = 0.528), NCD mortality (r = 0.537); COVID-19 mortality, and: GDP (r = 0.344), overweight (r = 0.514), obesity (r = 0.489), NCD mortality (r = 0.611); GDP, and: overweight (r = 0.507), obesity (r = 0.523), NCD mortality (r = 0.35), fully vaccinated people (r = 0.754). An increase in fully vaccinated people, from 3% to 30% of world population, decreases new confirmed COVID-19 cases, although the dependence was not significant (p = 0.07). Data from non-island world countries provides more highly significant correlations (p < 0.0001) between COVID-19 morbidity, and: GDP (r = 0.616), overweight (r = 0.581), obesity (r = 0.583); COVID-19 mortality, and: GDP (r = 0.43), overweight (r = 0.556), obesity (r = 0.539); GDP, and: overweight (r = 0.601), obesity (r = 0.633). The differences of correlation coefficients between data of 176 world countries and data of 143 world non-island countries were not significant (Z-scores<1.29; p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The study provides evidence of a significant impact of overweight/obesity prevalence on the increase in COVID-19 morbidity/mortality. Countries with higher GDP have a high overweight/obesity prevalence and possibility to get vaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health , Gross Domestic Product , Humans , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
16.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 14(1): e1-e7, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including type-2 diabetes and hypertension, have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates because of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Maintaining quality care for these conditions is important but data on the impact of COVID-19 on NCD care in South Africa are sparse. AIM:  This study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on facility and community-based NCD care and management during the first COVID-19 wave. SETTING:  Two public health sector primary care sites in the Cape Town Metro, including a Community Orientated Primary Care (COPC) learning site. METHODS:  A rapid appraisal with convergent mixed-methods design, including semi-structured interviews with facility and community health workers (CHWs) (n = 20) and patients living with NCDs (n = 8), was used. Interviews were conducted in English and Afrikaans by qualified interviewers. Transcripts were analysed by thematic content analysis. Quantitative data of health facility attendance, chronic dispensing unit (CDU) prescriptions and routine diabetes control were sourced from the Provincial Health Data Centre and analysed descriptively. RESULTS:  Qualitative analysis revealed three themes: disruption (cancellation of services, fear of infection, stress and anxiety), service reorganisation (communication, home delivery of medication, CHW scope of work, risk stratification and change management) and outcomes (workload and morale, stigma, appreciation and impact on NCD control). There was a drop in primary care attendance and an increase in CDU prescriptions and uncontrolled diabetes. CONCLUSION:  This study described the service disruption together with rapid reorganisation and change management at primary care level during the first COVID-19 wave. The changes were strengthened by the COPC foundation in one of the study sites. The impact of COVID-19 on primary-level NCD care and management requires more investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Community Health Workers , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa
17.
Arch Public Health ; 80(1): 29, 2022 Jan 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686031

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-Communicable diseases (NCD) are the main contributors to mortality and burden of disease. There is no infrastructure in Europe that could provide health information (HI) on Public Health monitoring and Health Systems Performance (HSP) for research and evidence-informed decision-making. Moreover, there was no EU and European Economic Area Member States (EU/EEA MSs) general consensus, on developing this initiative and guarantee its sustainability. The aim of this study is to analyze the integration of technical and political views made by the Joint Action on Health Information (InfAct; Information for Action) and the results obtained from those activities, in terms of advice and national and institutional support to develop an integrated and sustainable European Distributed Infrastructure on Population Health (DIPoH) for research and evidence-informed policy-making. METHODS: InfAct established two main boards, the Technical Dialogues (TDs) and the Assembly of Members (AoM), to provide a platform for discussion with EU/EEA MSs to establish a sustainable infrastructure for HI: 1) The TDs were composed by national technical experts (NTE) with the aim to discuss and provide feedback about scientific aspects, feasibility and EU-added value of the infrastructure proposed by InfAct. 2) The AoM gathered country representatives from Ministries of Health and Research at the highest political level, with the aim of providing policy-oriented advice for the future political acceptance, support, implementation, and development of InfAct's outcomes including DIPoH. The documentation provided for the meetings consisted in Fact-Sheets, where the main results, new methods and proposals were clearly exposed for discussion and assessment; altogether with more extended information of the DIPoH. The documentation was provided to national representatives within one more before each TD and AoM meeting. The Agenda and methodological approaches for each TD and AoM meeting consisted in the presentations of the InfAct outcomes extending the information provided in the Fact-Sheets; followed by a non-structured interaction, exchange of information, discussion and suggestions by the MSs representatives. The outcomes of the non-structured discussions were collected in Minutes of the TD and AoM meetings, and the final version was obtained with the consensus of all participants. Additionally, structured letters of political support were provided to the AoM representatives, for them to consider providing their MS written support for DIPoH. RESULTS: NTE, within the TDs, considered that DIPoH was useful for technical mutual learning and cooperation among and within countries; although they considered that the technical feasibility to uptake InfAct deliverables at the national and EU level was complex. The AoM focused on political support, resources, and expected MSs returns. The AoM representatives agreed in the interest of setting up an integrated and sustainable HI infrastructure and they considered DIPoH to be well-articulated and defined; although, some of them, expressed some barriers for providing DIPoH political support. The AoM representatives stated that the AoM is the most suitable way to inform EU MSs/ACs about future advances of DIPoH. Both boards provided valuable feedback to develop this infrastructure. Eleven countries and sixteen institutions supported the proposal, either by letters of political support or by signing the Memorandum of Understandings (MoU) and three countries, additionally, provided expression of financial commitment, for DIPoH to be added to the ESFRI 2021 roadmap. CONCLUSIONS: TDs and AoM were key forums to develop, advise, advocate and provide support for a sustainable European research infrastructure for Population Health.

18.
Scientific Journal of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences ; 26(6):21-32, 2021.
Article in Persian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1651876

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim: Overweight and obesity disrupt people's quality of life and increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension, gastrointestinal diseases and cancer. It also reduces the immunity of people against epidemic diseases. Materials and Methods: In this article, extensive search of electronic databases, review of national upstream documents as well as review of documents and reports of the Ministry of Health were conducted to comprehensively review the prevalence of obesity and its associated factors, measures taken to control this risk factor, and challenge of a syndemic of obesity and Covid-19 in Iran. Results: Based on the results of the national non-communicable diseases risk factors study (STEPS) in Iran, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was estimated to be 59.3% in people aged 18 years and older. Moreover, overweight and obesity were not homogeneously distributed in the country and the mean body mass index (BMI) changed from the lowest in the Southeastern to the highest in the Northwestern provinces. Covid-19 pandemic has made the situation even worse as the social distancing measures along with mental problems have made tremendous changes in people's lifestyles including physical activity and eating behaviors and this resulted in higher prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) risk factors especially overweight and obesity. Moreover, obesity increased the risk of hospitalization, admission to the intensive care units, the need for mechanical ventilation, and even mortality in patients with Covid-19. Meanwhile, anti-obesity services faced problems during the epidemics and posed a serious challenge to the world. Conclusion: This study highlighted the need for targeted national policies to simultaneously control the obesity and Covid-19 pandemics. © 2018 the Author (s). Published by Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences.

19.
Lancet Reg Health West Pac ; 21: 100377, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636014

ABSTRACT

In 2000, the Japanese government launched the National Health Promotion Movement known as Health Japan 21 (HJ21), a 13-year national health promotion policy (2000-2012) aimed at preventing and controlling non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and their underlying risk factors. After the revision in 2013 (2013-2023), the target NCDs and risk factors are being reviewed and a new strategy for the third term of HJ21 is going to be discussed. Using the latest findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019, this paper highlights NCDs that continue to increase health losses and preventable metabolic and behavioural risk factors. These NCDs and risk factors are associated with an increased risk of serious illness and death from the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The third term of HJ21 will be formulated during the continuing threat of acute health crises like the current COVID-19 pandemic and thus offers an important opportunity to renew public health efforts to halt the growing burden of NCDs in Japan. This article may serve as one of the roadmaps for the formulation of the third term of HJ21.

20.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 37(3): 1832-1837, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626452

ABSTRACT

Diagnostic and treatment services for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) face significant challenges in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. We used the Python programing language to extract and classify messages for help posted on the social networking platform microblog by NCD patients in the early stage of the COVID-19 epidemic in Wuhan, China. We found of all NCD patients, the most frequently recorded conditions were basic chronic diseases (42.50%), acute critical diseases (35.53%), malignant tumours (15.10%), and patients requiring haemodialysis (6.79%). Regarding COVID-19, 54.70% of patients reported suspected symptoms of infection, 32.01% were diagnosed with comorbidities, and 13.29% were non-COVID-19 patients. According to the analysis of the needs of the patients, 82.46% of the patients reported "No beds were available in the hospital", 25.31% of patients needed nucleic acid tests. Our results confirmed it is difficult to meet the regular needs in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with NCDs. Effective prevention and management of NCDs in public health emergencies has become an urgent issue to be addressed. During the COVID-19 epidemic, it is necessary to pay particular attention to the prevention and control of NCD patients, especially those with chronic disease. Governments and medical and health institutions at all levels should improve treatment mechanisms during major epidemics and ensure the uninterrupted treatment of patients with NCDs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , China/epidemiology , Chronic Disease , Health Services , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
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