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1.
International Journal of Nursing Sciences ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031351

ABSTRACT

Objectives Nurses are considered to be at risk of experiencing compassion fatigue, which can affect their personal and professional lives. The aim of this study was to investigate stressful factors contributing to the development of compassion fatigue in nurses, their experiences of compassion fatigue, and the coping strategies they used to cope with compassion fatigue. Methods The convenience sample of 86 nurses from Central Europe was recruited via social networking sites during the pandemic of COVID-19. Data collection was conducted via an online battery of questionnaires which included open-ended questions on the stressful factors, experiences, and coping strategies for compassion fatigue. The data were analysed using a theoretical thematic analysis based on Figley's descriptions of compassion fatigue. The initial data was read several times to identify recurring statements. Each statement was then categorized into the emerging domains, subdomains, categories, and subcategories. Results The results of our study show that stressful factors, experiences, and coping strategies for compassion fatigue in nurses in Central Europe could be related to cognitive, emotional, behavioural, somatic, personal relations, spiritual, and work-related symptoms of compassion fatigue as identified by Figley and that these may resemble experiences of nurses in North America, Japan, and Spain. Conclusion This study provides a detailed overview of the stressful factors, experiences, and coping strategies for compassion fatigue, which could be used to develop an early screening tool and interventions for alleviating compassion fatigue and for preventive adaptation of the health care system.

2.
Collegian ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031217

ABSTRACT

Background : Although rural nurses’ roles are indispensable for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) management, increased roles, workload, burnout, and reduced job satisfaction can hinder their work, potentially affecting nurses’ disaster nursing competencies. Aim : The aim of the study was to identify the predictors of rural nurses’ disaster nursing competencies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods : Nurses from rural community hospitals in South Korea (N=204) were surveyed during June–July 2021. We used the Professional Quality of Life and Disaster Nursing Preparedness-Response Competencies questionnaires. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of disaster nursing competencies. Findings : The mean score for disaster nursing competency of the 204 participants was 110.80 (standard deviation=19.14). Disaster nursing competencies correlated with age, nursing career, compassion satisfaction, and secondary traumatic stress. Compassion satisfaction (β=.27, p=.004), prior disaster nursing education (β=.19, p=.005), and prior participation in disaster nursing care (β=.16, p=.022) predicted disaster nursing competencies, together accounting for 24.2% of the variance. Discussion : Our findings imply that increasing opportunities for continuing education regarding disaster nursing is crucial to enhance the related competencies in rural nurses. This study also highlights the necessity for stakeholders to develop programs aimed at increasing rural nurses’ compassion satisfaction. Conclusion : Prior disaster nursing education, prior participation in disaster nursing care, and compassion satisfaction predicted disaster nursing competencies among rural nurses, with compassion satisfaction being the strongest predictor.

3.
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031123

ABSTRACT

Aim To explore anxiety, sleep quality, and mindfulness of frontline nurses at the initial epicenter of the pandemic, to examine the mediating effects of mindfulness. Background COVID-19 was first identified in Wuhan, China in January 2020. Nurses were at the forefront of care and treatment across hospitals in response to the pandemic. Methods Single site cross-sectional survey conducted in Wuhan province (China) between March and April in 2020. Quantitative analysis of survey data from N118 nurses working in the frontline COVID response. Questionnaires included: The general information questionnaire, the Self-Anxiety Scale, the Short Inventory of Mindfulness, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results Front-line nurses' anxiety was positively associated with sleep quality and mindfulness was negatively associated with anxiety and sleep quality. Mindfulness had a mediating role on anxiety and sleep quality, with intermediary adjustment effects (ES = 0.136, 95 % CI 0.02 to 0.26), accounting for 21.9 % of the total effect ratio. Conclusions Anxiety causes a reduction in sleep quality and mindfulness can help with anxiety. Mindfulness strategies may help during periods of higher anxiety in the workplace;however, other factors must be considered. Further research is required on strategies for assisting nurses during periods of extreme anxiety.

4.
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing ; 41:248-263, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031120

ABSTRACT

Aim This study aimed to investigate the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on nurses' burnout and related factors. Background Nurses at the frontlines in every field of the health system and composed most of the health service industry closely experience all negative events during the pandemic. Methods This study is a rapid systematic review. Results A total of 751 studies were selected, of which 13 studies were compatible with the inclusion criteria. The sample size ranged from 107 to 12.596. The studies determined that nurses' burnout levels were generally moderate level and above during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sociodemographic, occupational, psychological, and COVID-19-related factors affected this burnout. Conclusion The results of this review may use to make implications that would ease the effect of the pandemic on nurses and develop strategies to protect nurses from burnout in similar possible situations. The protocol information is included here for blind peer review. Prospero registration number (ID) CRD42021244849. Registration and protocol Prior to undertaking the review, we registered the protocol in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO). The registration number is CRD42021244849. Available from: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42021244849. The changes made during the review process were registered in PROSPERO with an update.

5.
Nurse Media Journal of Nursing ; 12(2):233-248, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2030373

ABSTRACT

Background: After one year of the pandemic, Indonesia experienced a crisis where the addition of COVID-19 cases increased significantly in several big cities;it made the healthcare system collapse, including the intensive care unit (ICU) service for COVID-19. ICU nurses, who are at the frontline of fighting against COVID-19 and defusing this crisis, are faced with various challenges in providing care for COVID-19 patients, and exploring such challenges are significant. Purpose: This study aimed to explore the challenges experienced by Indonesian nurses who work in the ICU caring for COVID-19 patients. Methods: A multi-centered-qualitative study with a descriptive phenomenological design was used. Twenty nurses working in the ICU of COVID-19 in eight COVID-19 referral hospitals in seven major cities in Indonesia were recruited using purposive sampling. Semi-structured individual video call interviews were conducted to collect the data from July-September 2021. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi’s (1978) method. Results: The nurses reported the challenges throughout caring for COVID-19 patients in ICU, which are described in four major themes: (a) working under pressure and moral distress, (b) choosing to do the best, (c) adaptation, learning, and research, and (e) survive physically and mentally healthy. Conclusion: This study describes the challenges experienced by nurses working in ICUs during the COVID-19 crisis, such as working under pressure, facing dilemmas caring for patients, and trying to survive working in inadequate professional conditions. An in-depth understanding of these challenges in the current pandemic can help managers in the hospital to provide psychological support, adequate training for ICU nurses, and high-quality protocols for upcoming emergency scenarios, as well as maximizing resource management (human and material). Copyright © 2022, NMJN.

6.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(9):516-523, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030111

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: By integrating a social determinants of health (SDOH) perspective into nursing programs, there is potential to reduce health disparities shaped by these forces. However, little is known about the extent to which nursing program curricula include SDOH education. METHOD: This study used course descriptions from 32 nursing programs in the United States to perform a frequency and content analysis on required course offerings. Healthy People 2020 was referenced to determine coding categories. RESULTS: Although 18.5% of courses implicitly referenced SDOH, only 1% made explicit references to SDOH. Implicit references were likely to include themes such as cultural sensitivity and diversity, or social, cultural, economic, and political factors influencing health. CONCLUSION: Although several required nursing course descriptions made implicit references to SDOH, explicit use of the term SDOH is still limited. Faculty, administrators, and program accrediting bodies must push to incorporate SDOH more thoroughly into nursing education. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(9):516-523.].

7.
Journal of Nursing Education ; 61(9):499-501, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030109

ABSTRACT

According to the most recent available data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (2017), the demand for RNs was projected to increase from 2.8 million in 2014 to 3.6 million by 2030 (an increase of 800,000 full-time equivalents between 2014 and 2030). Furthermore, diversity in nursing school faculty plays an important role in advancing new knowledge and fostering inclusive learning environments for nursing schools. Additionally, the AACN reports that within the nation's pool of full-time nurse faculty members in baccalaureate and higher degree programs (n = 22,372), 19.2% identified as belonging to an underrepresented population (AACN, 2022b). When marginalized, it is difficult to acquire tacit knowledge, find support for risk-taking, have the value of your work confirmed, and accumulate social capital—thus, faculty of color have more difficulty achieving success because of the effect of marginalization (Steffen-Fluhr, 2012).

8.
Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem ; 30, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese, Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2029835

ABSTRACT

Objective: to analyze the relationship between the concern and fear of COVID-19 with fatalism in the daily work of nurses. Method: analytical cross-sectional study carried out with a total of 449 nurses. Data collection was performed using instruments validated in Peru. In the analysis, the Shapiro-Wilk test and the Spearman correlation coefficient were used, and two multiple regression models were estimated, with variable selection in stages. Results: nurses had a moderate level of fatalism and a low level of fear and concern about COVID-19. The first statistical model, which included sociodemographic variables, explains only 3% of the fatalism variance. However, a second model that includes fear and perception explains 33% of it. Conclusion: Worry, fear and having been diagnosed with COVID-19 were predictors of fatalism. It is suggested the implementation of psycho-emotional interventions in daily work-aimed at Nursing professionals who present high levels of fear or concern-to reduce fatalism and prevent fatal consequences of the pandemic and promote health. © 2022 Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.

9.
PLoS One ; 17(9), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2029790

ABSTRACT

Introduction Shortages of human resources in radiation emergency medicine (REM) caused by the anxiety and stress of due to working in REM, are a major concern. The present study aimed to quantify stress and identify which tasks involved in REM response are most stressful to help educate (human resource development) and effectively reduce stress in workers. Furthermore, the final goal was to reduce the anxiety and stress of medical personnel in the future, which will lead to sufficient human resources in the field of REM. Methods In total, 74 nurses who attended an REM seminar were asked to answer a questionnaire (subjective) survey and wear a shirt-type electrocardiogram (objective survey). Then, informed consent was obtained from 39 patients included in the analysis. In the objective survey, average stress values of participants for each activity during the seminar were calculated based on heart rate variability (HRV). The average stress value was output as stress on a relative scale of 0–100, based on the model which is the percentile of the low-frequency/high-frequency ratio derived from HRV at any point in time obtained over time. Results A total of 35 (89.7%) participants answered that they had little or no knowledge of nuclear disaster and 33 (84.6%) had more than moderate anxiety. Stress values observed during the decontamination process were significantly higher than those observed when wearing and removing protective gear and during the general medical treatment process (P = 0.001, 0.004, and 0.023, respectively). Stress values did not increase during general medical treatment performed in protective clothing, but increased during the decontamination process, which is the task characteristic of REM. Discussion Stress felt by medical personnel throughout the entire REM response may be effectively reduced by providing careful education/training to reduce stress during the decontamination process. Reducing stress during REM response effectively could contribute to resolving the shortage of human resources in this field.

10.
The Ethiopian Journal of Health Development ; 35(4):328, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2027156

ABSTRACT

Background: The Coronavirus pandemic has resulted in an extreme challenge for humanity in recent times, like the challenges faced during World War II. Its origin has been pointed out, and the speculation made on its source directly points towards Wuhan in China. Since then, it has spread across the globe. The pandemic has resulted in more than one million deaths, which is a considerable challenge for humanity. Objective: With the pandemic of COVID-19, prevention of patient infection is crucial. This research focused on the orthopedic operating room nursing model effect based on evidence-based nursing and PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-act) cycle during the COVID-19 outbreak. Materials and Methods: From February 2020 to May 2020, 146 patients were admitted and received orthopedic surgery at Xuanwu Chunshu Hospital, Beijing, China, these admissions were grouped into control and intervention groups, which was based on the treatment provided. Satisfaction, time to bed and hospitalization, postoperative incision infection, and the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities, pain degree score, surgical treatment effect, anxiety, and depression scores were compared for all the admissions between the control and intervention groups. Results: In the control group, nursing satisfaction was less than in the intervention group. The time of getting out of bed and hospitalization was less in the intervention group;The total incidence of postoperative incision infection and lower limb deep vein thrombosis in the intervention group decreased. In the first postoperative day, the pain level in the intervention group was less than the control group. The effectiveness rate in the observation group is higher than that of the control group. Anxiety and depression scores of both groups tended to decrease with time and there was an interactive effect between grouping and time, where these differences were found to be statistically significant (P-value<0.05). Conclusion: The clinical application of the orthopedics operating room nursing model based on evidence-based nursing and PDCA cycle is remarkable and worth implementing during the COVID-19 outbreak.

11.
Journal of Occupational Health and Epidemiology ; 11(2):121-128, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026846

ABSTRACT

Background: Nursing is a profession through which a set of sometimes difficult tasks is assigned to nurses who face several physical and mental stressors in the workplace. Therefore, this study investigates the nurses' quality of life level in Khorramabad (Iran) during the first 3 months of the COVID-19 epidemic. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was carried out on 361 nurses of Khorramabad teaching hospitals in the first 3 months of the COVID-19 epidemic in 2020. Participants were selected by stratified random sampling of the nursing population. Data were collected using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. The independent t-test and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. SPSS version 22 was used for data analysis, and P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There was a significant association between marital status, having children, spouse employment status, hospital ward, and quality of life of nurses over the time of the COVID-19 outbreak (P <0.05). No significant association was observed between age, gender, education level, work experience, having a second job, and level of quality of life in nurses over the COVID-19 outbreak. Conclusions: Most nurses had a good quality of life;however, the quality of life varied depending on marital status, number of children, spouse employment status, and place of employment in nurses. © The Author(s) 2022.

12.
Journal of Occupational Health and Epidemiology ; 11(2):114-120, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026845

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses' direct exposure to COVID-19 patients and resulting health anxiety can threaten their performance of human and moral duties. Materials and Methods: This work was a descriptive correlational study. The statistical population was all nurses working in the intensive care unit of COVID-19 patients in Ardabil hospitals in the 2021 year, from which 150 people were selected by convenient sampling. Data were collected using the Health Anxiety Inventory, Scale for Existential Thinking, and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficient showed that the association between empathy and health anxiety was negative and significant (r =-0.47, P <0.001), and that between empathy and existential thinking was positive and significant (r = 0.31, P <0.001). Also, the correlation coefficients between health anxiety and existential thinking showed a negative and significant association between the two variables (r =-0.28, P <0.001). In addition, the moderated hierarchical regression analysis showed that the interactive effect of health anxiety and existential thinking on nurses' empathy with patients with COVID-19 was 29%. Conclusion: According to the finding of this study, strengthening the spiritual attitude and existential thinking among the nurses of the COVID-19 ward was necessary to reduce health anxiety and its negative effects on the empathetic comunication with patients. © The Author(s) 2022;All rights reserved. Published by Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences Press.

13.
Healthline, Journal of Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine ; 13(1):90-95, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2026835

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The 2019 Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has been a serious global threat with numerous researches indicating that frontline healthcare personnel involved in its management and diagnosis are at risk of experiencing psychological disturbances and deteriorating mental health. By definition, "burnout is a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed". Burnout has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity.

14.
Malaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences ; 18(4):119-127, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026813

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Compliance with Hand hygiene (HH) has been considered as a simple and the most efficient strategy to reduce hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). Compliance with this practice is not often assessed in Nigeria and thus posed a significant risk to the quality of care and patient safety and especially in this era of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aimed to assess neonatal nurses’ compliance to “my five moments for HH”. Method: A cross-sectional observational study was carried out in a Nigerian federal hospital, using an adapted version of a standardized observational WHO tool of ‘’my five moments of HH’’. A Chi-square test was employed to examine the relationship of HH compliance across units, shifts, and “my five moments for HH” opportunities. Results: The observer recorded 425 HH opportunities and the total HH compliance rate was (62.8%). There was no association between the units, working shifts, and nurses’ HH compliance. Compliance to HH was dependent on the five moments of HH (p < 0.000), better compliance was seen after body fluid exposure (100%), followed by after newborn contact (86.3%), and after contact with newborn surroundings (63.4%), while compliance before newborn contact (28.5%), and before an aseptic procedure (9.1%) were poor. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed a significant gap with the HH compliance among neonatal nurses, suggesting multiple opportunities for neonatal infections despite the current awareness of HH in the Covid-19 pandemic. Hence, there is a need to intensify infection control practices in Nigeria, especially on HH practice. © 2022 UPM Press. All rights reserved.

15.
Acta Paulista De Enfermagem ; 35, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2026728

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Brazilian nurses' life, health and work. Methods: This is research with a qualitative and social-historical approach, guided by the New History framework. The study had 22 participants, with a prevalence of females. Data collection took place in December 2020, through semi-structured interviews, in a virtual environment, using an electronic instrument created in Google Forms and processed via email. The analysis was conducted using the oral history methodology, with data transcription, transcreation and categorization. Results: The pandemic had an impact on the personal, professional and educational dimensions of nurses. In the personal dimension, there were changes in the routine of life, fear of contamination, physical and mental exhaustion. In professional assistance, there was a work overload, shortage of personnel and material, a high number of contaminations and deaths of team members due to COVID-19. In professional training, adaptations to remote learning were necessary. Given the uniqueness and lethality of coronavirus, specialized nursing knowledge was essential in promoting confidence in the reception and care of patients in the community. Conclusion: The study valued Brazilian nurses' narratives about coping with the COVID-19 pandemic and expanded the discussion on labor deficiencies experienced by nurses and their aggravation in the pandemic context. The situation presented is worrisome and demands a critical look from those involved in the health and human care management process, aiming at adequate and safe working conditions for nursing professionals, with protection of workers' health and life.

16.
Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing (Online) ; 39(3):33-44, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026719

ABSTRACT

Nurses can and need to take a leadership role in improving and maintaining older Australians' oral health in community, hospital, and residential care settings. [...]it is important to investigate the perspectives of nursing educators on the preparation of nursing students for the care of older people's oral health. Keywords: aged care, oral health, nursing, older people, nursing curricula, dental care, interprofessional and collaborative practice INTRODUCTION The oral health of many older Australians (65 years and above) remains poor despite an increased understanding of the importance of oral health and its association with general healths 2 Due to blood-borne pathogens from the mouth, oral diseases worsen heart problems, diabetes, and pneumonia, leading to unplanned hospitalisations.3"5 Poor oral health also increases the severity of complications arising from viral infections, including COVID-19.6,7 Predominant oral health issues for older people include tooth decay, gum diseases, dry mouth, tooth wear, and oral cancer.8 Poor oral health leads to oral pain, difficulties in eating, speaking, and swallowing as well as lower self-esteem due to bad breath and poor facial and dental appearance.9 Maintaining oral health - a mouth free of pain, discomfort and disease - is key to maintaining the quality of life and general health of older people.10 In providing oral healthcare, nurses need to understand the factors affecting people's oral health and oral healthrelated quality of life, ensure daily oral care practice, and be able to complete an oral health screening to identify issues needing timely referral to a dentist, doctor, or allied health specialist.11 Oral healthcare for older people has been promoted by Australian government-funded learning resource packages such as "Better Oral Health in Residential Care" and "Better Oral Health in Home Care".12 These resources were developed a decade ago to educate and assist nurses, nursing assistants, and allied health professionals to collaborate with dental professionals to ensure effective oral healthcare for the older population.12 However, the uptake of these learning resource packages appears limited, and the report of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety highlighted the continuing neglect of older people's oral health, particularly in residential care.13 Similar concerns have been raised about the oral healthcare of older people in hospitals in Australia.14 As people age, many become frail and require assistance with oral care. The importance of nurses in providing oral healthcare has been acknowledged in international reports and studies.15-18 Restrictions to dental services during the COVID -19 pandemic have highlighted the need for the leadership of nurses in oral healthcare, working closely with dentists, doctors, and allied health professionals to maintain older adults' oral and general health.19 Nursing curricula need to specify the knowledge and clinical competence requirements for the effective provision of oral healthcare to ensure that all graduating students are well-prepared to provide such care.11 Despite the acknowledged association between poor oral health and general health, 13, 20-22 there is little known about the extent of the preparation of nursing students in Australia to provide oral healthcare for older people.11 A review of the curricula of Australian Bachelor of Nursing programs, as presented on university websites, by the first author (VB) showed no information regarding the inclusion of units and clinical practice addressing the care of older people's oral health. Competence in oral healthcare may be implied in current Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC) Standards (Standard 3.6 does require nursing programs to integrate principles of interprofessional learning and practice in content and learning outcomes) but there is no particular focus on oral healthcare learning objectives.23 To address this apparent lack of focus on oral healthcare, this study aimed to assess the perceptions of nursing educators regarding the preparation of nursing students to understand and provide effective oral healthcare, particularly for older people.

17.
Health Science Journal ; 16(8):1-4, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026686

ABSTRACT

Patients with lung failure could be always easily identified because associated to typical signs and symptoms have anamnestic relevant data (e.g. immunocompromised patients or antivax people or non-responders to vaccines);yet also patients without recent clinical findings of lung failure may be found with interstitial pneumonia that should be investigated with a thorough differential diagnosis including also the research of SARS CoV2 on nasopharyngeal swab or bronchoalveolar lavage. Immunological tests as immunoglobulin's toward SARS CoV2 IG M or IG G have a positive clinical impact only if symptoms are longer than 5-6 days and in non-vaccinated people (in particular IG G). [...]in patients with high suspect of COVID-19radiological imaging of lung is always needed because the specific tropism of SARS CoV2 for respiratory system, in particular for the action of viral spike protein and its link with ACE2 protein present in high concentration on the surface of cells of respiratory tract. [...]these patients may induce clinical misunderstanding in daily clinical practice: they may refer a specific symptoms escaping each type of triage system, they may have a reduced or absent viral load so escaping real Time PCR at NPS and they may show not-extended interstitial pneumonia without recent infection and/or lung failure so inducing all of us to consider a thorough differential diagnosis with other causes of interstitial pneumonia. [...]after the exclusion of connettivitiis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, systemic erythematous lupus and so) [30] and hypersensitivity pneumonitis (e.g. drug intolerance, allergy and so on) [31, 32], an evaluation of infective causes should be performed and it should include the microbiological test to identify bacteria, pests or viruses (e.g. mycoplasma, legionellaspp, pneumocystis, influenza virus) [33, 34] and to include also the research of SARS CoV2 with NPS or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) with real time PCR (Table 1).

18.
Journal of Caring Science ; 11(3):154-162, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2026625

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Clinical decision-making related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new experience;thus, there is a lack in knowledge in this area. The aim of this study is to explore critical care nurses' experience of intuitive decision-making in patients diagnosed with COVID-19. Methods: In this qualitative descriptive study, 16 nurses who had the experience of providing care for patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were selected through purposive sampling and participated in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were transcribed and finally analyzed through the conventional content analysis approach. Results: 62.5% of participants were females and the mean (SD) of the participant's age and working experience were 36.56 (6.58) and 12.62 (5.59) years, respectively. Three main themes emerged out of the experiences of the nurses, including (a) inner revolution, (b) holistic awareness and (c) clinical wisdom. Conclusion: Critical care nurses use intuition in novel, complex situations where they often have to make quick and independent decisions. Understanding the phenomenon of intuition in clinical decision making increases the professional practice of nursing and leads to better quality care for patients, especially in acute, critical situations and pandemic diseases. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Caring Science is the property of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

19.
Revista Cientifica Da Faculdade De Educacao E Meio Ambiente ; 13(2):1-10, 2022.
Article in Portuguese | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2026501

ABSTRACT

To ensure periodic prenatal follow-up in a safe manner, health professionals and especially nurses, have been adopting strategic safety measures to face the challenges in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, the present study aims to describe strategic actions adopted by nurses, to ensure the performance of periodic prenatal care in a safe manner, as well as to welcome pregnant women in this difficult time. Materials and Methods: This is an integrative review, whose data sources used were, LILACS;Scielo;VHL;PubMed and Google Scholar. Results: There was an increase in the prevalence of gestational diabetes around 25.6% in pregnant women hospitalized and symptomatic for COVID-19. There was also an increase in the rate of premature births;and stillbirth cases occurred around four times more in pregnant women who had SARS-CoV-2. It is also worth mentioning that SARS-COV-2 can progress between phases I, II and III, ranging from mild to more severe symptoms, and pregnant women who progress to assistance in the intensive care unit have a high mortality rate. Conclusion: Among the strategies that stood out: the reorganization of the service flow of the units;holding teleconsultations and postponing face-to-face consultations with symptomatic pregnant women, also reinforced the importance of the professional nurse in the practice of skillful listening. Thus, for the future it is expected that lessons are learned, where the experiences lived by the population and health professionals, result in improvement of maternal-fetal health, with access and quality of assistance superior to those found before the pandemic.

20.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 7(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026485

ABSTRACT

In the age of digitization, telemedicine services are utilized more than ever, and this trend affects healthcare as well. Although the utilization of technology serves as a benefit in allowing more access to care, COVID-19 has identified some of the weaknesses and discrepancies of the system. The increase in usage of technology has shed light on and increased the severity of the gaps in the regulatory and legal infrastructure overseeing this rapid growth. We aim to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the telemedicine healthcare system, as well as address the frequent misconduct that occurs between patients and their nurses, pharmacists, and physician assistants, in order to highlight the necessity of a standardized method of reporting misconduct on an international, national, state, county, and local level. Our findings should alert the healthcare community of the growing urgency to address the policy and regulatory aspects of telemedicine to provide greater quality and safety during the post-COVID era.

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