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1.
Geriatr Nurs ; 48: 32-36, 2022 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004092

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify factors related to turnover intent among direct care professionals in nursing homes during the pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with surveys administered via an employee management system to 809 direct care professionals (aides working in nursing homes). Single items assessed COVID-19-related work stress, preparedness to care for residents during COVID-19, job satisfaction, and intent to remain in job. A two-item scale assessed quality of organizational communication. RESULTS: Path analysis demonstrated that only higher job satisfaction was associated with a higher likelihood of intent to remain in job. Higher quality of employer communication and greater preparedness were also associated with higher job satisfaction, but not with intent to remain. Higher quality communication and greater preparedness mediated the negative impact of COVID-19-related work stress on job satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Provision of high-quality communication and training are essential for increasing job satisfaction and thus lessening turnover intent in nursing homes.

2.
Int J Older People Nurs ; : e12498, 2022 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: NHs have been severely exposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Little is known about how staff who provide practical daily care of older residents experienced work during the pandemic. The aim of this study was to understand how nursing assistants (NAs) experienced their work at nursing homes (NHs) for older people during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study of focus group discussions with in total 20 participants from four NHs in Stockholm, Sweden. Discussions were held in November 2020. Transcripts were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: We identified three major themes: 1) We felt abandoned, scared and disrespected, 2) We made sure we made it through, and 3) We can do good work with appropriate resources. NAs felt disregarded as they were often left alone without adequate support from managers, registered nurses and the municipalities. NAs felt distressed and guilty and developed their own strategies to cope and manage their work. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic NAs felt abandoned and burdened due to lack of leadership. Organizational improvements are required to protect the wellbeing of NAs and to ensure sustainability of patient safety. NAs are crucial in the care for vulnerable older people and their experiences should constitute a keystone for development of future policy and practice in NHs.

3.
Primary Health Care ; 32(4):30-35, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1988444

ABSTRACT

Why you should read this article: • To understand some of the benefits that the nursing associate role can bring to community and primary care nursing teams • To be aware of the challenges involved in training and embedding nursing associates in community and primary care settings • To recognise the need for clarity on the boundaries and expectations of the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings Nursing associates have been part of the health and social care workforce in England since 2017 and are starting to contribute to managing workforce challenges. However, little is known about the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings. This article provides an overview of what is known about the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings and introduces some emerging findings from recent research. The article identifies some of the benefits that nursing associates can bring to community and primary care nursing teams and some of the challenges involved in training and embedding nursing associates in these sectors of the health and social care workforce.

4.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; 36(10):58, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1841683

ABSTRACT

The government’s regulations on mandatory vaccination in care homes will take effect in all care homes in England on 11 November.

5.
J Clin Med ; 11(9)2022 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820311

ABSTRACT

Healthcare professionals who work in front-line situations are among those under the highest risk of presenting negative mental health indicators. We sought to assess the prevalence of low personal realization, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as well as probable non-psychotic psychiatric pathologies during the pandemic in nursing assistants in the city of Huelva (Spain), and to study the association between these mental health indicators and sociodemographic and professional variables. A cross-sectional descriptive investigation with a quantitative approach was used. A representative sample of these professionals, consisting of 29 men and 284 women, completed the GHQ-12 questionnaire, including sociodemographic data and the MBI-HSS questionnaire, collecting information on situations of contact with SARS-CoV-2. Data analysis was conducted, and correlations were established. We found that emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and probable non-psychotic, psychiatric pathologies were related to contact with SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, personal realization, depersonalization and emotional exhaustion were related to just gender. We conclude that nursing assistants from public hospitals in the city of Huelva who had contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2 in the workplace, showed poor mental health indicators than those who did not come into contact with infected individuals.

6.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(3-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1717404

ABSTRACT

Formal and informal caregivers experience both negative and positive aspects of caregiving, such as burnout and compassion satisfaction. However, the existing literature primarily focuses on the experiences of family caregivers and nurses, but neglects nursing assistants. This study examined the relationships among personality, burnout, compassion satisfaction, work engagement, and job satisfaction in a sample of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) employed in healthcare settings. Additionally, this study compared CNA data collected prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants completed self-report surveys measuring burnout, compassion satisfaction, personality factors, work engagement, job satisfaction, intent to quit, and demographics. Results indicated significant positive relationships between compassion satisfaction and agreeableness and extraversion, as well as between burnout and neuroticism. Significant negative relationships were found between burnout and agreeableness and extraversion, as well as between compassion satisfaction and neuroticism. Work engagement and job satisfaction were not found to moderate these relationships. CNAs who participated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic reported lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction compared to CNAs who participated during the pandemic. However, there were no differences in job satisfaction or intent to quit. The current study provided novel information about CNA personality, burnout, compassion satisfaction, and levels of job satisfaction and work engagement. The findings may be useful in developing interventions for CNAs to bolster compassion satisfaction and decrease burnout to potentially reduce turnover rates. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Caring for the Ages ; 23(1):7-7, 2022.
Article in English | Cin20 | ID: covidwho-1649425
8.
J Nurs Scholarsh ; 54(4): 513-528, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583494

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To estimate the worldwide pooled prevalence of inadequate work ability among hospital nursing personnel using the Work Ability Index (WAI). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted on Medline/PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Scielo, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Nursing and Allied Health, LILACS, and Google Scholar from inception to July 2021 to identify observational studies on work ability among hospital nursing personnel using the WAI. Two researchers independently completed the study selection, quality assessments, and data extraction on the prevalence of inadequate work ability that was pooled using the random effects model. Finally, subgroup analyses were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. FINDINGS: A total of 42 studies were included, consisting of 24,728 subjects worldwide from 14 countries. Of these, 35 studies were included in the meta-analytical analyses. The worldwide pooled prevalence of inadequate work ability among hospital nursing personnel was 24.7% (95% CI = 20.2%-29.4%). High levels of heterogeneity were detected in all studies. Prevalence was higher in studies where samples were composed of nurses and nursing assistive personnel (26.8%; 95% CI = 22.4%-31.5%) than in those of nurses alone (22.2%; 95% CI = 13.1%-32.9%) and in studies where the sample was over 40 (28.1%; 95% CI = 19.5%-37.5%) than in those with a sample under that age (22.4%; 95% CI = 15.8%-29.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Almost one in four members of hospital nursing staff in the world has inadequate work ability and therefore are at risk of several negative outcomes during their working life. These prevalence data correspond to the pre-pandemic period, so new studies should also be especially useful in quantifying the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on work ability in the hospital nursing workforce. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The above findings justify the launch of initiatives that include annual assessment for the early identification of inadequate work ability, offering the possibility of anticipated corrective measures. Nursing workforce older than 40 years and those belonging to the professional category of nursing assistive personnel should be priority target groups for screening and intervention to improve work ability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Work Capacity Evaluation
9.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 70(2): 512-521, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To describe the growth and characteristics of the direct care health workforce, encompassing home health aides, personal care aides, nursing assistants, and orderlies and psychiatric aides from 2010 to 2019 in the United States. METHODS: Using nationally representative data from the 2010 to 2019 American Community Survey, we described the growth in the direct care health workforce overall and by type of direct care health worker. In addition, we examined the distribution of direct care workers by geographic region of the country, age categories, citizenship, world area of birth, income, health insurance status, and other characteristics. RESULTS: From 2010 to 2019, the number of direct care health workers in the United States per 10,000 individuals decreased slightly from 135.81 in 2010 to 133.78 in 2019. Personal care aides made up 42.1% of the direct care health workforce in 2019, followed by nursing assistants (39.5%) and home health aides (16.3%). In 2019, the number of direct care health workers who were not U.S. citizens accounted for roughly 10% of all workers in each year. The relative percentage of direct care health workers that were not a citizen of the United States was highest among home health aides (16.3%). Among workers born outside of the United States, the majority were from Latin America, followed by Asia. CONCLUSION: From 2010 to 2019, there was little growth in the direct care health workforce despite growing demand for direct care health workers. In the midst of the current and projected shortage of direct care health workers-particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, longer-term solutions to improve retention of direct care health workers and increase the supply of direct care health workers may be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Adult , Female , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/trends , Home Health Aides/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Long-Term Care , Male , Nursing Assistants/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Aides/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
10.
Geriatr Nurs ; 42(6): 1556-1561, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466355

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to examine the challenges and needs of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) working in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic in the greater New York City area. Between September and November of 2020, a telephone survey was administered to and completed by 208 CNAs in the study area about various aspects of their working experience during COVID-19. CNAs reported significant exposure to COVID-19 and experienced additional emotional and financial strain due to the pandemic. CNAs also expressed the influence of COVID-19 on their work schedules and intent to continue working as CNAs, and strong interest in financial support and further training. This study offers empirical insights into the experiences of CNAs working in nursing homes during the pandemic, which are of unique value to inform future efforts to support CNAs and other long-term care providers in general and during public health emergencies in New York and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Assistants , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Appl Gerontol ; 41(1): 235-244, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999440

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To access associations between job satisfaction and supervisory support as moderated by stress. METHODS: For this cross-sectional study, data collected from 591 nursing assistants in 42 nursing homes in Canada and Spain were analyzed with mixed-effects regression. RESULTS: In both countries, stress related to residents' behaviors was negatively associated with job satisfaction, and, in Canada, it moderated the positive association between supervisory support and job satisfaction. Stress related to family conflict issues moderated the positive association of supervisory support and job satisfaction differently in each location: in Canada, greater stress was associated with a weaker association between supervisory support and job satisfaction; in Spain, this was also observed but only when supervisory support was sufficiently weak. DISCUSSION: Stress was associated with lower job satisfaction and moderated the association of supervisory support and job satisfaction, reinforcing the importance of supervisors supporting nursing assistants, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Job Satisfaction , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
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