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1.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 77(Supplement 4):83, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2147568

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic declared in March 2020 has disrupted education at all levels, forcing it to switch to online learning. Prompt actions were taken by the Faculty of Medicine, UniKL RCMP, to change the physical classroom teaching to online learning in ensuring that medical and nursing education can be carried out during the pandemic and students were able to graduate on time. Objective(s): To explore the final year of graduating Nursing students' experiences in online learning and the effects of the pandemic on their education. Material(s) and Method(s): A total of 52 students from the graduating cohort of January Semester 2022 were invited to provide feedback on the Nursing education conducted in the 'new normal' after they have sat for the Malaysian Nursing Board Examination. Evaluation forms were given and explained to students, areas evaluated include factors that support or hinder online learning, their experiences, and effects on their education. A total of 47 completed evaluation forms were received. Result(s) and Conclusion(s): Over 95% of students perceived online learning as less effective and preferred to learn in the conventional method of face-to-face classes. The impact of the pandemic has caused multiple stressors in lives including financial concerns, lack of family and peer support, feeling alone and isolated, role confusion, and conflicts between home and college environments when studying online. They have difficulty understanding the diseases' pathophysiology and nursing management when learning in the virtual environment, which leads to a loss of interest or failure to stay focused in their study. Technical challenges, intermittent or poor internet connectivity, lack of student engagement, and camera usage remains the main limitations of online learning. Nursing education was interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The evaluation showed some negative impacts of online learning among the students who preferred to learn in traditional face-to-face classes. However, students' and lecturers' experiences, their readiness for online teaching and learning, their effectiveness, technical support, and resources needed in this new learning platform need further evaluation.

2.
J Nurs Manag ; 2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052810

ABSTRACT

AIM: We aim to investigate the interplay between moral distress and moral injury among nurses working in palliative and oncology wards and to assess its impact on nursing leadership. BACKGROUND: The past 2 years have been particularly challenging for nurses and nursing leaders in Croatia. The coronavirus disease pandemic and the subsequent earthquakes in the country significantly impacted the work of nurses. Moral distress has been well-known to nursing professionals, but recent studies warn about cofounding it with moral injury and their possible intercorrelation, deserving more attention from an empirical perspective. METHODS: We conducted quantitative cross-sectional research in palliative and oncology wards in 11 Croatian health care facilities on 162 nurses, using a questionnaire and paper/pencil method over 6 months (1 January 2021 to 1 July 2021). The questionnaire consisted of three parts: sociodemographic data, a Measure of moral distress for health care professionals and Moral injury symptoms scale for health care professionals. The research protocol was approved by the Ethics committee of the Catholic University of Croatia under no. 1-21-04. RESULTS: The findings of our study demonstrated that the current average levels of moral distress might be characterized as low, but the moral injury symptoms are severe. The results of our study bring interesting novel insights, such as the strong correlation between moral distress and moral injury, but also in terms of nurses' decision to leave or consider leaving their position. The nurses who experience higher levels of moral distress experience severe symptoms of moral injury, while nurses who score higher in moral distress and moral injury have left, considered or consider leaving their positions. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlighted the need to pay attention to the emerging phenomenon of moral injury that has been unaddressed and overshadowed by moral distress, their intercorrelation, and the importance of addressing them timely and adequately within health care organizations with their leadership and management. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: These findings provide a significant insight that may assist nursing managers and leaders to act and respond in time to develop various prevention and mitigation measures and help resolve situations leading to moral distress or moral injury.

3.
Journal of Thoracic Oncology ; 17(9):S499, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031529

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The International Thoracic Oncology Nursing Forum (ITONF) is an international lung cancer nursing organization with a mission to educate nurses around the world about caring for patients with thoracic cancers. The mission of ITONF is accomplished through educational workshops, online educational modules and networking opportunities. Methods: During 2020-2021 ITONF had been collaborating with the Mersal Cancer Center in Egypt to provide an educational program to educate Egyptian oncology nurses on the latest treatments in thoracic cancers as well as nursing management strategies. This was based on a regional need’s assessment. Due to the COVID pandemic, as well as practical needs, a hybrid delivery was required. ITONF developed 5 learning modules to meet identified needs. Educational modules with detailed slides were pre-recorded and presented to the Egyptian nurses during an educational conference. Results: A total of 18 Egyptian nurses and social workers attended the conference. Participants viewed the 5 educational modules, each covering a different topic about lung cancer. On the final day of the conference, 3 ITONF presenters joined the conference via Zoom for a live question and answer session. One Egyptian nurse was present to translate questions and facilitate an interactive discussion. During the question and answer session, expert international thoracic oncology nurses from the United States and Australia were able to provide valuable nursing education and answer questions. The Egyptian nurses submitted feedback after the completion of the conference with positive results and constructive feedback. Also, several nurses joined the ITONF organization and have since attended ITONF virtual webinars. Conclusions: ITONF serves as a unified source of international thoracic oncology nurses eager to provide education to any country or organization using a robust educational program. The collaboration with the Mersal Cancer Center in Egypt was the first customized educational program to fit the needs of the Egyptian nurses. During the pandemic, when in person educational opportunities were limited, ITONF collaborated internationally to meet the needs of thoracic oncology nurses. Based on the positive feedback, ITONF feels that this effort can be replicated for other countries and cancer centers. A hybrid educational model of live meetings, recordings, and live-streaming education is a practical model for international oncology nursing education. [Formula presented] Keywords: ITONF, Mersal Cancer Center, Collaboration

4.
Jpn J Nurs Sci ; : e12507, 2022 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968154

ABSTRACT

AIM: Temporary lodging facilities which were non-medical facilities were established to secure beds for severely and moderately ill patients with COVID-19, as well as for isolation, non-contact observation, and care of mildly ill and asymptomatic patients in Japan. This study aims to understand nursing management practices adopted in these facilities by examining cases of their establishment and operation. METHODS: A multiple-case study design was used. Interviews for qualitative data collection were conducted from August to October 2020. After analyzing the nursing management practices in four temporary lodging facilities, common points were collated and integrated. RESULTS: For the establishment and operation of temporary lodging facilities, a three-layer structure based on disaster management methods was adopted: headquarters at the helm as overseers, field supervisors in the middle, and frontline nursing staff at the base. The structure had clear roles, facilitated information exchange, and provided efficient and effective nursing care. Field supervisors mainly provided psychological and clinical support for staff and served as information and interprofessional hubs. CONCLUSION: It is recommended that temporary lodging facilities should be organized based on principles of the division of labor. The workforce should comprise nursing staff, and experienced nursing professionals should be recruited to the higher echelons.

5.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 37(SUPPL 3):i394, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Management of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis has been challenging during the COVID19 epidemic. Staff illness led to a shortage of manpower that affected patient care. We established a specialty nursing management for mineral and bone disease (MBD) in the ambulatory dialysis service in Qatar in 2016. We are presenting a retrospective study about the effects of the COVID-19 epidemic on MBD outcomes in ambulatory dialysis patients in the State of Qatar. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study in all adult patients with ESRD on chronic hemodialysis therapy (>1 month) in ambulatory dialysis clinics in the State of Qatar. Data collected were patient's characteristics, laboratory and diagnostic investigations for each patient through our electronic data system (nationwide). We focused on parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium and phosphorus levels done routinely on monthly basis. The study duration was 31 months (January 2019-September 2021). RESULTS: We included 623 patients. Age was 56 ± 11 years old and 61% were male. The main comorbidities were diabetes mellitus (63%), hypertension (92%) and cardiovascular disease (22%). The percentage of patients with PTH levels within targets ranged from 63 to 74%. It was stable before and during the first wave of COVID-19 in Qatar (March-June 2020) then dropped afterward briefly for 3 months (October-December 2020) (74% versus 63% respectively P = 0.0003). PTH level in target improved afterward and also during the second wave of COVID-19 (February- May 2021) but then dropped again for 3 months (July-September 2021) [72% versus 66% respectively P = 0.02 (graph below with details)]. Patients with phosphorus and calcium in the target were mostly stable [79% (77-83%) and 76% (74-79%), respectively]. CONCLUSION: Our retrospective study regarding the effect of the COVID-19 epidemic on MBD outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) showed a temporary drop in PTH level in the target without affecting calcium and phosphorus targets. The delayed drop after COVID-19 waves in PTH in target could be related to the routine quarterly measurement of PTH. We think that establishing a solid management system for MBD led to reasonably stable outcomes despite all challenges during the COVID-19 epidemic. (Figure Presented).

6.
Fertility and Sterility ; 116(3 SUPPL):e31, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880904

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The WHO declared a global pandemic on 11th March 2020 for Coronavirus (COVID-19). During this time, fertility clinics around the world had to adapt very quickly in order to care for patients in a changing landscape with many clinics reducing or halting in-person clinical care during national lockdowns. This provided a unique opportunity for fertility nurses to increase engagement with patients via digital approaches. The purpose of this study was to examine the shift in fertility nursing clinical care pathways from face to face to virtual including the use of electronic patient information/ education delivery, electronic consenting platforms, and telehealth visits. understand the experience of fertility nursing care during the pandemic from a cohort of nursing professionals based in the UK and US. MATERIALSANDMETHODS: Baseline data was collected from the EngagedMD electronic patient information and consenting platform taken (March 2019 to March 2020), and then during the first year of the pandemic (March 11th 2020 [the declaration from the WHO] to April 11th 2021), and via a survey about virtual patient engagement conducted via interviews with nursing staff currently based in fertility clinics in both the US and UK. Descriptive statistics were analysed for all the data. RESULTS: There was an increase from baseline of 105.32% in the use of electronic consent forms during the pandemic, an increase of 60.016% of patients who had been educated with electronic patient information modules and an increase of 102.33% of fertility nurses implementing an electronic consenting or electronic patient education tool into their clinical patient pathway. All respondents (n=28) reported that the use of electronic consenting, electronic patient information and telehealth services changed the way in which they care for fertility patients. 62% (n=17) reported that as a direct result of implementing virtual care pathways, they had saved nursing time. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence collected from both data sources shows that there has been a significant shift in the way that fertility nurses are caring for their patients during the pandemic. There has been a change in the way that fertility nurses provide patient care due to the need to adapt during this global pandemic. The use of electronic and virtual platforms to educate, consult and consent fertility patients has increased at a much higher level than previous years. The results suggest that the role of the fertility nurse practitioner has changed to include the implementation of virtual care pathways and that care may continue to be provided this way in the future. IMPACT STATEMENT: Patient care can be delivered at a high level in a virtual way and the use of electronic platforms should be considered to save nursing administration time and to provide patients with better access to resources and information.

7.
Tianjin Journal of Nursing ; 30(2):182-185, 2022.
Article in Chinese | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1834997
8.
Int J Nurs Sci ; 7(2): 143-147, 2020 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796684

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This article summarizes the experience in the prevention and control of coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) epidemic in non-isolated areas in a general hospital. METHODS: Based on refined management theory, we professionally developed the standards for prevention and control of COVID-19 in non-isolated areas, systematically implemented various prevention and control measures, performed gridding audits, effectively communicated among teams and between medical staff and patients assisted by information techniques, and reported results for quality improvement. RESULTS: There was no hospital-acquired COVID-19 infections among staff in the hospital. The rates of mask-wearing, epidemiological history screening, and the medical supplies disinfection were all 100% in the hospital. The accuracy rate of mask-wearing of patients and their families was 73.79% and the compliance rate of their hand hygiene was 40.78%. CONCLUSION: Refined management strategies for the prevention and control of COVID-19 infection in non-isolated areas of the general hospital are effective. The accuracy rate of mask-wearing and hand hygiene compliance of patients and their families need to be further improved.

9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785666

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to develop an educational program to strengthen the nursing management competency of experienced nurses who are prospective nurse managers and then determine the effectiveness of the program. This quasi-experimental study was conducted from January to April 2021. A total of 22 nurses were assigned to the experiment group (mean age: 26.55 ± 1.30 years; 2 males, 20 females), and 20 were assigned to the control group (mean age: 27.55 ± 2.04 years; 20 females). The program, known as the "High-Up" program, comprised problem-based learning (PBL) and video lectures. In the experiment group, nurses discussed PBL cases through video conferences and applied problem-solving methods. The collected data were analyzed using the Friedman test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test (administered through SPSS). At four weeks after the intervention, the experiment group showed higher critical thinking tendency scores than the control group (pre-intervention score: 3.48 ± 0.36; post-intervention score: 3.71 ± 0.49; Z = -1.99, p = 0.046). The findings indicate that the "High-Up" program can enhance the nurse management competency of experienced nurses who need to prepare for nurse manager roles, and that it can also positively influence the performance of nursing organizations. However, it can be difficult to comprehensively enhance nursing management competency in a short period of time, meaning continuous education is required.


Subject(s)
Problem-Based Learning , Thinking , Adult , Clinical Competence , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Nurse's Role , Program Evaluation , Prospective Studies
10.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1136-1146, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there were difficulties in planning the nursing workforce and personal protective equipment. AIM: The purpose of this study was to identify the experiences and views of nurses on personal protective equipment use and nursing workforce planning in Turkey. METHODS: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted between 23 December 2020 and 3 May 2021, among 362 nurses who agreed to participate in this study voluntarily. RESULTS: The findings showed that the satisfaction scores were significantly higher for those nurses who worked in 8-h shifts, were not assigned to different clinics, were notified by an official letter and 1 week or month in advance before assignment compared with nurses in other categories. CONCLUSIONS: The problems that have arisen in the COVID-19 pandemic process have made it clear that there is a need for a nursing services management model in the event of an epidemic. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: This study reveals the need for the 'Nursing Services Management Model in the Event of an Epidemic' by discussing the problems of nurse workforce planning and protective personal equipment management from the perspective of nurses who experienced these problems at first hand.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Turkey/epidemiology
11.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S307-S308, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746581

ABSTRACT

Background. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused great burdens on emergency room (ER) and front-line ER healthcare personnel faced with great challenges, including threats to their safety. This study aimed to provide a basis for additional workload of ER nurses who are charged with providing care for COVID-19 confirmed or suspicious cases. Methods. With institutional review board approval, we recruited ER nurses who were assigned to COVID-19 isolation zone with more than 6 months' ER work experience. After their demographic information were collected through a questionnaire, their nursing practices and practice time during their 1 shift (day or evening) were recorded by one researcher using a stopwatch and an observation form. For each observation shift, unit-related information was collected, including the numbers of hospitalized patients, admission, discharge, and transfer of patients. For each nursing practice, frequency and total time spent were analyzed using descriptive statistics with SPSS 26.0 program. Results. From January 4 to February 22, 2021, a total 18 nurses (27.4 years old on average with 25.2 months of ER experience) were observed from 20 different shifts. During the observation period, the average number of nurses' working hours was 8.27 ± 0.39 hours. A total of 6,567 tasks were monitored with 337,703 seconds (93.81 hours) of the total time spent. Infection control practices were most frequent (33.88%) followed by nursing management (27.80%), assessment and observation (11.07%), medication (10.35%), pre and post examination care(4.86%), education (4.37%), communication (4.10%), safety care (1.10%), and others (0.03;Table 1). Nursing management (e.g., nursing recording) was most time-consuming (49.29%) followed by assessment and observation (15.03%), medication (12.94%), patient education (6.10%), infection control (5.30%), and safety care (1.64%). Conclusion. This study showed that infection control practices were most frequent while time spent was relatively insignificant among ER nurses in charge of COVID-19 isolation zones. Further studies for more observations or with different study designs at other ER settings are necessary to understand nurse's burdens with COVID-19 emergency care.

12.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(4): 926-935, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745879

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to explore the current evidence on business acumen of nurse leaders. BACKGROUND: Health systems across the world are under immense pressure to stay solvent, maintaining services within a defined budget as we recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. Effective nurse leaders not only need to have strong leadership and management skills but also strong business acumen to navigate the complexity of the system. EVALUATION: A scoping review of research was undertaken, using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) scoping extension checklist, with 571 studies found across multiple databases, 17 meeting final review eligibility. KEY ISSUES: Findings were noted surrounding three themes: the value of business acumen in nursing, the gaining of business acumen in health care as a nursing leader and the utilizing business acumen as a nurse leader in the health care industry. CONCLUSION: While nursing leadership and management were well researched, limited studies covered the specific focus of business acumen in health care for nurses or broader clinicians. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: While evidence points towards business acumen being important for health care leaders in balancing care and cost, inadequate research limits the recognition of these professional capabilities of nurse leaders. Further understanding could inform future policy and curriculum, as well as empower our next generation of clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Leadership
13.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(4): 872-882, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731200

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the COVID-19 pandemic as it was experienced by people on the front line in residential care settings for older people in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic had a disproportionate effect in residential care settings for older people in Ireland. METHODS: A two-phased mixed methods study was conducted, consisting of an online survey administered shortly after the first wave of the virus to staff, residents and family members and one-to-one interviews with family members shortly after wave 2 of the virus. RESULTS: Isolation, loss of connectedness as well as a reduction in the level/quality of care provision led to significant adverse impacts for both residents and their families. Staff reported high levels of stress, trauma and burnout. Family input to care was suspended, with adverse consequences. CONCLUSION: The pandemic had an extremely adverse impact on residents, family members and staff in care settings for older people. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Strategies to ensure that residents' physical, emotional and social needs and staffs' professional and personal needs are appropriately supported during future waves of the pandemic should now be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Family , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Blood ; 138:3022, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582292

ABSTRACT

Introduction In the Viterbo province (3612 Km 2 divided into 60 municipalities) is operative a Domiciliary Hematologic Care Unit (DHCU) for clinical assistance to frail patients (pts) with hemopathies: DHCU nursing activity is done by 4 units who were employed during Covid-19 pandemia to avoid as possible risks of viral contagium due to hospital admissions of our pts. Aims To evaluate the entity and type of nursing management for frail pts followed by DHCU during the first year of Covid-19 pandemia. Methods All nursing activities from 3/2020 to 3/2021 in the lockdown framework were analysed. On the whole, 107 pts in 43 municipalities of Viterbo province were followed by DHCU nurses in the study period. Results Main features of the pts at baseline of domiciliary assistance are reported in the Table. At beginning of the study period (08/03/2020), 37 pts (34.5%) were already followed by DHCU, while 70 pts (65.5%) entered domiciliary assistance during the year of study. Median distance from DHCU central site to pts house was 25 Km [Interquartile range (IQR) 16 - 34]: distance from DHCU was < 20 Km in 32 cases (29.9%), ≥ 20 < 40 Km in 57 (53.2%) and ≥ 40 Km in 18 (16.9%). A total number of 2609 nursing accesses was done in the whole period. According to different procedures, 1152 blood samples were performed, with a median number of 7 (IQR 3 - 15) for each pts: in addition, there were 1040 accesses for chemotherapy (CHT) administration (108 cycles of azacytidine in 15 pts, 87 bortezomib-based cycles in 30 pts, 16 administrations of other CHTs in 2 pts) and 417 accesses for other procedures (260 venous catheter medications, 125 therapy other than CHT, 32 nursing assistances of transfusions or marrow aspirates). Finally, 20 pts were vaccinated at home with respective caregivers. During the entire study period, 2 pts (1.8%) developed Covid-19 infection while in home care. At the last follow-up (31/03/2021), 59 pts (55.1%) were alive and still followed by DHCU, 20 pts (18.6%) were alive and returned to sDay-Hospital (DH) setting due to improvement of clinical conditions and 28 pts (26.3%) died while in domiciliary assistance. Conclusions Domiciliary nurse assistance during Covid-19 pandemia allowed to follow in a safer way compared to standard DH/ordinary admission settings > 100 frail pts with hemopathies, most of them in 1 st or subsequent active lines of therapy, in a wide geographic area. In our opinion, this approach should represent the best type of assistance for a high rate of hematologic pts even beyond Covid-19 period of pandemia. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Stagno: Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Support for attending meetings and/or travel, Research Funding;Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Support for attending meetings and/or travel;InCyte: Consultancy, Honoraria. Latagliata: BMS Cellgene: Honoraria;Pfizer: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria.

15.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(8)2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341670

ABSTRACT

The research aim was to evaluate the rationale of undergraduate final-year student nurses to undertake paid clinical placements during COVID-19 (Wave 1). The nursing profession reacted innovatively to meet demands placed on the National Health Service during COVID-19. Temporary changes to professional regulation enabled final-year United Kingdom nursing students to voluntarily undertake paid placements in the National Health Service. Neither full-time employees nor full-time students, volunteers undertook a unique hybrid role bolstering the front-line health workforce. Using reflective qualitative inquiry, 17 volunteers evaluated reasoning for entering practice in acute hospitals. Online surveys based around the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council Competency Framework (NMC 2012) were completed weekly for 6 weeks. Data were thematically analysed. Six themes were identified, including sense of duty, and opting-in or out. These highlighted the importance of collaboration and the tripartite relationship between University, host and student during placement, and the influence of these on the learning experience. Several significant insights emerged for nurse education and curricula during pandemics related to patient safety, safety climate and governance. The insights were used to develop a "Student Nurses Placement Framework" with recommendations for Pre-During-Post placement, offering a guide for future nursing workforce recruitment and retention.

16.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(8): 2542-2556, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295084

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to construct a quality evaluation system for fever clinic nursing management. BACKGROUND: Fever clinic is the first line of defence against the epidemic during COVID-19 in China. METHODS: Our study combines the Delphi method and the analytic hierarchy process. Delphi method was used to carry out two rounds of consultation for 18 experts, to select and revise indicators at all levels. Analytic hierarchy process was used to calculate the weight of indicators at all levels. RESULTS: A quality evaluation system of nursing management for fever clinics is built using Delphi method. It includes five first-level indexes, 14 second-level indexes and 82 third-level indexes. A two-round expert consultation is used to build the indicators. The recovery rates of expert questionnaires in the two rounds were, respectively, 100% and 94%, and expert authority coefficients were 0.925. The Kendall coefficients in the two rounds were, respectively, 0.205 and 0.162 (P < .001). The weight analysis shows that health management of nursing staff (0.2803) and disinfection isolation and treatment of medical waste (0.2803) are most important, followed by nursing post management and personnel training (0.1889), configuration and management of equipment (0.1427) and patient consultation management and nursing (0.1078). CONCLUSION: The quality evaluation system of nursing management in the constructed fever clinic is used to put forward a specific, objective and quantifiable evaluation criteria of nursing quality for fever clinic management, which can better meet the needs of epidemic prevention and control, and has a certain application and promotion value. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The establishment and improvement of a quality system for fever clinic care management will help to respond to outbreaks such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Care , Delphi Technique , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 14: 1805-1813, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229115

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to COVID-19 outbreak, since January 24, 2020, national medical teams from across the country and the armed forces have been dispatched to aid Hubei. The present review was designed to timely summarize the existing frontline information about nursing scheduling mode with special focus on the length of shifts with the aim to contribute to improve the nurses' job satisfaction and the quality of nursing services. METHODS: Articles from Jan 2020 to October 2020 were retrieved from China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data and Weipu Information, with the terms "COVID-19", "designated hospital", "Hubei-assisted", "makeshift hospital", "nursing", "nursing shift", "whole-system takeover" and variations of these, in the title and abstract fields and the Boolean combinations of these words as the retrieval strategy. RESULTS: Seventeen journal articles have been included in the target field, from the nurses in aiding Hubei Province, four kinds of shift length, 2-hour (h), 3-h, 4-h and 6-h shift have been considered, the main nursing scheduling mode adopted in designated hospitals for COVID-19 patients was dynamic scheduling based on workload, flexible scheduling based on working hours, workload and the number of critically ill patients admitted, humanized scheduling based on the daily reported health status of the nurses, and professional-integrated scheduling according to the professional distribution of nurses on the basis of four-hour shift length, and in makeshift hospitals for mild patients, the scheduling mode was 6-h based correspondingly. CONCLUSION: The descriptive results of the present systematic review shed light on the challenges and practical solutions of nursing scheduling mode in the context of cross-regional medical assistance. Additionally, the present systematic review could provide the academic community of nurses, nurse managers and administrators with baseline information and scientific productions from the content's points of view in the target field.

18.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 68(2): 92-98, 2021 Apr.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168053

ABSTRACT

Cases in the current novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continue to increase, bringing tremendous psychological pressures to frontline caregivers and threating the ability of existing medical care systems in many countries to cope with related demands. In this situation, nursing leaders have a heightened responsibility to assist nursing staff to remain at their jobs and feel secure, to strengthen safety systems, to provide adequate equipment and personnel training, and to proactively lead nursing staff. In this article, leadership strategies implemented under the COVID-19 pandemic are presented from the perspective of transformational leadership in nursing practice. This article is divided into the following five themes: 1. Leadership makes the vision more vivid; 2. Demonstrating charismatic leadership; 3. Leaders who stimulate intellectual potential; 4. Paying attention to spiritual inspiration; 5. Providing individualized sincere care. Leaders should promote the professional role of nursing staff and provide a safe and secure practice environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Nurse Administrators , Nursing Staff , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Nursing Staff/organization & administration , Nursing Staff/psychology
19.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(6): 1351-1355, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133008

ABSTRACT

AIM: To reflect upon the concrete implications of the COVID-19 outbreak regarding ongoing health service and nursing management research (NMR) and to identify possible research priorities for the current and post-pandemic era. BACKGROUND: Health service research and the nursing management research debate have received little attention to date, despite their relevance in responding to the increased demand of care during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A critical analysis on experiences was performed while leading international-funded studies at different degrees of complexity and targets, involving nurse managers, nurses, care processes and health care services in the last year. RESULTS: Ongoing research projects have been profoundly affected by the COVID-19 outbreak in their aims, methods, management processes, feasibility and outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 outbreak is an unprecedented stress test for the health care sector and for the nursing services. Its onset and persistence have rendered more easily to see what prevails in terms of effectiveness and what fails in our health care services. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers have lived and are still living through this crisis, given their omnipresence in the health care systems. Therefore, setting NMR priorities and working together to imagine and design the post-COVID-19 era is essential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Research , Delivery of Health Care , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int Nurs Rev ; 68(2): 172-180, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052286

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rampant spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has assumed pandemic proportions across the world. Attempts to contain its spread have entailed varying early screening and triage strategies implemented in different countries and regions. AIM: To share the experience of scientific and standardized management of fever clinics in China, which provide the first effective checkpoint for the prevention and control of COVID-19. INTRODUCTION: A fever clinic was established at our hospital in Tianjin, China, for initially identifying suspected cases of COVID-19 and controlling the spread of the disease. METHODS: The management system covered the following aspects: spatial layout; partitioning of functional zones; a work management system and associated processes; management of personnel, materials and equipment; and patient education. RESULTS: Within two months of introducing these measures, there was a comprehensive reduction in the number of new COVID-19 cases in Tianjin, and zero infections occurred among medical staff at the fever clinic. DISCUSSION: The fever clinic plays an important role in the early detection, isolation and referral of patients presenting with fevers of unknown origin. Broad screening criteria, an adequate warning mechanism, manpower reserves and staff training at the clinic are essential for the early management of epidemics. CONCLUSION: The spread of COVID-19 has been effectively curbed through the establishment of the fever clinic, which merits widespread promotion and application. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICIES: Health managers should be made aware of the important role of fever clinics in the early detection, isolation and referral of patients, and in the treatment of infectious diseases to prevent and control their spread. In the early stage of an epidemic, fever clinics should be established in key areas with concentrated clusters of cases. Simultaneously, the health and safety of health professionals require attention.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , COVID-19/nursing , Fever of Unknown Origin/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Facility Design and Construction , Fever of Unknown Origin/epidemiology , Fever of Unknown Origin/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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