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1.
Nephrology Nursing Journal ; 49(4):369-377, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072505

ABSTRACT

Nursing remains one of the most in-demand jobs in the American workforce. The impact of the COVID-19 pandem-ic has created strain on nursing resources throughout the health care industry and drawn attention to longstanding workforce issues. Inadequate staffing is often a multidi-mensional problem that warrants a comprehensive assessment of elements that may contribute to recruit-ment and retention issues. In the dialysis practice setting, nursing shortages remain an ongoing issue due to an aging workforce and ongoing issues for recruiting nurses both new and skilled into the field of nephrology. This article explores the evidence on approaches to staffing in the dial-ysis practice setting by defining core elements to consider when designing a staffing model. These elements include federal/state regulations, patient acuity, staff ratios, work-force perceptions, patient outcomes, and dialysis modali-ties offered.

2.
New Jersey Nurse ; 52(4):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2057602
3.
New Jersey Nurse ; 52(4):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2058058
4.
Journal of Men's Health ; 18(4), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026505
5.
Nephrol Nurs J ; 49(4): 369-383, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2012263

ABSTRACT

Nursing remains one of the most in-demand jobs in the American workforce. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has created strain on nursing resources throughout the health care industry and drawn attention to longstanding workforce issues. Inadequate staffing is often a multidimensional problem that warrants a comprehensive assessment of elements that may contribute to recruitment and retention issues. In the dialysis practice setting, nursing shortages remain an ongoing issue due to an aging workforce and ongoing issues for recruiting nurses both new and skilled into the field of nephrology. This article explores the evidence on approaches to staffing in the dialysis practice setting by defining core elements to consider when designing a staffing model. These elements include federal/state regulations, patient acuity, staff ratios, workforce perceptions, patient outcomes, and dialysis modalities offered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Renal Dialysis , Workforce
6.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(10-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2011123

ABSTRACT

There is a problem in the United States regarding the percentage of bachelor-prepared nurses in the workforce. The primary purpose of this study was to explore the role of the employer in a more educated nursing workforce through the lens of connectivism. A mixed methods study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic in the fall of 2021. Chief nursing officers (n = 89) from hospitals and long-term care facilities across one southeastern state were surveyed regarding the percentage of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)-prepared registered nurses (RNs) in their facilities. Fisher's exact test (r x 2) was conducted to determine if there was a significant association between the reported percentage of BSN-prepared RNs and the plans, policies, and promotions of the employer, as well as the location and type of facility. Findings suggest that the employer does play a role in the education level of nurses. There was a significant association between the reported percentage of BSN-prepared RNs and the presence of plans and goals for the facility suggesting that the employers' plans and goals increase the percentage of BSN-prepared RNs in a facility. There was also a significant association between the reported percentage of BSN-prepared RNs and the type of facility suggesting that there are more BSN-prepared RNs in the hospital setting than in the long-term care setting. An additional significant association was found related to magnet status suggesting that maintaining or pursuing magnet status does increase the percentage of BSN-prepared RNs in a facility. Four main themes evolved during the coding of the qualitative data. The four main themes were: 1) the need for more nurses, 2) the need for more resources, 3) the need for partnerships, and 4) the ramifications of the pandemic. The implications for practice included raising awareness regarding the need for more BSN-prepared RNs, developing goals related to this initiative, and forming partnerships with key stakeholders. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand ; : 75-78, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2010732
8.
Neuro-Oncology ; 24:i74-i75, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956572

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: High-grade gliomas account for <5% of all pediatric brain tumors with a 20% 5-year overall survival even with maximal safe resection followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Patients in low-and middle-income countries already face delays and barriers to the treatment they require. The current COVID pandemic has added unique challenges to the delivery of complex, multidisciplinary health services to these patients. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of four patients, ages 2-18 years old, with histologically confirmed high-grade glioma managed in a tertiary government institution from 2020-2021. Three of the patients had a supratentorial tumor and one patient had multiple tumors located in both supra-and infratentorial compartments. Neurosurgical procedures performed were: gross total excision (1), subtotal excision (2), and biopsy (1). The tissue diagnoses obtained were glioblastoma (3) and high-grade astrocytoma (1). Two patients survived and are currently undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The remaining two patients expired: one from hospital-acquired pneumonia and the other from COVID-19 infection. DISCUSSION: Decreased mobility due to lockdowns, the burden of requiring negative COVID-19 results before admission for surgery, reduced hospital capacity to comply with physical distancing measures, the postponement of elective surgery to minimize COVID-19 transmission, physician and nursing shortages due to infection or mandatory isolation of staff, cancellation of face-to-face outpatient clinics, and hesitation among patients and their families to go to the hospital for fear of exposure were found to be common causes of delays in treatment. Also, the redirection of health resources and other government and hospital policies to handle the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an overall delay in the delivery of health services. In particular, the management of pediatric patients with cancers, especially high-grade gliomas, was significantly disrupted.

9.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(6-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1898274

ABSTRACT

Nursing simulations have been used for over 100 years to better prepare nursing students and equip them with the medical and social skills necessary to provide high quality patient care. The use of simulation in nursing programs has helped students better their clinical skills, increase their confidence with patients, and practice with rare and difficult medical and social scenarios. With states approving up to 50% replacement of clinical hours with simulation hours, many schools have taken this opportunity to provide their students with the technology. With the onset of the COVID pandemic, clinical placements were suspended, and nursing programs turned to virtual simulations. The California Board of Nursing (BON) increased their approval to 75% replacement of clinical hours (AB2288) and, based on the results of this study, the vast majority of California nursing programs increased their percent of simulation use by 100% on average. Simulation was used to replace a higher percent of clinical hours than ever before.This explanatory sequential mixed methods study included a survey, followed by an interview to understand how simulation use changed as a result of the COVID pandemic and explore ways in which simulation technology can impact nursing school admissions for the future. For the quantitative portion, surveys were sent to simulation leaders at 128 of the 149 nursing programs in California, and 43 completed the survey (a 34% response rate). The survey revealed that 90% of programs increased their simulation use overall during the pandemic, 92% of respondents stated that the increase was necessary to address a scarcity of clinical placements, and the percent of clinical hours replaced by simulation during the pandemic rose from an average of 16% to 40%. After the pandemic, 68% of respondents predicted that they would use more simulation than they did before the pandemic, which suggests that schools have increased their buy-in to the benefits of the technology. Lastly, 31% of respondents stated that they were able to increase admission offers in 2020 because of increased simulation use.From the survey data collected, I interviewed simulation leaders of 5 nursing programs at which simulation impacted enrollment in the past, currently or had a predicted impact on future enrollment. Interviews were conducted virtually and further confirmed that increasing simulation use for the replacement of clinical hours could allow the enrollment of more students. If each student requires fewer clinical placement hours because a higher percent of these hours can be replaced by simulation, then the available clinical placement hours can be spread across more students. However, all interview respondents stated the next biggest barrier of increasing enrollment, insufficient number of faculty, would stifle any hopes of enrolling more students.Program leaders reported highly positive perceptions of the effectiveness of simulation on student NCLEX scores as well as their clinical competence. Respondents noted that the top three motivators for increasing simulation use before the pandemic was to practice clinical skills, expose students to rare scenarios and assess students' clinical skills. During the pandemic, the top three motivators shifted;an overwhelmingly high percent of respondents (92%) stated that the top reason for increasing simulation was to address the scarcity of clinical placements.Although most nursing programs have increased their simulation substantially, there are still programs that are nowhere near the maximum allowable usage. The Diffusion of Innovation theory categorizes schools that have not fully integrated the innovation as being in the implementation stage. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(3):893-895, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1856776

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses constitute the majority of healthcare practitioners, have been fighting the COVID-19 outbreak on the front lines. Nurses could face several challenges during delivering care for patients at ICUs especially at the time of pandemic of COVID -19, including workload and shortage, psychological load, availability of resources, responsibilities, and role conflict. Aims of the study: To what extent is there a significant relationship between challenge that facing nursing care at intensive care unit during the pandemic of corona virus ? Methodology: A descriptive study design was conducted on ICU nurses at Baquba teaching hospital for the period October 15th, 2021, to March 25th, 2022. A non-probability (Purposive) sample was selected of 35 nurses who work at Baquba teaching hospital. The data was collected using a previously prepared questionnaire and official agreement to use the study questionnaire was obtained from the original author. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, percentages, mean, and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (person correlation) were used in the data analysis. Results: Results showed that nurses who work at ICU during the pandemic of COVID -19 were faced several challenges to deliver care for patients, including shortage of nurses in the presence of large number of patients, lack of appropriate offices for nurses, stressful work environment, sense responsibilities for some critical cases, and lack of support from superiors. Conclusion: The study concluded that nurses who work at ICU during the pandemic of COVID -19 were faced several challenges to deliver care for patients, including shortage and workload, psychological load, taking responsibilities, and role conflict challenges.

11.
EClinicalMedicine ; 45: 101314, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1828404

ABSTRACT

Background: The extent to which healthcare worker (HCWs) experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic vary by race or ethnicity after adjustment for confounding factors is not currently known. Methods: We performed an observational prospective cohort study of 24,769 healthcare workers from 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, enrolled between April 10, 2020 and June 30, 2021, and evaluated participant experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, including testing, diagnosis with COVID-19, emotional experiences, burnout, and interest in vaccines and vaccine clinical trials. Findings: After adjustment for professional role, medical history, and community characteristics, Black and Asian participants were less likely to receive SARS-CoV-2 viral testing (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0·82 [0·70, 0·96], p=0·012 and aOR 0·77 [0·67, 0·89], p<0·001 respectively) than White participants. Hispanic participants were more likely to have evidence of COVID-19 infection (aOR 1·23 (1·00, 1·50, p=0·048). Black and Asian participants were less likely to report interest in a COVID-19 vaccine (aOR 0·11 [0·05, 0·25], p<0·001 and aOR 0·48 [0·27, 0·85] p=0·012). Black participants were less likely to report interest in participating in a COVID-19 vaccine trial (aOR = 0·39 [0·28, 0·54], p<0·001). Black participants were also less likely to report 3 or more daily emotional impacts of COVID-19 (aOR = 0·66 [0·53, 0·82], p=<0·001). Black participants were additionally less likely to report burnout (aOR = 0·66 ([0·49, 0·95], p=0·025). Interpretation: In a large, national study of healthcare workers, after adjustment for individual and community characteristics, race/ethnicity disparities in COVID-19 outcomes persist. Future work is urgently needed to understand precise mechanisms behind these disparities and to develop and implement targeted interventions to improve health equity for healthcare workers. Funding: This work was funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Contract # COVID-19-2020-001.

12.
Nursing Management ; 29(2):5-5, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1811282

ABSTRACT

The insufficient number of nurses required to serve a growing and diverse population remains a challenge worldwide. In our feature (page 16), Nick Evans reminds us that, as the UK continues to respond to the impact of Brexit, the recent pandemic and world events, many healthcare organisations are once again looking to international recruitment to help address the national shortfall of nurses.

13.
J Adv Nurs ; 78(11): 3687-3695, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794651

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To examine whether inactive nurses are willing to return to nursing during the COVID-19 pandemic, the reasons for or against their decision and further, possibly relevant factors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional online survey. METHODS: We developed a questionnaire, addressing registration, professional experiences, anticipations, and internal and external factors that might affect the decision of inactive nurses to return to nursing during the pandemic. Between 27 April and 15 June 2020, we recruited participants in Germany via social networks, organizations and institutions and asked them to forward the link to wherever other inactive nurses might be reached. RESULTS: Three hundred and thirty-two participants (73% female) could be included in the analysis. The majority of the participants (n = 262, 79%) were general nurses. The main reason for registering was 'want to do my bit to manage the crisis' (n = 73, 22.8%). More than two thirds of the participants (n = 230, 69%) were not or not yet registered. One hundred and twelve (49%) out of 220 participants, who gave reasons why they did not register, selected they 'could not see a necessity at that time'. The few inactive nurses who were deployed reported a variety of experiences. CONCLUSIONS: Different factors influence the nurses' decision to register or not. A critical factor for their decision was previous experiences that had made them leave the job and prevented a return-even for a limited time in a special situation. IMPACT: From the responses of the participants in this study, it can be deduced that: negative experiences made while working in nursing influence the willingness to volunteer for a deployment; only one-third of the inactive nurses would be willing to return to the nursing profession to help manage the Corona pandemic; policymakers and nursing leaders should not rely on the availability of inactive nurses in a crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
hfm (Healthcare Financial Management) ; 76(3):25-27, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1787224

ABSTRACT

The article provides information on an internal travel pool for nurses implemented by Novant Health in 2013. Topics discussed include the opportunity provided by the model to staff nurses, forecast made by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on the number of nurses that would leave their jobs even before the pandemic, and changes that have been implemented, underway or are under consideration as the organization seeks to further establish its internal pool as a viable option.

15.
Nurse Leader ; 20(2):127-133, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1778377

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has created serious emotional distress for health care workers. Staffing shortages and a fraught political landscape have made it more challenging for health care organizations to honor their core values, whereas burnout, PTSD, and moral injury have made it more difficult, if not impossible, for caregivers to live up to their personal values. This article describes the problem and presents 7 recommendations for health care leaders.

16.
Clinical Nurse Specialist: The Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice ; 36(2):73-73, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1735699
17.
Caring for the Ages ; 23(1):7-7, 2022.
Article in English | Cin20 | ID: covidwho-1649425
18.
Nursing Praxis in Aotearoa New Zealand ; 37(3):8-11, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1597062

ABSTRACT

The author reflects on the contributions and visibility of nurses in Aotearoa New Zealand during the Covid-19 pandemic. Also cited are the factors leading to the country's effective response to the pandemic like the decisive and empathetic leadership of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, effective public communication, and the use of genomic sequencing for tracing and testing possible infections, and the reasons behind the lack of visibility of nurses during the fight against the pandemic.

19.
Cureus ; 13(6): e15755, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290571

ABSTRACT

Introduction Adequate staffing in the intensive care units (ICUs) is the most important factor to provide optimal care and ensure favorable outcomes in critically ill patients. Recently, the need for ICU beds has reached unprecedented levels and the management and treatment of critically ill patients has been in focus. The aim of the study was to assess the targeted and actual nurse-to-patient (NPR) and physician-to-patient ratios (PPR) regarding patients with and without COVID-19. Methods We conducted a nationwide online survey assessing the standard of care in German ICUs treating patients with COVID-19. We asked questions regarding targeted PPR and NPR and their implementation in daily clinical practice to heads of German ICU departments. Results We received 244 responses of which 171 were eligible for final analysis. Targeted median PPR ratio was 8 [interquartile range (IQR) = 4] and targeted NPR was 2 (IQR = 1). For COVID-19 patients, the median targeted PPR was 6 (IQR = 2) and the median targeted NPR was 2 (IQR = 0). Targeted PPRs were rarely met by 15.2% and never met by 3.5% of responding institutions. Targeted NPRs were rarely met in 32.2% and never in 5.3% of responding institutions. Conclusion In contrast to PPR, targeted NPRs were largely unattainable in German ICUs. Our results raise concern in view of studies linking worse outcomes in critically ill patients to suboptimal NPRs. This warrants further health policy efforts regarding optimal staffing in the ICU.

20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256539

ABSTRACT

The global COVID-19 pandemic is creating challenges to manage staff ratios in clinical units. Nurse staffing level is an important indicator of the quality of care. This study aimed to identify any changes in the nurse staffing levels in the general wards of hospitals in Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic. The unit of analysis was the hospitals. This longitudinal study observed the quarterly change of the nurse staffing grades in 969 hospitals in 2020. The nurse staffing grades ranged from 1 to 7 according to the nurse-patient ratio measured by the number of patients (or beds) per nurse. The major dependent and independent variables were the change of nurse staffing grades and three quarterly observation points being compared with those during the 1st quarter (1Q) of 2020, respectively. A generalized linear model was used. Unexpectedly, the nurse staffing grades significantly improved (2Q: RR, 27.2%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 15.1-27.6; p < 0.001; 3Q: RR, 95% CI, 20.2%; 16.9-21.6; p < 0.001; 4Q: RR, 26.6%; 95% CI, 17.8-39.6; p < 0.001) quarterly, indicating that the nurse staffing levels increased. In the comparison of grades at 2Q, 3Q, and 4Q with those at 1Q, most figures improved in tertiary, general, and small hospitals (p < 0.05), except at 3Q and 4Q of general hospitals. In conclusion, the nurse staffing levels did not decrease, but nursing shortage might occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Workforce
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