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1.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(8):7940-7952, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033464

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 had profound effects on nurses' general health. The severity and extent of the COVID-19 epidemic means it is highly likely that health personnel will suffer from psychological stress as a result the direct contact they have with patients who are infected. The goal of this research is to assess the level of anxiety and stress behaviors in B.Sc Nursing students, and to determine the relationship between stress levels and levels of coping, and socio-demographic variables. Methods: This study was cross sectional study. The sample size consisted of 500 BSc nursing students and samples were selected using convenient sampling techniques and the data was collected through self-administered COVID 19 stress scale and COVID 19 coping scale. Results: The study revealed that majority of students (22 %) were male and (78%) were female. Result showed that only (8%) has mild stress, (91%) had moderate stress and had (1%) severe stress, and (2.2%) had poor coping, (96.8%) had average coping and (1%) good coping. There was negative significant correlation (r=-0.721) between stress and coping behaviour among nursing year nursing students. There was significant association between level of stress and demographic variables such as age, education of father and mother, occupation of father and mother and family income. Conclusion: Nursing students' stress levels should be examined on a regular basis, contributing variables should be recognized, and the nurse administrators should establish a guidance, counselling, and stress management program to especially manage the stress during pandemic.

2.
Nurse Education Today ; : 105562, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031591

ABSTRACT

Background Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many unexpected changes occurred in healthcare. With the abrupt change to online education in 2020, nursing students experienced challenges with virtual learning which impacted their perception of preparedness to practice. There were few qualitative studies completed in the U.S. that investigated the nursing students' experiences. The aim of this study was to explore pre-licensure nursing students' experiences with the transition to virtual learning and their perception of nursing amidst a pandemic. Objectives This study investigated nursing students' experiences and perceptions of the nursing profession amidst a pandemic and explored whether students would continue pursuing a career in nursing. Design A descriptive exploratory qualitative study utilizing focus group interviews and questions using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a framework. Setting A university in Northern Illinois educating baccalaureate degree pre-licensure nursing students. Participants Twenty-four pre-licensure nursing students first through fifth semesters. Ten focus groups were established and consisted of two to three students. Methods A descriptive qualitative study design using the Theory of Planned Behavior to construct 9 semi-structured questions. These questions were utilized in the focus groups (n = 24) and Framework Analysis was utilized to analyze data. Results Five themes and three sub-themes emerged from the study. Themes included: inspiration to become nurses with sub-themes-students' own inspiration and inspired by family;relationship strain with friend/family due to poor adherence to isolation guidelines;transition to online learning with sub-theme mental health strain;unprepared to begin nursing practice;and ambiguity regarding how to impact government health policy. Conclusions This study found that the students' perceptions of the nursing profession did not waiver, and their desire to pursue a nursing career was resolute. This study demonstrated the challenges students experienced with a transition to virtual learning. Students expressed having insufficient in-person experiences and felt unprepared to begin practice.

3.
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031122

ABSTRACT

Background Nursing students experienced mental symptoms when they switched to distance education due to the pandemic. Aims This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of online laughter therapy sessions on depression, anxiety, stress, and loneliness levels in first-year nursing students. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, 61 healthy nursing students were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 32) and control groups (n = 29). The intervention group received online laughter therapy twice weekly for four weeks. The control group received no intervention. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale at the study initiation and week four in both groups. Results There was no difference between the mean scores of the groups in the pre-test (p > 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of depression after online laughter therapy sessions (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between anxiety, stress, and loneliness levels (p > 0.05). Conclusions Online laughter therapy sessions significantly reduced depression but had no effect on anxiety, stress, and loneliness. During the COVID-19 pandemic, online laughter therapy can be organized to reduce depression levels.

4.
Journal of Men's Health ; 18(4), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026505
5.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(8): e37195, 2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022364

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous research has found digitally supported mindfulness interventions to be effective when used for stress management among workers in high-stress occupations. Findings on digitally supported mindfulness interventions among nurses working in acute inpatient care settings are heterogeneous, lack long-term follow-up, and do not assess adherence and acceptability. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of a digitally supported mindfulness intervention designed to improve health- and work-related outcomes among nurses and nursing trainees working in acute inpatient care settings. METHODS: We will conduct a multicenter randomized controlled trial using a wait-list control group design. Randomization will be stratified by hospital and job status (nurse or nursing trainee). Recruitment will take place on the web and offline during the working hours of nurses and nursing trainees. The intervention group will receive a digitally supported mindfulness intervention, which will comprise an app, 2 web-based workshops, and a workbook, whereas the wait-list control group will be scheduled to receive the same intervention 14 weeks later. The 2 web-based workshops will be led by a certified mindfulness-based stress reduction trainer. Nurses will use the app and the workbook independently. Self-report web-based surveys will be conducted on the web at baseline, at 10 weeks after allocation, at 24 weeks after allocation, and at 38 weeks after allocation. Outcomes of interest will include perceived stress (primary outcome), health- and work-related variables, and variables related to adherence and acceptability of the digitally supported mindfulness intervention. We will perform intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses. RESULTS: Data collection will be completed by the beginning of August 2022. Data analyses will be completed by December 2022. CONCLUSIONS: Our study design, including long-term follow-up and the investigation of variables related to adherence and acceptability, will ensure rigorous evaluation of effectiveness and efficacy. Relative to costly in-person intervention efforts, this program may present a cost-effective and potentially highly scalable alternative. Findings regarding effectiveness, efficacy, adherence, and acceptability will inform stakeholders' decisions regarding the implementation of similar interventions to promote the well-being of nurses and nursing trainees, which may, in turn, alleviate detrimental stress-related outcomes (eg, burnout) because of work-related demands. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00025997; https://tinyurl.com/433cas7u. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/37195.

6.
Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology ; 15(7):3125-3136, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010622

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic forcing the students to stay at home to curb the spread of the coronavirus, which inevitably affects their mental and physical health. Thus, the evaluation of mental health (MH), physical activity (PA) and Sedentary Behaviour (SB) of Health Science students during COVID-19 is a need. Objective: To evaluate the physical activity level, mental health and sedentary behaviour of Health Science students in UTAR during COVID-19 and find the correlation among them. Method: 258 health science students were participated in this study via social media, like Facebook and WhatsApp, The Depression, anxiety, stress scale-21 (DASS-21) was used to assess mental health and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was used to assess physical activity levels and sedentary behaviour. Result: There were 34.89%, 55.04% and 25.58% of Health Science students were suffering moderate to extremely severe level of depression, anxiety and stress, respectively. Females had a higher prevalence in anxiety (F:55.49%, M: 53.95%) and stress (F:26.37%, M:23.69%), while depression more prevalent in males (M:42.81%, F: 31.87%). The Chinese Medicine students had the poorest mental health and this followed by Physiotherapy, M.B.B.S and Nursing students. Besides, the prevalence of physical inactivity was 48.99%, which a higher prevalence in females (51.43%) than males (43.10%). Besides, 39.53% of Chinese Medicine Students, 62% of M.B.B.S students, 55.56% of Nursing students and 44.83% of Physiotherapy students were categorized as physical inactivity. The prevalence of sedentary behaviour was 48.10% in Health Science students. Besides, no significant correlation found between physical activity and mental health, and sedentary behaviour and mental health. A weak negative correlation was found between physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Conclusion: The prevalence of Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Physical Inactivity and Sedentary Behaviour during the pandemic was very alarming. From government to institution, adequate and regular surveillance, policy monitoring and further research should be taken.

7.
International journal of mental health nursing ; 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008744

ABSTRACT

Media impact on suicide is well-established. Groups at heightened risk of suicide, such as nurses, may be particularly influenced by poor news reporting. This study aimed to examine UK newspaper reporting of suicide of nurses and student nurses, including during the COVID-19 pandemic. Print and online newspaper reports about suicide in nurses (including students) published in the UK between January 2018 and August 2021 were obtained and data extracted for analysis in collaboration with Samaritans' media advisory team. Content and quality of newspaper reports were examined using a content analysis approach. The study was compliant with the STROBE checklist. Nurse or student nurse suicides were reported in 134 articles, including 50 individual suicides. Most articles were acceptable against Samaritans' media guidelines. However, common problems included absence of signposting to support organizations and lack of suicide prevention messages. A minority of articles included methods of suicide within article headlines (18, 13.4%) and sensationalist or romanticizing language (14, 10.7%). Most contained occupation-related content. Many named the individual's specific hospital or university and a substantial proportion included occupation-related images. Working on the frontline was the most reported link between COVID-19 and nurse suicide. While reporting on suicide among nurses and students was largely acceptable, quality of reporting was variable. Occupation was often discussed, and most articles published during COVID-19 linked suicide to the pandemic. The research findings can help shape guidance on reporting of suicide in specific professions and occupations, including nursing, to encourage responsible reporting and reduce inadvertent promotion of suicide.

8.
Nursing education perspectives ; 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008642

ABSTRACT

: It is known that nursing students in an online learning environment may experience challenges related to their quality of life and well-being. However, it is unknown what additional challenges students face in a resource-limited environment like Appalachia. This descriptive study surveyed 154 undergraduate nursing students from a single institution in the Appalachian region at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results reveal that students experienced unique resource-related barriers specific to underserved communities that impacted their online learning experiences. Findings offer unique implications for nurse educators facilitating online learning. Specific ideas for those teaching in resource-limited areas are presented.

9.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(9):430-444, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1998071

ABSTRACT

A documentary review was carried out on the production and publication of research papers on the study of the variables of Work Stress and Academic Stress, within the family dynamics by nursing students during the Covid-19 pandemic. The purpose of the bibliometric analysis proposed in this document was to know the main characteristics of the volume of publications registered in the Scopus database during the period 2020-2021, achieving the identification of 38 publications in total. The information provided by this platform was organized through tables and figures, categorizing the information by Year of Publication, Country of Origin, Area of Knowledge and Type of Publication. Once these characteristics were described, the position of different authors regarding the proposed topic was referenced through qualitative analysis. Among the main findings of this research, it is found that the United States, with 18 publications, was the country with the highest scientific production registered in the name of authors affiliated with institutions of that country. The area of knowledge that made the greatest contribution to the construction of bibliographic material referring to the study of work and academic stress in nursing students and interns in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic was nursing with 21 published documents, and the type of publication that was most used during the period indicated above was the journal article, representing 9% of the total scientific production.

10.
Teaching and Learning in Nursing ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1996580

ABSTRACT

Introduction : This study examined Filipino nursing students' use of household materials as low-cost simulators and how they aid in online return demonstrations. Methods : Summative content analysis guided this study. We collected uploaded YouTube videos (n=14) depicting Filipino nursing students using low-cost simulators in their skills demonstration. We used Bengtsson's approach to content analysis to analyze the data. Findings : Four themes of low-cost simulators were identified: home and hardware, health and beauty, creative articles, and entertainment. The categories under home and hardware were tools, containers, furniture, and packaging. Health and beauty low-cost simulators were toiletries and medical supplies. Creative articles included fabrics, clothing accessories, and stationeries. Entertainment low-cost-simulators had toys and computer accessories. Discussion : During the COVID-19 pandemic, our research uncovered home equipment employed as low-cost simulators to help nursing students' online simulation of skills demonstration. We recommend further investigation of whether students learned using low-cost simulators.

11.
International Journal of Academic Medicine and Pharmacy ; 4(2):47-51, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1989066

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has affected many countries in the world and has been known as one of the fast-spreading pandemics viruses. This research was carried out to investigate the thoughts of the senior nursing students about their profession during the COVID-19 pandemic period. A cross-sectional methodology of 112 senior nursing students in Turkey participated. The majority students (72.3%) do not think to change their thoughts toward profession after the COVID-19 pandemic even when they get the chance to do. 39.3% of the students stated that they could take care of a patient diagnosed with COVID-19, 34.8% of them were undecided about taking care of the patient and 25.9% of them stated that they could not take care of the patient with COVID-19. The students reported anxiety scores (67.1% ) of 5 or more on anxiety levels. Findings indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic period does not have a negative effect on the thoughts of the nursing students towards their profession. However, the students reported that they lacked information about COVID-19. Can contribute to the use of post-graduate and in-service education opportunities to complete the students' lack of training about COVID-19.

12.
Revista Medica de Chile ; 150(2):216-221, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1988173

ABSTRACT

Procedural skills are essential in the nursing profession and should be acquired during undergraduate training according to new regulations. Clinical simulation is a good alternative to teach such skills. During COVID pandemic, face-to-face learning activities were reduced to a minimum amount, thus hampering the use of clinical simulations. Since simulations should adapt to the new scenario, their virtual implementation appears as an alternative. The latter should become an important teaching tool while restrictions in mobility last. We herein review the evolution of clinical simulation as a teaching tool and to determine its future challenges.

13.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:805-812, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1957490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic has forced nursing schools in Indonesia to implement online learning. The association between online learning variables and psychological distress among nursing students is not fully understood. AIM: This study aimed to assess psychological distress among nursing students and the association between online learning variables and psychological distress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2020 to February 2021. Six hundred and thirty-five nursing students from four universities in Indonesia participated in this study and were recruited through a consecutive sampling method. The measurement of psychological distress used the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between online learning predictors and psychological distress. RESULTS: Most of the respondents had severe psychological distress (n = 194;30.6%). Older age was found to act as a protective factor against psychological distress (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = –0.159, p = 0.035;95% confidence interval [CI]: (–0.307)–(–0.011)). Contrarily, not living at their own home during lockdown (aOR = 1.019, p = 0.001;95% CI: 0.657–1.382), always feeling that online learning is expensive (aOR = 1.387, p = 0.001;95% CI: 0.645–2.130), always experienced poor Internet connection during online learning (aOR = 3.380, p = 0.001;95% CI: 1.935–4.826), and having no motivation toward online learning (aOR = 3.154, p = 0.001;95% CI: 2.372–3.936) acted as risk factors for having psychological distress. CONCLUSION: Cost and Internet access barriers as well as low motivation during the abrupt shift to implementation of online learning in the current pandemic situation acted as risk factors for psychological distress among nursing students.

14.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10(G):440-444, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has affected research and students all over the world. Ongoing studies have been disrupted and upcoming studies cannot begin until they are adapted to the new reality. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. The study was realized during the period March-May 2020. This study was included n = 340 (nurse. physiotherapy, midwife) students. In this study, we conduct a short questionnaire about the perception of quality of e-learning. The study was conducted with students of University of Shkodra, Department of Nursing. The survey was performed through an online form and all participants were virtual and anonym and were free to write everything about the quality of learning, methodology of teaching, and the difficulty during this process. RESULTS: In this study, n = 340 students were included. One hundred and fifty eight of them were attending their nurse studies, 40 physiotherapy, 72 midwife, and 70 were master students. Thirty-seven percentage of the participants were nurse students in their 2nd year of studies, 10% were nurse students in the 3rd year of their bachelor degree, 21% of students were midwifes in the 2nd year of the bachelor degree, 12% physiotherapy and (20%) in master’s degree. Eighty-three percentage of students were female and 17% were male. The student included were 19–25-year old, minimum 19-year old, maximum 25-year old, average 23-year old. The most part of them were from rural areas (70%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of students were satisfied with the methodology of teachers, but they have identified a lot of problems and difficulties during this time. Most part of the problems was identified as technical and economic related with the students and professors.

15.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(7):FC01-FC06, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1928867

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Nutritional supplements modify immune response and protect against viral infections. Health related behaviour of medical and nursing students governs their attitude towards counselling patients. This study assessed the differences in the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) between undergraduate medical and nursing students regarding the role of nutraceuticals in Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). Aim: To assess the differences in the KAP between undergraduate medical and nursing students regarding the role of nutraceuticals in COVID-19. Materials and Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Patna, Bihar, India in September 2020. A questionnaire was administered to assess the KAP of 265 medical and 150 nursing undergraduates regarding nutraceuticals. The total knowledge score varied between 0 and 12. The score of the attitude was based on 5 points Likert scale. The data was collected through self-administered google forms. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test was used to compare the difference in categorical data. results: There were total 273 (65.8%) participants with good knowledge and only 47 (11.3%) with positive attitude. About 68.7% medical students and 82.7% nursing students felt that regular intake of nutraceuticals has a positive role in protecting against COVID-19 (p=0.007). Out of 415, 264 participants (63.6%) had used nutraceuticals. About 156 (58.9%) medical students and 103 (68.7%) nursing students felt that the safety of nutraceuticals is a grave concern. Two- fifth of the participants (202, 48.7%) had consumed a dietary supplement to maintain good health. conclusion: Although the knowledge score was good, but positive attitude was lacking. Thus, Health Care Personnels (HCP)s should be trained regarding proper usage and recommendations of nutraceuticals.

16.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 2022 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923048

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based mandala activity on the anxiety levels and spiritual well-being of nursing students who started clinical practice after distance education during COVID-19 period. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study is a randomized controlled study employing a pre-/posttest design with a single-blind, parallel group. The study was completed with a total of 170 participants (n = 84, intervention group; n = 86, control group). Data were collected using the Descriptive Characteristics Form, State-trait Anxiety Inventory, Spirituality Well-Being Scale, and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The intervention group participated in three mindfulness-based mandala sessions. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT05053178. FINDINGS: In three sessions, there was a significant decrease in the intervention group compared with the control group regarding the mean values of pretest and posttest anxiety levels. Evaluation of the mean scores Spiritual Well-Being Scale before and after the intervention showed a significant decrease in the scores between groups (p < 0.05). PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: With mindfulness-based mandala activity, the well-being of nursing students can be increased.

17.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(5):1314-1321, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1918158

ABSTRACT

Aim This research aimed to ascertain Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards e-learning during COVID-19. Design A cross-sectional design Methods A cross-sectional design utilizing an online survey collected data, recruiting 200 students across four years from nursing faculties at four prominent public and private universities in Amman. Results There are no statistically significant differences in nursing Jordanian students' attitudes towards e-learning during COVID-19according to gender, university sector, and year level.

18.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(6):NC19-NC23, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1918103

ABSTRACT

Introduction: MBBS and nursing students spend a lot of time in near vision activities daily while studying. In the covid and post COVID-19 pandemic era, the emphasis on electronic teaching and studying has increased immensely. Students have started depending more on online studying, teaching and search for study material leading to more time being spent using electronic devices like mobile phones, tabs, PC etc. This can lead to lot of eye strain (digital eye strain) and this predisposes them to develop Non Strabismic Binocular Vision Anomalies (NSBVA) related to accommodation and convergence of eyes. Aim: To study prevalence of NSBVA and report associated ocular symptoms and association of electronic devices (mobile, laptop) use with prevalence NSBVA, in MBBS and nursing students of a teaching hospital in Western Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: This study was a prospective observational study conducted between November 2020 to April 2021at Rajiv Gandhi Medical College and CSM Hospital, Thane, Maharashtra, India. In this study, a total of 110 students including both MBBS and nursing students from all academic years of the hospital were examined for a comprehensive ophthalmic examination and complete binocular vision assessment. The prevalence of NSBVA, associated ocular symptoms, prevalence of refractive errors and duration of electronic device use in the students was documented. Student's t-test was used to compare the total daily duration of electronic devices (mobile, laptop, Computer tablets) use between students with and without NSBVA. Chi-square test was used to find association of variables duration of electronic device use and occurrence of NSBVA. Results: Out of 110 students examined, there were 37.27% (n=41) were males and 62.72% (n=69) females. Age range was 18-30 years with mean age 21.85±2.67 years. Overall, 47 (42.72%) students had NSBVA including 34 MBBS and 13 nursing students. 12 (11%) students had ocular symptoms with NSBVA while 35 (31.8%) students had NSBVA without any ocular symptom. Eye strain was the most common ocular symptom. Average electronic device use was 4.53 hours/day. Most used electronic device was mobile phone. There was no association between NSBVA and electronic device use. Conclusion: The NSBVA is highly prevalent among MBBS and nursing students. Ocular symptoms are absent in many students with NSBVA which may lead to delayed diagnosis and worsening of ocular symptoms due to NSBVA. Older age group of students have higher prevalence of NSBVA. Electronic device exposure is not significantly associated with NSBVA in these students. Screening of such at risk population is important for timely diagnosis and treatment of NSBVA.

19.
Teach Learn Nurs ; 2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1907816

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Academic success requires grit and positive thinking. However, research on Middle Eastern nursing students' grit and positive thinking is limited. This study investigated the demographic variables that correlate to and predict Saudi nursing students' grit and positive thinking. Method: A descriptive cross-sectional design guided this study. We used the 12-item Short Grit Scale (Grit-S) and 8-item Positive Thinking Skills Scale (PTSS) to collect data from 338 nursing students. The Pearson correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis were utilized to analyze the data. Findings: Nursing students' Grit-S mean score is more significant than their PTSS score. The year level is inversely associated with Grit-S, while gender and Grit-S had a weak direct correlation. Regarding PTSS, only the year level was inversely correlated. Finally, both the year level and gender were significant predictors of Grit-S and PTSS. Discussion: Participants' responses to Grit-S and PTSS scores vary greatly depending on their demographics. The nursing students' grit and positive thinking did not develop as they progressed in the nursing program, which is viewed differently by each gender.

20.
Fertility and Sterility ; 116(3 SUPPL):e294, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1881003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To prospectively evaluate the dynamics of pregnancy intention and incidence of pregnancy among professional women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We followed 11,276 pre-menopausal non-pregnant women aged 19-45 years participating in the Nurses' Health Study 3 (2010-2021). Pregnancy intention and pregnancy status were assessed at baseline and every 3 months thereafter. Women who became pregnant during follow-up were asked to report their pregnancy intention at the time they conceived in a follow-up questionnaire administered at gestation week 20-25. RESULTS: At baseline, 898 (8%) women self-reported they were actively trying to conceive, 1285 (11%) self-reported they were not actively trying to conceive but thought they would be pregnant within 1 year, and the remaining 9093 (81%) self-reported they were neither trying to conceive nor thought they would be pregnant within 1 year. Women actively trying to conceive were more likely to be married or in a domestic partnership, nulliparous, and to have a higher educational achievement than women in the other two groups. We documented 870 self-reported pregnancies within 12 months of pregnancy intention assessment. The crude rates of pregnancy were 45%, 28%, and 1% for women in the three pregnancy intention groups, respectively. About 1 in 7 women changed their intention status during follow up. Among women reporting at baseline being actively trying to conceive who did not become pregnant during follow-up, 27% subsequently reported that they were neither trying nor thought they would become pregnant soon. The corresponding figure for women reporting at baseline they thought they might become pregnant soon was 33%. Conversely, among women reporting at baseline that they were neither trying nor thought they would become pregnant soon, 9% reported that they were either actively trying to conceive or thought they would become pregnant soon. Among women who became pregnant during follow-up, 79% reported that they were actively trying to get pregnant when they conceived, including 50% of women who at baseline reported they were not trying to conceive. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy intention is highly fluid among nurses and nursing students of reproductive age. Unsurprisingly, pregnancy intention is strongly associated with incidence of pregnancy. IMPACT STATEMENT: Our findings suggest that pregnancy intention is highly fluid, and current approaches to assess this construct may not fully capture this fluidity. POSTER SESSION: COVID-19.

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