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1.
The International Journal of Bank Marketing ; 40(5):937-938, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1878888

ABSTRACT

[...]it is likely that consumers' payment habits and social behavior, as well as society as a whole, will be drastically altered for the foreseeable future. Moving forward, we can underline at least three future research directions related to m-payment;(1) how to improve the effectiveness of m-payment rollout from the retailing, entertainment, financial services and marketing perspectives using different levels of grand and mid-range theories;(2) security, legal, regulatory, trust and privacy concerns in m-payment rollout in different contexts and levels and (3) business strategies, challenges and policies associated with m-payment implementation among the organizations. [...]we want to explicitly thank Professor Hooman Estelami, the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Bank Marketing, for supporting this Special Issue topic and providing his invaluable suggestions throughout the process of this project.

2.
Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal ; 72, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1876781

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the current habits of personal hygiene practices, to determine the role of demographic characteristics in personal hygiene practices and to identify barriers to sustainable behavioral change during COVID-19 pandemic in general communities of Rawalpindi. Study Design: A cross sectional mixed method study. Place and Duration of Study: Different communities of Rawalpindi city, from Aug 2020 to Apr 2021. Methodology: Non-probability consecutive sampling was used. Both qualitative and quantitative data (sample size;n=400) was collected for understanding of the barriers in sustainability of modified behaviour during and after COVID-19. Results: Out of 400 respondents, 43% were in the age group of 15-30 years while 30% were between 31-45 years. More than half 65% of them were males and 35% females. About 98% of the respondents practice frequent hand washing, 87% uses hand sanitizers, 75% wear masks, 67% practice social distancing and 95% cover their mouth during coughing and sneezing. The educational and occupational status of the respondents was significantly associated with personal hygiene and lifestyle change behaviour. About 391 respondents 391 (97%) were used to practice hand washing, 350 (87.3%) hand sanitizer 301 (75%) wear masks outside home. About 269 (67%) practice social distancing and 382 (95%) cover their mouth while coughing/sneezing. Conclusion: Sustainable behaviour change for positive health and reduced transmission of communicable diseases is possible, if the nature of human beings and the cultural and religious beliefs that define them are taken into account.

3.
Journal of Long-Term Care ; 2022:61-70, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1876501

ABSTRACT

Context: Older people living in LTCF were particularly affected by COVID-19. Italy was the first country in Europe to experience high death rates among older people. Analysing the factors which may have determined high mortality rates in LTCF and identifying actions to safeguard older people’s health in long-term care settings may be critical for future public health emergencies. Objectives: Identify the main challenges and failures faced by a small number of Italian professionals working in LTCF and suggest key actions to better protect older people’s health in future emergencies. Methods: Rapid survey conducted among Italian professionals working in the LTC sector in Italy during the pandemic. Findings: Several factors contributed to higher death rates in LTCF for older people in Italy. To better protect LTCF residents in case of future health emergencies, actions need to be implemented in relation to LTCF’s management, governance and capacity building. Furthermore, safety plans and strategies need to be put in place to ensure older residents’ protection and maintain high level of care in LTCF during public health emergencies, such as COVID-19. Limitations: The article reflects the opinions of a limited number of professionals working in the long-term care sector, which may not be representative of all workers operating in the sector. Implications: Policy and system changes are needed to strengthen the capacity of the Italian long-term care sector to respond to the needs of a growing older population in the context of COVID-19 and beyond. © 2022 The Author(s).

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875633

ABSTRACT

In the digital age, electronic health literacy (eHealth literacy) of community-dwelling older people plays a potentially important role in their health behaviors which are critical for health outcomes. Researchers have documented that self-efficacy and self-care ability are related to this relationship. This study aimed to assess the relationship between eHealth literacy and health promotion behaviors among older people living in communities and explore the chain mediating role of self-efficacy and self-care ability. For this cross-sectional study, we used data from 425 older adults at 3 communities in Qingdao, Shandong Province in Northeastern China, from June to September 2021. Path analysis using the structural equation model was performed. We found that eHealth literacy was significantly associated with health promotion behaviors in older people. Additionally, eHealth literacy indirectly affected health promotion behaviors through self-efficacy and self-care ability, respectively. In addition, the chain mediation effect was identified in the relationship of eHealth literacy and health promotion behaviors: eHealth literacy→ self-efficacy→ self-care ability→ health promotion behaviors. These findings offer promising directions for developing interventions to modify older adults' health behaviors through enhancing their eHealth literacy. These interventions should integrate components that target improving the self-efficacy and self-care ability of older people.


Subject(s)
Self Efficacy , Telemedicine , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Promotion , Humans , Independent Living , Self Care
5.
International Journal of Migration, Health, and Social Care ; 18(2):164-178, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1874095

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The stay-at-home orders were necessary to contain the spread of COVID-19 but have worsened social isolation and loneliness among older persons. Strategies to maintain social connections have been proposed. It is unclear if the reported experiences of social isolation and loneliness are comparable for older immigrants and if the proposed strategies are relevant to this vulnerable population. This study aimed to address this knowledge gap.Design/methodology/approach>This scoping review addressed two questions: What evidence exists on the experience of social isolation and loneliness in older immigrants? What strategies can be beneficial to keep older immigrants socially connected during the COVID-19 pandemic? The search for relevant articles was done in several databases covering the scientific and gray literature, using keywords that reflect the diversity of terminology referring to the main concepts (isolation and loneliness) and target population (older immigrants). Discussion papers and research studies were reviewed, and the main points or findings were documented on data ion forms and summarized in a table. The information in the table was compared and contrasted to identify common themes.Findings>Only six articles (four discussion papers and two studies) met the scoping review’s eligibility criteria. Concerns about interruptions of older immigrants’ social connection during the pandemic were partially corroborated with the studies’ results. Most participants shifted the medium of their contacts from in-person to telephone or social media, and perceived no change in the experience of loneliness. Those with high levels of loneliness reported heightened anxiety and depression. The proposed strategies entailed the use of technology to connect with others and to deliver services, outdoor group activities within the constraints of containment measures and provision of culturally tailored social programs or services.Research limitations/implications>The acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed strategies should be examined to determine the best practices aimed to promote social connection among older immigrants within and outside the context of the pandemic.Originality/value>The scoping review identified strategies that can be used to address social isolation and loneliness among older immigrants during the pandemic.

6.
Computing. Archives for Informatics and Numerical Computation ; 104(6):1481-1496, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1872437

ABSTRACT

Online social platforms or social platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram have become popular platforms for a public discussion about social topics. Recent studies show that there is a growing tendency for people to talk about COVID-19 pandemic in these online channels. The rapid growth of the infected cases by COVID-19 pandemic makes a lots of anxiety and fear among people. With the recent released of Pfizer vaccine, people start posting a lot of rumors regarding the safety concerns of the vaccine, especially among the elderly people. The aim of this study is to bring out the fact that tweets containing all pertinent details about the COVID-19 vaccine and provides an analysis and understanding of users emotions regarding the recent release of COVID-19 vaccine. This study starts with the collection of tweets related to COVID-19 vaccine and then cleaning the dataset from redundant tweets. In this study, we use Twitter API and Web Scraping techniques to obtain a sample of 50,000 tweets talking about COVID-19 vaccine.Further, The analysis of users emotions is achieved by manually labeling and classifying the tweets to either positive or negative. Then, a deep learning based model is used to train the data and classify the people opinion about COVID-19 vaccine. The experimental results illustrate that high percentage of people have shown a positive attitude towards COVID1-19 vaccine. The proposed method is validated over Twitter datasets and the results also demonstrate that use of deep learning classifier can successfully improve the accuracy of people emotions analysis with an accuracy up to 98% for training set and the accuracy for testing set is 73%.

7.
Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ; 128:177-196, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1872374

ABSTRACT

“Old Age People Emotional Stress Prediction during Outbreak using Machine learning methods” discusses that there are two types of stress in elderly people: physical stress and emotional stress. It is very easy to detect physical stress, such as walking problems, breathing problems, problems in doing their daily routine work, etc., but it is very tough to detect emotional stress, and treatment is even more difficult. There are some common reasons for stress, such as financial problems after retirement, taking care of a sick spouse or the death of a spouse, and many more. The common symptoms of stress are loss of appetite, anxiety, insomnia, etc. But the situation gets worse during an outbreak. If an outbreak comes in the form of a pandemic such as a coronavirus, resulting in the death of loved ones, these things increase the level of emotional stress in elderly people. To predict their emotional stress, authors are using machine learning algorithms, Support vector machine for classification and for prediction Logistic Regression have been applied. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

8.
Healthcare ; 10(5):893, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1872022

ABSTRACT

Background: Service-learning is an effective intervention to solve social issues. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of intergenerational virtual service-learning on loneliness and ageism. Method: This study used a pre-post design. A group of undergraduate students were randomly assigned to a “service-learning” project (n = 18). They were paired with seniors (n = 22) to have at least a 30-min weekly virtual interaction for six weeks. The following scales were used: the Aging Semantic Differential (ASD) Scale, the UCLA Loneliness Scale, a one-item researcher generated Likert-rating of loneliness, and two-item researcher generated Likert-rating of student competence. Results: Among college students, the service-learning group showed lower ASD and ageism scores at the post-test compared to the non-service-learning group, t (1, 40) = −2.027, p = 0.049;t (1, 40) = −2.102, p = 0.042, respectively. Among seniors, loneliness scores on the UCLA Scale and the one-item scale of loneliness dropped significantly from pre- to post-interactions with students, t (1, 19) = 2.301, p = 0.033, and t (1, 22) = 2.412, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion: Virtual service-learning is an effective way to solve social issues such as loneliness and ageism.

9.
Cureus ; 14(4), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871970

ABSTRACT

The causes of fevers in older adults are numerous and diverse, resulting in fevers of unknown origin that complicate the diagnosis process. Compared to young adults, older adults are characterized by comorbidities, aging-induced physiological changes, decreased homeostasis, reduced activities of daily living, and a diminished quality of life due to disease and aging. Thus, diverse perspectives are required to facilitate the accurate diagnosis of fever in older adults. In this study, we experienced a case of epidermal staphylococcal bacteremia of unknown cause with a persistent fever that eventually led to the diagnosis of cervical pseudogout. A 94-year-old bedridden woman visited our hospital with a chief complaint of persistent fever. She was diagnosed with cervical pseudogout after closely examining the prolonged fever following Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia. Noninfectious diseases are frequent causes of unexplained fever in older adults, and systemic inflammatory diseases, such as cervical pseudogout, should be considered during examination.

10.
Generations Journal ; 45(2):1-12, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871952

ABSTRACT

Under Medicare, older Americans have access to government-subsidized health insurance to protect them from catastrophic healthcare costs and ensure access to needed care. And yet, one in ten Medicare beneficiaries report delaying care due to cost, and 6 percent report having problems paying medical bills. The health and economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic have exacerbated issues of healthcare affordability for older adults, particularly those with low incomes. This article reviews the financial impact of gaps in the Medicare program, and proposals designed to meet Medicare beneficiaries' evolving needs.

11.
California Journal of Politics and Policy ; 14(1):1-16, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871630

ABSTRACT

Threatening economic impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic on Utah's economy proved to be short-lived, due in part to early budget cuts, federal economic relief, and an expanding economy that out-performed expectations. Subsequently, FY22 provided the Utah Legislature opportunities to invest in education, infrastructure, and social services. Legislators also used this opportunity to cut taxes for veterans, the elderly population, and families. As the state's population continues to grow at record rates, Utah decisionmakers must grapple with rising housing prices and record-high rental rates. This report highlights specific challenges and opportunities Utah faced through negotiating a record-high budget of $25.6 billion and provides an overview of Utah's economy and changing demographic makeup.

12.
Generations Journal ; 45(2):1-11, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871628

ABSTRACT

Attending to neighborhood environments as important determinants of health equity among older adults emphasizes improving environments that prevent poor health and create health inequities in the first place. Investing in neighborhood solutions to improve older adults' health and address health equity will require a shift in thinking and priorities. As our nation attempts to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative to make these shifts now, otherwise the risk is even greater devastation and deepened inequities in the aging population's health.

13.
Generations Journal ; 45(2):1-13, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871550

ABSTRACT

Federal legislation in 1996 imposed severe restrictions on immigrant eligibility for public benefits, which created a chilling effect that discouraged even eligible immigrants and their families from accessing needed income, healthcare, and food. States recognized the harm to the community as a whole when some members are excluded from public benefits and have filled in some of these gaps. But the better solution is to reverse the 1996 federal restrictions and reform our public benefit programs for a future society that is increasingly older, and an older adult population that is increasingly immigrant.

14.
Generations Journal ; 45(2):1-12, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871544

ABSTRACT

Low-income older people in particular face a number of risks and precarities related to health, housing, and care. This article offers case studies from members of a city-wide advocacy group, Senior Housing Preservation-Detroit. Although the coalition's work began in raising awareness about risks arising from displacement due to HUD building contracts expiring, its work was altered by COVID-19. Thus the article outlines how community-based initiatives protected older residents from risks at the intersections of poverty, housing, and health amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

15.
Sotsiologicheskie Issledovaniia ; - (5):71, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871517

ABSTRACT

The article is devoted to the analysis of the pandemic impact on the life of the older people in urban and rural contexts. Our study permits to conclude that the pandemic in a rural context has not increased social exclusion of the older people at the community level. In turn, in the urban context, the elderly faced severe spatial isolation and inability to maintain their usual daily lifestyle, which negatively affected their physical and psychological state. In terms of health care, many older people, both urban and rural, have been forced to cancel scheduled doctor visits and check-ups, postpone surgery indefinitely. The pandemic emphasized the infrastructure deficit in rural areas, when, after the cancellation of bus traffic, the villagers were actually cut off from shops and services. A striking trend during the pandemic has been a rapid digitalization (developing gadgets, transferring communication to an online format, searching for and consuming information on the Internet), which has affected both villages and city dwellers. We can see the growth of intergenerational and local solidarity expressed in the help from the younger generations of the family, volunteer associations in the city and the local community in the countryside.

16.
Sustainability ; 14(10):5906, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871490

ABSTRACT

Access to adequate and appropriate transport options enables older people to continue as thriving community participants, to reach services and to maintain social connections. While transport needs are diverse, and tend to change over time, there is little information on current and future transport patterns, and the awareness, acceptance and adoption of new technologies. A national online survey was administered to current drivers in Australia. A sample of 705 drivers provided information on available travel modes and use of these modes, awareness of in-vehicle technologies and future use of vehicle technologies. The findings revealed high use of private vehicles, walking and taxis but little use of other travel modes (bicycles, motorcycles, rideshare, community services and public transport). Age, gender and residential location influenced the availability and use/potential use of some transport options. Overall awareness of in-vehicle technologies was generally low and particularly so amongst older and female participants. There was some appetite to use emerging technologies in the future. The findings inform the development of effective strategies and initiatives aligned with healthy ageing and wellbeing targets, increased sustainability, resilience and connectedness, creation of healthier travel choices and healthier environments to promote acceptance and use of a range of transport options and uptake of safer vehicles equipped with in-vehicle technologies to ultimately enhance safe and sustainable mobility of older road users.

17.
Population & Societies ; - (600):1-4, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871470

ABSTRACT

Isolated and restricted in their social relations and activities during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, more than half of pensioners under the general pension scheme reported a decline in their mental well-being following the outbreak and lockdowns. For those stating they had needed help, moral or emotional support came first. Those living alone felt the consequences of health policies more so than those living with a partner. Individuals' mental well-being also differed by sex, health status, economic level, and age. Those having the worst experience of lockdown were among the youngest pensioners and those living alone.

18.
JMIR Aging ; 5(2), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871428

ABSTRACT

Background: In people with cognitive impairment, loss of social interactions has a major impact on well-being. Therefore, patients would benefit from early detection of symptoms of social withdrawal. Current measurement techniques such as questionnaires are subjective and rely on recall, in contradiction to smartphone apps, which measure social behavior passively and objectively. Objective: This study uses the remote monitoring smartphone app Behapp to assess social behavior, and aims to investigate (1) the association between social behavior, demographic characteristics, and neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively normal (CN) older adults, and (2) if social behavior is altered in cognitively impaired (CI) participants. In addition, we explored in a subset of individuals the association between Behapp outcomes and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods: CN, subjective cognitive decline (SCD), and CI older adults installed the Behapp app on their own Android smartphone for 7 to 42 days. CI participants had a clinical diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer-type dementia. The app continuously measured communication events, app use and location. Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) total scores were available for 20 SCD and 22 CI participants. Linear models were used to assess group differences on Behapp outcomes and to assess the association of Behapp outcomes with the NPI. Results: We included CN (n=209), SCD (n=55) and CI (n=22) participants. Older cognitively normal participants called less frequently and made less use of apps (P<.05). No sex effects were found. Compared to the CN and SCD groups, CI individuals called less unique contacts (β=–0.7 [SE 0.29], P=.049) and contacted the same contacts relatively more often (β=0.8 [SE 0.25], P=.004). They also made less use of apps (β=–0.83 [SE 0.25], P=.004). Higher total NPI scores were associated with further traveling (β=0.042 [SE 0.015], P=.03). Conclusions: CI individuals show reduced social activity, especially those activities that are related to repeated and unique behavior, as measured by the smartphone app Behapp. Neuropsychiatric symptoms seemed only marginally associated with social behavior as measured with Behapp. This research shows that the Behapp app is able to objectively and passively measure altered social behavior in a cognitively impaired population.

19.
Social Sciences ; 11(5):190, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871373

ABSTRACT

Looking forward, as Japan faces increasing financial challenges approaching the norm of 100-year life, the authors note the emergence of a recrafting of the active aging motif to shogai gen’eki, encouraging older adults to remain productive with continued employment, suggesting the significance of remaining useful for a sustainable society. Besides a macro socio-historical review, the article also included a microanalysis of one case study of the development of senior clubs and senior colleges in a Japanese city, and a brief overview of the U.S. experience for comparative insights of active aging initiatives in Japan. [...]it should be noted that in Japanese literature, active aging programs are more widely known as programs to promote ikigai (life purpose). [...]the papers selected for this Special Issue have contributed towards the stock of knowledge that exists on how active aging is conceptualized and expressed in the region.

20.
JMIR Aging ; 5(2), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871366

ABSTRACT

Background: Although smart speaker technology is poised to help improve the health and well-being of older adults by offering services such as music, medication reminders, and connection to others, more research is needed to determine how older adults from lower socioeconomic position (SEP) accept and use this technology. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using smart speakers to improve the health and well-being of low-SEP older adults. Methods: A total of 39 adults aged between 65 and 85 years who lived in a subsidized housing community were recruited to participate in a 3-month study. The participants had a smart speaker at their home and were given a brief orientation on its use. Over the course of the study, participants were given weekly check-in calls to help assist with any problems and newsletters with tips on how to use the speaker. Participants received a pretest and posttest to gauge comfort with technology, well-being, and perceptions and use of the speaker. The study staff also maintained detailed process notes of interactions with the participants over the course of the study, including a log of all issues reported. Results: At the end of the study period, 38% (15/39) of the participants indicated using the speaker daily, and 38% (15/39) of the participants reported using it several times per week. In addition, 72% (28/39) of the participants indicated that they wanted to continue using the speaker after the end of the study. Most participants (24/39, 62%) indicated that the speaker was useful, and approximately half of the participants felt that the speaker gave them another voice to talk to (19/39, 49%) and connected them with the outside world (18/39, 46%). Although common uses were using the speaker for weather, music, and news, fewer participants reported using it for health-related questions. Despite the initial challenges participants experienced with framing questions to the speaker, additional explanations by the study staff addressed these issues in the early weeks of the study. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that there is promise for smart speaker technology for low-SEP older adults, particularly to connect them to music, news, and reminders. Future studies will need to provide more upfront training on query formation as well as develop and promote more specific options for older adults, particularly in the area of health and well-being.

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