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1.
Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed ; : 1-7, 2022.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-2007119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, concerns were raised about sufficiency of available intensive care resources. In many places, routine interventions were postponed and criteria for the allocation of scarce resources were formulated. In Germany, some hospitals were at times seriously burdened during the course of the pandemic. Intensive care units in particular experienced a shortage of resources, which may have led to a restriction of services and a stricter indication setting for resource-intensive measures such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this work is to provide an overview of how these pressures were managed at large ECMO centers in Germany. METHODS: One representative of each major ECMO referral center in Germany was invited to participate in an online survey in spring 2021. RESULTS: Of 34 invitations that were sent out, the survey was answered by 23 participants. In all centers, routine procedures were postponed during the pandemic. Half of the centers increased the number of beds on which ECMO procedures could be offered. Nevertheless, in one-third of the centers, the start of at least one ECMO support was delayed because of a feared resource shortage. In 17% of centers, at least one patient was denied ECMO that he or she would have most likely received under prepandemic conditions. CONCLUSION: The results of this online survey indicate that the experienced pressures and resource constraints led some centers to be cautious about ECMO indications.

2.
Radioprotection ; 57(3):233-240, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2004805

ABSTRACT

The pandemic situation, originated due to the appearance of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, changed many aspects of our lives and jobs. This health crisis also affected the day-to-day work of radiation protection experts, including the wide range of areas involved in this sector. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of this pandemic on the Spanish radiation protection experts. For that purpose, a Google Forms online survey was developed with 39 questions. The survey covered different aspects related to the work developed by the Spanish professionals, taking into account three different time periods along the pandemic situation. According to this survey, the appearance of COVID-19 modified the labour conditions and modalities of many Spanish radiation protection professionals, especially at the beginning of the pandemic. Most on-site activities were related to the health sector and the nuclear industry, other sectors were more flexible, and the workload increased for half of the surveyed participants. Many operational activities suffered delays due to the pandemic, whereas the one-month wearing period of passive personal dosimeters was extended in most cases during the first Spanish alarm state (15th March 2020 up to the 21st June 2020). Finally, difficulties faced in terms of the working area have been identified and may be useful for the future.

3.
Journal of Infection and Public Health ; 15(10):1043-1046, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2004243

ABSTRACT

We approached European tertiary care institutions to provide details regarding their management of the current human monkeypox outbreak. 73 out of 105 sites stated to have capacities to manage the outbreak adequately amid the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. There are effective protective measures to prevent nosocomial infections in place at nearly all institutions. Diagnostic and treatment capacities on the other hand have potential to be improved.

4.
Orv Hetil ; 163(29): 1135-1143, 2022 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997356

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In 2021, vaccines against COVID-19 became widely available in Hungary, but a part of the population refuses to be vaccinated, which hinders the control of the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To explore the sociodemographic characteristics of the Hungarian vaccination-refusing population and to preliminarily explore the reasons behind their refusal. METHODS: In December 2021, survey data were collected online using quota-sampling among the Hungarian population aged 18-65 years with internet access. Sociodemographic variables, individual variables, and reasons for refusal were asked. 1905 completed questionnaires were included in this analysis. After variable selection using LASSO regression, binary logistic regression was used to identify the influencing variables. Reasons for rejection were examined both descriptively and using hierarchical classification. RESULTS: Respondents with lower income, lower education, females, younger age, people living in smaller municipalities and who perceived their own health as better were more likely to refuse vaccination. No similar associations were found with marital status, household size, life satisfaction and loneliness. Distrust of vaccination, safety concerns (especially side effects) and efficacy concerns are the main reasons for refusal, and to a lesser extent, the belief of immunity. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination refusal is higher in vulnerable groups, which further increases their health risks. Alongside a well-designed health communication campaign, restoring trust in scientific and health institutions, transparent communication and a community-based approach appear to be important to increase vaccination uptake in Hungary. Orv Hetil. 2022; 163(29): 1135-1143.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Vaccination , Vaccination Refusal
5.
Journal of Cancer Policy ; : 100359, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1996324

ABSTRACT

Background Worldwide, COVID-19 greatly reduced healthcare accessibility and utilization by non-COVID patients including cancer. This study aimed to quantify and characterize cancer care adjustments experienced by cancer patients/survivors;and to explore their concerns, beliefs, and knowledge regarding COVID-19. Methods A cross‐sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire distributed through social media patients’ groups (June–December 2020). Questionnaire included basic information, care adjustments (in “care provision” and in “treatment plan”), and patients’ concerns, beliefs, and knowledge. Data description and analysis were done. Results Out of 300 participants, there were 68.0% on-treatment and 32.0% in follow-up stage. Care adjustments were reported by 29.7%;mostly in care provision (27.3%) rather than treatment plan (4.9%). Adjustments were less likely to occur when healthcare facility was in governorate other than that of residence (OR:0.53, 95%CI:0.30–0.96, P=0.037) and more likely with long-standing diagnosis (≥12 months) compared with recent (<3 months) (adjusted-OR:4.13, 95%CI:1.19–14.34, P=0.026). Lower proportion of on-treatment patients used remote consultation than patients in follow-up [4.4% versus 17.7%, P<0.001]. Patients were concerned about fulfilling their care visits more than the probable COVID-19 infection (72.3%). It was uncommon to feel that the risk of COVID-19 infection is higher in care places than in the community (27.3%) or to feel safe with remote consultations (34.3%). However, patients increased their infection control practice (64.0%) and the majority were aware of their increased susceptibility to complications (86.0%). Somewhat, they were also concerned about the care quality (57.3%). Many had adequate access to COVID-19 information (69.0%) and their main sources were the Ministry of Health webpage and ordinary media (radio/TV). Conclusion Cancer patients were primarily concerned about fulfilling their planned care and COVID-19 infection was less appreciated. Policy Summary Launching of a policy for enhancement of telemedicine experience through more patients’ engagement—as essential stakeholders—may be required. To heighten pandemic resilience for cancer care in Egypt, more investment in establishing specialized end-to-end cancer care facilities that ensure continuity of care may be justified.

6.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1536, 2022 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Confusion of information has also colored the course of the Covid-19 pandemic in Indonesia. The study analyzes the relationship between media exposure and information clarity about Covid-19 in Indonesia. METHODS: The study collected extensive data (n = 5,397). The study determines information clarity about Covid-19 based on respondents' admissions. There were four types of media exposure analyzed: frequency of reading a newspaper/magazine, frequency of listening to a radio, frequency of watching television, and frequency of internet use. The study carried out a binary logistic regression test in the final stage. RESULTS: The results show read a newspaper/magazine every day is 1.670 times more likely than reading a newspaper/magazine > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. Reading a newspaper/magazine 2-3 days a week is 1.386 times more likely than reading a newspaper/magazine > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. Reading a newspaper/magazine 4-5 days a week is 1.470 times more likely than reading a newspaper/magazine > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. Watching television 2 to 3 days a week is 1.601 times more likely than watching television > five days a week to get clear details about Covid-19. Watching television 4 to 5 days a week are 1.452 times more likely than watching television > five days a week to get precise information about Covid-19. CONCLUSION: The study concluded two types of media exposure related to information clarity about Covid-19 in Indonesia: the frequency of reading newspapers and watching television.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Television , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Mass Media , Pandemics
7.
Soc Sci Med ; 308: 115192, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984057

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic induces a social dilemma: engaging in preventive health behaviors is costly for individuals but generates benefits that also accrue to society at large. The extent to which individuals internalize the social impact of their actions may depend on their prosociality, i.e. the willingness to behave in a way that mostly benefits other people. We conduct a nationally representative online survey in Germany (n = 5843) to investigate the role of prosociality in reducing the spread of COVID-19 during the second coronavirus wave. At the individual level, higher prosociality is strongly positively related to compliance with public health behaviors such as mask wearing and social distancing. A one standard deviation (SD) increase in prosociality is associated with a 0.3 SD increase in compliance (p < 0.01). At the regional (NUTS-2) level, a one SD higher average prosociality is associated with an 11% lower weekly incidence rate (p < 0.01), and a 2%p lower weekly growth rate (p < 0.01) of COVID-19 cases, controlling for a host of demographic and socio-economic factors. This association is driven by higher compliance with public health behaviors in regions with higher prosociality. Our correlational results thus support the common notion that voluntary behavioral change plays a vital role in fighting the pandemic and, more generally, that social preferences may determine collective action outcomes of a society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Res Dev Disabil ; 129: 104307, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic presents a great challenge for governments, health care professionals and the general population. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might be especially vulnerable to restrictions imposed by the crisis. AIM: The objective of the study was to examine the impact of the SARSCoV- 2 pandemic on children with ASD and their families. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We conducted an online survey two months after the beginning of lock-down (18th of May to 5th of July 2020) in Germany and Austria. We investigated behavioral and emotional changes of children related to the lock-down alongside parental stress and intrafamilial burden OUTCOME AND RESULTS: Of the 216 participating families with an autistic child (mean age: 12.23 years), nearly 50% reported aggravation of autistic symptoms and heightened parental stress. Families reported discontinuation of therapy, more intrafamilial conflicts and increase of psychopharmacological medication of the child. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Our report on short-term detrimental effects of the pandemic calls for thorough investigation of long-term sequalae for children and families.

9.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(7): e35168, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization World Mental Health International College Student (WMH-ICS) initiative aims to screen for mental health and substance use problems among postsecondary students on a global scale as well as to develop and evaluate evidence-based preventive and ameliorative interventions for this population. This protocol paper presents the Canadian version of the WMH-ICS survey, detailing the adapted survey instrument, the unique weekly cross-sectional administration, the multitiered recruitment strategy, and the associated risk mitigation protocols. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to provide a methodological resource for researchers conducting cross-national comparisons of WMH-ICS data, as well as to serve as a useful guide for those interested in replicating the outlined cross-sectional methodology to better understand how mental health and substance use vary over time among university students. METHODS: The online survey is based on the WMH-ICS survey instrument, modified to the Canadian context by the addition of questions pertaining to Canadian-based guidelines and the translation of the survey to Canadian French. The survey is administered through the Qualtrics survey platform and is sent to an independent stratified random sample of 350 students per site weekly, followed by two reminder emails. Upon survey closure every week, a random subsample of 70 nonresponders are followed up with via phone or through a personal email in an effort to decrease nonresponder bias. The survey is accompanied by an extensive risk mitigation protocol that stratifies respondents by the level of need and provides tailored service recommendations, including a facilitated expedited appointment to student counseling services for those at increased risk of suicide. The anticipated sample size is approximately 5500 students per site per year. RESULTS: In February 2020, the Canadian survey was deployed at the University of British Columbia. This was followed by deployment at Simon Fraser University (November 2020), McMaster University (January 2021), and the University of Toronto (January 2022). Data collection at all 4 sites is ongoing. As of May 6, 2022, 29,503 responses have been collected. CONCLUSIONS: Based on international collaboration, the Canadian version of the WMH-ICS survey incorporates a novel methodological approach centered on the weekly administration of a comprehensive cross-sectional survey to independent stratified random samples of university students. After 27 months of consecutive survey administration, we have developed and refined a survey protocol that has proven effective in engaging students at four Canadian institutions, allowing us to track how mental health and substance use vary over time using an internationally developed university student survey based on the criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition). INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR1-10.2196/35168.

10.
Pilot Feasibility Stud ; 8(1): 134, 2022 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974170

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Corona-Vakzin-Konsortium project (CoVaKo) analyses the efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccines in a real-world setting, as well as breakthrough infections in Bavaria, Germany. A subproject of CoVaKo aims to identify adverse reactions of the COVID-19 vaccine and compare these to adverse reactions of other vaccines in an online survey. In a preceding feasibility study, the study materials were tested for comprehensibility, visual design, and motivation to participate, as well as for their ability to be implemented and carried out in primary care practices and vaccination centres. METHODS: We used a mixed-methods research design. First, three focus groups consisting of general population participants were organised to evaluate the study materials and survey. Second, a test roll-out was conducted in vaccination centres and primary care practices that involved implementing and quantitatively evaluating the online survey. Third, interviews were conducted with participating general practitioners and heads of vaccination centres four weeks after the test roll-out. RESULTS: Parts of the information and registration form proved incomprehensible, specifically regarding the recruitment material and/or online survey. For example, headings were misleading given that, relative to other vaccinations, the COVID-19 vaccination was overemphasised in the title. Participants requested additional information regarding the procedure and completion time. Within 31 days, 2199 participants, who received either a COVID-19 vaccination (99%) or at least one of the control vaccinations (1%), registered for the study. Participants (strongly) agreed that the registration process was easy to understand, that the completion time was reasonable, and that the technical setup was straightforward. Physicians and heads of the vaccination centres perceived the study as easy to integrate into their workflow. The majority expressed willingness to participate in the main study. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicated that identifying and documenting adverse reactions following vaccinations using an online survey is feasible. Testing materials and surveys provided valuable insight, enabling subsequent improvements. Participation from health professionals proved essential in ensuring the practicality of procedures. Lastly, adapting the study's organisation to external fluctuating structures and requirements confirmed necessary for a successful implementation, especially due to dynamic changes in the nation's COVID-19 vaccination strategies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was retrospectively registered at the "Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien" (DRKS-ID: DRKS00025881 ) on Oct 14, 2021.

11.
Int J Sports Physiol Perform ; : 1-15, 2022 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962047

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate differences in athletes' knowledge, beliefs, and training practices during COVID-19 lockdowns with reference to sport classification and sex. This work extends an initial descriptive evaluation focusing on athlete classification. METHODS: Athletes (12,526; 66% male; 142 countries) completed an online survey (May-July 2020) assessing knowledge, beliefs, and practices toward training. Sports were classified as team sports (45%), endurance (20%), power/technical (10%), combat (9%), aquatic (6%), recreational (4%), racquet (3%), precision (2%), parasports (1%), and others (1%). Further analysis by sex was performed. RESULTS: During lockdown, athletes practiced body-weight-based exercises routinely (67% females and 64% males), ranging from 50% (precision) to 78% (parasports). More sport-specific technical skills were performed in combat, parasports, and precision (∼50%) than other sports (∼35%). Most athletes (range: 50% [parasports] to 75% [endurance]) performed cardiorespiratory training (trivial sex differences). Compared to prelockdown, perceived training intensity was reduced by 29% to 41%, depending on sport (largest decline: ∼38% in team sports, unaffected by sex). Some athletes (range: 7%-49%) maintained their training intensity for strength, endurance, speed, plyometric, change-of-direction, and technical training. Athletes who previously trained ≥5 sessions per week reduced their volume (range: 18%-28%) during lockdown. The proportion of athletes (81%) training ≥60 min/session reduced by 31% to 43% during lockdown. Males and females had comparable moderate levels of training knowledge (56% vs 58%) and beliefs/attitudes (54% vs 56%). CONCLUSIONS: Changes in athletes' training practices were sport-specific, with few or no sex differences. Team-based sports were generally more susceptible to changes than individual sports. Policy makers should provide athletes with specific training arrangements and educational resources to facilitate remote and/or home-based training during lockdown-type events.

12.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(7): ofac260, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1948423

ABSTRACT

Routine data on vaccine uptake are not disaggregated by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other sexual identities (LGBTQ+) populations, despite higher risk of infection and severe disease. We found comparable vaccination uptake patterns among 1032 LGBTQ+ New Yorkers and the general population. We identified critical socioeconomic factors that were associated with vaccine hesitancy in this economically vulnerable population.

13.
PeerJ ; 10: e13384, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934569

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 social distancing on medical research from the perspective of postgraduate students. Methods: A cross-sectional study using an online survey was conducted from October 31 to November 1, 2021. A questionnaire was used to assess the impact of COVID-19 social distancing on medical research among postgraduate students. The questionnaire included basic information, medical research information, and information about social distancing measures. Participants also completed the self-made Research Work Affected Scale of Postgraduates (RWAS-P; qualitative evaluation: very mildly 0-10; mildly 11-20; moderately 21-30; severely 31-40; very severely 41-50). Logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the impact of COVID-19 social distancing. Results: A total of 468 participants were analyzed; 95.2% of the participants adhered to social distancing measures. The median total RWAS-P score was 22. The median RWAS-P scores for earlier research data, current research projects, future research plans, paper publication, and graduation schedule were 2, 6, 6, 6, and 4, respectively (score range 0-10). The higher grade of students, experimental research, and existence of inappetence or sleeplessness were related to negative attitude towards COVID-19 social distancing (odd ratio = 6.35, 9.80, 2.31, 2.15, 1.95, respectively). Conclusions: Participants reported that social distancing had a moderate overall impact on their medical research. Social distancing had the greatest impact on current research projects, future research plans, and paper publications among postgraduate students. Higher grade level, experimental research type, inappetence, and sleeplessness were related to the impact of social distancing on their medical research.

14.
Scand J Public Health ; 50(6): 693-702, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923465

ABSTRACT

AIMS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, Sweden was one of the few countries that rejected lockdowns in favour of recommendations for restrictions, including careful hand hygiene and social distancing. Preschools and primary schools remained open. Several studies have shown negative impacts of the pandemic on children, particularly high levels of anxiety. The study aim was to explore how Swedish school-aged children aged 6-14 years, experienced the COVID-19 pandemic and their perceived anxiety. METHODS: In total, 774 children aged 6-14 years and their guardians answered an online questionnaire containing 24 questions, along with two instruments measuring anxiety: the Children's Anxiety Questionnaire and the Numerical Rating Scale. A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was used for analysing the quantitative and qualitative data. Each data source was first analysed separately, followed by a merged interpretative analysis. RESULTS: The results showed generally low levels of anxiety, with no significant sex differences. Children who refrained from normal social activities or group activities (n=377) had significantly higher levels of anxiety. Most of the children were able to appreciate the bright side of life, despite the social distancing and refraining from activities, which prevented them from meeting and hugging their loved ones. CONCLUSIONS: These Swedish children generally experienced low levels of anxiety, except those who refrained from social activities. Life was nonetheless mostly experienced as normal, largely because schools remained open. Keeping life as normal as possible could be one important factor in preventing higher anxiety and depression levels in children during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sweden/epidemiology
15.
Journal of Punjab Academy of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology ; 21(2):21-26, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1912057

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 has prompted medical faculty all across Indian sub-continent to start online classes, with no prior sensitization and experience. This study was planned to assess the perceptions of medical students on online teaching. Materials and Methods: Present study is cross sectional and done through anonymous online survey from 15th June to 15th July 2020 across the Indian subcontinent on undergraduate students from all the phases of MBBS course across the country. Perceptions of medical students on Online teaching-learning during COVID-19 pandemic was measured. Results: Of the 1256 complete responses received, >60% of the students reported online lectures to be less interesting, less interactive and less engaging. They disagreed that online learning gives stronger sense of community among students and are capable of replacing the traditional didactic lecture format but were of the opinion that online learning encourages self-directed learning. The majority of students felt online teaching is a better opportunity for introvert students to express themselves through chat messages and it requires more self-direction and discipline. Conclusion: The results showed that students were not much satised with online teaching. The possible reason could be lack of awareness of faculty about the available online teaching-learning strategies. Teachers must undergo faculty development training to learn the use of technology in teaching. Students should also be sensitized on the various online tools available for learning and assessment. © 2021, Punjab Academy of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. All rights reserved.

16.
Mar Policy ; 144: 105185, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1907546

ABSTRACT

Chile is the second largest producer of salmon in the world and is an important pillar of the national economy. Any disruption in how the industry functions will have economic and social effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Chilean salmon industry. An online survey was sent to the highest positions in the industry: presidents, managers, and chiefs of salmon companies. Of the 52 respondents, 75% indicated that operations were moderately affected by the pandemic. More than 70% reported a decrease in their company's production and sales. Work absenteeism was a concern for 88%, and the implementation of sanitary measures was considered effective and relevant to prevent the spread of the virus. However, there were no statistically significant differences (p-value > 0.05) between the degree of impact on operations by company size, or between absenteeism and company size. The information obtained in this study is a first look into understanding the impacts of the pandemic on the Chilean salmon industry in the year 2020.

17.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 348, 2022 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior, particularly prevalent during the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19), has been shown to lead to depression. In medical students, this could negatively affect the provision of healthcare. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the association between sedentary behavior and depression in Japanese medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 30 to August 30, 2021, using anonymous questionnaire system to assess respondents' sociodemographic characteristics, physical activity, sedentary behavior among 1000 Japanese university students. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2). The data of 484 respondents (48.4%) were included in a stepwise analysis, where we set the difference between medical and non-medical students as Model 1 and that between medical students with and without depression as Model 2. For group comparisons of both models, the chi-square test was used for sociodemographic characteristics, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for physical activity and sedentary behavior. In Model 2, factors associated with depression among medical students were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: In Model 1, medical students were less physically active (p < 0.001), had longer sedentary time (p < 0.001), and had higher PHQ-2 scores (p = 0.048) than non-medical students. In Model 2, medical students with depression had longer sedentary time (p = 0.004) and longer leisure screen time than those without depression (p = 0.007). Moreover, logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders showed that sedentary time (OR = 1.001, p = 0.048) and leisure screen time (OR = 1.003, p = 0.003) were significantly associated with depression among medical students. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these results, it is evident that reducing Japanese medical students' sedentary time and leisure screen time can help combat depression during the COVID-19 pandemic; thus, these results can guide the development of appropriate interventions to prevent and treat depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior
18.
Case Studies in the Environment ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1892387

ABSTRACT

The aviation sector represents an important terrain for contemporary environmental politics and policy. This position has been complicated by the Covid-19 pandemic, which led to a dramatic slowdown in international travel and threatened the position of the aviation and airline sectors. The temporality of this decline remains unclear. In this article, we present online qualitative research that explores how people think their flying habits might change in the future-in the wake of both Covid-19 and resultant social restrictions and awareness of climate breakdown. To do so, we foreground our analysis in Bristol, United Kingdom-a city characterized by a strong brand of green politics and debates surrounding airport expansion and the role of aviation in a net-zero future. This work adopted a research design conducted entirely online, incorporating surveys disseminated via local media and online focus groups. Findings from this work demonstrate that close to 60% of those surveyed will likely fly less in a post-Covid future. Furthermore, the Covid-19 pandemic has prompted a "reimagination" of flying-with important behavioral, policy, and justice implications. Our objective in presenting this work is twofold-first to illuminate emergent patterns of behavioral change in flying post-Covid and, second, to critically reflect on conducting online qualitative research in a pandemic. © 2022 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

19.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(7): e37929, 2022 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the real-world effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines and understanding the incidence and severity of SARS-CoV-2 illness in children are essential to inform policy and guide health care professionals in advising parents and caregivers of children who test positive for SARS-CoV-2. OBJECTIVE: This report describes the objectives and methods for conducting the Pediatric Research Observing Trends and Exposures in COVID-19 Timelines (PROTECT) study. PROTECT is a longitudinal prospective pediatric cohort study designed to estimate SARS-CoV-2 incidence and COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness (VE) against infection among children aged 6 months to 17 years, as well as differences in SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccine response between children and adolescents. METHODS: The PROTECT multisite network was initiated in July 2021, which aims to enroll approximately 2305 children across four US locations and collect data over a 2-year surveillance period. The enrollment target was based on prospective power calculations and accounts for expected attrition and nonresponse. Study sites recruit parents and legal guardians of age-eligible children participating in the existing Arizona Healthcare, Emergency Response, and Other Essential Workers Surveillance (HEROES)-Research on the Epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in Essential Response Personnel (RECOVER) network as well as from surrounding communities. Child demographics, medical history, COVID-19 exposure, vaccination history, and parents/legal guardians' knowledge and attitudes about COVID-19 are collected at baseline and throughout the study. Mid-turbinate nasal specimens are self-collected or collected by parents/legal guardians weekly, regardless of symptoms, for SARS-CoV-2 and influenza testing via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and the presence of COVID-like illness (CLI) is reported. Children who test positive for SARS-CoV-2 or influenza, or report CLI are monitored weekly by online surveys to report exposure and medical utilization until no longer ill. Children, with permission of their parents/legal guardians, may elect to contribute blood at enrollment, following SARS-CoV-2 infection, following COVID-19 vaccination, and at the end of the study period. PROTECT uses electronic medical record (EMR) linkages where available, and verifies COVID-19 and influenza vaccinations through EMR or state vaccine registries. RESULTS: Data collection began in July 2021 and is expected to continue through the spring of 2023. As of April 13, 2022, 2371 children are enrolled in PROTECT. Enrollment is ongoing at all study sites. CONCLUSIONS: As COVID-19 vaccine products are authorized for use in pediatric populations, PROTECT study data will provide real-world estimates of VE in preventing infection. In addition, this prospective cohort provides a unique opportunity to further understand SARS-CoV-2 incidence, clinical course, and key knowledge gaps that may inform public health. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR1-10.2196/37929.

20.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(5): e37876, 2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the benefits of yoga are well established across the world, there are limited studies exploring the long-term interrelation between yoga, meditation, and health. Specifically, there is limited research exploring the differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among regular meditators and nonmeditators. OBJECTIVE: This study explored the differences in 7 domains of HRQOL (including quality of life, ability to adopt a healthy lifestyle, ability to relax, frequency of nervousness and stress, coping with day-to-day stress, workplace productivity, and staying healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic) among practitioners of yoga and meditation. METHODS: A cross-sectional, online survey was distributed to all members who participated in a 100-day yoga and meditation program, culminating in the International Day of Yoga event, organized by the Heartfulness Institute in partnership with the Central Council for Research in Yoga and Naturopathy, Ministry of Ayush, SVYASA Yoga University, and Patanjali Yoga Institute, India. The program consisted of daily virtual yoga, meditation, and speaker sessions. The data were analyzed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis tests for continuous variables and chi-square test for categorical variables. RESULTS: A total of 3164 participants from 39 countries completed the survey. Mean age was 33.8 (SD 13.6) years. The majority of the participants were female (n=1643, 52%) and students (n=1312, 41.5%). Regular yoga and meditation practice was associated with a positive impact on all 7 domains of HRQOL (Mann-Whitney P<.05 and χ2P<.05). Notably, experienced Heartfulness (≥2 years) meditators reported better outcomes in all the domains of HRQOL as compared to those not currently practicing this form of meditation and participants with ≤1 year of Heartfulness meditation experience (P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first cross-sectional studies to explore HRQOL outcomes among participants of a 100-day virtual yoga and meditation program. Overall, a yoga and meditation practice was found to be an effective tool for promoting HRQOL. Regular yoga and meditation practice was associated with factors promoting health and well-being, with long-term meditation practice associated with increased benefits.

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