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1.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 96, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100230

ABSTRACT

Background: Education and capacity building in palliative care are greatly needed in Nigeria. Currently, two institutions integrate palliative care into the undergraduate medical curriculum and no post graduate training exists. A team from the University of Lagos in Nigeria and Northwestern University in the US collaborated to design, implement, and evaluate a 12-hour virtual palliative care training program for Nigerian health professionals. Objective: This study investigated the impact of the first session of the training program on healthcare professionals' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence in palliative care. Methods: The Education in Palliative and End-of-Life (EPEC) curriculum and the Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) curriculum were used as foundations for the program and adapted for the Nigerian context. Delivered online, the training focused on goals of palliative care, whole patient assessment, communication skills, pain management, psychosocial issues, palliative care in COVID, oncology, and HIV. A mixed-methods evaluation based on Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework was used and data were gathered from surveys and focus groups. Findings: Thirty-five health professionals completed the training. The training had a positive impact on knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Confidence in providing end-of-life care increased from 27.3% to 92.9% while confidence in prescribing medication to relieve symptoms at the end of life increased from 42.9% to 92.0%. Performance on multiple-choice knowledge tests increased by 10% (p < 0.01). All participants stated that they would recommend the program to a peer while 96.4% reported the program was relevant to the Nigerian context. Qualitative analysis suggested that the training would help participants provide more holistic care for patients, communicate better, and change how they interacted with families. Topics to be addressed in future training were identified. Conclusions: This virtual training can be an important element in palliative care capacity building in Nigeria and represents a model for global health collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , Palliative Care , Nigeria , Curriculum , Workforce
2.
Palliat Med ; : 2692163221123966, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to rapid adaptations among palliative care services, but it is unclear how these adaptations vary in relation to their unique organizational contexts. AIM: Understand how the pandemic impacted the implementation of new and existing palliative care programs in diverse hospital systems using the Dynamic Sustainability Framework. DESIGN: Twelve in-depth interviews with 15 key informants representing palliative care programs from seven hospital systems between April and June 2020. SETTING: Public, not-for-profit private, community, and academic teaching hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area with existing palliative care programs that were expanding services to new clinical areas (e.g. new outpatient clinic or community-based care). RESULTS: Six themes characterized how palliative care programs were impacted and adapted during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic: palliative care involvement in preparing for surge, increased emphasis on advance care planning, advocating for visitors for dying patients, providing emotional support to clinicians, adopting virtual approaches to care, and gaps in chaplaincy support. There was variation in how new and existing programs were able to adapt to early pandemic stresses; systems with new outpatient programs struggled to utilize their programs effectively during the crisis onset. CONCLUSIONS: The fit between palliative care programs and practice setting was critical to program resiliency during the early stages of the pandemic. Reconceptualizing the Dynamic Sustainability Framework to reflect a bidirectional relationship between ecological system, practice setting, and intervention levels might better guide implementers and researchers in understanding how ecological/macro changes can influence interventions on the ground.

3.
J Palliat Med ; 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097264

ABSTRACT

Context: A daily nine-item "Handbook for Self-Care at Work" was created to increase the well-being and satisfaction of the staff at the department of palliative care of a tertiary oncological center in the United States. Objectives: To evaluate the perceived usefulness of and adherence to the Handbook. Design, Setting and Participants: An anonymous survey was conducted among the palliative care staff asking for the frequency of utilization and the perception of usefulness of the Handbook. Additional data collected included demographics, satisfaction with professional life, frequency of burnout, and frequency of callousness toward people. We also compared the use and perception of the Handbook before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Of 52 palliative care clinicians, 39 (75%) completed the survey. Most participants were women and were <49 years. Most respondents (59%) found the Handbook useful or very useful. Offer help, ask for help, and hydration were perceived as the most useful items. The items most frequently achieved were movement, hydration, and eat light. The least useful perceived item was nap time, which was rarely achieved. During the COVID-19 pandemic, 32 (82%) respondents found the Handbook to be as/somewhat more/much more useful, and 29 (75%) were able to adhere to the items as/somewhat more/much more often than before. Conclusion: Most respondents found the Handbook useful and were able to accomplish the items most of the days. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the staff felt that the Handbook was more useful.

4.
J Palliat Med ; 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097263

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the implementation of a triage protocol for palliative care (PC) during the COVID-19 pandemic (PALI-COVID) at a referral center in Brazil. Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted. Based on the triage protocol, patients were classified into a red group, a yellow group, and a green group (GG). Patients should receive PC as recommended for each group. Results: A total of 1517 patients were included in the analysis. About 11% (n = 162) of patients received PC. About 35% (n = 529) of all patients died. There was a significant difference in the mortality rate between the groups; the GG had the highest mortality rate. Most patients who died (77.1%) did not receive PC. Conclusion: PALI-COVID was effective in identifying patients who had a higher risk of death and needed end-of-life support. Despite the protocol, few patients received PC.

5.
J Palliat Med ; 25(11): 1639-1645, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097262

ABSTRACT

Background: Adults with advanced lung cancer experience reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and psychological symptoms at diagnosis. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate whether the COVID-19 pandemic worsened HRQOL among patients recently diagnosed with cancer. Design: We analyzed baseline data from two randomized controlled trials of early palliative care to compare HRQOL and depression symptoms among those enrolled during the pandemic (January 2020 to January 2021) versus prepandemic (March 2018 to January 2019). Setting/Subjects: This cohort included patients recently diagnosed with advanced lung cancer in two multisite studies. Measurements: We used analysis of covariance to calculate adjusted mean differences between groups with the timeframe as an independent variable and HRQOL (using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General) and depression symptoms (using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9) as dependent variables, adjusting for age, gender, relationship status, performance status, symptoms, and time since diagnosis. We tested for an interaction between the COVID-19 timeframe and relationship status. Results: Neither HRQOL (adjusted mean difference -1.78; p = 0.137) nor depression symptoms (0.06; p = 0.889) differed between patients enrolled pre-COVID-19 (n = 665) relative to those enrolled during COVID-19 (n = 191) in adjusted analyses. Relationship status moderated the effect of the COVID-19 timeframe on HRQOL; unmarried patients experienced worse HRQOL during COVID-19 (adjusted mean difference: -5.25; p = 0.011). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic did not further reduce HRQOL or increase depression symptoms among patients recently diagnosed with lung cancer, but did worsen HRQOL for unmarried patients in moderation analysis. Psychosocial evaluation and supportive care are important for all patients, particularly those with limited social support. Clinical trial registration numbers: NCT03337399 and NCT03375489.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , Quality of Life , Pandemics , Depression
6.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr ; 2022 Oct 24.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095947

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: End-of-life care is one of the most crucial experiences for both the patient and their loved ones. However, as a result of the changes generated by the COVID 19 pandemic, the dynamics of the end-of-life process has undergone changes at both the family, social and health levels. In turn, this has altered the perception and development of the grief of relatives of patients who died during the pandemic regardless of the cause of death. Then, the aim of this study is to analyze the perceptions and some aspects of bereavement of died patients` relatives during the pandemic of Covid 19. METHODS: Through the admission evaluation and follow-up of the relatives with an adapted version of the international Care Of the Dying Evaluation (iCODE) questionnaire. RESULTS: 239 relatives were surveyed, of which 112 completed the follow-up questionnaire. Most of the patients died at home and their family members were highly involved in their care. Medical attention was considered adequate and the symptom with the highest perception was pain. 87% of those surveyed participated in funeral rites, and 42% rated them as very sober. Regarding grief, the scale of personal growth predominates, however, in the negative aspects, the feeling of pressure in the chest and frequent crying predominates. CONCLUSIONS: The end of life of home-care patients during the pandemic was perceived as adequate, allowing family support and symptom control. The grieving process shows no complications. The training of health professionals in these fundamental aspects of patient care is important.

7.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; : 10499091221136550, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089094

ABSTRACT

This personal essay brings readers into what it is like to experience a patient's death for the first time as a medical student, but with a topical twist: this experience happens over Zoom. The author is part of the 2023 cohort of medical school graduates who will have spent at least half of medical school online. Most people think of virtual medical education as a loss, but this essay is about how "Zoom medical school" actually allowed one student to experience a "good death" very unlike the deaths typically witnessed in hospitals. The essay details and reflects upon the experience of shadowing a palliative care physician's Zoom appointments with a patient, Mrs. K, over the weeks leading up to her death from cancer, surrounded by children and grandchildren at home. In contrast, the author weaves in the story of her own grandfather who died last year from COVID-19, intubated alone in an ICU all the way in Tehran, Iran. The essay concludes that medicine is not just about preventing death, but about making a good death possible-and that a good death is embedded in the communities that brought meaning to one's life in the first place.

8.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; : 10499091221116794, 2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089093

ABSTRACT

Background: Death can be difficult to address personally, to discuss and to plan for. Since 2016 The Omega Course (Omega) has educated local people in Kenilworth, UK, about death and dying; broaching these issues and teaching communication skills whilst enabling social interaction. It aspires to produce practical outcomes with positive implications for end of life (EoL) planning and future neighbourhood care within the town. Aim: To investigate the impact of Omega on the attitudes and actions of participants. Method: Anonymous questionnaires, distributed by Qualtrics, or by post if preferred, were sent to 62 participants of Omega aged 22-94 two and a half years post course institution. Thematic analysis and inferential statistics were used. Results: 23 replies (37%) scored changes across 4 areas; barriers to discussion, ease discussing death, fears about death and future planning capability. All showed a significant beneficial change using a Paired Sample t-test (P< .01). Respondents noted common fears of death and dying, barriers to discussing the topic and planning for it. The course helped to allay fear, enabled discussion and encouraged planning for death and EoL. Respondents rated the course as 9.1/10 for achieving its aims. They appreciated discussing death and dying in a supportive environment and found the approach effective in developing their skills and changing attitudes. Conclusion: Omega has the potential to change attitudes towards death; promoting discussion, planning, and tackling misconceptions.

9.
Revista Colombiana De Cancerologia ; JOUR(3):337-345, 26.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082972

ABSTRACT

Primary melanomas in the oral mucosa arise from the malignant proliferation of melanocytes. They rarely occur, with aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. We present the case of an 82-year-old patient with oral mucous melanoma with metastatic involvement of the right cervical lymph node, multisegmental lung metastases, at the gastroesophageal junction and at the level of the L3 vertebral body with extension to the dural sac, without response to radiotherapy, chemotherapy or immunotherapy. The patient undergoes palliative cryosurgery of the primary tumor every two to three weeks, observing a notable decrease of the tumoral lesion when the procedure is performed, with recovery of oral functionality and a decrease in the size of lymph node metastases in the neck. We present the technique used in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the benefits of cryosurgery, its mechanism of action and its immunomodulatory function, and the future benefit of its combination with immunotherapy for primary management of advanced melanomas.

10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 927874, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080283

ABSTRACT

Background: Hospice and palliative care (HPC) aims to improve end-of-life quality and has received much more attention through the lens of an aging population in the midst of the coronavirus disease pandemic. However, several barriers remain in China due to a lack of professional HPC providers with positive behavioral intentions. Therefore, we conducted an original study introducing machine learning to explore individual behavioral intentions and detect factors of enablers of, and barriers to, excavating potential human resources and improving HPC accessibility. Methods: A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate healthcare providers' behavioral intentions, knowledge, attitudes, and practices in hospice care (KAPHC) with an indigenized KAPHC scale. Binary Logistic Regression and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) were performed to model impacting and predict individual behavioral intentions. Results: The RFC showed high sensitivity (accuracy = 0.75; F1 score = 0.84; recall = 0.94). Attitude could directly or indirectly improve work enthusiasm and is the most efficient approach to reveal behavioral intentions. Continuous practice could also improve individual confidence and willingness to provide HPC. In addition, scientific knowledge and related skills were the foundation of implementing HPC. Conclusion: Individual behavioral intention is crucial for improving HPC accessibility, particularly at the initial stage. A well-trained RFC can help estimate individual behavioral intentions to organize a productive team and promote additional policies.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Palliative Care , Supervised Machine Learning
11.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 182, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The legalization of Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada in 2016 provided new impetus for improving palliative care. This commitment to improvement included the development of a National Palliative Care Framework and Action Plan. The purpose of this study was to understand the progress made in palliative care since 2016 from the perspective of persons working and volunteering in palliative care and compare geographic differences. METHODS: A digital survey was developed from goals identified in Canada's Palliative Care Framework and Action Plan and administered online using Qualtrics. Participants were recruited through national palliative care organizations. The survey included both quantitative survey items designed to evaluate improvements across 5 domains and 29 items and included open-ended questions about impacts, innovations, and ongoing challenges. Descriptive statistics were generated for survey domains, items, and demographic variables. Geographic differences were compared using Independent-Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Qualitative data was analyzed inductively into themes. RESULTS: One hundred fifty surveys met inclusion criteria and were analysed. Overall, the most improvement was reported in palliative care education and the least improvement was reported in support for family caregivers. Items on which respondents reported the most improvement included healthcare provider education in palliative care, advance care planning, and use of technology. Items on which respondents reported the least improvement were respite for family caregivers, access to bereavement services, and in-home support for family caregivers. Notably, rural participants reported more statistically significant improvements in the domains of education, access, and research and data collection than their urban counterparts. However, rural participants reported less improvement in places to die when home is not preferable. The COVID-19 pandemic was a significant contributor to these perceived improvements and ongoing challenges. CONCLUSION: Canada's Framework and Action Plan sets out a roadmap for improving palliative care in Canada. Participants in this survey noted significant improvements in key areas, a notable accomplishment amidst the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some improvements were a result of greater use of distance technology. Further leveraging these improvements will make an important contribution to solving some of the rural and remote palliative care issues that have arisen from Canada's unique geography.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Canada , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Health Equity ; 6(1): 794-797, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077561

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted certain racial and ethnic groups due to systemic racism and poor governmental emergency responses. Health organizations and leaders worked strategically to pivot their workflows to meet the emerging needs of their patient population. In this perspective, three examples are shared of successful interventions that made workflow improvements to be efficient while ensuring excellent patient care during the pandemic and beyond. Lessons from the initiatives are ones that health professionals can advocate for and easily adopt to ensure that medical mistreatment and disparities for some patient populations do not continue to flourish.

13.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 50(3): 12-13, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074981

ABSTRACT

In a field that strives to care for patients and families together, what can palliative care clinicians do when patients' families are physically absent? The Covid-19 pandemic has put both literal and figurative walls between health care professionals and families. How health care workers respond to these disconnections might have a lasting impact on patients, on families, and on our practice. Recently, I saw this in the case of a patient our palliative care team was consulted to see. Mr. B was minimally responsive and dying from multisystem organ failure of unclear etiology. As in other cases during this pandemic, our team became a facilitator of interaction between the patient and the physically absent family, seeing an intimacy we normally would not, in this case, by being present while our intern held the phone to Mr. B's ear for an end-of-life call from his wife, son, and daughter. Such moments force us clinicians to be even more present for our families and patients, and they allow us to bear witness to the strength and sadness and love that we might otherwise miss.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Ethics Consultation , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Clin Med ; 11(20)2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic confronted nursing homes with a variety of challenges to ensure the provision of palliative care for residents. PallPan-Implement aimed to adapt the recommendations of the National Strategy for the Care of Seriously Ill, Dying Adults and their Families in Times of Pandemic (PALLPAN) in such a way that nursing facilities can use and implement them. METHODS: Based on 33 PALLPAN recommendations, we developed a questionnaire, conducted a pilot implementation for selected nursing homes, and asked for qualitative feedback. RESULTS: The developed questionnaire contains 22 main questions. A three-stage pilot implementation with an introductory event, processing phase, and evaluation event took place in seven facilities. The facilities evaluated the developed questionnaire as helpful. Feedback from the facilities identified three major categories: (a) requirements for facilities should be realistic to avoid frustration, (b) the creation of a pandemic plan for palliative care only is impractical, (c) measures for the psychosocial support of staff is particularly necessary, but was perceived as difficult to implement. CONCLUSIONS: The practical implementation of recommendations requires a concept and material tailored to facilities and areas. The strategy of PallPan Implement developed in this project appears to be target-oriented, well-received, and can be recommended for further implementation.

15.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069379

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Palliative care awareness, education and practice vary widely across global health systems, especially throughout low- and middle-income countries such as Nigeria. Unfortunately, qualitative investigations into the context, experiences and challenges of Nigerian health care professionals providing palliative care in these settings are still underrepresented in the literature. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to better understand the perceptions of palliative care providers in Nigeria. METHODS: The authors conducted an online survey of health professionals caring for patients with palliative care and end of life needs. Survey participants were recruited via convenience sampling from a palliative care training program in Lagos, Nigeria. RESULTS: 27 palliative care program participants (12 physicians, seven nurses, four pharmacists, two psychiatrists and two physiotherapists) responded to the two-question survey. 39 free text responses were collected and analyzed. A majority (33%, n = 13) of responses reported challenges associated with caring for patients with cancer. Suboptimal pain management was the second most common response type (18%, n = 7). Other significant responses included caring for patients with comorbidities (13%, n = 5), patients seeking spiritual care (8%, n = 3) and patients who were unable to afford standard treatment (5%, n = 2). Uncategorized responses (23%, n = 9) included experiences caring for patients with injuries sustained in military operations and COVID-19, among others. CONCLUSION: These results provide valuable insights into the palliative care experiences and challenges of an interdisciplinary set of health care practitioners providing palliative care in Nigeria. Further research is needed to elucidate the facilitators and barriers of delivering palliative care in similar settings.

16.
J Clin Med ; 11(19)2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066204

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 patients who may require invasive therapeutic procedures such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have high symptom burden and in-hospital mortality. In addition, awake patients on ECMO are new in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Inpatient specialist palliative care (sPC) provides support such as symptom control on a physical, psychosocial and spiritual level. The field of sPC in COVID-19 patients is still new and important to investigate. We aim to analyze sPC of COVID-19 patients in the ICU with regard to patient characteristics and symptoms from a palliative care perspective. We conducted a retrospective analysis (03/2020-04/2021) and identified 51 ICU patients receiving sPC. The statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and comparisons of symptoms. The first sPC contact of patients (mean age 69.5 years, 62.7% male) was around 14 days after COVID-19 confirmation, and 43% were treated with ECMO therapy. The baseline symptom burden was high with a focus on weakness (100%), tiredness (98%), dyspnea (96%) and family burden (92%). The symptom intensity significantly decreased during the time period of sPC and COVID-19 treatment (t(99) = 3.119, p = 0.003, d = 0.437). These results help intensivists and sPC clinicians to identify symptoms and the need for sPC in COVID-19 patients. However, studies with prospective and controlled designs need to follow.

17.
J Clin Med ; 11(19)2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066200

ABSTRACT

The Nursing Homes End-of-life Programme (NUHELP) was developed in 2017 and is based on quality standards of palliative care, but it was not implemented due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVES: To describe perceptions among staff at nursing homes and primary health care (PHC) centres regarding the relevance, feasibility, and degree of achievement of quality standards for palliative care in nursing homes and to determine the differences in these perceptions before and after the pandemic. METHODOLOGY: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Professionals at eight nursing homes and related PHC centres who participated in NUHELP development assessed 42 palliative care standards at two time points (2018 and 2022). The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to analyse differences in the scores between these two times and between perceptions at nursing homes and at PHC centres. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 58 professionals in 2018 and 50 in 2022. The standard regarding communication with persons affected by the death of a family member was considered less relevant (p = 0.05), and that concerning the culturally sensitive and dignified treatment of the body was less fully achieved (p = 0.03) in 2022 than in 2018. Social support (p = 0.04), sharing information among the care team (p = 0.04), patient participation (p = 0.04) and information about the treatment provided (p = 0.03) were all more poorly achieved in 2022 than in 2018. The perceptions of nursing home and PHC workers differed in several respects. CONCLUSIONS: Professional intercommunication and social support should be reinforced, and residents should be more actively involved in decision-making.

18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066091

ABSTRACT

In the midst of COVID-19, radical change in the work environment further exacerbated the detrimental effects of critical illness in the intensive care unit (ICU). This may be heightened if the patient experiences a lamentable end-of-life experience due to inadequate end-of-life care (EoLC). Anchoring on the theory of bureaucratic caring and the peaceful end-of-life theory, insights can be gained into the motivations and behaviors that support the delivery of palliative care during COVID-19. With this having been having said, the objective of this study was to use a narrative approach to examine the lived experience of 12 nurses who provided EoLC in the COVID-19 ward of several hospitals in the Western Philippines. Participants' narratives were transcribed, translated and analyzed. Among the themes that have emerged are: establishing a peaceful journey to death, holistic caring for the end of life, venturing into risky encounters in the call of duty, staying close amidst the reshaped work environment, and preparing the family life after a loved one's departure. The study identified the importance of assisting patients on their journey to a peaceful death, but this journey was also accompanied by a sense of self-preservation and safety for colleagues and families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Terminal Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Palliative Care , Philippines , Qualitative Research
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065957

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the care of critically ill and dying patients in isolation wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and regular wards was severely impaired. In order to support physicians in communicative and palliative care skills, an e-learning tool was developed as part of the joint project "Palliative Care in Pandemic Times" (PallPan). This study investigates the feasibility of this e-learning tool. Secondly, we aim to analyze changes in knowledge and attitude upon completion of the e-learning tool. A 38-item questionnaire-based evaluation study with assessment of global and specific outcomes including ICU and non-ICU physicians was performed. In total, 24 questionnaires were included in the anonymous analysis. Feasibility was confirmed by a very high rate of overall satisfaction (94% approval), with relevance reaching 99% approval. Overall, we detected high gains in knowledge and noticeably lower gains on the attitude plane, with the highest gain in naming reasons for incorporating palliative care. The lowest learning gain on the attitude plane was observed when the participants were confronted with their own mortality. This study shows that e-learning is a feasible tool for gaining knowledge and even changing the attitudes of physicians caring for critically ill and dying patients in a self-assessment evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Physicians , Terminal Care , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Humans , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 170, 2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064780

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Social support is described by patients and other stakeholders to be a valuable component of palliative day care. Less is known about the range of hospice services that have been used in practice that facilitate social support. An online survey aimed to gain an overview of all hospice day services that facilitated social support for adults outside of their own homes. METHODS: An online survey was distributed via email to people involved in managing hospice day services. Questions were asked on hospice characteristics, including staff and volunteer roles. Respondents were asked to identify services they felt offered social support to patients. Data collection took place between August 2017 and May 2018. RESULTS: Responses were received from 103 hospices in the UK and ROI (response rate 49.5%). Results provide an overview of hospice day and outpatient services that offer social support to patients. These are: multi-component interventions, activity groups, formal support groups, befriending, and informal social activities. Multi-component interventions, such as palliative day care, were the most commonly reported. Their stated aims tend to focus on clinical aspects, but many survey respondents considered these multicomponent interventions to be the 'most social' service at their hospice. The survey also identified a huge variety of activity groups, as well as formal therapeutic support groups. Informal 'social-only' activities were present, but less common. Over a third of all the services were described as 'drop in'. Most responding hospices did not routinely use patient reported outcome measures in their 'most social' services. CONCLUSIONS: The survey documents hospice activity in facilitating social support to be diverse and evolving. At the time of data collection, many hospices offered multiple different services by which a patient might obtain social support outside of their own home and in the presence of other patients.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Adult , Humans , Ireland , Palliative Care/methods , Pandemics , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
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