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1.
Eur J Midwifery ; 6:15, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1791611

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Expectant fathers want to participate in perinatal care. COVID-19 policies restrict their access to care, but it is unknown how these policies have affected them. The aim of this study is to explore the perinatal care given to and wanted by expectant and new fathers during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden. METHODS: The current study used an inductive qualitative design where 14 expectant or new fathers participated in a video- or telephone-based semi-structured interview. Interviews lasted 20 minutes, on average. The collected data were analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: Two main themes were reported: 1) 'Being left out, but trying to remain positive', and 2) immediate consequences related to restrictions. Expectant fathers were not able to attend as many perinatal visits as they wanted to, due to the COVID-19 restrictions on non-birthing parents. Expectant fathers regretted and felt discouraged that they could not support their partner during visits and not follow their baby's growth and development. Furthermore, they faced uncertainties and stress regarding whether or not they could attend the birth of their child. Fathers reported how their exclusion negatively impacted the entire family. CONCLUSIONS: Expectant and new fathers felt that their level of participation in prenatal care was negatively impacted by the Swedish policies imposed on them during the COVID-19 pandemic. Fathers were physically and emotionally excluded, resulting in receiving little direct care support, and lacked companionship with other parents. Fathers provided suggestions and alternatives on how to increase their participation with individual midwives and from an organizational level.

2.
Birth ; 2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784605

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patient-centered care is the best practice in the care of pregnant and postpartum patients. The COVID-19 pandemic prompted changes in perinatal care policies, which were often reactive, resulting in unintended consequences, many of which made the delivery of patient-centered care more difficult. This study aimed to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on perinatal health care delivery from the perspective of family physicians in the United States. METHODS: From October 5 to November 4, 2020, we surveyed mid- to late-career family physicians who provide perinatal care. We conducted descriptive analyses to measure the impact of COVID-19 on prenatal care, labor and delivery, postpartum care, patient experience, and patient volume. An immersion-crystallization approach was used to analyze qualitative data provided as open-text comments. RESULTS: Of the 1518 survey respondents, 1062 (69.8%) stated that they currently attend births; 595 of those elaborated about the impact of COVID-19 on perinatal care in free-text comments. Eight themes emerged related to the impact of COVID-19 on perinatal care: visitation, patient decisions, testing, personal protective equipment, care continuity, changes in care delivery, reassignment, and volume. The greatest perceived impact of COVID-19 was on patient experience. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians who provided perinatal care during the COVID-19 pandemic noted a considerable impact on patient experience, which particularly affected the ability to deliver patient-centered and family-centered care. Continued research is needed to understand the long-term impact of policies affecting the delivery of patient-centered perinatal care and to inform more evidence-based, proactive policies to be implemented in future pandemic or disaster situations.

3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 260, 2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to unprecedented worries and challenges for pregnant women due to social restrictions and changes in maternity care provision. We aimed to investigate the mental health impact of COVID-19 pandemic on pregnant women in Sweden and explore factors associated with poor perinatal mental health in this specific context. METHOD: This was a nation-wide cross-sectional survey of pregnant women living in Sweden. Validated questionnaires were distributed through non-profit organizations´ websites and social media channels from May 2020 to February 2021. Perinatal depression, anxiety, and acute stress reaction were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Impact Event Scale (Revised) (IES-R), respectively. Sociodemographic characteristics and self-perceived mental well-being were also obtained. Factors associated with mental health outcomes were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among a total of 470 participants, 43.2% (n = 203) reported depression (EPDS ≥13), 25.7% (n = 121) moderate to severe anxiety (GAD-7 score ≥ 10), and 23.7% (n = 110) moderate to severe acute stress reaction (IES-R ≥ 33). 27.4% participants (n = 129) expressed concerns regarding their mental well-being during the pandemic. Pregnant mothers who had sick family members reported poorer mental health outcomes than those who did not (median [Interquartile range (IQR)] EPDS scores: 14.0 [8.75-18.0] vs 11.0 [6.25-15.0], p < .001; median (IQR) GAD7 scores: 7.0 [4.0-12.25] vs 6.0 [3.0-9.0], p = .003); median (IQR) IES-R scores: 20.0 [9.0-38.0] vs 15.0 [7.0-30.0], p = .048). Logistic regression analyses revealed that risk factors for poor mental health outcomes were having a sick family member with any illness, unemployment, and experiencing a substantially stressful life event. Having a higher educational level and a younger age during the pandemic were protective. CONCLUSION: Depression and anxiety were highly prevalent among pregnant women in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic, indicating a need for professional mental health support for this vulnerable group of population. Unemployment was an associated risk factor whereas younger age and higher educational level were protective suggesting an important role of socio-economic factors in modulating the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on perinatal mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , Self Report , Sweden/epidemiology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742442

ABSTRACT

The objective of this scoping review is to determine to what extent the recommendations on perinatal care protect breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic. The review follows the PRISMA ScR Extension guidelines. The research was conducted in Scopus, Medline via Pubmed, and Web of Science databases from 1 March 2020 to 31 May 2021, using 392 combinations of keywords. We searched for reviews and original papers published in English providing recommendations on delivery mode, companion during labor, the possibility of skin-to-skin contact (SSC), breastfeeding, and visitors policy. After screening, 86 out of 8416 publications qualified for data extraction. The majority of them indicated that COVID-19 infection is not a sufficient reason for a cesarean section; however, on a national level, cesarean births in severely ill patients were overrepresented. A significant number of recommendations deprived mothers of the necessary support during their labor and stay in the maternity ward. A shared decision-making model was hardly visible. Only the earliest COVID-19 recommendations suspended direct breastfeeding; in later publications, decisions were related to the mother's health, but other options of natural feeding were rarely discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant Welfare , Perinatal Care , Breast Feeding , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mothers , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy
5.
Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal ; 27(12):1129-1240, 2021.
Article in English | WHOIRIS | ID: covidwho-1737632

ABSTRACT

Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal is the official health journal published by the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office of the World Health Organization. It is a forum for the presentation and promotion of new policies and initiatives in health services;and for the exchange of ideas concepts epidemiological data research findings and other information with special reference to the Eastern Mediterranean Region. It addresses all members of the health profession medical and other health educational institutes interested NGOs WHO Collaborating Centres and individuals within and outside the Region المجلة الصحية لشرق المتوسط هى المجلة الرسمية التى تصدرعن المكتب الاقليمى لشرق المتوسط بمنظمة الصحة العالمية. وهى منبر لتقديم السياسات والمبادرات الجديدة فى الصحة العامة والخدمات الصحية والترويج لها، و لتبادل الاراء و المفاهيم والمعطيات الوبائية ونتائج الابحاث وغير ذلك من المعلومات، و خاصة ما يتعلق منها باقليم شرق المتوسط. وهى موجهة الى كل اعضاء المهن الصحية، والكليات الطبية وسائر المعاهد التعليمية، و كذا المنظمات غير الحكومية المعنية، والمراكز المتعاونة مع منظمة الصحة العالمية والافراد المهتمين بالصحة فى الاقليم و خارجه La Revue de Santé de la Méditerranée Orientale est une revue de santé officielle publiée par le Bureau régional de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé pour la Méditerranée orientale. Elle offre une tribune pour la présentation et la promotion de nouvelles politiques et initiatives dans le domaine de la santé publique et des services de santé ainsi qu’à l’échange d’idées de concepts de données épidémiologiques de résultats de recherches et d’autres informations se rapportant plus particulièrement à la Région de la Méditerranée orientale. Elle s’adresse à tous les professionnels de la santé aux membres des instituts médicaux et autres instituts de formation médico-sanitaire aux ONG Centres collaborateurs de l’OMS et personnes concernés au sein et hors de la Région

6.
Zeitschrift fur Geburtshilfe und Neonatologie ; 225(SUPPL 1):e77, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735329

ABSTRACT

Introduction Telemedicine has become increasingly important over the past decade. With the pressure of the COVID-19 pandemic, demands for remote healthcare solutions have seen an unprecedented rise. However, many questions regarding the feasibility and benefits of telemedicine remain. The aim of our study was to evaluate both the technical feasibility and patient satisfaction with video consultations in a tertiary centre for obstetric care. Material and Methods This prospective single-centre trial was part of the larger oVID (open Video Service) project on telemedicine at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University of Münster. Patients requiring prenatal or pre-pregnancy counselling were included. A questionnaire was designed for the evaluation of patient satisfaction and filled in by both patient and healthcare provider at the end of the video consultation. Results Of 80 eligible cases, 75 video-consultations were carried out and data from the questionnaire was collected. Overall patient satisfaction was high (95%, 71/75) although technical problems occurred in 37% (29/75) of the appointments. Healthcare providers' satisfaction was equally high and in 88% (66/75) of cases, remote consultations avoided an in-house visit without effect on healthcare quality. Discussion Remote consultations are feasible and yield high satisfaction rates even in a medical field as sensitive as perinatal medicine. In-house visits can be avoided in an important number of cases. Further research is necessary to determine the cost-effectiveness and effects on perinatal outcome. Healthcare systems should be offered clear guidance on medicolegal issues and funding of remote consultations in order to integrate telemedicine into routine healthcare.

7.
Portuguese Journal of Pediatrics ; 53(1):393-399, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1716409

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We aimed to characterize newborns admitted to the pediatric emergency department in the first months of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study regarding newborns who presented to the pediatric emergency department during the pandemic period in comparison with the same period of the previous year. Data gathered concerning the neonatal characteristics included the length of postpartum stay in the nursery, age at presentation to the pediatric emergency department, source of referral to the pediatric emergency department, presenting complaint, need for complementary exams, diagnosis, final destination, and hospital readmission. Results: The number of births was 591 in the pandemic period and 709 in the homologous period. We analyzed 72 pediatric emergency department admissions in the pandemic period and 123 pediatric emergency department admissions in the homologous period. During the pandemic period, there was a decreased rate of neonatal admissions to the pediatric emergency department, but not as pronounced as for the total number of children. We found an increased rate of patients visiting the pediatric emergency department and without disease during the first 2 weeks of life. There were higher referral rates to the pediatric emergency department and to an ambulatory pediatrics appointment. No differences were found concerning the presenting complaints, need for complementary exams, diagnoses, and admission rates. Discussion: Although there was a decreased rate of neonatal admissions during the pandemic period, it was not as pronounced as for the total number of children, denotating a greater need to attend to the pediatric emergency department compared to the other age categories. The reduced access to primary care during the pandemic period and the decreased time of parental education in the nursery might have contributed to these findings. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) and Portuguese Journal of Pediatrics 2022.

8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715327

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way prenatal education and obstetric care are provided. Pandemic-related anxiety, restrictions, limitations in perinatal care, and the inability to be accompanied by a loved one can have negative psychological consequences for future parents and their child. The aim of this study was to analyze the determinants and assess the anxiety of pregnant women in individual trimesters, as well as to learn about the sources of support and medical personnel proceeding methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This research was conducted as a diagnostic survey, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Childbirth Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ), and a standardized interview questionnaire, on 534 pregnant women in Poland. Resultsand Conclusions: The pregnant women, regardless of the trimester of pregnancy, are characterized by: increased anxiety level influenced by the current epidemiological situation, psychophysical condition, previous maternal experiences, participation in classes preparing for childbirth, organization of perinatal care, their relationship with a partner, and the presence of a loved one during childbirth. A negative correlation was shown between the level of childbirth anxiety and maternal experience, as well as the support of a doctor and midwife.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy
9.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713553

ABSTRACT

Background: Many pregnant and postpartum Veterans have experienced multiple lifetime traumas, including military sexual trauma, intimate partner violence, and combat trauma. These women may be particularly vulnerable to increased post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health problems following additional trauma exposures or stressful events, such as Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study sought to examine the impact of prior trauma exposures on the lived experience of pregnant and postpartum Veterans during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: Pregnant Veterans at 15 VA medical centers were surveyed at 20 weeks of pregnancy and 3 months postpartum asked about their COVID-19-related perinatal and mental health experiences, as well as the stressors that impacted them as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Overall, 111 women Veterans completed both the pregnancy and postpartum surveys that included COVID-19 items. Sixty percent of our sample had experienced at least one potentially traumatic lifetime event, with 22% of our sample experiencing two or more of the included exposures. Women with a trauma history had 3.5 times increased odds of reporting their mental health as "much worse" compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-11.75) and were more likely to report that COVID-19 negatively affected their mental or emotional health "a lot" compared with women without a trauma history (odds ratio: 8.5; 95% CI: 1.93-37.48). Conclusions: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on pregnant and postpartum Veterans' mental health. Obstetricians should consider strategies to ensure women have access to mental health care during pregnancy, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Hospitals should also consider the importance of labor support companions during the COVID-19 pandemic and examine adjusting policies to allow for at least one labor support companion during labor and delivery.

10.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 119, 2022 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The provision of care to pregnant persons and neonates must continue through pandemics. To maintain quality of care, while minimizing physical contact during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-related Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2) pandemic, hospitals and international organizations issued recommendations on maternity and neonatal care delivery and restructuring of clinical and academic services. Early in the pandemic, recommendations relied on expert opinion, and offered a one-size-fits-all set of guidelines. Our aim was to examine these recommendations and provide the rationale and context to guide clinicians, administrators, educators, and researchers, on how to adapt maternity and neonatal services during the pandemic, regardless of jurisdiction. METHOD: Our initial database search used Medical subject headings and free-text search terms related to coronavirus infections, pregnancy and neonatology, and summarized relevant recommendations from international society guidelines. Subsequent targeted searches to December 30, 2020, included relevant publications in general medical and obstetric journals, and updated society recommendations. RESULTS: We identified 846 titles and abstracts, of which 105 English-language publications fulfilled eligibility criteria and were included in our study. A multidisciplinary team representing clinicians from various disciplines, academics, administrators and training program directors critically appraised the literature to collate recommendations by multiple jurisdictions, including a quaternary care Canadian hospital, to provide context and rationale for viable options. INTERPRETATION: There are different schools of thought regarding effective practices in obstetric and neonatal services. Our critical review presents the rationale to effectively modify services, based on the phase of the pandemic, the prevalence of infection in the population, and resource availability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Maternal-Child Health Services/organization & administration , Perinatal Care , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/therapy , Canada , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Inpatients , Organizational Policy , Outpatients , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) ; 2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670463

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: To describe prenatal stress and state anxiety levels in pregnant women living in Spain during the lockdown of the first wave of COVID-19 and its relation with obstetric factors, perception of health care, and concerns about the socio-sanitary situation. METHODS: The present study is an observational, correlational, and cross-sectional quantitative study. The participants in the study were pregnant women recruited through non-probabilistic convenience and snowball sampling during the lockdown. A web link was provided to an online questionnaire designed for this research, which collected socio-demographic and obstetric variables, perceptions of health care received during the pandemic and preoccupations associated with COVID-19. It also included the Prenatal Stress Questionnaire (PDQ) and the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). RESULTS: Based on the responses of 695 pregnant women, the results showed a mean of 16.98 (SD = 25.20) of prenatal stress and elevated levels of anxiety (M = 25.20/SD = 11.07) in the first wave of the pandemic. Risk factors for prenatal stress and anxiety were the level of preoccupation associated with COVID-19 and previous mental health issues. A specific risk factor for anxiety was having more than one child and a protective factor were perceiving accessibility and availability of health care, with clear and consistent pregnancy care and follow-up protocols. CONCLUSIONS: The lockdown period for COVID-19 was a stressful experience for pregnant women, highlighting the need to address their psychological well-being through clear and coherent protocols in terms of maternal-foetal health control and follow-up.

12.
Ginekol Pol ; 2022 Jan 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648790

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: A novel coronavirus - SARS CoV-2 - outbreak has, for sure, been the greatest medical challenge in recent years. The maternal and neonatal consequences of the infection are still largely unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This prospective study aims to describe the perinatal care and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnant women and their newborn infants during the third wave of the pandemic, in a large tertiary university center in Wroclaw/Poland from 15 February to 1 May 2021. RESULTS: The paper describes a group of 83 women with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection during delivery, as well as their newborn infants (n = 84). The course of COVID-19 disease in pregnant patients was mostly asymptomatic (56%) but 31% women manifested mild to moderate symptoms and 14% had severe infection. The median gestational age at the delivery was 38 weeks. On average, 16.7% of mothers were separated from their newborns at birth, 83.3% practiced skin-to-skin, and roomed in with their babies, and 84.5% of the infants received any mother'smilk. Preterm infants were more often borne by mothers with symptomatic course of COVID-19 infection. Need for neonatal treatment was only due to prematurity. Neonates with acquired infection (after 14th day of life) had to be treated symptomatically with fever and loose stools, only 28.5% had symptoms of respiratory failure. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, the majority of mother- infant dyads were in a good health condition. The data on perinatal care reported in the paper could be helpful contribution supporting childbirth physiology protection during the COVID-19 pandemic.

13.
Cureus ; 14(1): e20998, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and other respiratory infections have been attributed to causing severe disease and pneumonia in pregnant women because of physiological stress and alterations in the immune system during pregnancy. Pregnant women are prone to develop serious outcomes for both mother and child when infected by previous coronaviruses, but there is a paucity of data regarding clinical characteristics and maternal-fetal outcomes in COVID-19. Moreover, various laboratory and radiological parameters are scarcely studied in pregnant women in the third trimester who develop severe COVID-19. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess and compare the maternal-fetal outcomes of critically ill pregnant women with COVID-19 pneumonia who required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS:  We conducted this retrospective observational study at a tertiary care hospital affiliated with an academic center in the United Arab Emirates. A total of 123 patients in their third trimester were included in the study from December 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021, comprising 30 cases of severe or critical COVID-19 and 93 mild to moderate COVID-19 patients. We collected and analyzed maternal demographic data and radiological and biochemical profiles. We also compared maternal-fetal outcomes. RESULTS:  Thirty patients (24.3%) were admitted to the ICU, and eight required invasive ventilation. Severe COVID-19 pneumonia was significantly associated with higher mortality (20% vs. 0%; p < 0.001), postpartum complications (50% vs. 9.67%; p < 0.001), and increased overall hospital stay than mild to moderate COVID-19 (p < 0.001). In addition, the primary indication for intervention in severe cases was worsening of COVID-19 pneumonia, and pregnant patients had significantly greater chances of undergoing delivery by Cesarean section (80% vs. 40.8%; p = 0.01). Neonates born to severe COVID-19 patients had significantly higher chances of being born preterm (76.6% vs. 35.7%; p < 0.001) and had low birth weight (46.6% vs. 13.9%; p-value = 0.002). There were four stillbirth cases, two vertical transmission cases, and no neonatal deaths. CONCLUSIONS:  This study assessed and compared maternal-fetal outcomes of critically ill pregnant women with COVID-19 pneumonia who required admission to the ICU because of the paucity of data in this patient demographic. Pregnant women with severe COVID-19 have high mortality, peripartum complications, increased hospital stay, and are more likely to undergo Cesarean section delivery because of COVID-19 progression than pregnant patients with less severe forms of COVID-19. The newborns born to such mothers may be premature and have low birth weights but have similar mortality to those born to mothers with mild to moderate COVID-19.

14.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 114(1): 94-103, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620864

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand perceived quality of obstetric care following changes to the structure of care in a safety-net institution during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a mixed-methods study including a web-based survey (n = 67) and in-depth interviews (n = 16) between October 2020 and January 2021. We present a descriptive analysis of quantitative results and key qualitative themes on reactions to changes and drivers of perceived quality. RESULTS: Reported quality was high for in-person and phone visits (median subscale responses: 5/5). Respondents were willing to include phone visits in care for a future pregnancy (77.8% (49)) but preferred in-person visits (84.1% (53)). In interviews, provider communication was the key driver of quality. Respondents found changes to care to be inconvenient but acceptable. CONCLUSIONS: To improve satisfaction with changes to care, health systems should ensure that relationship building remains a priority and offer patients information about the reason behind changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety-net Providers , Telemedicine/methods
15.
Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617065

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the paradigm when it comes to infection control. However, there are still many doubts about pregnancy and the perinatal period in this context, even though many studies suggest the benignity of infection in this phase. The present study took place in a Level II Hospital with differentiated perinatal care and describes the newborns whose mothers were infected with COVID-19 during pregnancy. We aim to understand the mother-newborn pattern of transmission and clinical, analytical and serologic follow-up. Methods: Prospective observational study from 1/4/2020 to 31/5/2021, using the clinical files of every SARS-COV-2 PCR-positive mother and their newborns. Among others, we evaluated the state of infection of the newborn at 12 and 48h and after 14 days with SARS-Cov-2 PCR tests. In the first three months, serologic and clinical evaluation were performed. Results: Of the 1684 live births, 60 (3,6%) mothers were infected with SARS-COV-2 during pregnancy, 43% of which were diagnosed in the screening performed during/before labour. The median value of gestational age was 39 weeks, and the average weight was 3171g. 81,7% of the newborns remained with their mother in the hospital ward, and 85% were breastfed. 7 newborns (11,7%) needed NICU, one of which was born at 32 weeks because the mother needed ICU support due to COVID-19. Of the 26 newborns whose mothers were positive in labour, 15 were tested for SARS-Cov-2 PCR in the first 12 h, and 21 within 48h: all of them were negative.16 were tested after 14 days. Only one of them (6,2%) tested positive but remained asymptomatic. Serologic anti-spike and anti-nucleocapsid analyses were performed in 32 babies: 10 of them (31.3%) showed positive antibodies. In these cases, 80% of the mothers were positive in the 3rd trimester and 20% in the 2nd trimester. The clinical follow-up showed a positive outcome in all of them. Conclusions: This study supports others that show the benignity of perinatal SARS-COV-2 infection. There were no more significant rates of prematurity or NICU need. None of the newborns tested positive in SARS-Cov-2 PCR tests in the first 48h, supporting the rarity of the vertical infection, and only one has been affected by horizontal transmission.

16.
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol ; : 1-4, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608572

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders has significantly increased with the COVID-19 pandemic. In parallel, the pandemic has caused a major shift in delivery of care to telemedicine.Purpose: This article aimed to discuss the different advantages and disadvantages of telemedicine for perinatal mental health. Telemedicine has significant benefits for perinatal mental health patients, including increased accessibility to specialized care, direct observation of child-parent interactions in their home environment, and facilitation of collaborative work between obstetrical providers and psychiatrists. Alternatively, telemedicine may impede recovery and contribute to an increase in social isolation. The use of telemedicine by obstetrical care providers may also contribute to a reduction in screening and identification of these disorders.Conclusion: A hybrid model of in-person and telemedicine delivery of care may serve as a durable compromise solution for these women and their families.

17.
Paediatrics and Child Health (Canada) ; 26(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1576816

ABSTRACT

The proceedings contain 122 papers. The topics discussed include: educational impact of targeted neonatal echocardiography (TNE) on neonatal-perinatal medicine (NPM) subspecialty residents;extremely low gestational age neonates and resuscitation: perspectives of Canadian neonatologists;neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants with late-onset bacterial sepsis according to type of bacteria;efficacy of pharmacologic therapy for patent ductus arteriosus closure in preterm newborns according to their gestational age-specific Z-score for birth weight;food insecurity during COVID-19 in a Canadian academic pediatric hospital;the burden of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary vascular disease in premature infants;high spontaneous ductal closure even at the extreme of prematurity;exploring the impact of COVID-19 on families of children with developmental disabilities: a community-based formative study;a qualitative study of factors that helped prepare athletes for special Olympics sport programs;and impact of catheter choice on procedural success of minimally invasive surfactant therapy.

18.
Front Pediatr ; 9: 785524, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581248

ABSTRACT

Background: Rapid spread of the COVID-19 pandemic raised an urgent need for preparedness in the healthcare sector, including training of healthcare workers to cope with the burden of infected cases while ensuring proper protection of themselves. Improper infection prevention and control measures were key reasons for infection in healthcare workers during the early phase of the outbreak. Objectives/Methods: This paper describes the combined approach of 3 restructured hospitals in Singapore in preparing and training neonatal healthcare workers' during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, as well as lessons learnt during this process. Results: Information sharing was conducted in the form of e-learning, emphasizing on topics like disease knowledge and infection prevention and control procedures. Skills and competency training were carried out in the form of simulation, with sessions scaled into 4 levels progressing from individual task training to larger group simulations involving multiple disciplines and departments. Challenges encountered included information fatigue by large amount of constantly changing information and multiple amendments to workflows as more information arose. Difficulties conducting training and simulation sessions included restriction of group size to mitigate infection risk amongst participants and the limited supply of personal protective equipment prioritized for direct patient care. Conclusion: Healthcare institutions should ensure adequate dissemination of conceptual knowledge as well as skills competency training of staff in infection control measures for the protection of healthcare workers and patient safety. Ongoing training for sustainability of knowledge and skills, while adapting to the rapidly evolving situation is important in the preparation for future outbreaks.

19.
Birth ; 2021 Dec 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583677

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospitals quickly adapted perinatal care to mitigate SARS-CoV-2 transmission at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of pandemic-related hospital policy changes on perinatal care and outcomes in one region of the United States. METHODS: This interrupted time series analysis used retrospective data from consecutive singleton births at 15 hospitals in the Pacific Northwest from 2017 to 2020. The primary outcomes were those hypothesized to be affected by pandemic-related hospital policies and included labor induction, epidural use, oxytocin augmentation, mode of delivery, and early discharge (<48 hours after cesarean and <24 hours after vaginal births). Secondary outcomes included preterm birth, severe maternal morbidity, low 5-minute Apgar score, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, and 30-day readmission. Segmented Poisson regression models estimated the outcome level shift changes after the pandemic onset, controlling for underlying trends, seasonality, and stratifying by parity. RESULTS: No statistically significant changes were detected in intrapartum interventions or mode of delivery after onset of the pandemic. Early discharge increased for all births following cesarean and vaginal birth. Newborn readmission rates increased but only among nulliparas (aRR: 1.49, 95%CI: 1.17, 1.91). Among multiparas, decreases were observed in preterm birth (aRR: 0.90, 95%CI: 0.84, 0.96), low 5-minute Apgar score (aRR: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.68, 0.81), and term NICU admission rates (aRR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.80, 0.91). CONCLUSIONS: Increases in early discharge and newborn readmission rates among nulliparas suggest a need for more postpartum support during the pandemic. Decreases in preterm birth and term NICU admission among multiparas may have implications beyond the pandemic and deserve further study.

20.
Enferm Clin ; 2021 Oct 21.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540612

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: To describe prenatal stress and state anxiety levels in pregnant women living in Spain during the lockdown of the first wave of COVID-19 and its relation with obstetric factors, perception of health care, and concerns about the socio-sanitary situation. METHODS: The present study is an observational, correlational, and cross-sectional quantitative study. The participants in the study were pregnant women recruited through non-probabilistic convenience and snowball sampling during the lockdown. A web link was provided to an online questionnaire designed for this research, which collected socio-demographic and obstetric variables, perceptions of health care received during the pandemic and preoccupations associated with COVID-19. It also included the Prenatal Stress Questionnaire (PDQ) and the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). RESULTS: Based on the responses of 695 pregnant women, the results showed a mean of 16.98 (SD=25.20) of prenatal stress and elevated levels of anxiety (M=25.20/ SD=11.07) in the first wave of the pandemic. Risk factors for prenatal stress and anxiety were the level of preoccupation associated with COVID-19 and previous mental health issues. A specific risk factor for anxiety was having more than one child and a protective factor were perceiving accessibility and availability of health care, with clear and consistent pregnancy care and follow-up protocols. CONCLUSIONS: The lockdown period for COVID-19 was a stressful experience for pregnant women, highlighting the need to address their psychological well-being through clear and coherent protocols in terms of maternal-foetal health control and follow-up.

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