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1.
Chest ; 162(4):A597, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060642

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Variety in Chest Infections Case Posters SESSION TYPE: Case Report Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 12:45 pm - 01:45 pm INTRODUCTION: Actinomyces is a Gram-positive anaerobic and micro aerophilic filamentous bacillus that normally colonize the human mouth and digestive and urogenital tracts. They most commonly cause cervical and abdominopelvic infections and rarely pulmonary actinomycosis. CASE PRESENTATION: 67-year-old female with past medical history of recurrent DVT with IVC filter placement, non- ischemic cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, 40 pack year history, recent COVID19 infection, lung nodules & COPD presented with complaint of coughing up blood associated with chest pain for the past 2 days. She had a low-grade fever with stable vitals with preliminary labs showing she was anemic and had reactive leukocytosis. She was recommended to hold oral anticoagulation and follow-up outpatient during when her symptoms worsened. On admission she was started on tranexamic acid nebulization for hemostasis and underwent CTA chest which showed no evidence for pulmonary embolism but commented on a right lower lobe perihilar 12.5 mm mass which has increased in size compared to previous scans. Patient underwent bronchoscopy which showed generalized edema of the tracheobronchial tree with bleeding from superior segment of the right lower lobe bronchus with no visualization of mass. PET scan showed hyper-metabolic lung mass with concerns for malignancy. CT guided biopsy of nodule was done and was not staining for malignant cells, acid fast bacilli with no fungal or bacterial growth. Blood cultures and Karius Digital cultures were also negative. She began expectorating blood clots despite being on treatment and cardiothoracic surgery was consulted. A partial lobectomy with lysis of adhesions of the right lower lobe was done. Specimen sent to pathology showed no evidence for malignancy but instead elicited a contained pulmonary abscess containing filamentous bacteria with parenchymal inflammation with areas of chronic hemorrhagic fibrosing pleuritis and hilar thrombi. She was diagnosed with pulmonary actinomycosis and started on IV 24,000,000 IU penicillin. She underwent a panoramic dental x-ray which was read as suboptimal dentition with multiple missing teeth and did not identify a source. Patient symptoms resolved post lobectomy and since discharged on long course of antibiotics. She continued to have no more episodes of hemoptysis. DISCUSSION: Hemoptysis as a symptom of pulmonary actinomycosis is a rather rare presentation. Actinomycosis causes cavities, nodules, and pleural effusions. It is commonly mistaken for chronic suppurative lung disease and sometimes malignancy. Isolation and identification occur only a minority of cases with a high culture failure rate due to previous antibiotic therapy, inadequate incubation time or culture conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Due to it's variable presentation pulmonary actinomyces has a large overlap with other diseases but must be considered in the differential of unexplained hemoptysis. Reference #1: Hemoptysis secondary to actinomycosis: A rare presentation. PMID: 24778485 PMCID: PMC3999682 DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.129864 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Victoria Famuyide No relevant relationships by rukhsaar khanam

2.
Journal of Prevention and Treatment for Stomatological Diseases ; 30(7):528-532, 2022.
Article in Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056376

ABSTRACT

Corona Virus Disease 2019 (Corona Virus Disease 2019,COVID-19) has become a public health emergency that has attracted global attention because of its large-scale outbreak resulting in numerous human infections and deaths. COVID-19 is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by novel coronavirus 2019-nCoV. Due to a large number of infections and fast transmission speed, it's significant to diagnose the infected people quickly and detect the asymptomatic infected people as soon as possible. At present, the preliminary screening is judged by the clinical manifestations of the patients, mainly involving the respiratory system, but recent studies have found that the patients infected with COVID-19 have unique oral manifestations, such as taste disturbance, xerostomia, halitosis, inflammation of salivary glands, necrotizing periodontal disease and some of them are earlier than typical symptoms such as dry cough, fever, etc. Paying attention to the oral manifestations of patients can further improve the COVID-19 screening procedure. At present, symptomatic treatment is mainly used for these oral symptoms. © 2022, J Prev Treat Stomatol Dis. All rights reserved.

3.
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo ; 150(7-8):384-389, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2029916

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Objective Stress is proposed as one of the risk factors linked to periodontal disease. The COVID-19 pandemic has a significant negative impact in population on mental and somatic health. This study aimed to examine the possible association between COVID-19 resultant stress and periodontal health. Methods An observational pilot study was conducted from March 2020 to October 2021 and included 202 participants. Participants graded their stress level using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Periodontal Disease Index and Clinical Attachment Level were determined. Participants were categorized into following groups: Ia (low stress), IIa (moderate stress), IIIa (high stress) and Ib (healthy parodontium), IIb (mild periodontal disease), IIIb (severe periodontal disease). The cause/effect relationship between stress and health was measured. Results The results indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups classified accord-ing to the stress level concerning values of all the measured parameters. The Poisson regression analysis showed that in both models, crude and adjusted, periodontal health-related covariables were higher in subjects perceiving greater stress (Periodontal Disease Index – Pradjusted = 1.042, 95% CI [1.030–1.055] and Clinical Attachment Level – PRadjusted = 1.108, 95% CI [1.094–1.122]). Conslusion During COVID-19 pandemic increased stress has a negative impact on mental health and may result in the deterioration of the entire oral cavity’s health, including the periodontium. © 2022, Serbia Medical Society. All rights reserved.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997586

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Knowledge of the oral manifestations associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection, the new coronavirus causing the COVID-19 pandemic, was hindered due to the restrictions issued to avoid proximity between people and to stop the rapid spread of the disease, which ultimately results in a hyperinflammatory cytokine storm that can cause death. Because periodontal disease is one of the most frequent inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity, various theories have emerged postulating periodontal disease as a risk factor for developing severe complications associated with COVID-19. This motivated various studies to integrate questions related to periodontal status. For the present work, we used a previously validated self-report, which is a useful tool for facilitating epidemiological studies of periodontal disease on a large scale. Methodology: A blinded case-control study with participants matched 1:1 by mean age (37.7 years), sex, tobacco habits and diseases was conducted. After the diagnostic samples for SARS-CoV-2 detection were taken in an ad hoc location at Guadalajara University, the subjects were interviewed using structured questionnaires to gather demographic, epidemiological and COVID-19 symptom information. The self-reported periodontal disease (Self-RPD) questionnaire included six questions, and subjects who met the criteria with a score ≥ 2 were considered to have periodontal disease. Results: In total, 369 participants were recruited, with 117 participants included in each group. After indicating the subjects who had self-reported periodontal disease, a statistically significant difference (p value ≤ 0.001) was observed, showing that self-reported periodontal disease (n = 95, 85.1%) was higher in SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals than in controls (n = 66, 56.4%), with an OR of 3.3 (1.8-6.0) for SARS-CoV-2 infection in people with self-reported periodontal disease. Cases reported a statistically higher median of symptoms (median = 7.0, Q1= 5.5, Q3 = 10.0) than controls (p value ≤ 0.01), and cases with positive self-RPD had a significantly (p value ≤ 0.05) higher number of symptoms (median = 8.0, Q1 = 6.0, Q3 = 10.0) in comparison with those who did negative self-RPD (median = 6.0, Q1 = 5.0, Q3 = 8.0). Conclusions: According to this study, self-reported periodontal disease could be considered a risk factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection, and these individuals present more symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Periodontal Diseases , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Periodontal Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
5.
Journal of General Internal Medicine ; 37:S529-S530, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1995833

ABSTRACT

CASE: A 75-year-old man with a history of aortic stenosis status post transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), compensated cirrhosis in the setting of alcohol use disorder, and osteoarthritis presented with hyper-acute dyspnea and chest pain that awoke him from sleep. Three years prior to admission, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) for his TAVR evaluation revealed a 2 cm, irregular, peripherally-enhancing mass in the right subphrenic space, most concerning for malignancy but stable in size a year later. Further work-up was delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. One week prior to this presentation, he returned to care with 6 months of progressive right shoulder pain, pleuritic chest pain, and 5 kg of unintentional weight loss and was found to have growth of the right subphrenic mass to 4.9 cm, for which he underwent interventional radiology-guided aspiration and biopsy from a subxiphoid approach. Pathology on the core biopsy was inconclusive, revealing granulation tissue with chronic inflammatory changes and negative routine cultures. He was hemodynamically stable and discharged home. On admission, he was afebrile, tachypneic to 26, tachycardic to 120, hypotensive to 80/40, and saturating 94% on room air. He was found to have a large pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology, upon which 500 mL of serous fluid was drained via emergent pericardiocentesis. Laparoscopic biopsy of the subphrenic mass revealed a purulent fluid collection. 16S/18S sequencing and MALDI cultures were most consistent with Actinomyces spp. With further history-taking alongside an Italian language interpreter, he was found to have had prior dental abscesses, the likely origin of his Actinomyces infection, although the curious propensity for the subphrenic location remains unknown. Periodontal disease had been diagnosed but not fully treated given lack of insurance coverage and perceived importance. His pericarditis and ensuing tamponade was attributed to irritation and seeding from the subxiphoid approach for attempted fluid aspiration. IMPACT/DISCUSSION: Actinomyces spp. are a part of the normal human gut and oral cavity flora, but when pathogenic, they are often associated with dental, pulmonary, and urinary tract infections. In addition to periodontal disease, this patient's risk factors for Actinomyces abscess formation include cirrhosis (via transient gut translocation from elevated portal pressures) and alcohol use disorder (via increased aspiration risk). There have been several reports of Actinomyces spp. causing pericarditis and tamponade following seeding from liver, lung, and oral cavity abscesses- to our knowledge, however, none from subphrenic abscesses. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance of an oral health history in work-up of an indolent growing thoracic mass and the challenges in comprehensive history-taking in patients with limited English proficiency. Increasing coverage of dental services (e.g. a Medicare dental benefit) is key to health and health equity.

6.
Journal of General Internal Medicine ; 37:S381, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1995664

ABSTRACT

CASE: A 51-year-old man without significant past medical history presented to our hospital with dyspnea on exertion. SARS-CoV-2 was detected on routine occupational screening 2 months prior to admission. He subsequently reported a 100lb weight loss, during which time he experienced dysgeusia and ate primarily cereal, sandwiches, and potatoes and consumed nearly no fruits or vegetables. Three weeks prior to admission he developed postprandial nausea and vomiting and anorexia. A week later he developed progressive epigastric pain, lower extremity edema, and dyspnea while walking around the college campus where he worked as a security guard, and sought medical attention. He did not have fever, chills, night sweats, cough, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, rash, or diarrhea. He had not seen a doctor in 20 years and took no medications. He did not drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes, or use illicit substances. Vital signs were T 36.6°F HR 104 BP 149/111 RR 20 and SpO2 97%. Physical examination revealed a cachectic man with bitemporal wasting, sunken orbits, poor dentition, and severe periodontal disease. JVP was 14cm of H2O at 45°. An S3 was present. The abdomen was tender to palpation in the mid epigastrium. The extremities were cool with 3+ pitting edema. Pancreatitis was diagnosed after discovery of markedly elevated lipase levels and peripancreatic fat stranding on abdominal CT. TTE showed biventricular systolic dysfunction with LVEF 15%. He developed cardiogenic shock complicated by oliguric renal failure, congestive hepatopathy and obtundation, requiring ICU transfer for diuresis and inotropic support. Further workup revealed deficiencies of thiamine, zinc, and vitamins A, C, and D. A regadenoson myocardial perfusion PET/CT showed no flow-limiting coronary artery disease, and workup for inflammatory, infectious, and toxic-metabolic causes of heart failure was unrevealing. While COVID myocarditis and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) were considered, ultimately, a diagnosis of wet beriberi was made. After 5 months of aggressive nutritional supplementation via percutaneous gastrostomy tube and initiation of guideline-directed medical therapy, LVEF improved to 53% and weight increased by 35lbs. IMPACT/DISCUSSION: Wet beriberi is a potentially underrecognized cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in resource-rich areas. Within 3 months, thiamine deficiency can cause high-output heart failure due to impaired myocardial energy metabolism and dysautonomia. Risk factors include alcohol use disorder, prolonged vomiting, and history of bariatric surgery. CONCLUSION: The laboratory evaluation of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy should include measurement of serum thiamine, carnitine, and selenium levels in select patients, alongside iron studies, ANA, screening for HIV, Chagas disease, and viral myocarditis, and genetic testing in patients with a suggestive family history. Empiric thiamine repletion should be considered in all critically ill patients with evidence of malnutrition.

7.
J Multidiscip Healthc ; 15: 1547-1557, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993637

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Oral conditions exist worldwide, and are related with astounding morbidity. Indian adults' incidence of mild and moderate periodontal conditions was nearly 25%, while about 19% of adults experience severe periodontitis. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse epidemiological factors of periodontal disease among a south Indian population based on the role of sociodemographic factors, habitual factors and set of oral health knowledge, attitude, and behaviour measures. Methods: A sample of 288 participants above 18 years of age residing in Tamil Nadu, India took part in this cross-sectional study. Based on WHO criteria, periodontal disease was measured in our study. Age, ethnicity, smoking, education, and oral health behavior were found to be the covariates. Ordinal logistic regression analysis using R version 3.6.1 was utilized to study the various factors that influence periodontal disease among south Indian adults. Results: Various demographic factors such as age between 25 and 34 years (AOR = 2.25; 95% CI 1.14-4.55), 35-44 years (AOR = 1.80; 95% CI 0.89-3.64), ≥ 45 years old (AOR = 2.89; 95% CI 1.41-6.01), ethnicity (AOR = 2.71; 95% CI 1.25-5.81), smoking (AOR = 0.38; 95% CI 0.16-0.65), primary level education (AOR = 0.07; 95% CI 0.01-0.50) high school level education (AOR = 0.06; 95% CI 0.01-0.27), university level education (AOR = 0.08; 95% CI 0.01-0.36) and an individual's oral health behavior (AOR = 0.59; 95% CI 0.32-1.08) were found to be related with periodontal disease among the south Indian population. The maximum log likelihood residual deviance value was 645.94 in the final model. Conclusion: Based on our epidemiological findings, sociodemographic, habitual factors and oral health behavior play a vital role in an individual's periodontal status among south Indian adults. An epidemiological model derived from the factors from our study will help to bring better understanding of the disease and to implement various preventive strategies to eliminate the causative factors.

8.
Saudi Dent J ; 34(7): 596-603, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983982

ABSTRACT

Objective: Studies have shown that gingival crevices may be a significant route for SARS-CoV-2 entry. However, the role of oral health in the acquisition and severity of COVID-19 is not known. Design: A retrospective analysis was performed using electronic health record data from a large urban academic medical center between 12/1/2019 and 8/24/2020. A total of 387 COVID-19 positive cases were identified and matched 1:1 by age, sex, and race to 387 controls without COVID-19 diagnoses. Demographics, number of missing teeth and alveolar crestal height were determined from radiographs and medical/dental charts. In a subgroup of 107 cases and controls, we also examined the rate of change in alveolar crestal height. A conditional logistic regression model was utilized to assess association between alveolar crestal height and missing teeth with COVID-19 status and with hospitalization status among COVID-19 cases. Results: Increased alveolar bone loss, OR = 4.302 (2.510 - 7.376), fewer missing teeth, OR = 0.897 (0.835-0.965) and lack of smoking history distinguished COVID-19 cases from controls. After adjusting for time between examinations, cases with COVID-19 had greater alveolar bone loss compared to controls (0.641 ± 0.613 mm vs 0.260 ± 0.631 mm, p < 0.01.) Among cases with COVID-19, increased number of missing teeth OR = 2.1871 (1.146- 4.174) was significantly associated with hospitalization. Conclusions: Alveolar bone loss and missing teeth are positively associated with the acquisition and severity of COVID-19 disease, respectively.

9.
Clin Exp Dent Res ; 8(5): 1021-1027, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1976703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the pandemic of COVID-19, the scientific community tried to identify the risk factors that aggravate the viral infection. Oral health and specifically periodontitis have been shown to have a significant impact on overall health. Current, yet limited, evidence suggests a link between periodontal status and severity of COVID-19 infection. OBJECTIVES: The present pilot study aimed to assess whether younger patients (≤60 years) that have been hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) for severe COVID-19 infection were susceptible to severe periodontitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All dentate patients ≤60 years of age diagnosed with COVID-19 and surviving hospitalization in the ICU were considered for inclusion. Susceptibility to periodontitis was determined by assessing radiographic bone loss (RBL) in recent dental radiographs (posterior bitewings, periapical, and panoramic X-rays). RBL in % was obtained from the most affected tooth and patients were classified into: Stage I, RBL ≤ 15%; Stage II, RBL = 15%-33% and Stage III/IV, RBL ≥ 33%. The grade was defined using the RBL to age ratio on the most severely affected tooth. Patients were attributed to: Grade A, ratio <0.25; Grade B, ratio 0.25-1 and Grade C, ratio >1. Patients classified into Stage III/IV and Grade C were considered highly susceptible to periodontitis. RESULTS: Of 87 eligible patients, 30 patients were finally assessed radiographically and/or clinically; from the remaining 57 patients, 16 refused participation for various reasons and 41 could not be reached. Based on the radiographic assessment, all patients were periodontally compromised. Half of them were classified with Stage III/IV and Grade B or C; 26.7% were classified with Stage III/IV and Grade C. CONCLUSIONS: The present pilot study showed that about half of the patients suffering from severe forms of COVID-19 infection in need of ICU admission suffered also from severe periodontitis, and about one-fourth of them were highly susceptible to it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Periodontitis , Tooth , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Periodontitis/complications , Periodontitis/diagnostic imaging , Periodontitis/epidemiology , Pilot Projects
10.
Clin Oral Investig ; 26(11): 6721-6732, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1971727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In previous studies, COVID-19 complications were reported to be associated with periodontitis. Accordingly, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that a history of periodontal therapy could be associated with lower risk of COVID-19 complications. METHODS: A case-control study was performed using the medical health records of COVID-19 patients in the State of Qatar between March 2020 and February 2021 and dental records between January 2017 and December 2021. Cases were defined as COVID-19 patients who suffered complications (death, ICU admissions and/or mechanical ventilation); controls were COVID-19 patients who recovered without major complications. Associations between a history of periodontal therapy and COVID-19 complications were analysed using logistic regression models adjusted for demographic and medical factors. Blood parameters were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: In total, 1,325 patients were included. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) analysis revealed that non-treated periodontitis was associated with significant risk of need for mechanical ventilation (AOR = 3.91, 95% CI 1.21-12.57, p = 0.022) compared to periodontally healthy patients, while treated periodontitis was not (AOR = 1.28, 95% CI 0.25-6.58, p = 0.768). Blood analyses revealed that periodontitis patients with a history of periodontal therapy had significantly lower levels of D-dimer and Ferritin than non-treated periodontitis patients. CONCLUSION: Among COVID-19 patients with periodontal bone loss, only those that have not received periodontal therapy had higher risk of need for assisted ventilation. COVID-19 patients with a history of periodontal therapy were associated with significantly lower D-dimer levels than those without recent records of periodontal therapy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The fact that patients with treated periodontitis were less likely to suffer COVID-19 complications than non-treated ones further strengthen the hypothesis linking periodontitis to COVID-19 complications and suggests that managing periodontitis could help reduce the risk for COVID-19 complications, although future research is needed to verify this.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Bone Loss , COVID-19 , Periodontitis , Humans , Case-Control Studies , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Periodontitis/therapy , Periodontitis/complications , Biomarkers
11.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(8):1519-1527, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1969848

ABSTRACT

This study investigated dental problems and radiological and cardiac evaluations in patients affected by Covid-19. Heart disease is related to the health of the teeth, and people who have damaged and decayed teeth are more prone to cardiovascular disease. Researchers have concluded that poor dental hygiene is a sign of acute heart disease risks. In the report presented by Tarje Imna service, a group of researchers examined almost 65 thousand people infected with the corona virus in order to evaluate the effects of the covid 19 virus on the oral and dental health of the affected people. According to the results of this research, one of the effects of the corona virus on the body is the reduction of oral moisture. Almost 43% of patients accepted this effect. In general, dry mouth is one of the causes of oral and dental diseases, especially bad breath. Corona virus also increases the risk of tooth decay by reducing the moisture in the mouth. Another effect of the corona virus on the mouth and teeth is to cause ulcers in the gums and tongue. Of course, in this case, researchers do not comment with certainty, because they believe that other factors are also effective in causing these wounds. Some experts say that considering that more than 47 percent of adults who are 30 years old or older have periodontal diseases, such as gum infection, inflammation of the gums and bone around the teeth. We should expect that the existing dental and oral problems will become more acute in case of infection with Covid-19.

12.
Journal of Clinical Periodontology ; 49:296, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956769

ABSTRACT

Background: Nifedipine is a calcium channel-blocking drug, common antihypertensive medication. Gingival tissue enlargement is a frequent periodontal side effect, associated to the presence of dental plaque. Description of the procedure: In January 2018, a male 62-year-old patient was evaluated at the Dentistry Department of Coimbra University Hospital. His main complaint was gingival “swelling” and masticatory difficulty. Anamnesis revealed hypertension medicated with Nifedipine for 8 years. Besides partial edentulism and tooth migration, oral observation highlighted severe bimaxillary gingival enlargement, not restricted to the papillae, pronounced inflammation and periodontal attachment loss. Periodontal screening revealed 10 mm probing depth (PD) at several interdental sites, maximum clinical attachment loss (CAL) of 5 mm, bleeding on probing (BOP) of 61% and plaque index (PI) of 100%. The patient was diagnosed Nifedipine Gingival Enlargement with a Generalized Stage IV, Grade B Periodontitis. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was initiated with oral hygiene instructions, supra and subgingival instrumentation. Simultaneously, his assistant physician replaced nifedipine with enalapril. The patient attended regular periodontal appointments for 12 months. A decrease in gingival enlargement was noted in the subsequent months. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, patient was only reevaluated in May 2021. Outcomes: Three years after replacement of nifedipine and nonsurgical periodontal treatment, gingival enlargement was resolved. Periodontitis was stabilized, as periodontogram revealed a mean reduction PD of 6 mm at the deepest sites, grade II furcation involvements, BOP of 10% and PI of 34%. Step 3 periodontal therapy could be initiated. Due to economic restrictions, oral rehabilitation could not be fulfilled. Conclusions: Severe gingival tissue enlargement related to nifedipine in a periodontitis IVB patient was resolved by non-surgical periodontal treatment. Meticulous plaque control is mandatory. Communication with the Physician is important to alter the medication and restore patient's quality of life.

13.
Journal of Clinical Periodontology ; 49:348-349, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956766

ABSTRACT

Background: Necrotizing periodontal diseases (NPD) are fuso-spirochetal infections causing ulceration and destruction of periodontal tissues and associate with impaired host response. Elevated bacterial levels of Prevotella intermedia, Veillonella and Streptococci present in NPD lesions were detected in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Description of the procedure: A 40-year-old female, non-smoker patient was referred to the clinic with complaints of fever, halitosis, bad taste, severe gingival pain and bleeding. The patient reported a history of COVID-19 a month prior to any symptoms. Extra and intraoral examinations revealed submandibular lymphadenopathy, plaque accumulation, necrotic areas covered with pseudo-membranes, spontaneous gingival bleeding and suppuration. Alveolar bone loss was detected in the radiographic examination. Since periodontal pocket formation was present, the clinical diagnosis of the case was necrotizing gingivitis as a result of previously occurred periodontitis. During the first visit, necrotic areas were gently swabbed with 3% H2O2 moistened cotton pellets and oral hygiene instructions were given. Systemic antibiotic (metronidazole 500 mg 2 × 1) was prescribed for 5 days and rinsing with 0.12% chlorhexidine and 3% H2O2 was recommended. Three days later, since the acute complaints were reduced, clinical periodontal parameters were recorded and nonsurgical periodontal treatment (NSPT) was performed in 4 sessions in 2 weeks. One month after NSPT, all clinical periodontal parameters were recorded again. Outcomes: Following NSPT with the combination of systemic antibiotic regimen, all symptoms were resolved leading to the dissolution of necrotic areas. All clinical parameters were improved after NSPT. Conclusions: This case may be an evidence that COVID-19 could be a contributing factor for the appearance of NPD. Since COVID-19 leads to an altered immune response of the patient, a suitable environment becomes present orally for bacteria causing infections that result in NPD. The importance of routine intra-oral examination for COVID-19 patients is highlighted.

14.
Journal of Clinical Periodontology ; 49:158, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956760

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim: To determine the influence of the SARS-CoV 2 virus pandemic on periodontal status and to establish which factors are involved in these changes. Methods: Analysis of 50 questionnaires randomly distributed through the google forms program, with easy-to-follow graphics and processing of personal data while respecting confidentiality. The questionnaire included 30 questions with one or multiple answers and text boxes for individual completion. The questions were about oral hygiene and the gingival changes observed by participants in the first months after the pandemic broke out, including the lockdown period. Results: The average age of participants was between 20 and 30 years, most with higher education, from urban areas, 8.2% of them with pre-existing periodontal diseases but only 6.3% followed a periodontal treatment. 32.7% of participants tested positive for Sarcov2. The impairments of the marginal periodontium were observed by the increase with 9.6% (from 19.4% to 29%) of the gingival color changes, with 16.2% (from 16.1% to 32.3%) of the gingival volume, with 23% (from 51.6% to 74.2%) of gingival bleeding at tooth brushing and with 6.5% (from 0% to 6.5%) of dental mobility. Interest in oral health was modified by changing the frequency and the time of tooth brushing (less than 3 min increased with 8.2%), by reducing dental checks and halving specialized prophylaxis. 75% of the participants noticed an increase in stress during the pandemic, and 38.8% noticed a direct influence of the pandemic situation on their oral hygiene. Conclusions: The negative action of the SARS-CoV 2 virus is not limited to the direct one, the effects of the pandemic being felt in the field of oral health, having repercussions on the condition of periodontal tissues by influencing the measures of prophylaxis of these diseases.

15.
Journal of Clinical Periodontology ; 49:117, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956756

ABSTRACT

Background & Aim: There is ongoing international debate about the optimal frequency of dental check-ups and the effects of different recall intervals on periodontal health. Recommendations vary between countries but six-month dental check-ups have traditionally been advocated by clinicians in many high-income countries.The aim of this systematic review was to determine the optimal recall interval for maintaining periodontal health in a primary care setting. Methods: Cochrane Oral Health methods were followed. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of different dental recall intervals in a primary care setting were included. Two authors screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. The certainty of the evidence was assessed using GRADE. Results: Two studies were included with data from a total of 1736 participants. The main outcomes considered were: percentage of sites with gingival bleeding, mean periodontal probing depths and oralhealth- related quality of life (OHRQoL) measured using Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14). This review found high-certainty evidence of little to no difference between risk-based and 6-month recall intervals after four years for the outcomes: gingival bleeding (MD 0.78%, 95% CI -1.17% to 2.73%);periodontal disease (MD 0.03 mm, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.07) and OHRQoL (MD -0.35, 95% CI -1.02 to 0.32). There is high-certainty evidence of little to no difference between risk-based and 24-month recall intervals after four years for gingival bleeding (MD -0.07%, 95% CI -4.10% to 3.96%);periodontal disease (MD 0.10 mm, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.19) and OHRQoL (MD -0.37, 95% CI -1.69 to 0.95). Conclusions: The results of this systematic review affirm that dentists can accurately assess patients' risk of periodontal disease and allocate appropriate risk-based recall intervals. This research is valuable when considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental services and provides reassurance those intervals between check-ups can be extended beyond six months without detriment to periodontal health.

16.
Journal of Clinical Periodontology ; 49:84, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956753

ABSTRACT

The aim is to determine oral manifestations in patients with COVID-19 disease and in the postcovid period. Methods: A special survey (questionnaire) was made in 424 people who had COVID-19 confirmed by RT-PCR, ELISA for specific IgM and IgG antibodies and Chest CT scan (168 people). 123 people had complaints and clinical symptoms in the oral cavity 2-6 months after the illness and they came to the University dental clinic. Laboratory tests have been performed (clinical blood test, blood immunogram, virus and fungal identification). Results: Survey results showed that 16,0% participants had asymptomatic COVID-19, 23,6% - mild and 48,1% moderate disease. 12,3% with severe COVID-19 were treated in a hospital with oxygen support. In the first 2 weeks 44,3% indicated xerostomia, dysgeusia (21,7%), muscle pain during chewing (11,3%), pain during swallowing (30,2%), burning and painful tongue (1,9%), tongue swelling (30,2%), catharal stomatitis (16,0%), gingival bleeding (22,6%), painful ulcers (aphthae) (8,5%) and signs of candidiasis - white plaque in the tongue (12,3%). After illness (3-6 months), patients indicated dry mouth (12,3%), progressing of gingivitis (20,7%) and periodontitis (11,3%). In patients who applied to the clinic we identified such diagnoses: desquamative glossitis - 16 cases, glossodynia (11), herpes labialis and recurrent herpetic gingivostomatitis (27), hairy leukoplakia (1), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (22), aphthosis Sutton (4), necrotising ulcerative gingivitis (13), oral candidiasis (14), erythema multiforme (8), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (2), oral squamous cell papillomas on the gingiva (4) and the lower lip (1). According to laboratory studies, virus reactivation (HSV, VZV, EBV, CMV, Papilloma viruces) was noted in 52 patients (42,3%), immunodeficiency in 96 people (78,0%), immunoregulation disorders (allergic and autoimmune reactions) in 24 people (19,5%). Conclusions: Lack of oral hygiene, hyposalivation, vascular compromise, stress, immunodeficiency and reactivation of persistent viral and fungal infections in patients with COVID-19 disease are risk factors for progression of periodontal and oral mucosal diseases.

17.
Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents ; 36(2):139-150, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955702

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause long-standing damage to the immune system characterized by increased inflammatory cytokine activation. Maintaining periodontal health may reduce host susceptibility to COVID-19 and prevent COVID-19 aggravation in infected patients. There is sufficient evidence in the literature to warrant an association between the presence of PDs and the development and course of respiratory illnesses. Optimum oral health, maintaining good systemic health, and elimination of smoking habits may be beneficial for the prevention and management of COVID-19 infections. Future studies on the periodontal status of patients with COVID-19, including from mild to severe forms, could allow the opportune identification of people at risk of severe illness and generate relevant recommendations. The connection, if any, between the oral microbiome and COVID-19 complications is urgently required to establish the importance of oral hygiene and pre-existing oral disease in the severity and mortality risk of COVID-19.

18.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(7)2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911470

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: The purpose of the present systematic review was to analyze the effectiveness of erythritol-based air-polishing in non-surgical periodontal therapy. Materials and methods: The protocol details were registered in the PROSPERO database (CRD42021267261). This review was conducted under the PRISMA guidelines. The electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases to find relevant clinical trials published until January 2022. The inclusion criteria consisted of human clinical trials which reported the use of non-surgical periodontal treatment and erythritol air-polishing compared to non-surgical periodontal treatment alone in patients with good systemic health requiring treatment for periodontal disease. Results: 810 studies were imported into the Covidence Platform. Of these, seven clinical trials met the inclusion criteria. In active periodontal therapy, for PD (probing depth), CAL (clinical attachment level), and BOP (bleeding on probing), no statistical significance was achieved at 6 months follow-up. In supportive periodontal therapy for PD, CAL, and BOP, no statistical significance was achieved at 3 months follow-up. Conclusions: The findings suggest that erythritol air-polishing powder did not determine superior improvements of periodontal parameters compared to other non-surgical periodontal therapies. Future randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with calibrated protocols for diagnosis, therapeutic approaches, and longer follow-up are needed to draw a clear conclusion about the efficiency of erythritol air-polishing powder.


Subject(s)
Erythritol , Periodontal Diseases , Erythritol/therapeutic use , Humans , Periodontal Diseases/therapy , Powders , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
19.
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar ; 51(2), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1856951

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Upon completion of this research, there was no evidence of studies addressing self-reported periodontal disease in Cuba, nor any antecedent of research relating it to COVID-19 in adults over 60. Objective: To determine the relationship between self-reported periodontal disease, dental loss, and COVID-19 activity. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional investigation was carried out. The sample included 238 individuals aged over 60 who were infected with COVID-19, and survived. They gave their consent. The study was performed for over 1 year in Playa municipality of Havana, Cuba. Variables such as gender, age, COVID-19 evolutionary severity, comorbidities, and self-reported periodontal disease were used. A validated 4-question survey was applied to identify the periodontal disease and all data were processed in a database. Some variables were dichotomized to perform the odds ratio and Pearson's Chi-squared test, and determine the relationship between possible risk factors and the evolutionary severity of COVID-19. Results: As a result, the odds ratio values and confidence intervals for periodontal disease and advanced periodontal disease were 1.598 (0.261;9.78) and 1.814 (0.296;11.105) respectively, and the p-values were 0.609 and 0.514 respectively. Conclusion: A relationship between periodontal disease and the evolutionary severity of COVID-19 cannot be established. However, a relationship was observed targeting dental loss and respiratory diseases as determinant risk factors in the severity of COVID-19. © 2022, Editorial Ciencias Medicas. All rights reserved.

20.
J Clin Med ; 11(9)2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis is to assess the available evidence from human clinical studies of using self-ligating brackets compared to conventional brackets in maintaining periodontal health. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The protocol details were registered in the PROSPERO database (CRD42022302689). This review was performed under the PRISMA guidelines. The electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and grey literature databases, as well as manual searches to find relevant articles published until January 2022. The inclusion criteria consisted of human clinical studies which reported the use of fixed orthodontic treatment with self-ligating brackets (SLBs) or conventional brackets (CBs) in maintaining periodontal health. RESULTS: A total of 453 studies were imported into the Covidence Platform from the databases. Of these, six articles met the inclusion criteria. For plaque index, statistical significance was achieved for SLBs compared to CBs (0.31 (95% CI (0.15 to 0.48), p = 0.0001). For gingival index, probing depth and bleeding on probing no statistical significance was achieved. None of the included studies assessed clinical attachment level. CONCLUSIONS: The present systematic review with meta-analysis was considered to provide relevant data on periodontal health during orthodontic treatment in patients with SLBs in comparison with patients wearing CBs. Our findings indicated that SLBs are not superior to CBs in terms of periodontal health.

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